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yorkists

yorkists Sentence Examples

  • To the west on the borders of Shropshire is Blore Heath, the scene of a defeat of the Lancastrians by the Yorkists in 1459.

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  • The Yorkists had many adherents in Ireland, and thither Lambert Simnel was taken by Symonds early in 1487; and, gaining the support of the earl of Kildare, the archbishop of Dublin, the lord chancellor and a powerful following, who were, or pretended to be, convinced that the boy was the earl of Warwick escaped from the Tower, Simnel was crowned as King Edward VI.

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  • In the 14th century the castle was held by the Mortimers, from whom it passed to the Yorkists.

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  • When France went over to the Yorkists, Kennedy, accepting an English pension, made a long truce between Scotland and England (October 1464).

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  • Her fierce partisanship embittered her enemies, and the Yorkists did not hesitate to allege that her son was a bastard.

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  • east in Staffordshire, Audley Cross marks a great battle in the Wars of the Roses (1459), in which the Yorkists were successful and Lord Audley fell.

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  • Though the Lancastrians ~ made much play with the watchword of loyalty to the crown, and though the Yorkists never forgot to speak of the need for strong and wise governance, and the welfare of the realm, y~ personal and family enmities had in many cases more effect in determining their action than a zeal for King Henrys rights or for the prosperity of England.

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  • While Lord Bonville supported the queen, the house of Courtenay were staunch Yorkists, and the earl of Devon joined in the armed demonstration of Duke Richard in 1452.

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  • The revulsion only came when the queen, victorious after the rout of Ludford, Supp,~sapplied to the vanquished Yorkists those penalties of sion of confiscation and attainder which Duke Richard ~had Yorks always refused to employ in his day of power.

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  • the Yorkists, after Northampton, showed themselves by no means so merciful and scrupulous as in their earlier days.

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  • The Yorkists proclaimed Ed ~ Edward, Duke Richards heir, king of England; they earl of took no further heed of the claims of King Henry, March, declared their leader the true successor of Richard II., Pro- and stigmatized the whole period of the Lancastrian ~ rule as a mere usurpation.

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  • Her partisans doubted his sincerity, while many of the Yorkists who had hitherto followed Warwick in blind admiration found it impossible to reconcile themselves to the new rgime.

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  • The Yorkists courted the approval of public opinion by their careful avoidance of pillage and requisitions; and the Lancastrians, though less scrupulous, only once launched out into general raiding and devastation, during the advance of the queens army to St Albans in the early months of 1461.

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  • ]ihe claim of the Yorkists to represent constitutional opposition to misgovernment became a mere hypocrisy.

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  • All that can be said in favor of the Yorkists is that they restored a certain measure of national prosperity, and that their leaders had one redeeming virtue in their addiction to literature.

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  • This promising scheme was to be supported by a rising of those Yorkists who rejected the usurpation of Richard III.,

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  • This time it was successfully carried out, and the earl of Richmond landed at Milford Haven with many exiles, both Yorkists and Lancastrians, and 1000 mercenaries lent him by the princess regent of France.

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  • were irreconcilable Yorkists who had suffered by the change of dynasty; but their hopes of success rested less on their own strength than on the not ill-founded notion that England would tire of any ruler who had to raise taxes and reward his partisans.

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  • He landed in Lancashire, and pushed forward, hoping to gather the English Yorkists to his aid.

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  • Bamburgh was twice taken by the Yorkists in the Wars of the Roses and twice recovered by Queen Margaret.

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  • stayed there for a year, but after the battle of Hexham it was again taken by the Yorkists, and the castle and town were then so much injured that from that time there is no mention of the burgesses or their privileges.

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  • During Richard III.'s short reign the earl of Kildare, head of the Irish Yorkists, was the strongest man in Ireland.

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  • In vain did he get his dilatory friends, the English Yorkists, to cross the Channel; on the 29th of August 1475, at Picquigny, Louis XI.

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  • 475) also suggests that he was not regarded as an enemy to the Yorkists, though a personal favourite of Henry's.

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  • He received a good deal of ecclesiastical preferment from the Lancastrian party, was present, if he did not fight on the losing side, at the battle of Towton in 1461, and was subsequently attainted by the victorious Yorkists.

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  • To the west on the borders of Shropshire is Blore Heath, the scene of a defeat of the Lancastrians by the Yorkists in 1459.

    0
    0
  • The Yorkists had many adherents in Ireland, and thither Lambert Simnel was taken by Symonds early in 1487; and, gaining the support of the earl of Kildare, the archbishop of Dublin, the lord chancellor and a powerful following, who were, or pretended to be, convinced that the boy was the earl of Warwick escaped from the Tower, Simnel was crowned as King Edward VI.

    0
    0
  • In the 14th century the castle was held by the Mortimers, from whom it passed to the Yorkists.

    0
    0
  • When France went over to the Yorkists, Kennedy, accepting an English pension, made a long truce between Scotland and England (October 1464).

    0
    0
  • Her fierce partisanship embittered her enemies, and the Yorkists did not hesitate to allege that her son was a bastard.

    0
    0
  • east in Staffordshire, Audley Cross marks a great battle in the Wars of the Roses (1459), in which the Yorkists were successful and Lord Audley fell.

    0
    0
  • Though the Lancastrians ~ made much play with the watchword of loyalty to the crown, and though the Yorkists never forgot to speak of the need for strong and wise governance, and the welfare of the realm, y~ personal and family enmities had in many cases more effect in determining their action than a zeal for King Henrys rights or for the prosperity of England.

    0
    0
  • While Lord Bonville supported the queen, the house of Courtenay were staunch Yorkists, and the earl of Devon joined in the armed demonstration of Duke Richard in 1452.

    0
    0
  • The revulsion only came when the queen, victorious after the rout of Ludford, Supp,~sapplied to the vanquished Yorkists those penalties of sion of confiscation and attainder which Duke Richard ~had Yorks always refused to employ in his day of power.

    0
    0
  • the Yorkists, after Northampton, showed themselves by no means so merciful and scrupulous as in their earlier days.

    0
    0
  • The Yorkists proclaimed Ed ~ Edward, Duke Richards heir, king of England; they earl of took no further heed of the claims of King Henry, March, declared their leader the true successor of Richard II., Pro- and stigmatized the whole period of the Lancastrian ~ rule as a mere usurpation.

    0
    0
  • Her partisans doubted his sincerity, while many of the Yorkists who had hitherto followed Warwick in blind admiration found it impossible to reconcile themselves to the new rgime.

    0
    0
  • The Yorkists courted the approval of public opinion by their careful avoidance of pillage and requisitions; and the Lancastrians, though less scrupulous, only once launched out into general raiding and devastation, during the advance of the queens army to St Albans in the early months of 1461.

    0
    0
  • ]ihe claim of the Yorkists to represent constitutional opposition to misgovernment became a mere hypocrisy.

    0
    0
  • All that can be said in favor of the Yorkists is that they restored a certain measure of national prosperity, and that their leaders had one redeeming virtue in their addiction to literature.

    0
    0
  • This promising scheme was to be supported by a rising of those Yorkists who rejected the usurpation of Richard III.,

    0
    0
  • This time it was successfully carried out, and the earl of Richmond landed at Milford Haven with many exiles, both Yorkists and Lancastrians, and 1000 mercenaries lent him by the princess regent of France.

    0
    0
  • were irreconcilable Yorkists who had suffered by the change of dynasty; but their hopes of success rested less on their own strength than on the not ill-founded notion that England would tire of any ruler who had to raise taxes and reward his partisans.

    0
    0
  • He landed in Lancashire, and pushed forward, hoping to gather the English Yorkists to his aid.

    0
    0
  • Bamburgh was twice taken by the Yorkists in the Wars of the Roses and twice recovered by Queen Margaret.

    0
    0
  • stayed there for a year, but after the battle of Hexham it was again taken by the Yorkists, and the castle and town were then so much injured that from that time there is no mention of the burgesses or their privileges.

    0
    0
  • During Richard III.'s short reign the earl of Kildare, head of the Irish Yorkists, was the strongest man in Ireland.

    0
    0
  • In vain did he get his dilatory friends, the English Yorkists, to cross the Channel; on the 29th of August 1475, at Picquigny, Louis XI.

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    0
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