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yeasts

yeasts Sentence Examples

  • Culture yeasts have also been successfully employed in the manufacture of wine and cider.

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  • Culture yeasts have also been successfully employed in the manufacture of wine and cider.

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  • In the United Kingdom the employment of brewery yeasts selected from a single cell has not come into general use; it may probably be accounted for in a great measure by conservatism and the wrong application of Hansen's theories.

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  • By this method several races of Saccharomycetes and brewery yeasts were isolated and described.

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  • The group has attained an importance of late even beyond that to which it was brought by Pasteur's researches on alcoholic fermentation, chiefly owing to the exact results of the investigations of Hansen, who first applied the methods of pure cultures to the study of these organisms, and showed that many of the inconsistencies hitherto existing in the literature were due to the coexistence in the cultures of several species or races of yeasts morphologically almost indistinguishable, but physiologically very different.

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  • Certain yeasts exercise a reducing action, forming sulphuretted hydrogen, when sulphur is present.

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  • Other yeasts are stated to form sulphurous acid in must and wort.

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  • moulds and yeasts - appear to be distributed all over the earth.

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  • Saccharomycetaceae include the well-known yeasts which belong mainly to the genus Saccharomyces.

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  • Physiologically, any cell or group of cells separated off from a hypha or unicellular fungus, and capable of itself growing out - germinating - to reproduce the fungus, is a spore; but it is evident that so wide a definition does not exclude the ordinary vegetative cells of sprouting fungi, such as yeasts, or small sclerotium like cell-aggregates of forms like Coniothecium.

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  • budding yeasts in anaerobic conditions but as mycelia in the presence of even low concentrations of oxygen.

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  • effective against clinically important strains of yeasts and fungi (Wright, Lam, Hansen & Burrell, 1999 ).

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  • Usually yeasts are grown on yeast glucose agar, other fungi on malt agar and bacteria on nutrient agar.

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  • inoculated with selected yeasts.

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  • microorganisms most commonly involved as probiotics are the Lactobacilli, Bifidobacteria, Streptococci and some yeasts and molds.

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  • Sporanox Pulse is indicated for the treatment of tinea pedis or tinea manuum and onychomycosis caused by dermatophytes or yeasts.

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  • They grow as budding yeasts in anaerobic conditions but as mycelia in the presence of even low concentrations of oxygen.

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  • It was not recognized that many of the diseases of fermented liquids are occasioned by foreign yeasts; moreover, this process, as was shown later by Hansen, favours the development of foreign yeasts at the expense of the good yeast.

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  • In the United Kingdom the employment of brewery yeasts selected from a single cell has not come into general use; it may probably be accounted for in a great measure by conservatism and the wrong application of Hansen's theories.

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  • By this method several races of Saccharomycetes and brewery yeasts were isolated and described.

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  • Division A comprises (a) the true Ascomycetes, of which the moulds Eurotium and Penicillium are examples, and (b) the Hemiasci, which includes the yeasts.

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  • cerevisiae, is never found wild, but the wine yeasts occur abundantly in the soil of vineyards, and so are always present on the fruit, ready to ferment the expressed juice.

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  • Certain yeasts exercise a reducing action, forming sulphuretted hydrogen, when sulphur is present.

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  • Other yeasts are stated to form sulphurous acid in must and wort.

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  • yeasts was by studying morphological differences with the aid of the microscope.

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  • Flux.A common event in the exudation of turbid, frothing liquids from wounds in the bark of trees, and the odours of putrefaction and even alcoholic fermentation in these are sufficiently explained by the coexistence of albuminous and saccharine matters with fungi, yeasts and bacteria in such fluxes.

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  • He examined the yeasts under the microscope, and at once saw that the globules from the sound beer were nearly spherical, whilst those from the sour beer were elongated; and this led him to a discovery, the consequences of which have revolutionized chemical as well as biological science, inasmuch as it was the beginning of that wonderful series of experimental researches in which he proved conclusively that the notion of spontaneous generation is a chimera.

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  • Many cancer-parasites have been described in cancerous growths, including bacteria, yeasts and protozoa, but the innumerable attempts made to demonstrate the causal infective organism have all completely failed.

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  • moulds and yeasts - appear to be distributed all over the earth.

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  • Among the enzymes already extracted from fungi are invertases (yeasts, moulds, &c.), which split cane-sugar and other complex sugars with hydrolysis into simpler sugars such as dextrose and levulose; diastases, which convert starches into sugars (Aspergillus, &c.); cytases, which dissolve cellulose similarly (Botrytis, &c.); peptases, using the term as a general one for all enzymes which convert proteids into peptones and other bodies (Penicillium, &c.); lipases, which break up fatty oils (Empusa, Phycomyces, &c.); oxydases, which bring about the oxidations and changes of colour observed in Boletus, and zymase, extracted by Buchner from yeast, which brings about the conversion of sugar into alcohol and carbondioxide.

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  • Physiologically, any cell or group of cells separated off from a hypha or unicellular fungus, and capable of itself growing out - germinating - to reproduce the fungus, is a spore; but it is evident that so wide a definition does not exclude the ordinary vegetative cells of sprouting fungi, such as yeasts, or small sclerotium like cell-aggregates of forms like Coniothecium.

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  • Saccharomycetaceae include the well-known yeasts which belong mainly to the genus Saccharomyces.

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  • The group has attained an importance of late even beyond that to which it was brought by Pasteur's researches on alcoholic fermentation, chiefly owing to the exact results of the investigations of Hansen, who first applied the methods of pure cultures to the study of these organisms, and showed that many of the inconsistencies hitherto existing in the literature were due to the coexistence in the cultures of several species or races of yeasts morphologically almost indistinguishable, but physiologically very different.

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  • The ordinary mycelium is the gametophyte since it hears the ascogonia and aritheridia when present; the cqe Two questions of great theoretical importance have been raised over and over again in connexion with yeasts, namely, (I) the morphological one as to whether yeasts are merely degraded forms of higher fungi, as would seem implied by their tendency to form elongated, hypha-like cells in the veils, and their development of "ascospores" as well as by the wide occurrence of yeast-like "sprouting forms" in other fungi (e.g.

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  • Numerous other cases of symbiosis have been discovered among the fungi of fermentation, of which those between Aspergillus and yeast in sake manufacture, and between yeasts and bacteria in kephir and in the ginger-beer plant are best worked out.

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  • Schizomycetes such as Clostridium, Plectridium, &c., where the sporiferous cells enlarge, bear out the same argument, and we must not forget that there are extremely minute " yeasts," easily mistaken for Micrococci, and that yeasts occasionally form only one spore in the cell.

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  • the Sereh disease of the sugar-cane, the slime fluxes of oaks and other trees, are not only very doubtful cases, in which other organisms such as yeasts and fungi play their parts, but it may be regarded as extremely improbable that the bacteria are the primary agents at all; they are doubtless saprophytic forms which have gained access to rotting tissues injured by other agents.

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  • 19, 20), where anaerobic bacteria are associated with yeasts, several interesting examples of symbiosis among bacteria are now known.

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  • Sporanox Pulse is indicated for the treatment of tinea pedis or tinea manuum and onychomycosis caused by dermatophytes or yeasts.

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  • This single-celled fungi is actually part of a vast group of fungi categorized as yeasts.

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  • Yeasts live in the air around us, the soil, and even inside our bodies.

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  • Nutritional Yeast: The king of dietary yeasts is nutritional yeast.

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  • There's no discernible difference in taste or quality among yeasts grown in different mixtures.

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  • The human body is riddled with bacteria and yeasts, many of which are harmless or even life-promoting.

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  • Sweetened black tea is fermented with the mushroom, which at this stage is the aforementioned culture of bacteria and yeasts and looks as though it was tipped straight from a Petri dish.

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  • One effective alternative approach to preventing and treating diarrhea involves oral supplementation of aspects of the normal flora in the colon with the yeasts Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bifidus, or Saccharomyces boulardii.

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  • These organisms include non-hemolytic and alpha-hemolytic streptococci, some Neisseria species, staphylococci, diphtheria and hemophilus organisms, pneumococci, yeasts, and Gram-negative rods.

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  • According to the inventor of this product, this mixture is capable of killing virtually every pathogen in the human body, including viruses, bacteria, molds, yeasts, and fungus.

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  • Well, for starters, the human body is loaded with naturally occurring bacteria, fungi, and yeasts.

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  • It's important to note that candida is one of many naturally occurring yeasts in the human digestive tract.

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  • Mold and yeasts can be the cause of nail fungus infections, but most often the group of fungi known to cause these conditions is known as dermatophytes.

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  • Among the enzymes already extracted from fungi are invertases (yeasts, moulds, &c.), which split cane-sugar and other complex sugars with hydrolysis into simpler sugars such as dextrose and levulose; diastases, which convert starches into sugars (Aspergillus, &c.); cytases, which dissolve cellulose similarly (Botrytis, &c.); peptases, using the term as a general one for all enzymes which convert proteids into peptones and other bodies (Penicillium, &c.); lipases, which break up fatty oils (Empusa, Phycomyces, &c.); oxydases, which bring about the oxidations and changes of colour observed in Boletus, and zymase, extracted by Buchner from yeast, which brings about the conversion of sugar into alcohol and carbondioxide.

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  • Schizomycetes such as Clostridium, Plectridium, &c., where the sporiferous cells enlarge, bear out the same argument, and we must not forget that there are extremely minute " yeasts," easily mistaken for Micrococci, and that yeasts occasionally form only one spore in the cell.

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  • the Sereh disease of the sugar-cane, the slime fluxes of oaks and other trees, are not only very doubtful cases, in which other organisms such as yeasts and fungi play their parts, but it may be regarded as extremely improbable that the bacteria are the primary agents at all; they are doubtless saprophytic forms which have gained access to rotting tissues injured by other agents.

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  • cerevisiae, is never found wild, but the wine yeasts occur abundantly in the soil of vineyards, and so are always present on the fruit, ready to ferment the expressed juice.

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