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york

york

york Sentence Examples

  • In 1916, the number of cases just in New York City was reported to be nine thousand.

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  • Two interesting government programs are under way in the United States, according to a June 2011 article in The New York Times.

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  • Michaux, more than thirty years ago, says that the price of wood for fuel in New York and Philadelphia "nearly equals, and sometimes exceeds, that of the best wood in Paris, though this immense capital annually requires more than three hundred thousand cords, and is surrounded to the distance of three hundred miles by cultivated plains."

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  • We stole one weekend together, remaining in New York, before answering a summons to join the others in Massachusetts.

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  • You read the newspaper—not the New York Times—you read the Parkside Sentinel.

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  • In dropped Fred O'Connor looking like a New York commuter during a subway strike.

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  • Nukes in New York and Miami and most of the other major cities.

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  • Both of us were new to New York City, and had few or no friends.

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  • Somehow, between her and Martha, Quinn and Howie agreed to run a trip back while we remained in New York in phone contact.

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  • "Georgia, not New York?" he asked.

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  • In 1895 he bought the New York Journal and the following year founded the Evening Journal, the morning paper being known after 1902 as the New York American.

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  • Delaware is served by the Pennsylvania, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (New York Central system), and the Hocking Valley railways, and by two interurban lines.

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  • There it was arranged that I should go to the Wright-Humason School for the Deaf in New York City.

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  • TO MRS. WILLIAM THAW New York, October 16, 1895.

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  • After we had had our breakfast, Teacher asked one of the train-men in the station if the New York train was made up.

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  • The conversation slipped back to our New York life with our sojourn in New Hampshire relegated to a fun, if bizarre weekend with friends.

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  • I want to get out of New York, or any city.

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  • Fred explained that the New York sister was staying in her motor home at a local campground.

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  • In 1783 he emigrated to America, and settled in New York, whither one of his brothers had previously gone.

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  • In New York State, where the population is largely industrial, the annual deaths per million are only three, but of the agricultural population eleven.

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  • TO MISS CAROLINE DERBY New York, March 2nd, 1896. ...We miss dear King John sadly.

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  • Now at least Betsy and I had time together before I returned to New York Sunday afternoon.

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  • His wealth, arising from property in New York, where also he built the New Netherland hotel and the Waldorf hotel, was enormous.

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  • In 1 9 05 he was Democratic candidate for mayor of New York on the Municipal Ownership ticket, and four years later on the Independence League ticket; in 1906 he was candidate for governor of New York on the Democratic and Independence League tickets, in every instance being defeated.

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  • About the year 919 the country was invaded by Raegenald (Rdgnvaldr grandson of I'varr), a Norwegian king from Ireland, who seized York and occupied the lands of St Cuthbert.

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  • But the "bosses" of the Republican party in three great States - New York, Pennsylvania and Illinois - were determined that he should be renominated.

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  • Blaine, the bitterest political enemy of Senator Roscoe Conkling the leader of the New York "stalwarts."

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  • Robertson, another political enemy of Conkling's, to the desirable post of Collector of the Port of New York, and thereby destroyed all prospects of party harmony.

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  • His wealth, arising from property in New York, where also he built the New Netherland hotel and the Waldorf hotel, was enormous.

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  • About the year 919 the country was invaded by Raegenald (Rdgnvaldr grandson of I'varr), a Norwegian king from Ireland, who seized York and occupied the lands of St Cuthbert.

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  • The two years in New York were happy ones, and I look back to them with genuine pleasure.

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  • "Don't even think about moving up here and leaving me in New York," my new wife snarled, removing that possibility from consideration.

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  • It was nearing Christmas and while New York was aglow, my wife and I were just the opposite; out of sync with the mood of the city.

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  • I was alone, back in New York, on a totally secure line.

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  • Three calls were telephoned from Boston, New York and Connecticut while two were made on untraceable phones.

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  • It looks like he's moving east and maybe will drop down in the states in New York or New England.

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  • Lake Erie sits north of Ohio for a long stretch so to get into Canada going east; he'd enter in New York State, around Niagara Falls.

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  • I used to use Amtrak when I was working out of New York and had to travel the east coast.

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  • He entered the Naval Academy from New York in 1857, but resigned in March 1861.

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  • He was also the agent in New York of the firm of Astor & Broadwood.

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  • His chief benefaction, however, was a bequest of $400,000 for the foundation and endowment of a public library in New York City, since known as the Astor library, and since 1895 part of the New York public library.

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  • Now video is everywhere—on my phone, in my cab in New York, and in the elevator as I zoom to the fourteenth floor.

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  • We spent about three weeks in Boston, after leaving New York, and I need not tell you we had a most delightful time.

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  • "We could call on our way back home, half way to New York," she answered.

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  • It pleased me doubly; to show off my fiancée and escape the rush of August in New York.

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  • Betsy and I faced a six hour return trip to New York.

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  • I changed the subject and opened one of the bottles of wine we'd brought from New York.

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  • Betsy and I live in New York.

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  • We would, as Betsy suggested, telephone the tip on our way back to New York.

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  • All pertained to the earlier tests Howie and Quinn had undertaken together while Betsy and I were still in New York.

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  • The accent says otherwise, but I was born in New York.

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  • I had enough trouble in New York.

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  • I went to the diamond district in New York.

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  • Of course, she could have taken that job offer in New York.

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  • He was sometimes known as the "Landlord of New York."

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  • Eadberht showed considerable independence in his dealings with the church, and his brother Ecgberht, to whom the well-known letter of Bede is addressed, was from 734 to 766 archbishop of York.

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  • Without consulting the New York senators, Garfield appointed William H.

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  • At New York, in order to earn a living, he became first a chandler, and afterwards a trading skipper, returning to Italy in 1854 with a small fortune, and purchasing the island of Caprera, on which he built the house thenceforth his home.

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  • The state is divided into two distinct physiographic provinces; the Alleghany Plateau on the west, comprising perhaps two-thirds of the area of the state, and forming a part of the great Appalachian Plateau Province which extends from New York to Alabama; and the Newer Appalachians or Great Valley Region on the east, being a part of the large province of the same name which extends from Canada to Central Alabama.

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  • When in November the duke of York encamped near Dartford, Waynflete with three others was sent from the king's camp at Blackheath to propose terms, which were accepted.

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  • During York's regency, both before and after the battle of St Albans, Waynflete took an active part in the proceedings of the privy council.

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  • He perished at sea on board a steamboat which was totally consumed by fire while on a voyage from New York to Boston, on the night of the 13th-14th of January 1840.

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  • WILLIAM LIVINGSTON (1723-1790), American political leader, was born at Albany, New York, probably on the 30th of November 1723.

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  • This Robert Livingston, founder of the American family, became in 1675 secretary of the important Board of Indian Commissioners; he was a member of the New York Assembly in1711-1715and 1716-1727 and its speaker in 1718-1725, and in 1701 made the proposal that all the English colonies in America should be grouped for administrative purposes "into three distinct governments."

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  • He served in the New York legislature (1759-1760), but his political influence was long exerted chiefly through pamphlets and newspaper articles.

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  • After the suspension of the Reflector in 1753, he edited in the New York Mercury the "Watch Tower" section (1754-1755), which became the recognized organ of the Presbyterian faction.

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  • With the help of William Smith (1728-1793), the New York historian, William Livingston prepared a digest of the laws of New York for the period 1691-1756, which was published in two volumes (1752 and 1762).

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  • See Theodore Sedgwick, Jr., Life of William Livingston (New York, 1833); and E.

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  • His brother, Peter Van Brugh Livingston (1710-1792), was a prominent merchant and a Whig political leader in New York.

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  • He was one of the founders of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), was a member of the New York Council for some years before the War of Independence, a member and president of the First Provincial Congress of New York (1775), and a member of the Second Provincial Congress (1775-1776).

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  • Another brother, Philip Livingston (1716-1778), was also prominent as a leader of the New York Whigs or Patriots.

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  • He was a member of the New York Assembly in 1759-1769, a delegate to the Stamp Act Congress of 1765, a member of the Continental Congress from 1774 until his death and as such a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and in1777-1778was a member of the first state senate.

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  • Frederick York Powell >>

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  • In 1856 he was translated to the see of Durham, and in 1860 he became archbishop of York.

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  • It is served by the Atlantic Coast Line, the Seaboard Air line, the Southern, the New York, Philadelphia & Norfolk, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Norfolk & Western, the Norfolk & Southern and the Virginian railways, by many steamship lines, by ferry to Portsmouth (immediately opposite), Newport News, Old Point Comfort and Hampton, and by electric lines to several neighbouring towns.

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  • (New York, 1849).

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  • A modern edition was issued in 1901 from the Grolier Club, New York.

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  • Williams was killed in the battle of Lake George on the 8th of September 1 755, but while in camp in Albany, New York, a few days before the battle, he drew a will containing a small bequest for a free school at West Hoosac on condition that the township when incorporated should be called Williamstown.

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  • Perry, Origins in Williamstown (New York, 1894;1894; 3rd ed.

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, and the Lehigh Valley railways, and by the Cayuga & Seneca Canal.

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  • It is the seat of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station and of Hobart College (nonsectarian), which was first planned in 1812, was founded in 1822 (the majority of its incorporators being members of the Protestant Episcopal church) as successor to Geneva Academy, received a full charter as Geneva College in 1825, and was renamed Hobart Free College in 1852 and Hobart College in 1860, in honour of Bishop John Henry Hobart.

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  • The expedition started in western New York.

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  • The rights of the Six Nations to all this territory were purchased at Albany, New York, by the Susquehanna Company in 1754, but the work of colonization was delayed for a time by the Seven Years' War.

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  • and then of Henry I., who secured his election as archbishop of York in August 1114.

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  • When the custom of commendation developed, the king charged the mayor of the palace to protect those who had commended themselves to him and to 1 The mayors of certain cities in the United Kingdom (London, York, Dublin) have acquired by prescription the prefix of "lord."

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  • Veitch, Method, Meditations and Selections from the Principles (1850-1853; I Ith ed., 1897; New York, 1899); by H.

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  • P. Torrey New York, 1892).

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  • Araucaria Cunninghami, the Moreton Bay pine, is a tall tree abundant on the shores of Moreton Bay, Australia, and found through the littoral region of Queensland to Cape York Peninsula, also in New Guinea.

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  • Paris is served by the Vandalia, and the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (New York Central system) railways; the main line and the Cairo division of the latter intersect here, and the city is the transfer point for traffic from the E.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by interurban electric lines running N., S.

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  • In 664 at the synod of Whitby, Oswio accepted the usages of the Roman Church, which led to the departure of Colman and the appointment of Wilfrid as bishop of York.

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  • In 1799 Alkmaar gave its name to a convention signed by the duke of York and the French general Brune, in accordance with which the Russo-British army of 23,000 men, which was defeated at Bergen, evacuated Holland.

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  • (New York, 1811-1812), and were republished with a Memoir by Rev. Tryon Edwards (2 vols., Boston, 1850).

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  • (New York, 1876).

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  • Many Anglican bishops (amongst them the archbishop of York and most of his suffragans) felt so doubtful as to the wisdom of such an assembly that they refused to attend it, and Dean Stanley declined to allow Westminster Abbey to be used for the closing service, giving as his reasons the partial character of the assembly, uncertainty as to the effect of its measures and "the presence of prelates not belonging to our Church."

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  • On this occasion no hesitation appears to have been felt; 100 bishops were present, and the opening sermon was preached by the archbishop of York.

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  • While these early traders used the canoe and the York boat,' yet the steam-boat played an important part in the early history of the region from 1868 till 1885, when access from the United States was gained by steamers down the Red River.

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  • It was devised by the Hudson's Bay Company for carrying freight, as a substitute for the less serviceable canoe, and was named after their York factory, the centre to which the traders brought down the furs for shipment to England and from which they took back merchandise and supplies to the interior of Rupert's Land.

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  • The table given below will be useful in calculating the size of the radiating surface necessary to raise the temperature to the extent required when the external air is at freezing point (32° Fahr.): - At the city of Lockport in New York state, America, an interesting example of the direct app of Lockport.

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  • of York on the Great Northern and North-Eastern railways.

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  • The same year a postal express to Leavenworth, Kansas (ro days, letters 25 cents an ounce) was established; and telegraph connexion with Boston and New York ($9 for ro words) in 1863.

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  • Huguenot churches were formed on Staten Island, New York, in 1665; in New York City in 1683; at Charleston, South Carolina, in 1686; at Boston, Massachusetts, in 1687; at New Rochelle, New York, in 1688; and at other places.

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  • Nine of these Puritan Presbyterian churches were established on Long Island between 1640 and 1670 - one at Southampton and one at Southold (originally of the Congregational type) in 1640, one at Hempstead about 1644, one at Jamaica in 1662, and churches at Newtown and Setauket in the next half century; and three Puritan Presbyterian churches were established in Westchester county, New York, between 1677 and 1685.

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  • In New York City, Francis Doughty preached to Puritan Presbyterians in 1643; in 1650 he was succeeded by Richard Denton (1586-1662).

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  • c. 1721) and George McNish (1660-1723); in 1707 was imprisoned in New York City for preaching without licence, but was acquitted in 1708.

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  • The synod increased the number of its churches by a large accession from New York and from New Jersey, where there had been large Presbyterian settlements.

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  • During the separation the synod of Philadelphia decreased from twentysix to twenty-two ministers, but the synod of New York grew from twenty to seventy-two ministers, and the New Side reaped all the fruits of the Great Awakening under Whitefield and his successors.

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  • The Anti-Burgher Synod sent Alexander Gellatly and Andrew Arnot in 1752, and two years later they organized the Associate Presbytery of Pennsylvania; they were joined in 1757 by the Scotch Church in New York City, which.

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  • The Burgher Synod in 1764 sent Thomas Clarke of Ballybay, Ireland, who settled at Salem, Washington county, New York, and in 1776 sent David Telfair, of Monteith, Scotland, who preached in Philadelphia; they united with the Associate Presbytery of Pennsylvania; in 1771 the Scotch Synod ordered the presbytery to annul its union with the Burghers, and although Dr Clarke of Salem remained in the Associate Presbytery, the Burgher ministers who immigrated later joined the Associate Reformed Church.

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  • Ministers and people with few exceptions - the most notable being the Scotch Highlanders who had settled in the valley of the Mohawk in New York and on Cape Fear river in North Carolina - sided with the patriot or Whig party: John Witherspoon was the only clergyman in the Continental Congress of 1776, and was otherwise a prominent leader; John Murray of the Presbytery of the Eastward was an eloquent leader in New England; and in the South the Scotch-Irish were the backbone of the American partisan forces, two of whose leaders, Daniel Morgan and Andrew Pickens, were Presbyterian elders.

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  • The result was mixed churches in western New York.

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  • More or less closely connected with the Northern Church are the theological seminaries at Princeton, Auburn, Pittsburg (formerly Allegheny - the Western Seminary), Cincinnati (Lane), New York (Union) and Chicago (McCormick), already named, and San Francisco Seminary (1871) since 1892 at San Anselmo, Cal., a theological seminary (1891) at Omaha, Nebraska, a German theological seminary (1869) at Bloomfield, New Jersey, the German Presbyterian Theological School of the North-west (1852) at Dubuque, Iowa, and the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of Kentucky, which is under the control and supervision of the northern and southern churches.

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  • Charles Augustus Briggs, tried for heresy for his inaugural address in 1891 as professor of biblical theology at Union Seminary, was acquitted by the presbytery of New York, but was declared guilty and was suspended from its ministry by the General Assembly of 1893.

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  • In New York state there were 199,923 Presbyterians, of whom 186,278 were members of the Northern Church and 10,115 of the United Presbyterian Church of North America.

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  • Briggs, American Presbyterianism (New York, 1885).

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  • TROY, a city and the county-seat of Rensselaer county, New York, U.S.A., at the head of tidewater on the eastern bank of the Hudson river, opposite the mouth of the Mohawk, about 6 m.

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  • of New York City.

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  • Troy is the market for a fertile agricultural region, and the principal jobbing centre for a large district in north-eastern New York and eastern Massachusetts.

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  • In 1819 she wrote A Plan for Improving Female Education, submitted to the governor of New York state; and in 1821 she removed to Troy.

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  • The first puddling works were opened in 1839, and Troy was long the centre of the New York iron and steel industry; in 1865 the second Bessemer steel works in the United States were opened here.

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  • In the war of 1665 the Dutch under Admiral Opdam were defeated off Lowestoft by the English fleet commanded by the duke of York.

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  • of New York city.

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  • Wilson, Ku Klux Klan (New York, 1905); W.

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  • Fleming, Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama (New York, 1905), and Documentary History of Reconstruction (Cleveland, 1906); J.

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  • Garner, Reconstruction in Mississippi (New York, 1901); W.

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  • Brown, Lower South in American History (New York, 1901); J.

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  • Burgess, Reconstruction and the Constitution (New York, 1901).

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  • Akers, Argentine, Patagonian and Chilian Sketches (London, 1893), and A History of South America 1854-1904 (New York, 1905); Theodore Child, The Spanish-American Republics (London, 1891); Sir T.

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  • Turner, Argentina and the Argentines (New York and London, 1892); Estanislao S.

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  • Clewell, History of Wachovia in North Carolina (New York, 1902).

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  • Wallace, Geographical Distribution of Animals (New York, 1876); Theodor Wolf, Ein Besuch der Galapagos Inseln (Heidelberg, 1879); and paper in Geographical Journal, vi.

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  • See a paper by Madison Grant, entitled "The Rocky Mountain Goat," published in the ninth annual report of the New York Zoological Society (1905).

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  • HORATIO SEYMOUR (1810-1886), American statesman, was born at Pompey, Onondaga county, New York, on the 31st of May 1810.

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  • His ancestor, Richard Seymour, a Protestant Episcopal ` clergyman, was an early settler at Hartford, Connecticut, and his father, Henry Seymour, who removed from Connecticut to New York, was prominent in the Democratic party in the state, being a member of the "Albany Regency" and serving as state senator in1816-1819and in 1822, and as canal commissioner in 1819-1831.

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  • Marcy in 1833-1839, was a member of the New York Assembly in 1842, in 1844 and in 1845, being speaker in 1845; mayor of Utica in 1843, and in 1852 was elected governor of the state over Washington Hunt (1811-1867), the Whig candidate, who had defeated him in 1850.

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  • In1863-1865he was again governor of New York state.

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  • During the draft riots in July he proclaimed the city and county of New York in a state of insurrection, but in a speech to the rioters adopted a tone of conciliation - a political error which injured his career.

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  • Seymour did not re-enter political life, refusing to be considered for the United States senatorship from New York in 1876.

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  • The Public Record of Horatio Seymour (New York, 1868) includes his speeches and official papers between 1856 and 1868.

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  • The Gulf of Carpentaria, situated in the north, is enclosed on the east by the projection of Cape York, and on the west by Arnheim Land, and forms the principal bay on the whole coast, measuring about 6° of long.

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  • In Queensland a succession of rivers falls into the Pacific from Cape York to the southern boundary of the state.

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  • From Cape York almost to the tropic of Capricorn the rainfall exceeds 50 in.

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  • The islands of Torres Strait have been shown to be the denuded remnant of a former extension of Cape York peninsula in North Queensland.

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  • Lines of steamers connect Australia with London and other British ports, with Germany, Belgium, France, Italy, Japan, China, India, San Francisco, Vancouver, New York and Montevideo, several important lines being subsidized by the countries to which they belong, notably Germany, France and Japan.

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  • Cook having completed the survey of the east coast, to which he gave the name of New South Wales, sighted and named Cape York, the northernmost point of Australia, and took final possession of his discoveries northward from 38° S.

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  • Mr Kennedy lost his life in 1848, being killed by the natives while attempting to explore the peninsula of Cape York, from Rockingham Bay to Weymouth Bay.

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  • Elphinstone Dalrymple, with Messrs Hill and Johnstone, finishing in December 1873, effected a valuable survey of the inlets and navigable rivers in the Cape York Peninsula.

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  • The principal thoroughfares are Wandsworth Road and Battersea Park and York Roads from east to west, connected north and south with the Victoria or Chelsea, Albert and Battersea bridges over the Thames.

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  • York Road recalls the existence of a palace of the archbishops of York, occasionally occupied by them between the reigns of Edward IV.

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  • Washington, Working With the Hands (New York, 1904); and Thrasher, Tuskegee, Its Story and Its Work (Boston, 1900).

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  • During the Burgundian period it was the residence of Margaret of York, widow of Charles the Bold; and the pretender Perkin Warbeck, whom she championed, if not born there, was the reputed son of a Jew of Tournai.

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  • by New York and Lake Champlain, which separates it in part from New York.

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  • West of the Green Mountains the Taconic Mountains form a nearly parallel (but distinct) range, extending from New York and Massachusetts N.

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  • (4,7 2 4,4 00 acres) were included in farms. The percentage of improved farm land, as in Maine, New York and Pennsylvania, increased from 1850 until 1890 and decreased after 1890; and in 1900 out of a total acreage of 4,724,400 acres only 2,126,624 acres (45%) were improved.

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  • to N.E., connecting Burlington, Montpelier and St Albans and affording connexion to the north with Montreal and to the south over trackage shared with the Boston & Maine, with the New London Northern which is leased by this road, and the Rutland railway (New York Central system) extending along the western edge of the state and connecting Rutland with Burlington to the north and with Bellows Falls and Bennington to the south.

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  • These railways provide outlets for through freight and passenger traffic southward to Boston and New York, and to the north to St Johns and Montreal.

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  • Water communication is afforded by Lake Champlain to the south, for seven months of the year, by way of the Champlain canal, via Whitehall, New York, to Troy and the Hudson river and the Atlantic coast, and to the north by way of the Richelieu river and the Chambly canal to the St Lawrence.

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  • Of the inhabitants born in the United States, 19,974 were natives of New York, 9675 were natives of New Hampshire and 9111 were natives of Massachusetts.

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  • The extension of the southern boundary line by this decision due westward until it met His Majesty's other governments gave rise, however, to a controversy with New York.

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  • New Hampshire claimed that her territory extended as far to the west as those of Massachusetts and Connecticut, whereas New York, under the charter of 1664, claimed eastward to the Connecticut river.

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  • New York protested against the Bennington grant in 1749, but the question did not become serious until the chief obstacle to settlement was removed by the conquest of Canada in 1760-61.

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  • A privy council decree recognizing the claims of New York was issued on the 10th of July 1764, and the settlers were soon afterwards ordered to surrender their patents and repurchase the land from the proper authorities at Albany.

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  • As a result, New York and New Hampshire formed a secret agreement to divide the state between themselves, the mountains to be the line of division.

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  • The difficulties with New Hampshire were adjusted in 1782, the west bank of the Connecticut being accepted as the final boundary, but New York refused to abandon her claims until 1790.

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  • Wood, The History of Taxation in Vermont (New York, 1894), and G.

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  • Hall, History of Eastern Vermont to the Close of the Eighteenth Century (2 vols., New York, 1858, 2nd ed., Albany, 1865); and Hiland Hall, History of Vermont from its Discovery to its Admission into the Union 1791 (Albany, 1868).

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  • ALEXANDER JOHNSTON (1849-1889), American historian, was born in Brooklyn, New York, on the 29th of April 1849.

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  • WILLIAM HENRY SEWARD (1801-1872), American statesman, was born on the 16th of May 1801 in the village of Florida, Orange county, New York.

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  • The British minister demanded from the national government M`Leod's release, but his case was in the New York courts, over which the national government has no jurisdiction.

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    0
  • HiS Son, Frederick William Seward, was born in Auburn, New York, on the 8th of July 1830, graduated at Union College in 1849 and was admitted to the bar at Rochester, N.Y., in 185x.

    0
    0
  • He served in the New York Assembly in 1875, and from 1877 to 1881 was again assistant secretary of state.

    0
    0
  • Seward (2 vols., New York, 1900); see also, The Life and Works of William H.

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    0
  • Seward: an Autobiography from 1891 to 1834, with a Memoir of his Life and Selections from his Letters (3 vols., New York, 1891), by his son, Frederick W.

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    0
  • Seward's Travels around the World (New York, 1873), by his adopted daughter, Olive R.

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    0
  • Seward; Lincoln and Seward (New York, 1874), by Gideon Welles; and William Henry Seward (new ed., Boston, 1899), by T.

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    0
  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and is primarily a residential suburb of Boston, with which it is connected by electric lines.

    0
    0
  • A small expedition sent by Cromwell in February 1654 to capture New Amsterdam (New York) from the Dutch was abandoned on the conclusion of peace, and the fleet turned to attack the French colonies; Major Robert Sedgwick taking with a handful of men the fort of St John's, Port Royal or Annapolis, and the French fort on the river Penobscot, the whole territory from this river to the mouth of the St Lawrence remaining British territory till its cession in 1667.

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    0
  • McENTEE, Jervis (1828-1891), American artist, was born at Rondout, New York, on the 14th of July 1828, and was a pupil of Frederick E.

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    0
  • He was made an associate of the National Academy of Design, New York, in 1860, and a full academician in 1861.

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  • They were published after his death by his son, William Theobald Wolfe Tone (1791-1828), who was educated by the French government and served with some distinction in the armies of Napoleon, emigrating after Waterloo to America, where he died, in New York City, on the 10th of October 1828.

    0
    0
  • The marriage of Charles the Bold and Margaret of York, sister of Edward IV., was celebrated at Damme on the 2nd of July 1468.

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    0
  • It is served by the Grand Trunk, the New York, Chicago & St Louis, and the Pennsylvania railways.

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    0
  • Manchester is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway and by electric line connecting with Hartford, Rockville and Stafford Springs.

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  • RICHFIELD SPRINGS, a village of Richfield township, Otsego county, New York, U.S.A., about 22 m.

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  • It is served by the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western railway, and by the Oneonta & Mohawk Valley electric line connecting with the New York Central railway at Herkimer.

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    0
  • Radau, Early Babylonian History (New York, 1900); C. H.

    0
    0
  • Collins, Wireless Telegraphy (New York, 1905); G.

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    0
  • Sewall, Wireless Telegraphy (New York, 1903); A.

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    0
  • Perry and the War on the Lakes (New York, 1905).

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    0
  • The line of circuit passed through the secondary of the induction coil I to the line, from that to the telephone T at the receiving station, 'See Journal of the Telegraph, New York, April 1877; Philadelphia Times, 9th July 1877; and Scientific American, August 181 This term was used by Wheatstone in 1827 for an acoustic apparatus intended to convert very feeble into audible sounds; see his Scientific Papers, p. 32.

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    0
  • ABRAM STEVENS HEWITT (1822-1903), American manufacturer and political leader, was born in Haverstraw, New York, on the 31st of July 1822.

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  • In 1886 he was elected mayor of New York City, his nomination having been forced upon the Democratic Party by the strength of the other nominees, Henry George and Theodore Roosevelt; his administration (1887-1888) was thoroughly efficient and creditable, but he broke with Tammany, was not renominated, ran independently for re-election, and was defeated.

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  • He died in New York City on the 18th of January 1903.

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  • He was a leader of those who contended for reform in municipal government, was conspicuous for his public spirit, and exerted a great influence for good not only in New York City but in the state and nation.

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  • draught up to Nova York, a few miles above the mouth of the Gurgueia, and could be made navigable up to the mouth of the Balsas.

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    0
  • He was introduced to public life and to court by his neighbour in Yorkshire, George, 2nd duke of Buckingham, was elected M.P. for York in 1665, and gained the "first step in his future rise" by joining Buckingham in his attack on Clarendon in 1667.

    0
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  • In November he occupied York in the prince's interest, returning to London to meet William on the 26th of December.

    0
    0
  • Near the town, round a point marked by an obelisk, was fought in 1471 the decisive battle between the houses of York and Lancaster, in which the earl of Warwick fell and the Lancastrians were totally defeated.

    0
    0
  • ACCEPTED FREWEN (1588-1664), archbishop of York, was born at Northiam, in Sussex, and educated at Magdalen College, Oxford, where in 1612 he became a fellow.

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    0
  • It was mainly by his instrumentality that the university plate was sent to the king at York in 1642.

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    0
  • At the Restoration he reappeared in public, and in 1660 he was consecrated archbishop of York.

    0
    0
  • Ten years later he was recalled to York, but refusing to consent to the division of his see was again deposed and again appealed to Rome.

    0
    0
  • In the end he was brought back to York, but not to the undivided see.

    0
    0
  • In England the dispute between Canterbury and York was settled by making them both primates, giving Canterbury the further honour of being primate of all England.

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    0
  • In York there are two courts, one called the consistory for the diocese, the other called the chancery for the province.

    0
    0
  • Canterbury, York, Armagh, Dublin, Cashel and Tuam are put in the place of Rome.

    0
    0
  • The judge under this act became (upon vacancies occurring) ex officio official principal of the arches court of Canterbury and of the chancery court of York.

    0
    0
  • In New York state there is still a court called the surrogates court, surrogate being the regular name for a deputy ecclesiastical judge.

    0
    0
  • Smith, Elements of Ecclesiastical Law, New York, i.

    0
    0
  • Smith, Elements of Ecclesiastical Law (New York, 1889-1890); S.

    0
    0
  • The establishment of The Atlantic Monthly in 1857 gave her a constant vehicle for her writings, as did also The Independent of New York, and later The Christian Union, of each of which papers successively her brother, Henry Ward Beecher, was one of the editors.

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    0
  • To the Windward Islands belong Tapamanu or Majaiti (Wallis's Sir Charles Saunders's Island and Spanish Pelada); Moorea or Eimeo (Wallis's Duke of York Island and Spanish San Domingo); Tahiti - Cook's Otaheite (probably Quiros's Sagittaria; Wallis's King George's Island, Bougainville's Nouvelle Cythere and Spanish Isla d'Amat); Tetuaroa - "The Distant Sea" (?

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    0
  • He was instrumental in saving New York and Vermont from invasion by his brilliant victory of lake Champlain gained, on the nth of September 1814, with a flotilla of 14 vessels carrying 86 guns, over Captain George Downie's 16 vessels and 92 guns.

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    0
  • For this important achievement New York and Vermont granted him estates, whilst Congress gave him a gold medal.

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  • been made to arrive at a definite international agreement on this subject, and certain terms suggested by a committee were adopted by the Eighth International Geographical Congress at New York in 1904.4 The forms of the ocean floor include the " shelf," or shallow sea margin, the " depression," a general term applied to all submarine hollows, and the " elevation."

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    0
  • Phillipson, Studien uber Wasserscheiden (Leipzig, 1886); also I.C. Russell, River Development (London, 1898) (published as The Rivers of North America, New York, 1898).

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    0
  • He voted for the exclusion of James, duke of York, from the throne, and made overtures to William, prince of Orange, and consequently in 168r he lost both his secretaryship and his seat on the privy council.

    0
    0
  • By this time he had made his peace with the duke of York, and when in February 1685 James became king, he retained his position of secretary, to which was soon added that of lord president of the council.

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    0
  • Lee, History of the City of Columbus, Ohio (New York, 1892).

    0
    0
  • Portland is served by the Maine Central, the Boston & Maine, and the Grand Trunk railways; by steamboat lines to New York, Boston, Bar Harbor, Saint John, N.B., and other coast ports, and, during the winter season, by the Allan and Dominion transatlantic lines.

    0
    0
  • Lyc. N.H., 'New York, x., 1874; J.

    0
    0
  • Heilprin, The Geographical and Zoological Distribution of Animals (New York, 1887); W.

    0
    0
  • The Cape York peninsula practically belongs to Papuasia.

    0
    0
  • The head of her elder brother, the boy earl marshal, had been stricken off in the cornfield under the walls of York, but her younger brother's right to his father's dukedom was allowed by parliament in 1425.

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    0
  • The last of the dukes of Norfolk had left a child heir, Anne Mowbray, married to the infant duke of York, the younger of the princes doomed by Richard in the Tower.

    0
    0
  • He married Mary Alsop (1769-1819) of New York in 1786 and removed to that city in 1788.

    0
    0
  • He was elected a member of the New York Assembly in the spring of 1789, and at a special session of the legislature held in July of that year was chosen one of the first representatives of New York in the United States Senate.

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    0
  • King, and published in six volumes (New York, 1894-1900).

    0
    0
  • Rufus King's son, John Alsop King (1788-1867), was educated at Harrow and in Paris, served in the war of 1812 as a lieutenant of a cavalry company, and was a member of the New York Assembly in1819-1821and of the New York Senate in 1823.

    0
    0
  • He was a member of the New York Assembly again in 1832 and in 1840, was a Whig representative in Congress in 1849-1851, and in1857-1859was governor of New York State.

    0
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  • Another son, Charles King (1789-1867), was also educated abroad, was captain of a volunteer regiment in the early part of the war of 1812, and served in 1814 in the New York Assembly, and after working for some years as a journalist was president of Columbia College in 1849-1864.

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  • A third son, James Gore King (1791-1853), was an assistant adjutant-general in the war of 1812, was a banker in Liverpool and afterwards in New York, and was president of the New York & Erie railroad until 1837, when by his visit to London he secured the loan to American bankers of £i,000,000 from the governors of the Bank of England.

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  • Charles King's son, Rufus King (1814-1876), graduated at the U.S. Military Academy in 1833, served for three years in the engineer corps, and, after resigning from the army, became assistant engineer of the New York & Erie railroad.

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  • He was adjutant-general of New York state in 1839-1843, and became a brigadier-general of volunteers in the Union army in 1861, commanded a division in Virginia in 1862-1863, and, being compelled by ill health to resign from the army, was U.S. minister to the Papal States in 1863-1867.

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  • high, and as thick as the Duke of York's column in London.

    0
    0
  • On particular authors and subjects there are many excellent monographs in the Jewish Encyclopaedia (New York, 1901-6), to which the present article is much indebted.

    0
    0
  • JOHN McALLISTER SCHOFIELD (1831-1906), American soldier, was born at Gerry, Chautauqua county, New York, on the 29th of September 1831.

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  • General Schofield published Forty-six Years in the Army (New York, 1897).

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    0
  • THE BRONX, formerly a district comprising several towns in Westchester county, New York, U.S.A., now (since 1898) the northernmost of the five boroughs of New York City (q.v.).

    0
    0
  • Ionia was settled in 1833 by immigrants from German Flats, near Herkimer, New York.

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    0
  • (New York, 1902).

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    0
  • The chief manufactures are paper and wire, and from the quarries near the village of Lee is obtained an excellent quality of marble; these quarries furnished the marble for the extension of the Capitol at Washington, for St Patrick's cathedral in New York City and for the Lee High School and the Lee Public Library (1908).

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  • of New York by rail, and 183 m.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Indianapolis & Louisville, the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (New York Central System), the Lake Erie & Western (New York Central System), the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania System) and the Vandalia (Pennsylvania System) railways.

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    0
  • P. Powell's Historic Towns of the Western States (New York, 1901) .

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    0
  • Morfill, Russia (Story of the Nations Series, New York, 1891), History of Russia (New York, 1902); H.

    0
    0
  • Drage, Russian Affairs (New York, 1904); P. N.

    0
    0
  • A plot to carry off the young Mortimers was defeated; but Mowbray, the earl marshal, who had been privy to it, raised a rebellion in the north supported by Archbishop Scrope of York.

    0
    0
  • Ramsay, Lancaster and York (2 vols., Oxford, 1892), and C. W.

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    0
  • The latter, named the America, was the first to be delivered, reaching New York in January 1829, but one of the others, the Stourbridge Lion, was actually the first practical steam locomotive to run in America, which it did on the 9th of August 1829.

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    0
  • The first American-built loccmotive, the Best Friend, of Charleston, was made at the West Point Foundry, New York, in 1830, and was put to work on the South Carolina railroad in that year.

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  • an hour on the level: it was won by the York of Messrs Davis & Gartner in the following year.

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    0
  • west of New York), met the Central Pacific, which built from San Francisco eastwards, making a line 1848 m.

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  • In comparing the figures, it should be noted that main line mileage in the Eastern states, as for example that of the Pennsylvania railroad and the New York, New Haven & Hartford, does not differ greatly in standards of safety or in unit cost from the best British construction, although improvement work in America is charged to income far more liberally than it has been in England.

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    0
  • Hadley, Railroad Transportation, Its History and Laws (New York, 1885); E.

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    0
  • Johnson, American Railway Transportation (New York, 1908); L.

    0
    0
  • McPherson, Railroad Freight Rates (New York, 1909); S.

    0
    0
  • Byers, Economics of Railway Operation (New York, 1908); E.

    0
    0
  • Dewsnup (ed.), Railway Organization and Working (Chicago, 1906); Interstate Commerce Commission; Rate Regulation Hearings before the U.S. Senate Committee (Washington, 5 vols., 1905); and on current matters, The Official Railway Guide (monthly, New York, the Railroad Age Gazette (weekly, New York) and the Commercial and Financial Chronicle (weekly, New York).

    0
    0
  • - On economics of construction and of operation, see Wellington, The Economic Theory of Railway Location (5th ed., New York, 1896).

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    0
  • On comparative railway legislation and the principles governing it, see Hadley, Railroad Transportation; its History and its Laws (New York, 1885).

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    0
  • The most recent type of state commission is the so-called Public Utility Commission, of which the best examples are those of New York and Wisconsin, established in 1907.

    0
    0
  • Hadley, Railroad Transportation (New York, 1885); B.

    0
    0
  • Meyer, Railway Legislation in the United States (New York, 1903); F.

    0
    0
  • In New York and four adjacent states, having about as many miles of railway as the United Kingdom, the number in the year ending June 30, 1907, was 1552.

    0
    0
  • The next development in intra-urban railways was an elevated line in the city of New York.

    0
    0
  • By the year 1878 there were four parallel lines in the city of New York, and constructions of the same character had already been projected in Brooklyn and Chicago and, with certain modifications of details, in Berlin.

    0
    0
  • In the year 1894 an elevated railway was built in Liverpool, and in 1900 a similar railway was constructed in Boston, U.S.A., and the construction of a new one undertaken in New York.

    0
    0
  • Brunel for the construction of the original Thames tunnel, and it was afterwards improved by Beach, of New York, and finally developed by Greathead.

    0
    0
  • This principle of construction has since been followed in the construction of the Boston subway, of the Chemin de Fer Metropolitain in Paris, and of the New York underground railway.

    0
    0
  • The New York underground railway (fig.

    0
    0
  • As a general rule the interval varies from one-quarter to one-half mile; on the express lines of the New York underground railway, the inter-station interval averages about r1 m.

    0
    0
  • The contract price of the New York underground railway, exclusive of the incidentals above mentioned, was $35,000,000 for 21 m., of which 16 m.

    0
    0
  • - New York Rapid Transit railway, showing also the tracks and conduits of the electric surface tramway.

    0
    0
  • Fox and their two daughters, at Hydesville (Wayne county), New York, were much disturbed by unexplained knockings.

    0
    0
  • Andrew Jackson Davis was in America the most prominent example of such persons; his work, The Principles of Nature, Her Divine Revelations (New York, 1847), was alleged to have been dictated in "clairvoyant" trance, and before 1848 his followers were expecting a new religious revelation.

    0
    0
  • Dexter, Spiritualism (New York, 1853-1855); R.

    0
    0
  • Hare, Experimental Investigations of the Spirit Manifestations (New York, 1856); Allan Kardec, Livre des esprits (1st ed., 1853); Mrs De Morgan, From Matter to Spirit (London, 1863), with preface by Professor De Morgan; Alfred Russel Wallace, Miracles and Modern Spiritualism (1876); W.

    0
    0
  • EDMUND GRINDAL (c. 1519-1583), successively bishop of London, archbishop of York and archbishop of Canterbury, born about 1519, was son of William Grindal, a farmer of Hensingham, in the parish of St Bees, Cumberland.

    0
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  • Perhaps he was as wise as his critics; at any rate the rigour which he repudiated hardly brought peace or strength to the Church when practised by his successors, and London, which was always a difficult see, involved Bishop Sandys in similar tronbles when Grindal had gone to York.

    0
    0
  • A "campaign" biography was published by Lew Wallace (Philadelphia, 1888), and a sketch of his life may be found in Presidents of the United States (New York, 1894), edited by James Grant Wilson.

    0
    0
  • The winter found him arranging for the publication in England of the selection from his articles and reviews which appeared in 1845, under the title of Critical and Historical Essays, and was issued almost contemporaneously at New York under the title of Biographical and Critical Miscellanies.

    0
    0
  • His misgivings as to its reception were at once set at rest, and it was speedily issued in translations into French, Spanish, German and Dutch, in addition to the English editions of New York, London and Paris.

    0
    0
  • A brief history of the bishopric is given in the Catholic Encyclopaedia (London and New York, 1909), with bibliography.

    0
    0
  • Faulkner, Cyprian the Churchman (Cincinnati and New York, 1906).

    0
    0
  • Nye (1814-1876) of New York was appointed Territorial governor.

    0
    0
  • Shinn, The Story of the Mine as Illustrated by the Great Comstock Lode of Nevada, in The Story of the West " series (New York, 1896) The Silver Mines of Nevada (New York, 1864); M.

    0
    0
  • of his Works (San Francisco, 1890); Elliot Coues, On the Trail of a Spanish Cavalier, Francisco Garces (New York, 1900).

    0
    0
  • WILLIAM THOMAS SAMPSON (1840-1902), American naval commander, was born at Palmyra, New York, on the 9th of February 1840, and graduated at the head of his class from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1861.

    0
    0
  • It is served by the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, the Cincinnati Northern (New York Central system), and a branch of the Cincinnati, Lebanon & Northern (Pennsylvania system) railways.

    0
    0
  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by inter-urban electric lines and in summer by steamers to Boston.

    0
    0
  • (New York, 1889); and, especially, the monograph by Franklin B.

    0
    0
  • Sherman of New York was nominated for Vice-President.

    0
    0
  • See Moses Coit Tyler, Patrick Henry (Boston, 1887; new ed., 1899), and William Wirt Henry (Patrick Henry's grandson), Patrick Henry: Life, Correspondence and Speeches (New York, 1890-1891); these supersede the very unsatisfactory biography by William Wirt, Sketches of the Life and Character of Patrick Henry (Philadelphia, 1817).

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    0
  • P. Morgan & Co., in New York.

    0
    0
  • He returned to America with the rank of colonel, in 1918, and died in New York City, May 29 1919.

    0
    0
  • Early in 1852 he escaped, and in May reached New York City.

    0
    0
  • He made a tour of the cities of the United States as a popular lecturer, and then studied law and was admitted to the New York bar in 1855.

    0
    0
  • In 1861 he was captain of a company (which he had raised) in the 69th regiment of New York volunteers and fought at the first battle of Bull Run; he then organized an Irish brigade, of whose first regiment he was colonel until the 3rd of February 1862, when he was appointed to the command of this organization with the rank of brigadier-general.

    0
    0
  • Lyons, in Brigadier-General Thomas Francis Meagher (New York, 1870), gives a eulogistic account of his career.

    0
    0
  • The see, while for some purposes in the archdiocese of York, has its own convocation.

    0
    0
  • The third crusade, famous for the participation of Richard I., was the occasion for bloody riots in England, especially in York, where 150 Jews immolated themselves to escape baptism.

    0
    0
  • In Surinam the Jews were treated as British subjects; in Barbadoes, Jamaica and New York they are found as early as the first half of the 17th century.

    0
    0
  • In 1908 an organization, inclusive of various religious sections, was founded under the description " the Jewish community of New York."

    0
    0
  • Stillman, The Cretan Insurrection of 1866-68 (New York, 1874); Edwardes, Letters from Crete (London, 1887); Stavrakis, ETaTLUTLai (Athens, 1890); J.

    0
    0
  • at Canterbury, Bury St Edmunds, Hereford and York.

    0
    0
  • JAY GOULD (1836-1892), American financier, was born in Roxbury, Delaware county, New York, on the 27th of May 1836.

    0
    0
  • For a short time he worked for his father in the hardware business; in1852-1856he worked as a surveyor in preparing maps of Ulster, Albany and Delaware counties in New York, of Lake and Geauga counties in Ohio, and of Oakland county in Michigan, and of a projected railway line between Newburgh and Syracuse, N.Y.

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    0
  • An ardent anti-renter in his boyhood and youth, he wrote A History of Delaware County and the Border Wars of New York, containing a Sketch of the Early Settlements in the County, and A History of the Late Anti-Rent Difficulties in Delaware (Roxbury, 1856).

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    0
  • He then engaged in the lumber and tanning business in western New York, and in banking at Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania.

    0
    0
  • Besides, he obtained a controlling interest in the Western Union Telegraph Company, and after 1881 in the elevated railways in New York City, and was intimately connected with many of the largest railway financial operations in the United States for the twenty years following 1868.

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  • 1868), became widely known as a philanthropist, and particularly for her generous gifts to American army hospitals in the war with Spain in 1898 and for her many contributions to New York University, to which she gave $250,000 for a library in 1895 and $100,000 for a Hall of Fame in 1900.

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  • In the extreme north-east are found the oldest rocks in the state - lower Devonian (the New Scotland beds of New York) and, not so old, an extension of the Lower Carboniferous which underlies the Warrior coalfields of Alabama, and which consists of cherts, limestones, sandstones and shales, with a depth of 800 to 900 ft.

    0
    0
  • McCardle, History of Mississippi (New York, 1893), is useful for local history.

    0
    0
  • Hamilton's Colonial Mobile (Boston and New York, 1898), and the Colonization of the South (Philadelphia, 1904) are standard authorities for the French and English periods (1699-1781).

    0
    0
  • Garner's Reconstruction Mississippi (New York, 1902) is judicial, scholarly and readable.

    0
    0
  • A war with the Tuscarora Indians, in 1711-1713, resulted in the defeat of the Indians and the removal of the greater part of the tribe to New York, where they became the sixth nation of the Iroquois confederacy.

    0
    0
  • Those who believe the " Declaration " to be spurious argue that survivors remembered only one such document, that the Resolutions might easily be thought of as a declaration of independence, that Governor Martin in all probability had knowledge only of these and not of the alleged " Declaration," and that the dates of publication in the Raleigh and Charleston newspapers, and the politics of those papers, show that the Resolutions are authentic. In July 1905 there appeared in Collier's Weekly (New York) what purported to be a facsimile reproduction of a copy of the Cape Fear Mercury which was referred to by Governor Martin and which contained the " Declaration "; but this was proved a forgery.'

    0
    0
  • Thompson, From the Cotton Field to the Cotton Mill, a Study of the Industrial Transition in North Carolina (New York, 1906), contains some interesting observations on the changes in social conditions resulting from the growth of the cotton-manufacturing industry.

    0
    0
  • Raper, North Carolina: a Study in English Colonial Government (New York, 1904), treats of the royal period (1729-1776) from the legal point of view; J.

    0
    0
  • Hoyt's The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence (New York, 1907) is the best presentation of the view generally adopted by competent historians that the alleged Declaration of the 10th of May 1775 is spurious; G.

    0
    0
  • Graham, The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence (New York, 1905), and J.

    0
    0
  • Cooke (ed.), Revolutionary History of North Carolina (Raleigh and New York, 1853), containing a defence of the Regulators.

    0
    0
  • His Journals (3 vols., New York, 1852), apart from their importance as a history of his life work, constitute a valuable commentary on the social and industrial history of the United States during the first forty years of their existence.

    0
    0
  • Wakeley, Heroes of Methodism (New York, 1856); W.

    0
    0
  • MATTHEW STANLEY QUAY (1833-1904), American political "boss," was born in Dillsburg, York county, Pennsylvania, on the 30th of September 1833.

    0
    0
  • See his Memoirs; with Special Reference to Secession and the Civil War (New York, 1906), edited by W.

    0
    0
  • books (New York, 1908).

    0
    0
  • The Robert Browning Settlement was founded in York Street, Walworth Road, in 1895 and incorporated in 1903, and in Nelson Square is the Women's University Settlement.

    0
    0
  • In particular, the Roman "North Road" which ran from York through Corbridge and over Cheviot to Newstead near Melrose, and thence to the Wall of Pius, and which has largely been in use ever since Roman times, is now not unfrequently called Watling Street, though there is no old authority for it and throughout the middle ages the section of the road between the Tyne and the Forth was called Dere Street.

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    0
  • In 917 Derby was captured from the Danes, and in the next year Leicester and York both submitted to her.

    0
    0
  • He was subsequently a representative in Congress from Ohio in 1877-1881; and from 1882 to 1896 practised law in New York City, where he was long one of the recognized leaders of the bar.

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  • Thirty-three bishops are included in the most authentic list of signatures, among them three from Britain, - York, London and "Colonia Londinensium" (probably a corruption of Lindensium, or Lincoln, rather than of Legionensium or Caerleon-on-Usk).

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  • Fling, Mirabeau and the French Revolution (London and New York, 1908).

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  • from York by a branch of the North Eastern railway.

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  • The state of New York, in order to reward the enterprise of Robert R.

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  • The M`Leod case' in which the state of New York insisted on trying a British subject, with whose trial the Federal government had no power to interfere, while the British govern - ment had declared that it would consider conviction and execu - tion a casus belli; the exercise of the hateful right of search by British vessels on the coast of Africa; the Maine boundary, as to which the action of a state might at any time bring the Federal government into armed collision with Great Britain - all these at once met the new secretary, and he felt that he had no right to abandon his work for party reasons.

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  • Webster's second wife was Caroline Le Roy, daughter of Jacob Le Roy, a New York merchant.

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    0
  • Curtis, Life of Daniel Webster (2 vols., New York, 1870) is the most complete biography, but it is written wholly from an admirer's point of view.

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  • McMaster, Daniel Webster (New York, 1902); E.

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  • P. Wheeler, Daniel Webster, the Expounder of the Constitution (New York, 2905); S.

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  • of the Pennsylvania German Society, Proceedings and Addresses (Lancaster, Penn., 1900); Julius Friedrich Sachse, The German Sectarians of Pennsylvania, 1742-1800: A Critical and Legendary History of the Ephrata Cloister and the Dunkers (Philadelphia, 1900); and John Lewis Gillin, The Dunkers: A Sociological Interpretation (New York, 1906), a doctor's dissertation,, with full bibliography.

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  • in 1514, and reaped his reward in the bishoprics of Lincoln and Tournai, the archbishopric of York, which was conferred on him by papal bull in September, and the cardinalate which he had sent Polydore Vergil to beg from Leo X.

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  • He surrendered all his offices and all his preferments except the archbishopric of York, receiving in return a pension of 1000 marks (equal to six or seven thousand pounds a year in modern currency) from the bishopric of Winchester, and retired to his see, which he had never before visited.

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    0
  • Libowitz, Herod and Agrippa (New York, 2nd ed., 1898); Gratz, Geschichte d.

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  • Large ore-bodies of granular and compact magnetite occur as beds and lenticular masses in Archean gneiss and crystalline schists, in various parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Urals; as also in the states of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Michigan, as well as in Canada.

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  • The duke of York public gardens were opened in 1894.

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  • Duyckinck (New York, 1860).

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  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia on topics related to New York.

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  • Its first meeting was held at York in 1831; and Brewster, along with Charles Babbage and Sir John F.

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  • Ashley in his translation (Economic Classics, New York, 1898), but the original MS. has never been found.

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  • This with his other publications, A Journey to the Land of Eden and A Progress to the Mines, was published at Petersburg, Va., in 1841, and again (New York, 1901) as The Writings of Colonel William Byrd of Westover in Virginia, edited by John S.

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  • Henry, " Richmond on the James " in Historic Towns of the Southern States (New York, 1900), edited by Lyman P. Powell; and Samuel Mordecai, Richmond in By-Gone Days (Richmond, 1856; 2nd ed., 1860).

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  • In 1883, at York, a prize of £50 was given for a butter dairy suitable for not more than twenty cows.

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  • In 1900, at York, the competitions were concerned with horse-power cultivators, self-moving steam diggers, milking machines and sheep-shearing machines (power and hand).

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway.

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  • In a single season Aberdeenshire suffered nearly 90,000 worth of damage owing to the ravages of the diamond back moth on the root crops; in New York state the codling moth caused a loss of $3,000,000 to apple-growers.

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  • American literature began as far back as 1788, when a report on the Hessian fly was issued by Sir Joseph Banks; in 1817 Say began his writings; while in 1856 Asa Fitch started his report on the " Noxious Insects of New York."

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  • Lintner extend from 1882 to 1898, in yearly parts, under the title of Reports on the Injurious Insects of the State of New York.

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  • became king of England, and one of the first acts of the new reign, after a narrow escape of the young king from capture by Moray, was the treaty of York, ratified at Northampton in April 1328, by which it was agreed that "Scotland, according to its ancient bounds in the days of Alexander III., should remain to Robert, king of Scots, and his heirs free and divided from England, without any subjection, servitude, claim or demand whatsoever."

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  • in 1373 to his grand-daughter Philippa, wife of Edmund Mortimer, and confirmed to Richard, duke of York, by Henry VI.

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  • Titchener, Experimental Psychology (New York, 1905); G.

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  • As for the "treason" of General York, who had come to terms with the Russians, it moved him merely to scorn and contempt.

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  • Sloane, Napoleon: a History (4 vols., London, 1896-1897); O'Connor Morris, Napoleon (New York, 1893); E.

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  • It is served directly by the Chesapeake & Ohio railway, and indirectly by the New York, Philadelphia & Norfolk (Pennsylvania System), passengers and freight being carried by steamer from the terminus at Cape Charles; by steamboat lines connecting with the principal cities along the Atlantic coast, and with cities along the James river; by ferry, connecting with Norfolk and Portsmouth; and by electric railway (3 m.) to Hampton and (1 2 m.) to Newport News.

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  • (The "Old" was added subsequently to distinguish it from a Point Comfort settlement at the mouth of the York river on Chesapeake Bay).

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  • The foundations and some of the architectural fragments of the temple were still in existence until 1777, when they were used to build the Passionist monastery by Cardinal York.

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  • Green (London and New York, 1896); D.

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    0
  • See Azel Ames, The May-Flower and Her Log (Boston, 1901); Blanche McManus, The Voyage of the Mayflower (New York, 1897); The General Society of Mayflower: Meetings, Officers and Members, arranged in State Societies, Ancestors and their Descendants (New York, 1901).

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    0
  • Other editions are in the King's Classics (1902) and for the Grolier Club (New York, 1889,1889, ed.

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    0
  • Folsom, Entomology (New York and London, 1906); A.

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    0
  • Elliot, Gallinaceous Game Birds of North America (New York, 1897) and Wild Fowl of the United States and British Possessions (1898), and Robert Ridgway's learned and invaluable Birds of North and Middle America, published by the Smithsonian Institution, Bull.

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  • The works of Audubon, and the Fauna Boreali-Americana of Richardson and Swainson have already been noticed, but they need naming here, as also do Nuttall's Manual of the Ornithology of the United States and of Canada (2 vols., Boston, 1832-1834; 2nd ed., 1840); and the Birds of Long Island (8 vo, New York, 1844) by J.

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    0
  • Beebe, Our Search for a Wilderness (New York, 1910) which deals with the birds of Venezuela and British Guiana, while Central America is fully treated in the comprehensive and beautiful Biologia CentraliAmericana of F.

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  • Thayer, A Short History of Venice (New York, 1905); H.

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  • Among the railways are the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Baltimore & Ohio, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the New York, Chicago & St Louis, the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania), the Pittsburgh, Ft.

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  • In 1701, New York, seeking another claim, obtained from the Iroquois a grant to the king of England of this territory which they claimed to have conquered but from which they had subsequently been expelled, and this grant was confirmed in 1726 and again in 1744 About 1730 English traders from Pennsylvania and Virginia began to visit the eastern and southern parts of the territory and the crisis approached as a French Canadian expedition under Celeron de Bienville took formal possession of the upper Ohio Valley by planting leaden plates at the mouths of the principal streams. This was in 1749 and in the same year George II.

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  • The result was that New York ceded its claim to the United States in 1780, Virginia in 1784, Massachusetts in 1785 and Connecticut in 1786.

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  • Wilson, Ohio (New York, 1902), and a great mass of material on this subject is contained in the publications of the Geological Survey of Ohio (1837 et seq.).

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  • 3 (New York, 1903); and Wilbur H.

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  • Siebert, The Government of Ohio, its History and Administration (New York, 1904).

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    0
  • 3 (New York, 18 95); J.

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  • Germann, National Legislation concerning Education, its Influence and Effect in the Public Lands east of the Mississippi River, admitted prior to 1820 (New York, 1899); J.

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    0
  • Moorehead, Primitive Man in Ohio (New York, 1892).

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    0
  • The best history is Rufus King, Ohio; First Fruits of the Ordinance of 1787 (Boston and New York, 1888), in the "American Commonwealths" series.

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  • Hinsdale, The Old North-west (2nd ed., New York, 1899), is good for the period before 1803.

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  • Slocum, Ohio Country between 1783 and 1815 (New York, 1910); and John Armstrong's Life of Anthony Wayne in Sparks' "Library of American Biography" (Boston, 1834-1838), series i.

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    0
  • Chaddock, Ohio before 1850 (New York, 1908).

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  • Gephart's Transportation and Industrial Development in the Middle West (New York, 1909), in the Columbia University Studies in History, Economics and Public Law, is a commercial history of Ohio.

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    0
  • Demaus, William Tyndale (London, 1871); also the Introduction to Mombert's critical reprint of Tyndale's Pentateuch (New York, 1884), where a bibliography is given.

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    0
  • His collected works, with a memoir by his son-in-law, Samuel Stanhope Smith (who succeeded him as president of the college), were edited by Dr Ashbel Green (New York, 1801-1802).

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  • See also David Walker Woods, John Witherspoon (New York, 1906); and M.

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  • Kane and Margaret Fox (New York, 1866); "Discoveries of Dr Kane," in Jour.

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  • Salisbury is served by the Central New England, and the New York, New Haven, & Hartford railways.

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  • Rudd, An Historical Sketch of Salisbury, Connecticut (New York, 1899); and Ellen S.

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  • Boston is the terminus of the Boston & Albany (New York Central), the Old Colony system of the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Boston & Maine railway systems, each of which controls several minor roads once in dependent.

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  • The former (the North, or Union station, 1893) covers 9 acres and has 23 tracks; the latter (the South Terminal, 1898), one of the largest stations in the world, covers 13 acres and has 32 tracks, and is used by the Boston & Albany and by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways.

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  • The Federal Street theatre-the first regular theatrewas established in 1794, the old Puritan feeling having had its natural influence in keeping Boston behind New York and Philadelphia in this respect.

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  • As a musical centre Boston rivals New York.

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  • deep. Railway rates have also been a matter of vital importance in recent years; Boston, like New York, complaining of discriminations in favour of Philadelphia, Baltimore, New Orleans and Galveston.

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  • of cattle, and of the various meat and dairy products classed as provisions, Boston is easily second to New York.

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  • The running expenses per capita in 1900 were $35.23; more than twice the average of 86 leading cities of the country (New York, $23.92; Chicago, $11.62).

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  • In 1805 Boston began the export of ice to Jamaica, a trade which was gradually extended to Cuba, to ports of the southern states, and finally to Rio de Janeiro and Calcutta (1833), declining only after the Civil War; it enabled Boston to control the American trade of Calcutta against New York throughout the entire period.

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  • Hale, Historic Boston and its Neighbourhood (New York, 1898), and L.

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  • A later king of the same name is commemorated by two inscribed bracelets of gold now in the Metropolitan Museum of New York.

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  • SACKETT'S HARBOR, a village in Jefferson county, New York, U.S.A., at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, on the south shore of Black River Bay, about i m.

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  • Sackett's Harbor is served by the New York Central & Hudson River railway.

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  • who was killed at York (now Toronto) on the 27th of April 1813.

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  • From Sackett's Harbor American expeditions against York (now Toronto) and Fort George respectively set out in April and May 1813; though scantily garrisoned it was successfully defended by General Jacob Brown (who had just taken command) against an attack, on the 29th of May, of Sir George Prevost with a squadron under Sir James Lucas Yeo.

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    0
  • Rawle) (London, 1897); McAdam, Rights, Remedies and Liabilities of Landlord and Tenant (New York, 1900); Wood, Law of Landlord and Tenant (New York, 1888).

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  • On the 7th of April he embarked with his wife at Gravesend and reached New York on the 4th of June.

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  • A successful settlement was made in 1851-1854 under the auspices of the New York Trust Co.; the Illinois Central railway was opened in 1856; and Cairo was chartered as a city in 1857.

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  • New Haven is served by the main line and five branches of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by three inter-urban electric lines and by two steamship lines connecting with New York.

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  • In 1770 most of the merchants agreed not to import goods from England and transferred their trade with New York City, where Loyalist influence was strong, to Boston and Philadelphia.

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  • In 1815 the Fulton, the first steamboat on Long Island Sound, made its first trip from New York to New Haven.

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  • Hammond 1 has constructed a table from information supplied by the secretaries of the cotton exchanges at New York, Charleston, Savannah, Mobile, New Orleans and Galveston, showing the sales of " spot " cotton at those ports for the twenty-two years between 1874-1875 and 1895-1896, and in all cases an absolute decline is evident.

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  • American cotton, we may remind the reader, is graded into a number of classes, both on the Liverpool and New York Ex changes, and an attempt is made in each market to keep the grades as fixed as possible.

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  • PEEKSKILL, a village of Westchester county, New York, U.S.A., on the E.

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River railway, and by passenger and freight steamboat lines on the Hudson river.

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  • The village is the home of many New York business men.

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  • The site was settled early in the 18th century, but the village itself dates from about 1760, when it took its present name from the adjacent creek or "kill," on which a Dutch trader, Jans Peek, of New York City, had established a trading post.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Boston & Albany (New York Central & Hudson River) railways, and by two inter-urban electric lines.

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  • (New York, 1902); S.

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  • The earliest mention 'of American petroleum occurs in Sir Walter Raleigh's account of the Trinidad pitch-lake in 1595; whilst thirty-seven years later, the account of a visit of a Franciscan, Joseph de la Roche d'Allion, to the oil springs of New York was published in Sagard's Histoire du Canada.

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  • Scotland, Devonshire, Spain, Hanover, Archangel, Vitebsk, Athabasca, Mackenzie, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Kentucky.

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  • Shropshire, Wales, Bohemia, Sweden, Esthonia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Newfoundland, New York, Pennsylvania [?], Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota, Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Alabama, Oklahoma, New Mexico, New Caledonia.

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  • Shropshire, New York.

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  • Hutchinson of New York, laid a short line from the Tarr Farm wells to the refinery, which passed over a hill, the oil being moved on the syphon principle, and a year later constructed another three miles long to the railway.

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  • The earliest form of testing instrument employed for this purpose was that of Giuseppe Tagliabue of New York, which consists of a glass cup placed in a copper water bath heated by a spirit lamp. The cup is filled with the oil to be tested, a thermometer placed in it and heat applied, the temperatures being noted at which, on passing a lighted splinter of wood over the surface of the oil, a flash occurs, and after further heating, the oil ignites.

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  • In Pennsylvania, the prescribed limit is a " fire-test " of 110° F., equivalent to about 70° F., close-test, while in the State of New York it is 1 00° F., close-test.

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    0
  • Allman, Greek Geometry from Thales to Euclid (1889); Florian Cajori, History of Mathematics (New York, 1894); M.

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  • In 1900 Florida ranked fourth in the manufacture of tobacco among the states of the Union, being surpassed by New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio; in 1905 it ranked third (after New York and Pennsylvania).

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  • Several plans were made to invade South Carolina and Georgia, but none matured until 1778, when an expedition was organized which co-operated with British forces from New York in the siege of Savannah, Georgia.

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  • Norton's Handbook of Florida (2nd edition, New York, 1892); the volumes of the Twelfth Census of the United States (for 1900) which treat of Agriculture and Manufactures, and the Special Report on Mines and Quarries for 1902.

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  • Dimock's Florida Enchantments (New York, 1908) areof interest.

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  • French's Historical Collections of Louisiana (New York, 1846-1875).

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  • In 1693 further correspondence between Gauden, Clarendon, the duke of York, and Sir Edward Nicholas was published by Mr Arthur North, who had found them among the papers of his sister-in-law, a daughter-in-law of Bishop Gauden; but doubt has been thrown on the authenticity of these papers.

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  • Herring, then archbishop of York, with whom he remained until it was safe to return to Edinburgh.

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  • Chicago, the principal port on the lake, is at its south-west extremity, and is remarkable for the volume of its trade, the number of vessels arriving and departing exceeding that of any port in the United States, though the tonnage is less than that of New York.

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  • His first difficulties were with Thomas of Bayeux, archbishopelect of York, who asserted that his see was independent of Canterbury and claimed jurisdiction over the greater part of midland England.

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  • Taking up his residence in New York, he was in 1832-1839 president of the National Bank (afterwards the Gallatin Bank) of New York, but his duties were light, and he devoted himself chiefly to the congenial pursuits of science and literature.

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  • In both fields he displayed much talent, and by writing his Synopsis of the Indian Tribes within the United States East of the Rocky Mountains and in the British and Russian Possessions in North America (1836), and by founding the American Ethnological Society of New York in 1842, he earned the title of "Father of American Ethnology."

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  • Almost his last public act was a speech, on the 24th of April 1844, in New York City, against the annexation of Texas; and in his eighty-fourth year he confronted a howling New York mob with the same cool, unflinching courage which he had displayed half a century before when he faced the armed frontiersmen of Redstone Old Fort.

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  • His second wife, whom he married in November 1793, was Miss Hannah Nicholson, of New York, the daughter of Com.

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  • At St Paul's the legatine constitutions of Otto were published in a synod of 1237, those of Ottobon in 1268: these were the most important national councils held after the independence of York had been established.

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  • on remarkable revival services in Western New York, in Philadelphia (1828), in New York City (1829-1830 and 1832, the New York Evangelist being founded to carry on his work), in Boston (1831, 1842-1843, 1856-1857), in London (1849-1850) and throughout England and Scotland (1858).

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  • See Finney's autobiographical Memoirs (New York, 1876); J.

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  • Fairchild (New York, 1907).

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  • In more sweeping measures, however, the pope refused to support him, until in 1170 Henry infringed the rights of Canterbury by causing Archbishop Roger of York to crown the young king.

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  • Instituts (Athens, from 1876); Bulletin de correspondence hellenique (Athens, from 1877); Papers of the American School (New York, 1882-1897); Annual of the British School (London, from 1894); Journal of Hellenic Studies (London, from 1880); American Journal of Archaeology (New York, from 1885); Jahrbuch des kais.

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    0
  • He graduated at Williams College in 1825, and settled in New York City, where he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1828, and rapidly won a high position in his profession.

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  • Becoming convinced that the common law in America, and particularly in New York state, needed radical changes in respect to the unification and simplification of its procedure, he visited Europe in 1836 and thoroughly investigated the courts, procedure and codes of England, France and other countries, and then applied himself to the task of bringing about in the United States a codification of the common law procedure.

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  • He appeared personally before successive legislative committees, and in 1846 published a pamphlet, "The Reorganization of the Judiciary," which had its influence in persuading the New York State Constitutional Convention of that year to report in favour of a codification of the laws.

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  • After 1876, however, he returned to the Democratic party, and from January to March 1877 served out in Congress the unexpired term of Smith Ely, elected mayor of New York City.

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  • He died in New York City on the 13th of April 1894.

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  • See also the Life of David Dudley Field (New York, 1898), by Rev. Henry Martyn Field.

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  • ANTI-MASONIC PARTY, an American political organization which had its rise after the mysterious disappearance, in 1826, of William Morgan (c. 1776 - c. 1826), a Freemason of Batavia, New York, who had become dissatisfied with his Order and had planned to publish its secrets.

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  • Opposition to Masonry was taken up by the churches as a sort of religious crusade, and it also became a local political issue in western New York, where early in 1827 the citizens in many mass meetings resolved to support no Mason for public office.

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  • In New York at this time the National Republicans, or "Adams men," were a very feeble organization, and shrewd political leaders at once determined to utilize the strong anti-Masonic feeling in creating a new and vigorous party to oppose the rising Jacksonian Democracy.

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  • In the elections of 1828 the new party proved unexpectedly strong, and after this year it practically superseded the National Republican party in New York.

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  • From New York the movement spread into other middle states and into New England, and became especially strong in Pennsylvania and Vermont.

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  • This was the high tide of its prosperity; in New York in 1833 the organization was moribund, and its.

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  • (New York, 1898); and J.

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  • Hammond, History of Political Parties in the State of New York (2 vols., Albany, 1842).

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  • He died in New York on the 6th of May 1873.

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  • His autobiography was published at New York in 1867-1869, and his son Ramon Paez wrote Public Life of J.

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  • DOBBS FERRY, a village of Westchester county, New York, on the E.

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  • Dobbs Ferry is served by the Hudson River division of the New York Central railway.

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  • There are many fine country places, two private schools - the Mackenzie school for boys and the Misses Masters' school for girls - and the children's village (with about thirty cottages) of the New York juvenile asylum.

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  • P. Dewees, The Molly Maguires;(Philadelphia, 18 77); Allan Pinkerton, The Molly Maguires and the Detectives (New York, 1877); E.

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  • Two lines of steamboats afford regular communication between San Juan and New York; one of them runs to Venezuelan ports and one to New Orleans; and there are lines to Cuba and direct to Spain.

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  • Van Middeldyk, The History of Puerto Rico (New York, 1903).

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    0
  • Davis, The Cuban and Porto Rican Campaigns (New York, 1898), is a sketch of the invasion of the island in 1898.

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    0
  • Willoughby, Territories and Dependencies of the United States (New York, 1905).

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    0
  • Soc. New York, vol.

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    0
  • (New York, 1900); W.

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  • Hill, Cuba and Porto Rico (New York, 1898).

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  • ALBION, a village and the county-seat of Orleans county, New York, U.S.A., about 30 m.

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  • The village is served by the New York Central & Hudson River railway, by the Buffalo, Lockport & Rochester electric railway, and by the Erie Canal.

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  • and between New York and Newark bays at the S., opposite lower Manhattan Island.

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  • It is the eastern terminus of the Pennsylvania, the Lehigh Valley, the West Shore, the Central of New Jersey, the Baltimore & Ohio, the Northern of New Jersey (operated by the Erie), the Erie, the New York, Susquehanna & Western, and the New Jersey & New York (controlled by the Erie) railways, the first three using the Pennsylvania station; and of the little-used Morris canal.

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  • and 6th Ave., New York City, and it also has docks of several lines of Transatlantic and coast steamers.

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  • Grain is shipped to and from Jersey City in large quantities, and in general the city is an important shipping port; being included, however, in the port of New York, no separate statistics are available.

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  • In 1764 a new post route between New York and Philadelphia passed through what is now the city, and direct ferry communication began with New York.

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  • In 1804 Paulus Hook, containing 117 acres and having about 15 inhabitants, passed into the possession of three enterprising New York lawyers, who laid it out as a town and formed an association for its government, which was incorporated as the "associates of the Jersey company."

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  • (New York, 1896).

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  • See Kate Mason Rowland, Life and Writings of George Mason (2 vols., New York, 1892).

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  • In 1790 he applied for and received the post of consul at New York.

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    0
  • The New York Museum has further investigated the Middle Kingdom pyramid field at Lisht and its neighbourhood, 53 and Prof. Petrie and Mr. Brunton have found fine XII.

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  • At Thebes, New York has also carried out work at Qurnet Murra`i and Sheikh `Abd el Qurna, as well as at Dra t Abul Neqqa and Deir el Bahri, 55 where the Earl of Carnarvon, assisted by Mr. Howard Carter, has also dug with remarkable success, recovering some of the most beautiful relics of the art of the XII.

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  • It is served by the Delaware && Hudson (being a terminus of one of its, branches) and the Rutland (New York Central system) railways..

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  • The township of Rutland was granted by New Hampshire in 1761 to John Murray of Rutland, Massachusetts, and about the same time it was granted (as Fairfield) by New York.

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  • No settlement was made until 1770, and in 1772 the place was again granted by New York under the name of Socialborough.

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  • HOOSICK FALLS, a village of Rensselaer county, New York, U.S.A., in the township of Hoosick, 27 m.

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  • Later he removed to New York City to establish a branch of the firm.

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  • In politics an active Republican, he was chairman of the Republican state committee in 1887 and 1888, and contributed much to the success of the Harrison ticket in New York in the latter year.

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  • Thus the distance between New York and Oporto, following the former (great circle sailing), amounts to 3000 m., while following the rhumb, as in Mercator sailing, it would amount to 3120 m.

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  • York, 1843).

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  • Hunt in Paris, and is preserved in the Lenox Library, New York.

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