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yarns

yarns Sentence Examples

  • is said to have granted letters of protection to John Kemp, a Flemish weaver who settled in the town; and, although the coarse cloth known to Shakespeare as "Kendal green" is no longer made, its place is more than supplied by active manufactures of tweeds, railway rugs, horse clothing, knitted woollen caps and jackets, worsted and woollen yarns, and similar goods.

  • With regard to the imports into Russia-they consist mainly of raw materials and machinery for the manufactures, and of provisions, the principal items being raw cotton, 17% of the aggregate; machinery and metal goods, 13%; tea, 5%; mineral ores, 5%; gums and resins, 4%; wool and woollen yarns, 32%; textiles, 3%; fish, 3%; with leather and hides, chemicals, silks, wine and spirits, colours, fruits, coffee, tobacco and rice.

  • These special qualities are its fineness, strength, elasticity and great natural twist, which combined enable it to make very fine, strong yarns, suited to the manufacture of the better qualities of hosiery, for mixing with silk and wool, for making lace, &c. It also mercerizes very well.

  • These native cloths are exceedingly durable, and many of them are ornamented by using dyed yarns and in other ways: Southern Nigeria (Lagos) and northern Nigeria are the most important cotton countries amongst the British possessions on the coast.

  • During recent years a considerable quantity of cotton has been exported, but more than a compensating amount of raw cotton, yarns and textiles, is imported.

  • Yarns, textile goods and weaving industries generally have not attained any great dimensions, but there are large jute-spinning mills and factories for cotton-wool and cotton driving - belts.

  • Although the protective tariffs thus imposed have resulted in a large increase in manufacturing industries, some of them have been antagonistic to the productive interests of the country, as in the case of weaving mills which use imported yarns.

  • Other principal branches of industry are: tobacco manufactories, belonging to the state, tobacco being a government monopoly; iron foundries, mostly in the mining region; agricultural machinery and implements, notably at Budapest; leather manufactures; paper-mills, the largest at Fiume; glass (only the more common sort) and earthenwares; chemicals; wooden products; petroleum-refineries; woollen yarns and cloth manufactories, as well as several establishments of knitting and weaving.

  • The imports largely consist of railway material, industrial machinery, cotton, woollen and linen textiles and yarns for national factories, hardware, furniture, building material, mining supplies, drugs and chemicals, wines and spirits, wheat, Indian corn, paper and military supplies and e9uipment.

  • Its chief industry is the manufacture of tweeds and fine yarns, which, together with the fame of its medicinal springs, brought the burgh into prominence towards the end of the 18th century.

  • The metric system of weights and measures has been adopted so widely that it forms the most suitable basis for the titrage or counts of yarns.

  • The resulting sliver is used by silk spinners who make a speciality of spinning short fibres, and the exhaust noils are bought by those who spin them up into " noil yarns " on the same principle as wool.

  • The yarns are chiefly used by manufacturers of powder bags.

  • Each draft may be worked into a quality of its own, and by such means the most level yarns are obtained.

  • Weft Yarns.

  • Folded Yarns are hairy after being spun and folded, and in addition sometimes contain nibs and rough places.

  • The yarn is now ready for reeling into skeins or for warping, both of which operations are common to all the textile yarns.

  • The three chief syndicates, one each in Italy, France and Switzerland, work very much together, practically ruling the prices for yarns and raw materials.

  • Spinning mills are established, however, in most of the large Lancashire towns as well as in some parts of Cheshire and in Yorkshire, where there is a considerable industry in doubling yarns.

  • The demand for cloths which require careful handling and regularity in weaving has helped to develop the supply of ring yarns which will stand the strain of the loom better than mule twists.

  • A great amount of doubled and trebled yarn is now sold, though it does not appear that recent expansions have added much to doubling spindles, and considerable developments continue in the use of dyed and mercerized yarns.

  • Yarns are sold according to their "actual" counts, though when they are woven into cloth they frequently attain nominal or brevet rank.

  • The amount permissible, according to the recommendation of the Manchester Chamber of Commerce, is 8%, but while it may be assumed that yarns at the time of their sale rarely contain less than this, they frequently contain a good deal more.

  • It is a matter of experience that cotton yarns which when spun contain only a small percentage of moisture will absorb up to about 8% when they are exposed to what may be rather vaguely described as natural conditions.

  • £7 2.7 £66.6 During the earlier decade the prices of cotton were comparatively high The whole of the cloth exports represent, of course, a corresponding home trade in yarns.

  • The following table, taken from the Manchester Guardian, gives in thousands of lb the amounts of cotton yarns exported from Great Britain during 1903, 1904 and 1905 respectively, according to the Board of Trade returns, together with the average value per lb for each of the countries: It should be understood, however, that in some cases the Board of Trade figures represent only an approximation to the ultimate distribution, as the exports are sometimes assigned to the intermediate country, and in particular it is understood that a considerable part of the yarn sent to the Netherlands is destined for Germany or Austria.

  • The large business done in yarns with the continent of Europe is in some respects an extension of the British home trade, though certain countries have their own specialities.

  • A considerable business is done with European countries in doubled yarns and in fine counts of Egyptian, including "gassed" yarns, which are also sent intermittently to Japan.

  • "Extra hard" yarns are sent to Rumania and other Near Eastern markets, and Russia, as the average price indicates, buys sparingly of very fine yarns.

  • The various Indian markets take largely of 40 8 mule twist and in various proportions of 30 8 mule, water twists, two-folds grey and bleached, fine Egyptian counts and dyed yarns.

  • In the Mexican the yarns were originally of nearly the same weight and number of threads to the 4 in., an arrangement which gave the cloth an even appearance, thus differing from the "pin-head" or medium makes.

  • Raising-cloths are of various kinds and may be merely mediums with a heavy weft, or "condensor" weft made from waste yarns.

  • The finer kinds, made from Egyptian yarns, are called mull-dhooties.

  • Glasgow buys largely of yarns and cloth, some considerable part of which is dyed or printed, for India and elsewhere, and has an indigenous manufacture and trade in fine goods such as book-muslins and lappets, a somewhat delicate department of manufacture which necessitates a slower running of machinery than is usual in Lancashire.

  • Export buyers, attended by salesmen, are commonly more or less stationary and prominent; Burnley manufacturers abound in one locality and spinners of Egyptian yarns in another.

  • The trade in worsted and woollen yarns, which formerly furnished employment to a large section of the population, has now completely declined, partly owing to the introduction of Irish worsted.

  • A good market had been created for Indian products, particularly yarns and cereals.

  • Cotton manufactures and yarns are imported almost exclusively from the United Kingdom, and amount to about 40% of the total trade.

  • Japanese cotton yarns are imported to be woven into a strong cloth on Korean hand-looms. Beans and peas, rice, cowhides, and ginseng are the chief exports, apart from gold.

  • The exports are: - Cereals, cotton, cotton seed, dried fruits, drugs, fruit, gall nuts, gum tragacanth, liquorice root, maize, nuts, olive oil, opium, rice, sesame, sponges, storax, timber, tobacco, valonia, walnut wood, wine, yellow berries, carpets, cotton yarn, cocoons, hides, leather, mohair, silk, silk stuffs, rugs, wax, wool, leeches, live stock, minerals, &c. The imports are: - Coffee, cotton cloths, cotton goods, crockery, drysalteries, fezzes, glass-ware, haberdashery, hardware, henna, ironware, jute, linen goods, manufactured goods, matches, petroleum, salt, sugar, woollen goods, yarns, &c.

  • Although its manufacturing importance is now small in comparison with that of several other Yorkshire towns, it possesses mills for spinning worsted and carpet yarns, coco-nut fibre and China grass.

  • In physical structure alpaca is somewhat akin to hair, being very glossy, but its softness and fineness enable the spinner to produce satisfactory yarns with comparative ease.

  • Bradford is still the great spinning and manufacturing centre for alpacas, large quantities of yarns and cloths being exported annually to the continent and to the United States, although the quantities naturally vary in accordance with the fashions in vogue, the typical "alpaca-fabric" being a very characteristic "dress-fabric."

  • The following statistics, taken from Hooper's Statistics of the Woollen and Worsted Trades of the United Kingdom, give an idea of the extent of the trade in yarns and fabrics of the alpaca type; unfortunately statistics for alpaca alone are not published.

  • Exports of Mohair and Alpaca Yarns for T905.

  • When the fibre is intended for goods in the natural colour it is essential that it should be of a light shade and uniform, but if intended for yarns which are to be dyed a dark shade, the colour is not so important.

  • Naraingunge is a strong fibre, possesses good spinning qualities, and is very suitable for good warp yarns.

  • All the better class yarns are spun from these two kinds.

  • It is, however, a valuable fibre for carpet yarns, especially for dark yarns.

  • The real cause of most of these objections was the fact that suitable machinery and methods of treatment had not been developed for preparing yarns from this useful fibre.

  • Indeed, it was not until Mr. Rowan got the Dutch government, about 1838, to substitute jute yarns for those made from flax in the manufacture of the coffee bagging for their East Indian possessions, that the jute trade in Dundee got a proper start.

  • The demand for this class of bagging, which is made from fine hessian yarns, is still great.

  • These fine Rio hessian yarns form an important branch of the Dundee trade, and in some weeks during 1906 as many as 1000 bales were despatched to Brazil, besides numerous quantities to other parts of the world.

  • For very heavy jute yarns the spinning frame is not used - the desired amount of twist being given at the roving frame.

  • The finest yarns weigh 22 lb to 3 lb per spyndle, but the commonest kinds are 7 Ib, 8 lb, 9 lb and io lb per spyndle.

  • with worsted in the various kinds of carpets, with cotton in tapestries and household cloths, with line and tow yarns for the same fabrics and for paddings, &c., and with wool for horse clothing.

  • The yarns are capable of being dyed brilliant colours, but, unfortunately, the colours are not very fast to light.

  • A Persian gentleman erected a cotton-spinning factory at Teheran in 1894 with expensive machinery; it turned out some excellent yarn but could not compete in price with imported yarns.

  • The cloth manufacture is located at Reichenberg; Rumburg and Trautenau are the centre of the linen industry; woollen yarns are made at Aussig and Asch.

  • There are also mills for flax and hemp yarns, a weaving factory and a hosiery factory.

  • A monopoly of bleaching was granted to the town, and thus a considerable trade in woollen and linen yarns was attracted to Chemnitz; paper was made here, and in the 16th century the manufacture of cloth was very flourishing.

  • The principal items of import are cotton yarns, metals, sugar, petroleum and coal; of export, silk, representing in value 34% of the total exports, cotton, tea, rice, hides and skins, wool, wheat and beans.

  • In 1830 the Linen Board ceased to exist, the trade having been for some time in a very depressed condition owing to the importation of machine-made yarns from Scotland and England.

  • The bottom of the cell is formed by those threads and picks which weave "plain," while the ascending sides of the figure are formed by the gradually increasing length of float of the warp and weft yarns.

  • The hemp fibre has always been valuable for the rope industry, and it was at one time very extensively used in the production of yarns for the manufacture of sail cloth, sheeting, covers, bagging, sacking, &c. Much of the finer quality is still made into cloth, but almost all the coarser quality finds its way into ropes and similar material.

  • Hemp yarns are also used in certain classes of carpets, for special bags for use in cop dyeing and for similar special purposes, but for the ordinary bagging and sacking the employment of hemp yarns has been almost entirely supplanted by yarns made from the jute fibre.

  • dyed yarns, banding and labels.

  • eyelash yarns which are perfect for scarves and hats, ponchos and shrugs.

  • The script is admittedly hackneyed, but amiably so - like the best boy's own adventure yarns of old.

  • Everyone enjoyed weaving squares of textured yarns which were then sewn into a colorful hanging.

  • hawser-laid ropes are made from three strands of the twisted yarns and are produced in sizes from 2.5 cm diameter upwards.

  • knitting yarns is color.

  • A collection of medium and heavy fancy acrylic and mixture yarns with self twist knops.

  • ply of the yarns that were wrapped round the bobbins.

  • revolving hooks are turned either by hand or by a small motor, twisting the yarns together to form a strand.

  • ripstop fabric using densely packed 70 denier yarns for strength and low weight.

  • By blending the highest quality yarns along with our highly skilled design team only products of the highest quality are produced.

  • spinning yarns to patients about what is going on in their bodies is putting them first?

  • storybook characters, yarns picked out of the books of Hemingway.

  • Peel's youthful yarns of family and (public) school excel at an edgy English surrealism: Waugh meets Python.

  • swapping yarns in the village inn.

  • Weave in the weft, embroider, tassel and braid with these twinkling yarns or add embellishment to your knitwear.

  • twinkling yarns or add embellishment to your knitwear.

  • warp yarns must be assembled onto a beam.

  • worsted yarns however, are made up of longer fibers with a higher twist.

  • A range of naturally dyed yarns are also available.

  • Due to ' very ' popular demand we are now stocking the fabulous Lana Grossa sock yarns.

  • Do you think that spinning yarns... Of course it is.

  • worsted yarns however, are made up of longer fibers with a higher twist.

  • Chic is a gorgeous and luxurious version of the extremely popular eyelash yarns which are perfect for scarves and hats, ponchos and shrugs.

  • is said to have granted letters of protection to John Kemp, a Flemish weaver who settled in the town; and, although the coarse cloth known to Shakespeare as "Kendal green" is no longer made, its place is more than supplied by active manufactures of tweeds, railway rugs, horse clothing, knitted woollen caps and jackets, worsted and woollen yarns, and similar goods.

  • With regard to the imports into Russia-they consist mainly of raw materials and machinery for the manufactures, and of provisions, the principal items being raw cotton, 17% of the aggregate; machinery and metal goods, 13%; tea, 5%; mineral ores, 5%; gums and resins, 4%; wool and woollen yarns, 32%; textiles, 3%; fish, 3%; with leather and hides, chemicals, silks, wine and spirits, colours, fruits, coffee, tobacco and rice.

  • These special qualities are its fineness, strength, elasticity and great natural twist, which combined enable it to make very fine, strong yarns, suited to the manufacture of the better qualities of hosiery, for mixing with silk and wool, for making lace, &c. It also mercerizes very well.

  • These native cloths are exceedingly durable, and many of them are ornamented by using dyed yarns and in other ways: Southern Nigeria (Lagos) and northern Nigeria are the most important cotton countries amongst the British possessions on the coast.

  • During recent years a considerable quantity of cotton has been exported, but more than a compensating amount of raw cotton, yarns and textiles, is imported.

  • Yarns, textile goods and weaving industries generally have not attained any great dimensions, but there are large jute-spinning mills and factories for cotton-wool and cotton driving - belts.

  • Although the protective tariffs thus imposed have resulted in a large increase in manufacturing industries, some of them have been antagonistic to the productive interests of the country, as in the case of weaving mills which use imported yarns.

  • Other principal branches of industry are: tobacco manufactories, belonging to the state, tobacco being a government monopoly; iron foundries, mostly in the mining region; agricultural machinery and implements, notably at Budapest; leather manufactures; paper-mills, the largest at Fiume; glass (only the more common sort) and earthenwares; chemicals; wooden products; petroleum-refineries; woollen yarns and cloth manufactories, as well as several establishments of knitting and weaving.

  • The imports largely consist of railway material, industrial machinery, cotton, woollen and linen textiles and yarns for national factories, hardware, furniture, building material, mining supplies, drugs and chemicals, wines and spirits, wheat, Indian corn, paper and military supplies and e9uipment.

  • Its chief industry is the manufacture of tweeds and fine yarns, which, together with the fame of its medicinal springs, brought the burgh into prominence towards the end of the 18th century.

  • The metric system of weights and measures has been adopted so widely that it forms the most suitable basis for the titrage or counts of yarns.

  • The resulting sliver is used by silk spinners who make a speciality of spinning short fibres, and the exhaust noils are bought by those who spin them up into " noil yarns " on the same principle as wool.

  • The yarns are chiefly used by manufacturers of powder bags.

  • Each draft may be worked into a quality of its own, and by such means the most level yarns are obtained.

  • Weft Yarns.

  • Folded Yarns are hairy after being spun and folded, and in addition sometimes contain nibs and rough places.

  • The yarn is now ready for reeling into skeins or for warping, both of which operations are common to all the textile yarns.

  • The three chief syndicates, one each in Italy, France and Switzerland, work very much together, practically ruling the prices for yarns and raw materials.

  • Spinning mills are established, however, in most of the large Lancashire towns as well as in some parts of Cheshire and in Yorkshire, where there is a considerable industry in doubling yarns.

  • The demand for cloths which require careful handling and regularity in weaving has helped to develop the supply of ring yarns which will stand the strain of the loom better than mule twists.

  • A great amount of doubled and trebled yarn is now sold, though it does not appear that recent expansions have added much to doubling spindles, and considerable developments continue in the use of dyed and mercerized yarns.

  • Yarns are sold according to their "actual" counts, though when they are woven into cloth they frequently attain nominal or brevet rank.

  • There has been a longcontinued discussion, which between buyer and seller sometimes degenerates into a dispute, on the subject of moisture in yarns, and the difficulty is not confined to the Lancashire industry.

  • The amount permissible, according to the recommendation of the Manchester Chamber of Commerce, is 8%, but while it may be assumed that yarns at the time of their sale rarely contain less than this, they frequently contain a good deal more.

  • It is a matter of experience that cotton yarns which when spun contain only a small percentage of moisture will absorb up to about 8% when they are exposed to what may be rather vaguely described as natural conditions.

  • £7 2.7 £66.6 During the earlier decade the prices of cotton were comparatively high The whole of the cloth exports represent, of course, a corresponding home trade in yarns.

  • The following table, taken from the Manchester Guardian, gives in thousands of lb the amounts of cotton yarns exported from Great Britain during 1903, 1904 and 1905 respectively, according to the Board of Trade returns, together with the average value per lb for each of the countries: It should be understood, however, that in some cases the Board of Trade figures represent only an approximation to the ultimate distribution, as the exports are sometimes assigned to the intermediate country, and in particular it is understood that a considerable part of the yarn sent to the Netherlands is destined for Germany or Austria.

  • The large business done in yarns with the continent of Europe is in some respects an extension of the British home trade, though certain countries have their own specialities.

  • A considerable business is done with European countries in doubled yarns and in fine counts of Egyptian, including "gassed" yarns, which are also sent intermittently to Japan.

  • "Extra hard" yarns are sent to Rumania and other Near Eastern markets, and Russia, as the average price indicates, buys sparingly of very fine yarns.

  • The various Indian markets take largely of 40 8 mule twist and in various proportions of 30 8 mule, water twists, two-folds grey and bleached, fine Egyptian counts and dyed yarns.

  • In the Mexican the yarns were originally of nearly the same weight and number of threads to the 4 in., an arrangement which gave the cloth an even appearance, thus differing from the "pin-head" or medium makes.

  • Raising-cloths are of various kinds and may be merely mediums with a heavy weft, or "condensor" weft made from waste yarns.

  • The finer kinds, made from Egyptian yarns, are called mull-dhooties.

  • Among the miscellaneous cloths made or made partly of cotton may be mentioned: waste cloths, made from waste yarns and usually coarse in texture; khaki cloth, made largely for military clothing in cotton as well as in woollen; cottonade, a name given to various coarse low cloths in the United States and elsewhere; lasting, which seems to be an abbreviation of "lasting cloth," a stiff, durable texture used in making shoes, &c.; bolting cloth, used in bolting or sifting; brattice cloth, a stout, tarred cloth made of cotton or wool and used for bratticing or lining the sides of shafts in mines; sponge cloths, used for cleaning machinery; shoddy and mungo, which though mainly woollen have frequently a cotton admixture; and splits, either plain or fancy, usually of low quality, which include any cloth woven two or three in the breadth of the loom and "split" into the necessary width.

  • Glasgow buys largely of yarns and cloth, some considerable part of which is dyed or printed, for India and elsewhere, and has an indigenous manufacture and trade in fine goods such as book-muslins and lappets, a somewhat delicate department of manufacture which necessitates a slower running of machinery than is usual in Lancashire.

  • Export buyers, attended by salesmen, are commonly more or less stationary and prominent; Burnley manufacturers abound in one locality and spinners of Egyptian yarns in another.

  • The trade in worsted and woollen yarns, which formerly furnished employment to a large section of the population, has now completely declined, partly owing to the introduction of Irish worsted.

  • A good market had been created for Indian products, particularly yarns and cereals.

  • Cotton manufactures and yarns are imported almost exclusively from the United Kingdom, and amount to about 40% of the total trade.

  • Japanese cotton yarns are imported to be woven into a strong cloth on Korean hand-looms. Beans and peas, rice, cowhides, and ginseng are the chief exports, apart from gold.

  • The exports are: - Cereals, cotton, cotton seed, dried fruits, drugs, fruit, gall nuts, gum tragacanth, liquorice root, maize, nuts, olive oil, opium, rice, sesame, sponges, storax, timber, tobacco, valonia, walnut wood, wine, yellow berries, carpets, cotton yarn, cocoons, hides, leather, mohair, silk, silk stuffs, rugs, wax, wool, leeches, live stock, minerals, &c. The imports are: - Coffee, cotton cloths, cotton goods, crockery, drysalteries, fezzes, glass-ware, haberdashery, hardware, henna, ironware, jute, linen goods, manufactured goods, matches, petroleum, salt, sugar, woollen goods, yarns, &c.

  • Although its manufacturing importance is now small in comparison with that of several other Yorkshire towns, it possesses mills for spinning worsted and carpet yarns, coco-nut fibre and China grass.

  • In physical structure alpaca is somewhat akin to hair, being very glossy, but its softness and fineness enable the spinner to produce satisfactory yarns with comparative ease.

  • Bradford is still the great spinning and manufacturing centre for alpacas, large quantities of yarns and cloths being exported annually to the continent and to the United States, although the quantities naturally vary in accordance with the fashions in vogue, the typical "alpaca-fabric" being a very characteristic "dress-fabric."

  • The following statistics, taken from Hooper's Statistics of the Woollen and Worsted Trades of the United Kingdom, give an idea of the extent of the trade in yarns and fabrics of the alpaca type; unfortunately statistics for alpaca alone are not published.

  • Exports of Mohair and Alpaca Yarns for T905.

  • When the fibre is intended for goods in the natural colour it is essential that it should be of a light shade and uniform, but if intended for yarns which are to be dyed a dark shade, the colour is not so important.

  • Naraingunge is a strong fibre, possesses good spinning qualities, and is very suitable for good warp yarns.

  • All the better class yarns are spun from these two kinds.

  • It is, however, a valuable fibre for carpet yarns, especially for dark yarns.

  • The real cause of most of these objections was the fact that suitable machinery and methods of treatment had not been developed for preparing yarns from this useful fibre.

  • Indeed, it was not until Mr. Rowan got the Dutch government, about 1838, to substitute jute yarns for those made from flax in the manufacture of the coffee bagging for their East Indian possessions, that the jute trade in Dundee got a proper start.

  • The demand for this class of bagging, which is made from fine hessian yarns, is still great.

  • These fine Rio hessian yarns form an important branch of the Dundee trade, and in some weeks during 1906 as many as 1000 bales were despatched to Brazil, besides numerous quantities to other parts of the world.

  • For very heavy jute yarns the spinning frame is not used - the desired amount of twist being given at the roving frame.

  • The finest yarns weigh 22 lb to 3 lb per spyndle, but the commonest kinds are 7 Ib, 8 lb, 9 lb and io lb per spyndle.

  • with worsted in the various kinds of carpets, with cotton in tapestries and household cloths, with line and tow yarns for the same fabrics and for paddings, &c., and with wool for horse clothing.

  • The yarns are capable of being dyed brilliant colours, but, unfortunately, the colours are not very fast to light.

  • A Persian gentleman erected a cotton-spinning factory at Teheran in 1894 with expensive machinery; it turned out some excellent yarn but could not compete in price with imported yarns.

  • The cloth manufacture is located at Reichenberg; Rumburg and Trautenau are the centre of the linen industry; woollen yarns are made at Aussig and Asch.

  • There are also mills for flax and hemp yarns, a weaving factory and a hosiery factory.

  • A monopoly of bleaching was granted to the town, and thus a considerable trade in woollen and linen yarns was attracted to Chemnitz; paper was made here, and in the 16th century the manufacture of cloth was very flourishing.

  • The principal items of import are cotton yarns, metals, sugar, petroleum and coal; of export, silk, representing in value 34% of the total exports, cotton, tea, rice, hides and skins, wool, wheat and beans.

  • In 1830 the Linen Board ceased to exist, the trade having been for some time in a very depressed condition owing to the importation of machine-made yarns from Scotland and England.

  • ($12,035,854) in 1905; yarns for sale, 24,859,616 lb ($3,461,090) in 1900 and 31,645,397 lb ($6,217,795) in 1905; drills, 116,467,224 sq.

  • The bottom of the cell is formed by those threads and picks which weave "plain," while the ascending sides of the figure are formed by the gradually increasing length of float of the warp and weft yarns.

  • The hemp fibre has always been valuable for the rope industry, and it was at one time very extensively used in the production of yarns for the manufacture of sail cloth, sheeting, covers, bagging, sacking, &c. Much of the finer quality is still made into cloth, but almost all the coarser quality finds its way into ropes and similar material.

  • Hemp yarns are also used in certain classes of carpets, for special bags for use in cop dyeing and for similar special purposes, but for the ordinary bagging and sacking the employment of hemp yarns has been almost entirely supplanted by yarns made from the jute fibre.

  • The revolving hooks are turned either by hand or by a small motor, twisting the yarns together to form a strand.

  • Ardura 70D is a high density ripstop fabric using densely packed 70 denier yarns for strength and low weight.

  • By blending the highest quality yarns along with our highly skilled design team only products of the highest quality are produced.

  • Do you think that spinning yarns to patients about what is going on in their bodies is putting them first?

  • These people are storybook characters, yarns picked out of the books of Hemingway.

  • Peel 's youthful yarns of family and (public) school excel at an edgy English surrealism: Waugh meets Python.

  • Its a village with a strong sense of community where locals sit swapping yarns in the village inn.

  • Weave in the weft, embroider, tassel and braid with these twinkling yarns or add embellishment to your knitwear.

  • Before weaving can commence the warp yarns must be assembled onto a beam.

  • Worsted yarns however, are made up of longer fibers with a higher twist.

  • A range of naturally dyed yarns are also available.

  • Due to ' very ' popular demand we are now stocking the fabulous Lana Grossa sock yarns.

  • Do you think that spinning yarns... Of course it is.

  • A distinctive feature is the single wefted edges -- a weft is a piece of yarn that is horizontally integrated over and under vertical "warp" yarns to create rows.

  • Chemicals are sometimes used in the preparation of fibers, for instance chemical dyes are sometimes used to color yarns and fabrics.

  • Turmeric has been used as dye for fabrics of all kinds as well yarns.

  • These include thick pile rugs or short twisted yarns.

  • There is a big difference in designs printed on a rug and those woven into the rug by using different colored yarns.

  • Wool, silk, or silk and wool blends are common fiber yarns used in oriental rugs.

  • Contemporary: Many contemporary rugs are made from expensive fibers like wool and silk, but you can also find them made of synthetic yarns such as acrylic, olefin, polyester, or a yarn blend.

  • Nylon yarns are a memory fiber that helps to keep its shape (twist).

  • Worsted spun yarns, used to create worsted fabric are spun from wool fibers that have been combed in a deliberate way to insure that the fibers all run in the same direction and remain parallel.

  • The result is stronger, softer more lustrous yarns that accept color with the greatest clarity.

  • You can also find fuzzy styles, made from interesting yarns to make them look like boas.

  • There are tons of great knitting patterns available, and nearly every yarn manufacturer offers wonderful yarns made of polyester or wool blends.

  • Michaels Crafts carries Lion Brand Yarns which are inexpensive and come in a lot of great colors.

  • Since the fibers are so long, they are ideal for creating the yarns used in large pieces of fabrics, such as sheets and comforters.

  • The manufacturing of chenille fabric is a unique process that involves placing short lengths of yarn between two "core yarns" and then twisting the yarn together.

  • Technically, the weave is created by using at least four yarns of what's known as cool fill or weft yarns.

  • These yarns are woven in a way that they "float over" or are drawn through a single weft yarn.

  • A knitter should be sure to choose yarns that will not irritate sensitive baby skin unless she already knows that the child for whom she is making a garment can wear virtually any material next to his or her skin.

  • The ASI intends for the scholarship to promote awareness of the variety and versatility of wool fabrics and yarns and to encourage personal creativity and fashionable expression.

  • Today, beaded jewelry designers have become much more adventurous and unique beaded jewelry can be created in fabrics and yarns, from natural materials such as seeds and nuts through to precious gold or gemstones.

  • El Pine Socks are made from rugged 3-ply yarns made from a blend of wool, nylon and spandex.

  • Unlike fabrics, which are still pretty limited in fiber type, yarns can be found in a variety of organic fibers.

  • While these yarns are more expensive than basic acrylic yarns, a single ball of yarn will make several pairs of socks.

  • Depending on your project, however, there are other yarns that can be substituted with excellent results.

  • Bernat no longer manufactures organic yarns, but they do have suggestion substitutions if you are willing to use conventional yarn.

  • Eco-Butterfly manufactures a wide variety of organic cotton yarns.

  • Lion Brand is another large, conventional company that has begun to manufacture organic yarns.

  • While you may not be able to get the exact Bernat yarn you wanted, there are many other companies producing high quality organic cotton yarns.

  • The cotton for these yarns is grown on organic farms in India.

  • Rowan has partnered with Biore of Switzerland to make the yarns traceable to the individual grower.

  • Blue Sky manufactures two different kinds of yarns.

  • These yarns are soft and luxurious, although not labeled organic.

  • You can find a list of retailers that carry Blue Sky Alpaca Yarns at the Blue Sky Alpaca homepage.

  • Also, if spandex is blended with other yarns it may change the "breathability" of the fabric.

  • It is created by knitting together adjacent, parallel yarns.

  • The use of PBT yarns ensure that these suits will retain their shape, providing necessary stretch with superior comfort.

  • Whether you're a purist who only want to knit with natural fibers like wool and alpaca or a wild child who loves the novelty yarns, there is truly something for every taste available at your local yarn shop.

  • Knit Picks has a variety of unique yarns and knitting essentials.

  • Annie's Attic many different types of yarns for knitting and crochet.

  • Halcyon carries yarns as well as fibers for spinning.

  • Yarns come in many price ranges, but keep in mind that cheap yarn is sometimes rougher than the more expensive types.

  • For instance, if you know that you need a bulky yarn, you automatically eliminate all those yarns that don't look bulky.

  • For big fluffy wooly yarns you'll probably only need one skein of yarn, but you might need more than one if the skeins are small.

  • Inside this bag was a collection of yarns of many different colors: reds, yellows, purples, and lots of neutrals, too.

  • You won't be able to find alpaca, angora or other special luxury yarns at a mega store.

  • It's easy to browse yarns on this site by brand, fiber content, texture, color and gauge, which is very cool when you've got an old pattern designed for yarn that is no longer available.

  • The yarns are high quality and much cheaper than similar yarns you could buy elsewhere.

  • Hello Knitty is a fun site with interesting patterns and a good collection of boutique yarns.

  • Cool Woolz offers shoppers a variety of choices in knitting supplies, yarns, and patterns.

  • The Yarn Warehouse manufactures quality hand knitting yarns.

  • The yarns are spun in the traditional manner at New Lanark in Scotland, using 100% Pure New Wool in Aran and double-knitting yarn.

  • Angel Yarns is billed as Europe's largest online yarn store.

  • Besides a large knitting supply, Angel Yarns also features a newsletter, patterns, and even a forum for sharing tips and ideas.

  • Choose yarns that are soft, yet durable.

  • Sock yarns have become much more interesting over recent years.

  • At one time, sock yarns were only available in single, muted colors.

  • One of the most popular yarns used when knitting socks is self-striping or self-patterning yarns.

  • These clever yarns give the illusion of Fair Isle or other patterned stitches when worked.

  • Super fine yarn also includes fingering and baby weight yarns.

  • Luxury yarns such as cashmere or cashmere blends are available and increasingly popular.

  • Some luxury yarns have to be hand washed, making them impractical for socks.

  • Many sock yarns are made from 'superwash' wool, which means that it has been preshrunk.

  • The introduction of fancy yarns, or colored yarns can transform a basic garment into something a little special.

  • No Fringe Poncho: Basic design using fancy yarns to great effect.

  • However, if this is not an issue, soft fine mohairs and other quality yarns can make a beautiful garment.

  • Therefore when working with bulky yarns, make sure that are knitting to the correct tension and not knitting too tight.

  • Acrylic: This is the most popular fiber for Red Heart yarns.

  • You can also use these incredibly economical yarns for charity knitting.

  • Some suggested yarns are wool or acrylic, but it's up to you what type of yarn you want to use.

  • Candy corn crocheted from a variety of yarns provides decorations in the same bright colors without the sweetness and stickiness of the candy.

  • Metallic yarns or yarns with bits of foil also lend themselves to robots; however, furry or hairy yarns with metallic elements will not be as effective as smooth yarn with no pile.

  • Bulky yarns work nicely for oversized crocheted dogs.

  • Just make sure to select a hook size that gives you tight crochet stitches so that the stuffing does not show or work out through the stitches.Fuzzy or hairy yarns make long-haired canines.

  • Variegated yarns can give a brindle pattern to the dog's coat.

  • Silk crepe, or crepe de chine, is a heavier weight, comprised of tightly twisted silk yarns.

  • Choose luxurious yarns and elegant colors for a treasured gift.

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