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wye

wye

wye Sentence Examples

  • It lies in a hilly well-wooded district above the valley of the small river Wye, a tributary of the Thames.

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  • It is pleasantly situated in the upper valley of the Wye, in a bend of the river on its right bank below the confluence of its tributary the Irfon.

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  • The scenery of the Wye valley, including a succession of rapids just above the town, also attracts many tourists.

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  • Towards the end of the 11th century, when the tide of Norman invasion swept upwards along the Wye valley, the district became a lordship marcher annexed to that of Brecknock, but was again severed from it on the death of William de Breos, when his daughter Matilda brought it to her husband, Roger Mortimer of Wigmore.

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  • RHAYADER (Rhaiadr-Gwy), a market town of Radnorshire, Wales, situated amid wild and beautiful scenery on the left bank of the Wye, about '1 m.

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  • A stone bridge over the Wye connects the town with the village and parish church of Cwmdauddwr.

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  • After the Trent the most important river is the Derwent, one of its tributaries, which, taking its rise in the lofty ridges of the High Peak, flows southward through a beautiful valley, receiving a number of minor streams in its course, including the Wye, which, rising near Buxton, traverses the fine Millersdale and Monsal Dale.

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  • TALGARTH, a decayed market town in Breconshire, South Wales, situated on the Ennig near its junction with the Llynfi (a tributary of the Wye), with a station on the joint line of the Cambrian and Midland companies from Brecon to Three Cocks Junction (22 m.

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  • It is situated in the midst of wild mountain scenery on the river Irfon, a right-bank tributary of the Wye.

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  • This involved impounding the headwaters of the Wye, the Towey and the Usk, and the total cost was estimated to exceed fifteen millions sterling.

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  • About this time (the exact chronology is uncertain) Ethelstan expelled Sihtric's brother Guthfrith, destroyed the Danish fortress at York, received the submission of the Welsh at Hereford, fixing their boundary along the line of the Wye, and drove the Cornishmen west of the Tamar, fortifying Exeter as an English city.

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  • It occupies a fine position on and about a rocky eminence on the left bank of the river Wye.

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  • JOHN KEMPE (c. 1 3 80 - 1 454), English cardinal, archbishop of Canterbury, and chancellor, was son of Thomas Kempe, a gentleman of 011antigh, in the parish of Wye near Ashford, Kent.

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  • He founded a college at his native place at Wye, which was suppressed at the Reformation.

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  • The Southeastern Agricultural College at Wye is under the control of the county councils of Kent and Surrey.

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  • The remaining four, Borowast Lest, Estre Lest, Limowast Lest and Wiwart Lest, existed at least as early as the 9th century, and were apparently named from their administrative centres, Burgwara (the burg being Canterbury), Eastre, Lymne and Wye, all of which were meeting places of the Kentish Council.

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  • After the Conquest the great ecclesiastical landholders claimed exemption from the jurisdiction of the shire, and in 1279 the abbot of Battle claimed to have his own coroner in the hundred of Wye.

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  • Tiles were manufactured at Wye in the r4th century.

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  • Plinlimmon is notable as the source of five streams - three small: the Rheidol, the Llyfnant and the Clywedog; and two larger and famous: the Wye (Gwy) and the Severn (Hafren).

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  • from the Steddfagurig inn, is Blaen Gwy (the point of the Wye), the course of the streamlet being traceable up to Pont-rhyd-galed (the hard ford bridge), some 4 m.

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  • But they were met by a large force under the three great ealdormen of Mercia, Wilts and Somerset, and forced to head off to the north-west, being finally overtaken and blockaded at Buttington, which some identify with Buttington Tump at the mouth of the Wye, others with Buttington near Welshpool.

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  • The Wye is the chief river, and forms the boundary between the county and Radnorshire on the north and north-east, from Rhayader to Hay, a distance of upwards of 20 m.; its tributary, the Elan, till it receives the Claerwen, and then the latter river, continue the boundary between the two counties on the north, while the Towy separates the county from Cardigan on the north-west.

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  • The hilly country to the north of the Eppynt is mainly drained by the Irfon, which falls into the Wye near Builth.

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  • - The oldest rocks in Brecknockshire are the Llandeilo shales and intrusive diabases of pre-Llandovery age which near Builth extend across the Wye from Radnorshire; another patch with volcanic outflows comes up at Llanwrtyd, and at both places they give rise to mineral springs.

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  • To the south-east of this region a narrow outcrop of Upper Llandovery, Wenlock and Ludlow sandstones and mudstones follows, uncomformably overlying the Llandeilo and Bala rocks, and dipping conformably under the Old Red Sandstone; they extend from Newbridge-on-Wye and Builth through Llangammarch (where there are mineral springs) towards Llandovery, while a tongue of Ludlow rocks brought up by faulting extends from Erwood on the Wye for 8 m.

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  • The Central Wales section of the London & North-Western railway from Craven Arms to Swansea crosses the north-west corner of the county, and is intersected at Builth Road by a branch of the Cambrian, which, running for the most part on the Radnorshire side of the Wye, follows that river from Rhayader to Three Cocks; the Midland railway from Hereford to Swansea runs through the centre of the county, effecting junctions at Three Cocks with the Cambrian, at Talyllyn with the Brecon & Merthyr railway (which connects the county with the industrial areas of East Glamorgan and West Monmouthshire), and at Capel Colbren with the Neath and Brecon line.

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  • In the eastern parts and along the Wye valley, English has become the predominant language, but in the rest of the county, especially north of the Eppynt range, Welsh occupies that position.

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  • Bernard himself initiated this policy by building a castle at Talgarth on the Upper Wye, but in 1091 he moved southwards, defeated the regulus of Brycheiniog, Bleddyn ab Maenarch, and his brother-in-law Rhys ap Tewdwr, the prince of south-west Wales, and with materials obtained from the Roman fort of Caer Bannau, built a castle at Brecon, which he made his caput baroniae.

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  • He was educated at Wye, and at Magdalen Hall, Oxford, where he graduated B.A.

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  • The Wye (130 m.) also rises in Plinlimmon, and forms for some 30 m.

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  • Wy, or gwy, an obsolete Celtic word for water, preserved in the names of many Welsh rivers - Elwy, Gwili, Wye or Gwy.

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  • The Wye, the Usk, the Dee, the Dovey, the Teifi, the Towy and most of the Welsh rivers and lakes are frequented by anglers for salmon and trout.

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  • from the mouth of the Dee to that of the Wye.

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  • But the most important result of this first Norman invasion was to be found in the marvellous and rapid success of Robert Fitz-Hamon, earl of Gloucester, who, accompanied by a number of knightly adventurers, quickly overran South Wales, and erected a chain of castles stretching from the Wye to Milford Haven.

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  • On Palm Sunday 1282, in a time of peace, David suddenly attacked and burnt Hawarden Castle, whereupon all Wales was up in arms. Edward, greatly angered and now bent on putting an end for ever to the independence of the Principality, hastened into Wales; but whilst the king was campaigning in Gwynedd, Prince Llewelyn himself was slain in an obscure skirmish on the 11th of December 1282 at Cefn-ybedd, near Builth on the Wye, whither he had gone to rouse the people of Brycheiniog.

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  • above sea-level, in an open hollow, surrounded at a distance by hills of considerable elevation, except on the south-east side, where the Wye, which rises about half a mile away, makes its exit.

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  • Of these the chief are Poole's Hole, a vast stalactite cave, about half a mile distant; Diamond Hill, which owes its name to the quartz crystals which are not uncommon in its rocks; and Chee Tor, a remarkable cliff, on the banks of the Wye, 300 ft.

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  • The streams of the southern and western slopes are short and many, flowing directly to the Bristol Channel and the Irish Sea; but the no less numerous streams of the eastern slopes gather themselves into three river systems, and reach the sea as the Dee, the Severn and the Wye.

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  • Plinlimmon (2468 ft.) is the highest of the hills, and forms a sort of hydrographic centre for the group, as from its eastern base the Severn and the Wye take their rise - the former describing a wide curve to east and south, the latter forming a chord to the arc in its southward course.

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  • A group of artificial lakes, one of them exceeded in area only by Windermere, has been formed in the valley of the Elan, a tributary of the Wye, for the supply of water to Birmingham.

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  • Throughout Hereford, and in part of Monmouthshire, the Old Red Sandstone sinks to a great undulating plain, traversed by the exquisite windings of the Wye, and forming some of the richest pasture and fruit lands of England.

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  • (I) North-western division, Rivers Eden, Derwent, Lune, Ribble; (2)North-eastern, Coquet, Tyne, Wear, Tees, &c.; (3) Western, Dee, Usk, Wye, Severn; (4) South-western, Taw, Torridge, Camel, Tamar, Dart, Exe, Teign, &c.; (5) Southern, Avon and Stour (Christchurch) and the Itchin and other famous trout streams of Hampshire.

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  • from Thirlmere in Cumberland, in the case of Manchester; from the river Vyrnwy, Montgomeryshire, a tributary of the Severn, in the case of Liverpool; and from the rivers Elan and Claerwen in Radnorshire, tributaries of the Wye, in the case of Birmingham.

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  • For the next two centuries and a half the lands west of Dee and Wye were divided between the new counties, forming the principality of Wales, and the marches where the old feudal franchises continued, till the marcher-lordships gradually fell by forfeiture or marriage to the crown.

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  • urban district and health-resort of Radnorshire, Wales, situated in a lofty and exposed district near the river Ithon, a tributary of the Wye.

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  • The town annually receives thousands of visitors, and lies within easy reach of the beautiful Wye Valley and the wild district of Radnor Forest.

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  • WYE, a river of England, famous for its beautiful scenery.

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  • The course of the Wye now becomes extremely sinuous; and the valley narrows nearly to Chepstow.

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  • For a short distance the Wye divides Herefordshire from Gloucestershire, and for the rest of its course Gloucestershire and Monmouthshire.

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  • The scenery is finest between Rhayader and Hay in the upper part, and from Goodrich, below Ross, to Chepstow in the lower, the second being the portion which gives the Wye its fame.

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  • The name of Wye belongs also to two smaller English rivers - (I) a right-bank tributary of the Derbyshire Derwent, rising in the uplands near Buxton, and having part of its early course through one of the caverns characteristic of the district; (2) a left-bank tributary of the Thames, watering the valley of the Chilterns in which lies Wycombe and joining the main river near Bourne End.

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  • Wye >>

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  • The old Sheepwash bridge is a narrow packhorse bridge, over the River Wye, dating from the 17th century.

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  • chub fishing on the river Wye.

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  • In Wales and on the rivers Wye and Severn these were called coracles.

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  • Pass the Foy Bridge, a suspension footbridge over the Wye, at which point the road turns away from the river.

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  • Crossed the Wye yet again at Boughrood Bridge where a kind pub landlady filled our water bottles.

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  • Founded by 12th century Cistercian monks, the abbey sits serenely amid the hills of the Wye river valley.

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  • nestled snugly on the banks of the Wye, below the wooded hills made famous by poet William Wordsworth.

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  • syphon on the siphon pipes used to carry the water supply over the River Wye, pictured in February 1897.

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  • He had originally been employed by the Severn & Wye company to build a tramroad but this idea was changed to a canal scheme.

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  • Little has changed since he penned those lines and the Wye river still wends its way by Tintern, its abbey and forest.

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  • wye tae learn history wis tae play it oot.

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  • wye o shoppin till the new.

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  • wye ye spikk tae a body that maitters, nae the label ye gie them, in't it!

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  • wye wid ye caa a cat a dog?

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  • But it's just da wye, isn ' it?

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  • Fa's like us, nae mony an ' they're a deid ony wye!

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  • Fit wye wid ye wid ye caa a cat a dog?

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  • BAKEWELL, a market-town in the western parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, on the river Wye, 25 m.

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  • The scenery of the neighbourhood, in both the Wye and the Derwent valleys, is very beautiful; the village of Eyam (pronounced Eem) near the Derwent may be noticed as specially picturesque.

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  • It lies in a hilly well-wooded district above the valley of the small river Wye, a tributary of the Thames.

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  • It is pleasantly situated in the upper valley of the Wye, in a bend of the river on its right bank below the confluence of its tributary the Irfon.

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  • The scenery of the Wye valley, including a succession of rapids just above the town, also attracts many tourists.

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  • Towards the end of the 11th century, when the tide of Norman invasion swept upwards along the Wye valley, the district became a lordship marcher annexed to that of Brecknock, but was again severed from it on the death of William de Breos, when his daughter Matilda brought it to her husband, Roger Mortimer of Wigmore.

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  • RHAYADER (Rhaiadr-Gwy), a market town of Radnorshire, Wales, situated amid wild and beautiful scenery on the left bank of the Wye, about '1 m.

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  • A stone bridge over the Wye connects the town with the village and parish church of Cwmdauddwr.

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  • Rhayader, built close to the Falls of the Wye (whence its name), owes its early importance to the castle erected here by Prince Rhys ap Griffith of South Wales, c. 1178, in order to check the English advance up the Wye Valley.

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  • After the Trent the most important river is the Derwent, one of its tributaries, which, taking its rise in the lofty ridges of the High Peak, flows southward through a beautiful valley, receiving a number of minor streams in its course, including the Wye, which, rising near Buxton, traverses the fine Millersdale and Monsal Dale.

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  • TALGARTH, a decayed market town in Breconshire, South Wales, situated on the Ennig near its junction with the Llynfi (a tributary of the Wye), with a station on the joint line of the Cambrian and Midland companies from Brecon to Three Cocks Junction (22 m.

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  • It is situated in the midst of wild mountain scenery on the river Irfon, a right-bank tributary of the Wye.

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  • This involved impounding the headwaters of the Wye, the Towey and the Usk, and the total cost was estimated to exceed fifteen millions sterling.

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  • About this time (the exact chronology is uncertain) Ethelstan expelled Sihtric's brother Guthfrith, destroyed the Danish fortress at York, received the submission of the Welsh at Hereford, fixing their boundary along the line of the Wye, and drove the Cornishmen west of the Tamar, fortifying Exeter as an English city.

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  • It occupies a fine position on and about a rocky eminence on the left bank of the river Wye.

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  • JOHN KEMPE (c. 1 3 80 - 1 454), English cardinal, archbishop of Canterbury, and chancellor, was son of Thomas Kempe, a gentleman of 011antigh, in the parish of Wye near Ashford, Kent.

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  • He founded a college at his native place at Wye, which was suppressed at the Reformation.

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  • past Wye and Canterbury, to meander through the lowlands representing the former channel which isolated the Isle of Thanet from the mainland.

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  • The Southeastern Agricultural College at Wye is under the control of the county councils of Kent and Surrey.

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  • The remaining four, Borowast Lest, Estre Lest, Limowast Lest and Wiwart Lest, existed at least as early as the 9th century, and were apparently named from their administrative centres, Burgwara (the burg being Canterbury), Eastre, Lymne and Wye, all of which were meeting places of the Kentish Council.

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  • After the Conquest the great ecclesiastical landholders claimed exemption from the jurisdiction of the shire, and in 1279 the abbot of Battle claimed to have his own coroner in the hundred of Wye.

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  • Tiles were manufactured at Wye in the r4th century.

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  • Plinlimmon is notable as the source of five streams - three small: the Rheidol, the Llyfnant and the Clywedog; and two larger and famous: the Wye (Gwy) and the Severn (Hafren).

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  • from the Steddfagurig inn, is Blaen Gwy (the point of the Wye), the course of the streamlet being traceable up to Pont-rhyd-galed (the hard ford bridge), some 4 m.

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  • But they were met by a large force under the three great ealdormen of Mercia, Wilts and Somerset, and forced to head off to the north-west, being finally overtaken and blockaded at Buttington, which some identify with Buttington Tump at the mouth of the Wye, others with Buttington near Welshpool.

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  • The Wye is the chief river, and forms the boundary between the county and Radnorshire on the north and north-east, from Rhayader to Hay, a distance of upwards of 20 m.; its tributary, the Elan, till it receives the Claerwen, and then the latter river, continue the boundary between the two counties on the north, while the Towy separates the county from Cardigan on the north-west.

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  • The hilly country to the north of the Eppynt is mainly drained by the Irfon, which falls into the Wye near Builth.

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  • - The oldest rocks in Brecknockshire are the Llandeilo shales and intrusive diabases of pre-Llandovery age which near Builth extend across the Wye from Radnorshire; another patch with volcanic outflows comes up at Llanwrtyd, and at both places they give rise to mineral springs.

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  • To the south-east of this region a narrow outcrop of Upper Llandovery, Wenlock and Ludlow sandstones and mudstones follows, uncomformably overlying the Llandeilo and Bala rocks, and dipping conformably under the Old Red Sandstone; they extend from Newbridge-on-Wye and Builth through Llangammarch (where there are mineral springs) towards Llandovery, while a tongue of Ludlow rocks brought up by faulting extends from Erwood on the Wye for 8 m.

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  • The Central Wales section of the London & North-Western railway from Craven Arms to Swansea crosses the north-west corner of the county, and is intersected at Builth Road by a branch of the Cambrian, which, running for the most part on the Radnorshire side of the Wye, follows that river from Rhayader to Three Cocks; the Midland railway from Hereford to Swansea runs through the centre of the county, effecting junctions at Three Cocks with the Cambrian, at Talyllyn with the Brecon & Merthyr railway (which connects the county with the industrial areas of East Glamorgan and West Monmouthshire), and at Capel Colbren with the Neath and Brecon line.

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  • In the eastern parts and along the Wye valley, English has become the predominant language, but in the rest of the county, especially north of the Eppynt range, Welsh occupies that position.

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  • But an earlier wave of Celtic invasion represented by the Goidels had passed westwards along the valleys of the Usk and Wye, leaving traces in place-names (e.g.

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  • Bernard himself initiated this policy by building a castle at Talgarth on the Upper Wye, but in 1091 he moved southwards, defeated the regulus of Brycheiniog, Bleddyn ab Maenarch, and his brother-in-law Rhys ap Tewdwr, the prince of south-west Wales, and with materials obtained from the Roman fort of Caer Bannau, built a castle at Brecon, which he made his caput baroniae.

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  • He was educated at Wye, and at Magdalen Hall, Oxford, where he graduated B.A.

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  • The Wye (130 m.) also rises in Plinlimmon, and forms for some 30 m.

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  • Wy, or gwy, an obsolete Celtic word for water, preserved in the names of many Welsh rivers - Elwy, Gwili, Wye or Gwy.

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  • By far the larger portion of Wales is purely agricultural in character, and much of the valley land is particularly fertile, notably the Vale of Glamorgan, the Vale of Clwyd and the valleys of the Towy, the Teifi, the Usk and the Wye, which have long been celebrated for their rich pastures.

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  • The Wye, the Usk, the Dee, the Dovey, the Teifi, the Towy and most of the Welsh rivers and lakes are frequented by anglers for salmon and trout.

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  • from the mouth of the Dee to that of the Wye.

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  • But the most important result of this first Norman invasion was to be found in the marvellous and rapid success of Robert Fitz-Hamon, earl of Gloucester, who, accompanied by a number of knightly adventurers, quickly overran South Wales, and erected a chain of castles stretching from the Wye to Milford Haven.

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  • On Palm Sunday 1282, in a time of peace, David suddenly attacked and burnt Hawarden Castle, whereupon all Wales was up in arms. Edward, greatly angered and now bent on putting an end for ever to the independence of the Principality, hastened into Wales; but whilst the king was campaigning in Gwynedd, Prince Llewelyn himself was slain in an obscure skirmish on the 11th of December 1282 at Cefn-ybedd, near Builth on the Wye, whither he had gone to rouse the people of Brycheiniog.

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  • above sea-level, in an open hollow, surrounded at a distance by hills of considerable elevation, except on the south-east side, where the Wye, which rises about half a mile away, makes its exit.

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  • Of these the chief are Poole's Hole, a vast stalactite cave, about half a mile distant; Diamond Hill, which owes its name to the quartz crystals which are not uncommon in its rocks; and Chee Tor, a remarkable cliff, on the banks of the Wye, 300 ft.

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  • 4 Including the Wye (1609 sq.

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  • The streams of the southern and western slopes are short and many, flowing directly to the Bristol Channel and the Irish Sea; but the no less numerous streams of the eastern slopes gather themselves into three river systems, and reach the sea as the Dee, the Severn and the Wye.

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  • Plinlimmon (2468 ft.) is the highest of the hills, and forms a sort of hydrographic centre for the group, as from its eastern base the Severn and the Wye take their rise - the former describing a wide curve to east and south, the latter forming a chord to the arc in its southward course.

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  • A group of artificial lakes, one of them exceeded in area only by Windermere, has been formed in the valley of the Elan, a tributary of the Wye, for the supply of water to Birmingham.

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  • Throughout Hereford, and in part of Monmouthshire, the Old Red Sandstone sinks to a great undulating plain, traversed by the exquisite windings of the Wye, and forming some of the richest pasture and fruit lands of England.

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  • (I) North-western division, Rivers Eden, Derwent, Lune, Ribble; (2)North-eastern, Coquet, Tyne, Wear, Tees, &c.; (3) Western, Dee, Usk, Wye, Severn; (4) South-western, Taw, Torridge, Camel, Tamar, Dart, Exe, Teign, &c.; (5) Southern, Avon and Stour (Christchurch) and the Itchin and other famous trout streams of Hampshire.

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  • from Thirlmere in Cumberland, in the case of Manchester; from the river Vyrnwy, Montgomeryshire, a tributary of the Severn, in the case of Liverpool; and from the rivers Elan and Claerwen in Radnorshire, tributaries of the Wye, in the case of Birmingham.

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  • For the next two centuries and a half the lands west of Dee and Wye were divided between the new counties, forming the principality of Wales, and the marches where the old feudal franchises continued, till the marcher-lordships gradually fell by forfeiture or marriage to the crown.

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  • urban district and health-resort of Radnorshire, Wales, situated in a lofty and exposed district near the river Ithon, a tributary of the Wye.

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  • The town annually receives thousands of visitors, and lies within easy reach of the beautiful Wye Valley and the wild district of Radnor Forest.

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  • WYE, a river of England, famous for its beautiful scenery.

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  • The course of the Wye now becomes extremely sinuous; and the valley narrows nearly to Chepstow.

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  • For a short distance the Wye divides Herefordshire from Gloucestershire, and for the rest of its course Gloucestershire and Monmouthshire.

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  • The scenery is finest between Rhayader and Hay in the upper part, and from Goodrich, below Ross, to Chepstow in the lower, the second being the portion which gives the Wye its fame.

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  • The name of Wye belongs also to two smaller English rivers - (I) a right-bank tributary of the Derbyshire Derwent, rising in the uplands near Buxton, and having part of its early course through one of the caverns characteristic of the district; (2) a left-bank tributary of the Thames, watering the valley of the Chilterns in which lies Wycombe and joining the main river near Bourne End.

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  • Summary St Mary 's church at Builth Wells lies close to the River Wye in a large rectilinear churchyard.

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  • Work on the siphon pipes used to carry the water supply over the River Wye, pictured in February 1897.

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  • He had originally been employed by the Severn & Wye company to build a tramroad but this idea was changed to a canal scheme.

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  • Little has changed since he penned those lines and the Wye river still wends its way by Tintern, its abbey and forest.

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  • She kent that the wye tae learn history wis tae play it oot.

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  • NOO, up tae date tae feenish, comparing the aul wye o shoppin till the new.

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  • It 's the wye ye spikk tae a body that maitters, nae the label ye gie them, i n't it !

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  • Fit wye wid ye caa a cat a dog?

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  • But it 's just da wye, isn ' it?

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  • Fa 's like us, nae mony an ' they 're a deid ony wye !

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