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yew

yew

yew Sentence Examples

  • All chlorophyll plants require light, but in very different degrees, as exemplified even in the United Kingdom by the shade-bearing beech and yew contrasted with the light-demanding larch and birch; and as with temperature so with light, every plant and even every organ has its optimum of illumination.

  • YEW (Taxus baccata).

  • This he accomplished by means of four wands of yew inscribed with ogam characters.

  • among the peculiar species are the red bay or" Florida Mahogany," satinwood and cachibou, and the Florida yew and savin, both almost extinct.

  • Among them are the beech, ash, birch, maple, cypress and yew.

  • Yew; 11.

  • The upper regions of Mt Elgon, Mt Debasien and Mt Agoro are clothed with forests of conifers - juniper and yew - and witch-hazels (Trichocladus).

  • slope of the Cascades the red fir ceases to be the dominant tree, and between this elevation and the region of perpetual snow, on a few of the highest peaks, rise a succession of forest zones containing principally: (1) yellow pine, red and yellow fir, white fir and cedar; (2) lodgepole pine, white pine, Engelmann spruce and yew; (3) subalpine fir, lovely fir, noble fir, Mertens hemlock, Alaska cedar and tamarack; (4) white-bark pine, Patton hemlock, alpine larch and creeeping juniper.

  • The implements found in the relic bed under it were axe-heads of stone, with their haftings of stag's horn and wood; a flint saw, set in a handle of fir wood and fastened with asphalt; flint flakes and arrow-heads; harpoons of stag's horn with barbs; awls, needles, chisels, fish-hooks and other implements of bone; a comb of yew wood 5 in.

  • Among the wooden objects recovered from the relic beds were tubs, plates, ladles and spoons, a flail for threshing corn, a last for stretching shoes of hide, celt handles, clubs, long-bows of yew, floats and implements of fishing and a dug-out canoe 12 ft.

  • Fine oaks and beeches are numerous, and yew trees of great size and age are seen in some Kentish churchyards, as at Stansted, while the fine oak at Headcorn is also famous.

  • Yew Testament Chronology.

  • The holly, the yew, the laurel, if allowed to grow from a single stem, become trees, other plants such as rhododendron, syringa, the euonymous are properly shrubs.

  • The little Skell descends from the uplands of Pateley Moor to the west a clear swift stream, traversing a valley clothed with woods, conspicuous among which are some ancient yew trees which may have sheltered the monks who first sought retreat here.

  • While building their monastery the monks are said to have lived at first under an elm and then under seven yew trees called the Seven Sisters.

  • Where these are required to be narrow as well as lofty, holly, yew or beech is to be preferred; but, if there is sufficient space, the beautiful laurel and the bay may be employed where they will thrive.

  • Taxus - Yew.

  • We have also the yew, the hazel, juniper, walnut, wild peach and almond.

  • Abies smithiana extends into Afghanistan; Abies webbiana forms dense forests at altitudes of 8000 to 12,000 ft., and ranges from Bhutan to Kashmir; several junipers and the common yew (Taxus baccata) also occur.

  • Youghal (Eschaill, " the Yew wood") was made a settlement of the Northmen in the 9th century, and was incorporated by King John in 1209.

  • The trees chiefly used for the hedges, and the best for the purpose, are the hornbeam among deciduous trees, or the yew among evergreens.

  • yew, are about 62 ft.

  • Of the Coniferae, Podocarpus and Pinus longifolia alone descend to the tropical zone; Abies Brunoniana and Smithiana and the larch (a genus not seen in the western mountains) are found at 8000, and the yew and Picea Webbiana at 10,000 ft.

  • In the less exposed localities, on northern slopes and sheltered valleys, the European forms become more numerous, and we find species of alder, birch, ash, elm, maple, holly, hornbeam, Pyrus, &c. At greater elevations in the interior, besides the above are met Corylus, the common walnut, found wild throughout the range, horse chestnut, yew, also Picea Webbiana, Pinus, excelsa, Abies Smithiana, Cedrus Deodara (which tree does not grow spontaneously east of Kumaon), and several junipers.

  • The commonest species of trees are such as grow in central Europe, namely, ash, fir, pine, beech, acacia, maple, birch, box, chestnut, laurel, holm-oak, poplar, elm, lime, yew, elder, willow, oak.

  • - This class-designation has been recently proposed to give emphasis to the isolated position of the genus Ginkgo (Salisburia) among the Gymnosperms. Ginkgo biloba, the maidenhair tree, has usually been placed by botanists in the Taxeae in the neighbourhood of the yew (Taxes), but the proposal by Eichler in 1852 to institute a special family, the Salisburieae, indicated a recognition of the existence of special characteristics which distinguish the genus from other members of the Coniferae.

  • The stamens of Araucaria and Agathis are peculiar in bearing several long and narrow free pollen-sacs; these may be compared with the sporangiophores of the horsetails (Equisetum); in Taxus (yew) the filament is attached to the centre of a large circular distal expansion, which bears several pollen-sacs on its under surface.

  • Finally in the yew, as a type of the family Taxeae, the ovules occur singly at the apex of a lateral branch, enclosed when ripe by a conspicuous red or yellow fleshy arillus, which serves as an attraction to animals, and thus aids in the dispersal of the seeds.

  • Resin-canals, which occur abundantly in the xylem, phloem or cortex, are not found in the wood of the yew.

  • The forests contain a great variety of useful woods, affording excellent timber; among the commonest trees are the yellow wood, which is also one of the largest, belonging to the yew species; black iron wood; heavy, close-grained and durable stinkhout; melkhout, a white wood used for wheelwork; nieshout; and the assegai or Cape lancewood.

  • They claimed to be able to foretell the future by watching the clouds, or by means of divining-rods made of yew.

  • Around the wall in the houses of the wealthy were arranged the bedsteads, or rather compartments, with testers and fronts, sometimes made of carved yew.

  • These were made of bronze backed with wood, or of yew covered with hide.

  • At the base are found vines and maize; on the lower slopes are green pastures, or wheat, barley and other kinds of corn; above are often forests of oak, ash, elm, &c.; and still higher the yew and the fir may be seen braving the climatic conditions.

  • Beyond the flowering cherries, is the serpentine yew tunnel, which runs the full length of the lawn.

  • Yew is especially abundant on the scree immediately below the Scar.

  • I do not know of any other garden, real or fictitious, claiming to have a " yew alley " .

  • archer's bow was normally made from yew and was about 6 feet long.

  • Current Status Biological status lowland beech and yew woodland spans a variety of distinctive vegetation types reflecting differences in soil and topographical conditions.

  • Calcareous beech and yew woodland forms perhaps 40% of the total amount of lowland beech and yew habitat type defined above.

  • Red backed hawks and crested caracara competed for perches in the few yew trees I was camping in the shelter of.

  • churchyard yew.

  • dowsethe north, the Yew was used for dowsing to find lost property (enlisting the help of the ancestors?

  • dowsethe north, the Yew was used for dowsing to find lost property (enlisting the help of the ancestors?

  • However, a shortage of yew trees meant that ash, elm or wych elm were also used.

  • flowering cherries, is the Serpentine Yew Tunnel, which runs the full length of the lawn.

  • At maturity, this yew will be about twelve feet tall with a five foot girth but may be kept smaller by regular clipping.

  • This is in origin a Celtic name perhaps meaning ' yew grove ' .

  • Plant a traditional yew hedge for a perfect finish.

  • Yew and juniper, and the broadleaved evergreen holly are best grown in containers, and planted out when 2-3 years old.

  • A yew hedge screens the approaches to the formal gardens near the house, where a north-south path is edged with pale blue iris.

  • kiln dried Yew.

  • Probably the most outstanding example is the growing of yew trees in the churchyards to supply the wood for making the longbows.

  • The garden has the oldest yew hedge maze in England.

  • The large walled garden has been restored to its 18 th -century formal design and has a Victorian parterre and yew walk.

  • Leaf shaped silver pendant with a large section of Yew inlayed.

  • Furniture: an octagonal, worn yellow sandstone sundial plinth is located under an Irish yew tree near the southeast gates.

  • Hawthorn is the best hedge, followed by holly, yew and wild privet.

  • His large grave is guarded by railings in the southeast corner of the churchyard, beneath the great yew.

  • A gnarly old yew tree reputed to be anywhere between 3000-5000 years old, it is the oldest living organism in the UK.

  • Vegetation: several yew trees of no great age are established within the churchyard.

  • Unfortunately Queen Anne, who hated yew, had it all uprooted and redesigned the garden.

  • Archeologists have recently found well-preserved Yew wood carvings at ancient sites of springs and wells which were probably votive offerings.

  • withyved side planks were stitched to the bottom of the boat with twisted yew withies.

  • withyved side planks were stitched to the bottom of the boat with twisted yew withies.

  • yew on the west side of the church.

  • Yews of lesser girth on east boundary and a 19thC yews of lesser girth on east boundary and a 19thC yew on the north side of the graveyard.

  • The history of the sacred yew can be sketched in outline.

  • His grave is beside no church, neither under the shadow of any ancient yew.

  • Florence Court's most notable tree, the Irish yew, grows in a much wilder part of the estate.

  • More information 3rd February 2003 300 year old yew saved from the chop!

  • Carolyn and Carole planted some green yew (Taxus baccata) in these boxes.

  • Tuesday, September 07, 2004 Where have yew been?

  • yew hedge maze in England.

  • yew hedging.

  • yew tree which he planted in 1645.

  • yew alley " .

  • yew woodland is an outstanding example of a habitat with a very small representation in Britain.

  • There is little sound except for the breeze stirring in the churchyard yew trees.

  • All chlorophyll plants require light, but in very different degrees, as exemplified even in the United Kingdom by the shade-bearing beech and yew contrasted with the light-demanding larch and birch; and as with temperature so with light, every plant and even every organ has its optimum of illumination.

  • YEW (Taxus baccata).

  • This he accomplished by means of four wands of yew inscribed with ogam characters.

  • among the peculiar species are the red bay or" Florida Mahogany," satinwood and cachibou, and the Florida yew and savin, both almost extinct.

  • In all three zones occur the chestnut, aspen, willow (especially Salix laurea), hornbeam, birch, alder, juniper and yew; while the mountain ash, hazel, wild plum, wild pear and other wild fruit trees are found at rarer intervals.

  • Among them are the beech, ash, birch, maple, cypress and yew.

  • Yew; 11.

  • The upper regions of Mt Elgon, Mt Debasien and Mt Agoro are clothed with forests of conifers - juniper and yew - and witch-hazels (Trichocladus).

  • slope of the Cascades the red fir ceases to be the dominant tree, and between this elevation and the region of perpetual snow, on a few of the highest peaks, rise a succession of forest zones containing principally: (1) yellow pine, red and yellow fir, white fir and cedar; (2) lodgepole pine, white pine, Engelmann spruce and yew; (3) subalpine fir, lovely fir, noble fir, Mertens hemlock, Alaska cedar and tamarack; (4) white-bark pine, Patton hemlock, alpine larch and creeeping juniper.

  • The implements found in the relic bed under it were axe-heads of stone, with their haftings of stag's horn and wood; a flint saw, set in a handle of fir wood and fastened with asphalt; flint flakes and arrow-heads; harpoons of stag's horn with barbs; awls, needles, chisels, fish-hooks and other implements of bone; a comb of yew wood 5 in.

  • Among the wooden objects recovered from the relic beds were tubs, plates, ladles and spoons, a flail for threshing corn, a last for stretching shoes of hide, celt handles, clubs, long-bows of yew, floats and implements of fishing and a dug-out canoe 12 ft.

  • Fine oaks and beeches are numerous, and yew trees of great size and age are seen in some Kentish churchyards, as at Stansted, while the fine oak at Headcorn is also famous.

  • a X yew), the fluid secreted by the mammary glands of the division of vertebrate animals called Mammalia (see Mammary Gland), and primarily devised for the nourishment of their own young.

  • Yew Testament Chronology.

  • The holly, the yew, the laurel, if allowed to grow from a single stem, become trees, other plants such as rhododendron, syringa, the euonymous are properly shrubs.

  • The little Skell descends from the uplands of Pateley Moor to the west a clear swift stream, traversing a valley clothed with woods, conspicuous among which are some ancient yew trees which may have sheltered the monks who first sought retreat here.

  • While building their monastery the monks are said to have lived at first under an elm and then under seven yew trees called the Seven Sisters.

  • Where these are required to be narrow as well as lofty, holly, yew or beech is to be preferred; but, if there is sufficient space, the beautiful laurel and the bay may be employed where they will thrive.

  • Taxus - Yew.

  • We have also the yew, the hazel, juniper, walnut, wild peach and almond.

  • Abies smithiana extends into Afghanistan; Abies webbiana forms dense forests at altitudes of 8000 to 12,000 ft., and ranges from Bhutan to Kashmir; several junipers and the common yew (Taxus baccata) also occur.

  • Youghal (Eschaill, " the Yew wood") was made a settlement of the Northmen in the 9th century, and was incorporated by King John in 1209.

  • The trees chiefly used for the hedges, and the best for the purpose, are the hornbeam among deciduous trees, or the yew among evergreens.

  • yew, are about 62 ft.

  • Of the Coniferae, Podocarpus and Pinus longifolia alone descend to the tropical zone; Abies Brunoniana and Smithiana and the larch (a genus not seen in the western mountains) are found at 8000, and the yew and Picea Webbiana at 10,000 ft.

  • In the less exposed localities, on northern slopes and sheltered valleys, the European forms become more numerous, and we find species of alder, birch, ash, elm, maple, holly, hornbeam, Pyrus, &c. At greater elevations in the interior, besides the above are met Corylus, the common walnut, found wild throughout the range, horse chestnut, yew, also Picea Webbiana, Pinus, excelsa, Abies Smithiana, Cedrus Deodara (which tree does not grow spontaneously east of Kumaon), and several junipers.

  • The commonest species of trees are such as grow in central Europe, namely, ash, fir, pine, beech, acacia, maple, birch, box, chestnut, laurel, holm-oak, poplar, elm, lime, yew, elder, willow, oak.

  • - This class-designation has been recently proposed to give emphasis to the isolated position of the genus Ginkgo (Salisburia) among the Gymnosperms. Ginkgo biloba, the maidenhair tree, has usually been placed by botanists in the Taxeae in the neighbourhood of the yew (Taxes), but the proposal by Eichler in 1852 to institute a special family, the Salisburieae, indicated a recognition of the existence of special characteristics which distinguish the genus from other members of the Coniferae.

  • The stamens of Araucaria and Agathis are peculiar in bearing several long and narrow free pollen-sacs; these may be compared with the sporangiophores of the horsetails (Equisetum); in Taxus (yew) the filament is attached to the centre of a large circular distal expansion, which bears several pollen-sacs on its under surface.

  • Finally in the yew, as a type of the family Taxeae, the ovules occur singly at the apex of a lateral branch, enclosed when ripe by a conspicuous red or yellow fleshy arillus, which serves as an attraction to animals, and thus aids in the dispersal of the seeds.

  • Resin-canals, which occur abundantly in the xylem, phloem or cortex, are not found in the wood of the yew.

  • The forests contain a great variety of useful woods, affording excellent timber; among the commonest trees are the yellow wood, which is also one of the largest, belonging to the yew species; black iron wood; heavy, close-grained and durable stinkhout; melkhout, a white wood used for wheelwork; nieshout; and the assegai or Cape lancewood.

  • They claimed to be able to foretell the future by watching the clouds, or by means of divining-rods made of yew.

  • Around the wall in the houses of the wealthy were arranged the bedsteads, or rather compartments, with testers and fronts, sometimes made of carved yew.

  • These were made of bronze backed with wood, or of yew covered with hide.

  • At the base are found vines and maize; on the lower slopes are green pastures, or wheat, barley and other kinds of corn; above are often forests of oak, ash, elm, &c.; and still higher the yew and the fir may be seen braving the climatic conditions.

  • We find the living British species of Rhamnus, maple, sloe, hawthorn, apple, white-beam, guelder-rose, cornel, elm, birch, alder, hornbeam, hazel, oak, beech, willow, yew and pine, and also the spruce.

  • His large grave is guarded by railings in the southeast corner of the churchyard, beneath the great yew.

  • A gnarly old yew tree reputed to be anywhere between 3000-5000 years old, it is the oldest living organism in the UK.

  • The large green lawn enclosed by a wall of yew hedges, provides a tranquil oasis in the heart of Stratford.

  • Vegetation: several yew trees of no great age are established within the churchyard.

  • His trees included the false larch, the Chinese plum yew, the umbrella pine and the Cryptomeria.

  • Unfortunately Queen Anne, who hated yew, had it all uprooted and redesigned the garden.

  • Archeologists have recently found well-preserved Yew wood carvings at ancient sites of springs and wells which were probably votive offerings.

  • Curved side planks were stitched to the bottom of the boat with twisted yew withies.

  • The earliest stone is of 1671 under a yew on the west side of the church.

  • Yews of lesser girth on east boundary and a 19thC yew on the north side of the graveyard.

  • The history of the sacred yew can be sketched in outline.

  • His grave is beside no church, neither under the shadow of any ancient yew.

  • Florence Court 's most notable tree, the Irish Yew, grows in a much wilder part of the estate.

  • More information 3rd February 2003 300 year old yew saved from the chop !

  • Carolyn and Carole planted some green yew (Taxus baccata) in these boxes.

  • Tuesday, September 07, 2004 Where have Yew been?

  • The boundary to the road consists of a low red brick wall planted with mature yew hedging.

  • The garden still contains a yew tree which he planted in 1645.

  • The yew woodland is an outstanding example of a habitat with a very small representation in Britain.

  • There is little sound except for the breeze stirring in the churchyard yew trees.

  • The body doesn't care about the source of chemicals broken down during digestion; a completely natural plant such as yew or foxglove can be poisonous, while a man-made aspirin, benign.

  • It would prove, I think, a good evergreen hedge plant where the dangerous poison of our own Yew makes its use impossible in any place to which horses or cattle have access.

  • Plumfruited Yew (Prumnopitys Elegans) - An evergreen tree from chili, allied to the common Yew, of dense growth and cheerful green color.

  • Podocarpus - Evergreen trees of the Yew tribe, tender in Britain save in the mildest parts.

  • Prince Alberts Yew (Saxegothoea Conspicua) - A Chilian evergreen tree of the Pine order.

  • At Castlewellan it is planted in a shady border near a large Yew hedge, in peat, leaf soil, and loam in equal proportions.

  • Some plants, such as the yew shrub, are almost entirely toxic: needles, bark, seeds, and berries.

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