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yukon

yukon

yukon Sentence Examples

  • m., or little more than one-fourth of the area draining to the Atlantic. The American rivers draining to the Pacific, except the Yukon, Columbia and Colorado, are unimportant.

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  • Similar wide tracts of less broken country occur, after a mountainous interruption, in northern British Columbia and to some extent in the Yukon Territory, where wide valleys and rolling hills alternate with short mountain ranges of no great altitude.

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  • wide covers towards the south almost all of British Columbia and a strip of Alberta east of the watershed, and towards the north forms the whole of the Yukon Territory.

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  • The GMC Yukon XL is the three-quarter-ton version of the Suburban.

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  • He slammed the Yukon's door closed as he slid into the back seat beside her and pinned her with a look she refused to meet.

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  • There are regular lines of steamers running between Vancouver and Alaska and the points of connexion with the Yukon territory, as well as lines to Puget Sound and San Francisco in the United States.

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  • He is responsible likewise for maps of Yukon and of Labrador, supplied by the geological survey, the former on a scale of 1:380,200, the latter of 1:1,584,000.

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  • Yukon Territory >>

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  • From the district of Yukon (Klondike, &c.) £2,800,000 was obtained in 1899, wholly from alluvial workings, but the progress made since has been slower than was expected by sanguine people.

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  • Yukon >>

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  • It is the seaward terminus of the Yukon & White Pass railway, by which goods and passengers reach the Klondike; and is connected with Dawson by telegraph and with Seattle by cable, and with Seattle, San Francisco and other Pacific ports by steamers.

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  • Though settled somewhat earlier, Skagway first became important during the rush in 1896 for the Klondike gold-fields, for which it is the most convenient entrance by the trail over White Pass, the lower of the two passes to the headwaters of the Yukon.

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  • Second among the great north-western rivers is the Yukon, which begins its course about 18 m.

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  • It flows first to the north, then to the north-west, passing out of the Yukon territory into Alaska, and then south-west, ending in Bering Sea, the northward projection of the Pacific, 2000 m.

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  • The highest mountains of the Cordillera in Canada are near the southern end of the boundary separating Alaska from the Yukon Territory, the meridian of 141°, and they include Mount Logan (1 9,54 o ft.) and Mount St Elias (18,000 ft.), while the highest peak in North America, Mount McKinley (20,000 ft.), is not far to the north-west in Alaska.

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  • in the interior of the Yukon Territory.

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  • The Atlin and White Horse regions in northern British Columbia and southern Yukon have attracted much attention, and the Klondike placers still farther north have furnished many millions of dollars' worth of gold.

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  • In the far north of the territories of Yukon, Mackenzie and Ungava the climate has been little studied, as the region is uninhabited by white men except at a few fur-trading posts.

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  • In 1898, owing to the influx of miners, the Yukon territory was constituted and granted a limited measure of self-government.

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  • Steamers ply on lakes and rivers in every province, and even in the far northern districts of Yukon and Mackenzie.

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  • The mineral districts occur from Cape Breton to the islands in the Pacific and the Yukon district.

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  • Nova Scotia, British Columbia and the Yukon are still the most productive, but the northern parts of Ontario are proving rich in the precious metals.

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  • The goldfields of the Yukon, though still valuable, show a lessening production.

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  • The discovery of large deposits of nickel at Sudbury; of extremely rich gold mines on the head-waters of the Yukon, in a region previously considered well-nigh worthless for human habitation; of extensive areas of gold, copper and silver ores in the mountain regions of British Columbia; of immense coal deposits in the Crow's Nest Pass of the same province and on the prairies; of veins of silver and cobalt of extraordinary richness in northern Ontario - all deeply affected the industrial condition of the country and illustrated the vastness of its undeveloped resources.

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  • He was in charge of the Canadian government's Yukon expedition in 1887, and his name is permanently written in Dawson City, of gold-bearing fame.

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  • by Yukon Territory and British Columbia.

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  • The Rocky Mountain system extends from Canada (the Yukon territory) into N.E.

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  • Between the Pacific Mountain and the Rocky Mountain systems lies the vast Central Plateau region, or Yukon plateau.

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  • White Pass (2888 ft.) and Chilkoot Pass (3500 ft.), at the head of the Lynn Canal, are the gateway to the mining country of the Klondike and Upper Yukon.

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  • They are the highest points that one meets in travelling from Skagway along the course of the Yukon to Bering Sea.

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  • The Yukon is one of the great drainage systems of the world.

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  • The Yukon itself has a length of more than 2000 m.

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  • Behind the bluffs that form in large part its immediate border its basin is a rolling country, at times sinking into great dead levels like the Yukon flats between Circle City and the Lower Ramparts, some 30,000 sq.

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  • Of the two great affluents of the Yukon, the Tanana is for the most part unnavigable, while the Koyukuk is navigable for more than 450 m.

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  • A low water-parting divides the Yukon valley from the Kuskokwim, the second river of Alaska in size, navigable by steamers for 600 m.

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  • That of the coast and that of the Yukon plateau are quite distinct.

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  • In the farther interior, in the valleys of the Yukon, the Tanana, the Copper and the Sushitna the summers are much the same in character, the winters much more severe.

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  • On the Yukon at the international boundary the mean of the warmest month is higher than that of the warmest month at Sitka, 500 m.

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  • At some points in the Upper Yukon valley the range of extreme temperatures is as great as from -75° to 90° F.3 The mean heat of summer in the upper valley is about 60° to 70° F., and at some points in the middle and lower valley even higher.

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  • 4 By the middle of September snow flurries have announced the imminence of winter, the smaller streams congeal, the earth freezes, the miner perforce abandons his diggings, and navigation ceases even on the Yukon in October.

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  • of the Yukon basin climatic conditions are much less uniform.

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  • The mean annual temperature on the Yukon at the international line is about 21° F., the monthly means run from -17° to 60° F., the range of extreme temperatures from -80° to 90° F.

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  • 4 At Fort Yukon five years' records showed mean seasonal temperatures of 14°, 60°, 17°, and -23.8° F.

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  • On the islands of the Alexander Archipelago and on Prince William Sound it grows to gigantic size; even on the Koyukuk and the middle Yukon it attains in places a diameter of 2 ft.

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  • Timber, however, is fairly abundant along the entire course of the Yukon above Anvik (about 400 m.

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  • from the mouth), along the great tributaries of the Yukon, and, so far as explorations have revealed, along every stream in central Alaska; and the woods of the interior consist almost entirely of spruce.

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  • On the Yukon flats it grows in a vast forest impenetrably dense.'

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  • Contrary, however, to the once universal belief, the experiments of the department of agriculture of the United States have definitely proved that hardy vegetables in great variety can readily be produced in the coastal region and at various stations in the Yukon valley; and presumably, therefore, all over the interior S.

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  • As early as 1861 gold discoveries were made on the Stikine river; repeated discoveries, culminating in the Cassiar district "boom," were made in British Columbia from 1857 to 1874; colourings along the Yukon were reported in 1866-1867 and systematic prospecting of the upper river began about 1873.

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  • Juneau was founded in 1880; the same year the opposition of the Indians was withdrawn that had prevented the crossing of the mountain passes to the interior, and after 1880 repeated and scattered discoveries were made on the Lewes, Pelly, Stewart and other streams of the Upper Yukon country in Canada.

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  • The product of gold and silver (of the latter some 1.3% of the total) from 1895 to 1901 was more than $32,000,000 from Alaska proper (not including that from the Canadian Yukon fields) as against a production of $5,000,000 in 1880-1896.

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  • The gold product of the Canadian Yukon territory from 1896-1903 was about $96,000,000, as estimated by the Canadian Geological Survey.

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  • of this road were in 1 Seattle, Sitka and Valdez are connected by cable; telegraph lines run from the Panhandle inland to the Yukon and down its valley to Fort St Michael.

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  • c. dalli; the grey sheep of the Yukon (0.

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  • The brooding blond bodyguard-Guardian driving the Yukon looked at him in the rearview mirror, torn.

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  • The highest mountains of the Cordillera in Canada are near the southern end of the boundary separating Alaska from the Yukon Territory, the meridian of 141°, and they include Mount Logan (1 9,54 o ft.) and Mount St Elias (18,000 ft.), while the highest peak in North America, Mount McKinley (20,000 ft.), is not far to the north-west in Alaska.

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  • From Labrador it ranges to the southern shores of Hudson's Bay and to those of the Great Bear Lake, and to the valley of the Yukon and the coast of Alaska, forming with the aspen, the larch, the balsam poplar, the banksian pine, the black and white spruces and the balsam fir, the great subarctic transcontinental forest; and southward it ranges through all the forest region of the Dominion of Canada and the northern states."

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  • At some points in the Upper Yukon valley the range of extreme temperatures is as great as from -75° to 90° F.3 The mean heat of summer in the upper valley is about 60° to 70° F., and at some points in the middle and lower valley even higher.

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  • The mean annual temperature on the Yukon at the international line is about 21° F., the monthly means run from -17° to 60° F., the range of extreme temperatures from -80° to 90° F.

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  • 4 At Fort Yukon five years' records showed mean seasonal temperatures of 14°, 60°, 17°, and -23.8° F.

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  • Sitka, Juneau (the capital) and Douglas, both centres of a rich mining district, Skagway, shipping point for freight for the Klondike country (see these titles), and St Michael, the ocean port for freighting up the Yukon, are the only towns apparently assured of a prosperous future.

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  • Marvel at the majestic beauty of the northland 's most famous waterway, the Yukon River, and learn of its storied past.

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  • Red, new, Yukon Golds, russet, white or yellow?

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  • The Yukon River tour happens mid-week which will take visitors to Tok.

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  • The Yukon NVMT is on sale as of 12/11/07 for $299.00 (regular price is $359.99).

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  • Yukon Viking 1x24 Night Vision Goggle Kit: This one includes goggles and a head gear kit so when you're using it, your hands get to remain free.

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  • FreeCell and Yukon are other popular versions of solitaire.

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