Xenophon sentence example

xenophon
  • 2-9; Xenophon, Hellenica, iv.
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  • ARAS, the anc. Araxes, and the Phasis of Xenophon (Turk.
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  • From Socrates, in Xenophon's Memorabilia, downwards, the argument is tolerably common; it is notable in Cicero; in the modern discussion it dominates the 18th-century mode of thought, is confidently appealed to though not worked out by Butler, and is fully stated by Paley.
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  • On the Mesopotamian side there would seem, from the accounts of Xenophon and Ptolemy, to have been an affluent which joined the Euphrates between Deir and `Ana, called Araxes by the former, Saocoras by the latter; but no trace of such a stream has been found by modern explorers and the country in general has always been uninhabited.
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  • See Plutarch, De Malignitate Herodoti, 26; Xenophon, Anab.
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  • - Last year and this I read St John's Gospel, with part of Xenophon's Cyropaedia, the Iliad, and Herodotus; but, upon the whole, I rather neglected my Greek."
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  • He deepened and extended his acquaintance with Greek, particularly with his favourite authors Homer and Xenophon; and, to crown all, he succeeded in achieving the third perusal of Blackstone's Commentaries.
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  • The didactic novel of Xenophon, the Cyropaedia, is a free invention adapted to the purposes of the author, based upon the account of Herodotus and occasionally influenced by Ctesias, without any independent traditional element.
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  • The army of Nabonidus was defeated; Babylon itself attempted no resistance, but surrendered on the 16th Tishri (loth of October) 539, to the Persian general Gobryas (Gaubaruva, see the chronicle of the reign of Nabonidus; the name Gobryas is preserved also by Xenophon, Cyrop. vii.
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  • He therefore deserves the homage which Xenophon paid to him in choosing him as hero for his didactic novel.
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  • Cyrus had 10,400 Greek hoplites and 2500 peltasts, and besides an Asiatic army under the command of Ariaeus, for which Xenophon gives the absurd number of ioo,000 men; the army of Artaxerxes he puts down at 900,000.
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  • The history of Cyrus and of the retreat of the Greeks is told by Xenophon in his Anabasis (where he tries to veil the actual participation of the Spartans).
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  • 19.27, viii.; Xenophon, Hellenica, i.
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  • Scanty information on its agriculture is to be derived from the Works and Days of Hesiod (about the 8th century B.C.), the Oeconomicus of Xenophon (4th century B.C.), the History of Plants and the Origin of Plants of Theophrastus (4th century B.C.).
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  • 8, called Tanyoxarces; by Xenophon, Cyrop. viii.
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  • He is said to have written the history of his consulship and the Cimbrian War after the manner of Xenophon; two epigrams by him have been preserved, one on Roscius the celebrated actor (Cicero, De Nat.
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  • His translation of Xenophon's Cyropaedia into Latin cannot be praised for accuracy.
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  • In the book as we have it there is no orderly exposition of a theory; it rather has the appearance of a collection of remarks jotted down by a pupil (somewhat after the manner of Xenophon's Memorabilia), or of extracts from a sage's notebook.
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  • (2) The fifth and fourth centuries: the "Constitution of Athens," ascribed to Xenophon; W.
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  • 19, 60; Xenophon, Hellenica, V.
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  • Columella, like Xenophon, favours a certain friendliness and familiarity in one's intercourse with his farm slaves.
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  • Xenophon makes no mention of the peach, though the Ten Thousand must have traversed the country where, according to some, the peach is native; but Theophrastus, a hundred years later, does speak of it as a Persian fruit, and De Candolle suggests that it might have been introduced into Greece by Alexander.
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  • By the earlier Greek authors (Herodotus, Thucydides and often in Xenophon) it is rendered by i»rapxos lieutenant, governor," in the documents from Babylonia and Egypt and in Ezra and Nehemiah by pakha, " governor "; and the satrap Mazaeus of Cilicia and Syria in the time of Darius III.
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  • Xenophon, Anab.
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  • Xenophon >>
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  • His other works include a Vie de Socrate (1650), a translation of the Cyropaedia of Xenophon (1658), and the Traite de la peinture parlance (1684).
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  • Xenophon found a queen in power, and no opposition was offered to the march of Cyrus.
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  • 14.8), Kar-Duniyas may have represented the Median Wall of Xenophon (Anab.
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  • He was called "Xenophon the younger" from his imitation of that writer, and he even speaks of himself as Xenophon.
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  • It was under the Lacedaemonian power when the Ten Thousand, exasperated by the conduct of the governor, made themselves masters of the city, and would have pillaged it had they not been dissuaded by the eloquence of Xenophon.
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  • These inaccessible slopes were inhabited even in Strabo's time by wild, half-barbarous tribes, of whose ethnical relations we are ignorant - the Chalybes (identified by the Greeks with Homer's Chalybes), Tibareni, Mosynoeci and Macrones, on whose manners and condition some light is thrown by Xenophon (Anab.
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  • The sea-coast, like the rest of the south shore of the Euxine, was studded with Greek colonies founded from the 6th century onwards: Amisus, a colony of Miletus, which in the 5th century received a body of Athenian settlers, now the port of Samsun; Cotyora, now Ordu; Cerasus, the later Pharnacia, now Kerasund; and Trapezus (Trebizond), a famous city from Xenophon's time till the end of the middle ages.
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  • In 355 his advance temporarily ceased, but, as we learn from Isocrates and Xenophon, the financial exhaustion of the league was such that its destruction was only a matter of time.
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  • 32-73; Xenophon, Hellenica, vi., vii.; Polybius ii.
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  • we are comparatively well informed from Greek sources; for the earlier part of his reign from Ctesias and Xenophon (Anabasis), for the later times from Dinon of Ephesus, the historian of the Persians (from whom the account of Justin is derived), from Ephorus (whose account is quoted by Diodorus) and others.
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  • He never mentions his authorities, but amongst authors still extant he used Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Polybius, Diodorus, Plutarch, Frontinus and Suetonius; amongst authors of whom only fragments now remain he drew upon Ctesias, Ephorus, Timaeus, Phylarchus and Nicolaus Damascenus.
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  • From Xenophon's Memorabilia he learned when a boy the Socratic method of argument.
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  • 134, v.; Xenophon, Hellenica, iv.-vii.; Diodorus xv.
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  • The word 6 uXia from iatXEiv (buou, Eau)), meaning communion, intercourse, and especially interchange of thought and feeling by means of words (conversation), was early employed in classical Greek to denote the instruction which a philosopher gave to his pupils in familiar talk (Xenophon, Memorabilia, I.
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  • Xenophon (Hellenica, i., ii.) was an eye-witness in 406-403, but is clearly inaccurate in his details and prejudiced throughout.
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  • According to ancient authors (Herodotus, Xenophon, Strabo, &c.), the Bithynians were an immigrant Thracian tribe.
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  • Historians (to): Thucydides, Herodotus, Xenophon, Philistius, Theopompus, Ephorus, Anaximenes, Callisthenes, Hellanicus, Polybius.
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  • The Greek authors were Homer, Hesiod, Pindar and the dramatists, with Herodotus, Xenophon and Plato, Isocrates and Demosthenes, Plutarch and Arrian.
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  • The approximate value from capitha = 2 Attic choenices (Xenophon) warrants us in taking the achane as fixed in the following system, which places it closely in accord with the preceding.
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  • The Persian silver coinage shows about 86.0; the danak was 1/3 of this or 28.7, Xenophon and others state it at about 84.
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  • Among the Greeks, Aristotle (384-322 B.C.) Xenophon (430-357 B.C.) and Strabo (63 B.C.-A.D.
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  • Atargatis is said to have had sacred fish at Askelon, and from Xenophon we read that the fish of the Chalus were regarded as gods.
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  • If, as generally admitted, the ruins of Mespila and Larissa " described " by Xenophon, Anab.
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  • 40) and to his God (Xenophon, Symp. iv.
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  • He gradually became a logician out of his previous studies: out of metaphysics, for with him being is always the basis of thinking, and common principles, such as that of contradiction, are axioms of things before axioms of thought, while categories are primarily things signified by names; out of the mathematics of the Pythagoreans and the Platonists, which taught him the nature of demonstration; out of the physics, of which he imbibed the first draughts from his father, which taught him induction from sense and the modification of strict demonstration to suit facts; out of the dialectic between man and man which provided him with beautiful examples of inference in the Socratic dialogues of Xenophon and Plato; out of the rhetoric addressed to large audiences, which with dialectic called his attention to probable inferences; out of the grammar taught with rhetoric and poetics which led him to the logic of the proposition.
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  • Her models are Thucydides, Polybius and Xenophon, and her style exhibits the striving after Atticism characteristic of the period, with the result that the language is highly artificial.
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  • 168; Thucydides i.-iii.; Xenophon, Hellenica, vi.
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  • The site is now partly occupied by Dineir (q.v., sometimes locally known also as Geiklar, " the gazelles," perhaps from a tradition of the Persian hunting-park, seen by Xenophon at Celaenae), which is connected with Smyrna by railway; there are considerable remains, including a great number of important Graeco-Roman inscriptions.
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  • Xenophon does not use it.
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  • The expedition of Cyrus the Younger, with which Xenophon has made us so familar, only skirted the left bank of the Euphrates.
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  • In Xenophon's Anabasis it is mentioned as in the kingdom of the Thracian prince Seuthes.
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  • Xenophon says it was subdued by the Assyrians; Curtius that 6000 Hyrcanians were in the army of Darius III.
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  • Thucydides, Sophocles and Herodotus followed in 1502; Xenophon's Hellenics and Euripides in 1503; Demosthenes in 1504.
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  • The Athenians failed in an expedition to Chalcidice under Xenophon, while the Spartan Cnemus with Chaonian and Epirot allies was repulsed from Stratus, capital of Acarnania,.
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  • Unfortunately the victorious generals at Arginusae, through negligence or owing Xenophon, Hell.
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  • Underhill's edition of Xenophon, Hellenica, i., ii., note on i.
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  • The Assyrian kings also maintained magnificent parks, or "paradises," in which game of every kind was enclosed; and perhaps it was from them that the Persian sovereigns borrowed the practice mentioned both by Xenophon in the Cyropaedia and by Curtius.
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  • 429 seq.), had developed at a very early period; they first found adequate literary expression in the work of Xenophon entitled Cynegeticus, 3 which expounds his principles and embodies his experience in his favourite art of hunting.
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  • As a writer on field sports Xenophon was followed by Arrian, who in his Cynegeticus, in avowed dependence on his predecessor, seeks to supplement such deficiencies in the earlier treatise as arose from its author's unacquaintance with the dogs of Gaul and the horses of Scythia and Libya.
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  • The immense vivaria or theriotropheia, in which various wild animals, such as boars, stags and roe-deer, were kept in a state of semidomestication, were developments which arose at a comparatively late period; as also were the venationes in the circus, although these are mentioned as having been known as early as 186 B.C. The bald and meagre poem of Grattius Faliscus on hunting (Cynegetica) is modelled upon Xenophon's prose work; a still extant fragment (315 lines) of a similar poem with the same title, of much later date, by Nemesianus, seems to have at one See Layard (Nineveh, ii.
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  • Xenophon (Anab.
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  • - Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon; Plutarch, Pyrrhus, 30-34; Strabo pp. 373-374; Pausanias ii.
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  • Plainly this is not the place for a full examination of the question; yet it may be remarked - (I) that the previous history of the sophists of the Euthydemus, who had been professors of tactics (Xenophon, Mem.
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  • We hear of an early poem named Pontius Glaucus the subject of which is uncertain, and of translations of Xenophon's Oeconomica and the Phenomena of Aratus.
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  • The idea is drawn from Aristo of Chios, and the materials largely derived from Xenophon and Plato.
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  • 3 Socrates' reference of a discussion to its presuppositions (Xenophon, Mein.
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  • They are mentioned by Herodotus among the races conquered by Croesus, and they sent an important contingent to the army of Xerxes in 480 B.C. Xenophon speaks of them as being governed by a prince of their own, without any reference to the neighbouring satraps, a freedom due, perhaps, to the nature of the country, with its lofty mountain ranges and difficult passes.
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  • Other names of the pre-Socratic and Socratic times are mentioned by Xenophon, Plato and Aristotle.
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  • 52, 82; Xenophon, Hellenica, iv., vi., vii.; Diodorus xviii.
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  • The produce, at first distributed amongst the citizens, was later a part of the state income, and forms the subject of some of the suggestions respecting the revenue in the treatise formerly ascribed to Xenophon.
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  • Xenophon's notice of its abundance in Assyria (Anabasis, i.
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  • To these 1nust be added the testimony of the other Greek historians (Thucydides, Ephorus, Theopompus, &c., with the histories of Alexander), and, before all~ that of Xenophon in the Anabasis and Hellenica.
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  • When, in 400 B.C., Xenophon marched with the mercenaries of Cyrus, from the Tigris to the Black Sea, the authority of the king was nonexistent north of Armenia, and the tribes of the Pontic moun~ tains, with the Greek cities on the coast, were completely inde~ pendent.
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  • See lives of Agesilaus by Xenophon (the panegyric of a friend),.
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  • Cornelius Nepos and Plutarch; Xenophon's Hellenica and Diodorus xiv., xv.
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  • To the latter fact we owe a contemporary description of it by Xenophon.
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  • - ix.; Thucydides and Xenophon (Hellenica), passim; Diodorus xvii., xix.; Pausanias ix.
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  • amongst the Socratic schools, and canonized Antisthenes and Diogenes; while reverence for Socrates was the tie which united to them such an accomplished writer upon lighter ethical topics, as the versatile Persaeus, who, at the capital of Antigonus Gonatas, with hardly anything of the professional philosopher about him, reminds us of Xenophon, or even Prodicus.
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  • Nothing more is recorded of the city till the time of Xenophon, when it was a small fortified town on the summit of the hill; but it had been striking coins since 420 B.C. at latest.
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  • The matter is well arranged, the style (modelled on that of Xenophon) simple, and on the whole free from the usual florid bombast of the Byzantine writers.
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  • There is no connexion whatever between the Black Sea peoples called "Chaldaeans" by Xenophon (Ahab.
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  • From the sublimity of Thucydides, and Xenophon's straightforward story, history passed with Theopompus and Ephorus into the field of rhetoric. A revival of the scientific instinct of investigation is discernable in Timaeus the Sicilian, at the end of the 4th century, but his attack upon his predecessors was the text of a more crushing attack upon himself by Polybius, who declares him lacking in critical insight and biased by passion.
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  • Besides his translations of Aristotle's Metaphysics and Xenophon's Memorabilia, his most important work is a treatise directed against George of Trebizond, a violent Aristotelian, entitled In Calumniatorem Platonis.
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  • The same distinction is found in Xenophon's Symposium (viii.
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  • Unsuccessful attempts have been made to identify this mythical Darius with the Cyaxares, son of Astyages, of Xenophon's Cyropaedia, and also with the Darius of Eusebius, who was in all probability Darius Hystaspis.
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  • The same thought is to be found in Xenophon, and is doubtless to be attributed to the historical Socrates.
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  • His earliest work, entitled Reloj de principes, published at Valladolid in 1529, and, according to its author, the fruit of eleven years' labour, is a didactic novel, designed, after the manner of Xenophon's Cyropaedia, to delineate, in a somewhat ideal way for the benefit of modern sovereigns, the life and character of an ancient prince, Marcus Aurelius, distinguished for wisdom and virtue.
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  • A number of astrological calendars and prognostics are among the best known and most widely circulated popular books, and the lives of St Alexius, Xenophon, &c. have become chapbooks.
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  • 62-81; Xenophon, Hellenica, vii.
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  • 95; Xenophon, Hellenica, iv.
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  • Or again Xenophon says "one would not err in thinking that this city is placed near the centre of Greece - nay, of the civilized world - because, the farther removed persons are from it, the severer is the cold or heat they meet with" (Vectigal.
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  • The union of the negative and the positive elements in his work has caused historians no little perplexity, and we cannot quite save the philosopher's consistency unless we regard some of the doctrines attributed to him by Xenophon as merely tentative and provisional.
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  • This it is which forms the kernel of the positive thought of Socrates according to Xenophon.
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  • In addition to these labours of the chair, he found time to translate portions of Aristotle, Plutarch, Xenophon and Lysias from the Greek.
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  • The measurements seem exaggerated, but we must remember that even in Xenophon's time (Anab.
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  • and Assur-nasir-pal crossed considerably farther north, and we have no reason to suppose that they were not simply following the practice of those early times; and we do not know when the custom of crossing at Thapsacus which the Hebrew text of the passage in 1 Kings may presuppose sprang up. Xenophon's army had to be content with fording the stream.
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  • The list of Gail's published works filled 500 quarto pages of the introduction to his edition of Xenophon.
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  • According to Xenophon, Cyrus had a palace and large park full of wild animals at Celaenae.
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  • As regards hue, the favourite colour of the ancients, according to Xenophon, was bay, and for a long time it was the fashionable colour in England; but for some time chestnut thoroughbreds have been the most conspicuous figure on English race-courses, so far as the more important events are concerned.
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  • In classical literature: Initia doctrinae Solidioris (1736), many subsequent editions; Initia rhetorica (1730); editions, mostly annotated, of Xenophon's Memorabilia (1737), Cicero (1737-1739), Suetonius (1748), Tacitus (1752), the Clouds of Aristophanes (1754), Homer (1759-1764), Callimachus (1761), Polybius (1764), as well as of the Quaestura of Corradus, the Greek lexicon of Hedericus, and the Bibliotheca Latina of Fabricius (unfinished); Archaeologia litteraria (1768), new and improved edition by Martini (1790); HoratiusTursellinus De particulis (1769).
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  • The silence of the Memorabilia of Xenophon must be admitted as an argument to the contrary; but the probability seems to be that Plato did not in the Phaedo altogether misrepresent the Master.
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  • It included, besides Hearne's Ductor historicus and the successive volumes of the Universal History, which was then in course of publication, Littlebury's Herodotus, Spelman's Xenophon, Gordon's Tacitus, an anonymous translation of Procopius; "many crude lumps of Speed, Rapin, Mezeray, Davila, Machiavel, Father Paul, Bower, &c., were hastily gulped.
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  • The character of Cyrus is highly praised by the ancients, especially by Xenophon (cf.
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  • By his eighth year he had read Aesop's Fables, Xenophon's Anabasis, and the whole of Herodotus, and was acquainted with Lucian, Diogenes Laertius, Isocrates and six dialogues of Plato (see his Autobiography).
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  • The Pisidians are not mentioned by Herodotus, either among the nations that were subdued by Croesus, or among those that furnished contingents to the army of Xerxes, and the first mention of them in history occurs in the Anabasis of Xenophon, when they furnished a pretext to the younger Cyrus for levying the army with which he designed to subvert his brother's throne, while he pretended only to put down the Pisidians who were continually harassing the neighbouring nations by their lawless forays (Ahab.
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  • Other extant works of Arrian are: Indica, a description of India in the Ionic dialect, including the voyage of Nearchus, intended as a supplement to the Anabasis; Acies Contra Alanos, a fragment of importance for the knowledge of Roman military affairs; Periplus of the Euxine, an official account written (iii) for the emperor Hadrian; Tactica, attributed by some to Aelianus, who wrote in the reign of Trajan; Cynegeticus, a treatise on the chase, supplementing Xenophon's work on the same subject; the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, attributed to him, is by a later compiler.
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  • His model was Xenophon, whom he has imitated with a tolerable measure of success; he abstains from an excessive use of simile and metaphor, and his style is concise and simple.
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  • Gryllus, celebrated in the dialogue on rhetoric, was Xenophon's son who fell at Mantineia in 362; and Eudemus of Cyprus, lamented in the dialogue on soul, died in Sicily in 352.
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  • AAca AEovrapca), founded by the Servian prince Stephen Nemanya (1159-1195) Iveron (7) tovrt Twv 'I(31)pwv), founded by Iberians, or Georgians; Esphigmenu (Tou 'Er4nyp. vov: the name is derived from the confined situation of the monastery); Kutlumush (KovrXov,uoi)n); Pandocratoros (Tou IIav-roeparopos); Philotheu (licXoKov); Caracallu (Tou KapatXAov); St Paul (Toil ayiov IlauXov); St Denis (Tou fiyiov OcovvoLov); St Gregory (Tou ayiou Fpnyopcov); Simopetra (It / 267E7pa); Xeropotamu (Toil flp07rorfiµov); St Xenophon (Tou aylou ZEv04wvTos); Dochiariu (AoXECapelov); Constamoni to (Kwv6Ta povirov); Zographu (Tou Zwypit4)ov); and Stavronikitu (Tou ITavpovtKLTov, the last built, founded in 1545).
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  • 76 -101; Xenophon, Hellenica, iii.-vii.; Strabo, pp. 400-412; Pausanias ix.; Theopompus (or Cratippus) in the Oxyrhynchus Papyri, vol.
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