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wrote

wrote

wrote Sentence Examples

  • She changed the decorating tip and wrote "Happy Birthday Dad!" on the top of the cake.

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  • And then wrote it up in code?

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  • She ripped off a piece of sketch paper and wrote down her address.

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  • I already wrote up an inventory.

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  • Carefully, Selyn wrote out something then passed it to Deidre.

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  • Soon after Prince Andrew had gone, Princess Mary wrote to her friend Julie Karagina in Petersburg, whom she had dreamed (as all girls dream) of marrying to her brother, and who was at that time in mourning for her own brother, killed in Turkey.

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  • Grandfather Ed Plotke learned Josh worked for Paul Dawkins and he wrote to Paul in California.

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  • "She wrote in a code," Dean answered.

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  • If you were a scientist in Salk's time, you did calculations by hand and wrote observations in notebooks.

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  • Then a little bit ago he wrote something on a little tablet and I looked at it.

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  • In a letter dated April 10, 1887, only five weeks after she went to Helen Keller, she wrote to a friend:

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  • To speak critically, I never received more than one or two letters in my life--I wrote this some years ago--that were worth the postage.

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  • That lady who's in the news, the one from Idaho who claims she's the tipster, she wrote an entry.

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  • Those he wrote about Gerakov: 'Lectures for the corps inditing'...

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  • Her eyes went to the number she wrote on her hand each morning.

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  • I received the letter which you wrote to me last summer, and I thank you for it.

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  • Alex wrote a check, pocketed the bill of sale and title, and then they all walked out of the office.

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  • I have letters from Josh Mulligan—letters he wrote my mom.

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  • She wrote a cover story about how the police force is sitting around on their thumbs while the poor widow's little twin darlings remain missing.

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  • "Well, I know what that is," he said to himself; and he wrote the word _turnip_ on his slate.

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  • She wrote Kris a short message and folded the paper, presenting it to Gabriel.

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  • Katie moved quickly in the direction she indicated and found a line in front of the guestbook as Immortals wrote their names.

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  • In her room that night, she wrote a letter to Connie explaining what she had observed.

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  • She grabbed the note pad and wrote a brand name and quantity.

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  • Her eyes widened with the realization that he wrote this beautiful composition for her.

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  • Fred wrote the number on his note pad.

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  • She wrote it and no one forced her to do so.

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  • She handed him the tablet and he laboriously wrote something again.

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  • She handed him the tablet and he laboriously wrote something again.

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  • Some people said that they were what Henry Longfellow wrote on his slate that day at school.

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  • Her attention lingered on it for a moment before she wrote one more.

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  • Her attention lingered on it for a moment before she wrote one more.

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  • This note sounds like and looks like he was blind drunk when he wrote it and he doesn't know what the hell he's talking about.

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  • This note sounds like and looks like he was blind drunk when he wrote it and he doesn't know what the hell he's talking about.

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  • She wrote on the blackboard the names of all the gentlemen present.

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  • Besides, I could not see what I wrote on my typewriter.

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  • If she didn't have a place she felt was safe enough, maybe she wrote her journal in code.

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  • As much and as often as Annie wrote, the letters and numbers must have almost become a second language to her.

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  • Before we can read what she wrote, we can only guess the reason for it.

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  • As much and as often as Annie wrote, the letters and numbers must have almost become a second language to her.

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  • Before we can read what she wrote, we can only guess the reason for it.

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  • I could not make notes in class or write exercises; but I wrote all my compositions and translations at home on my typewriter.

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  • Martha wrote on her pad as he continued.

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  • I wrote letter to Uncle James.

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  • "Dear Princess," she wrote in French quickly and mechanically, and then paused.

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  • Once when making such calculations he wrote down his own name in French, Comte Pierre Besouhoff, but the sum of the numbers did not come right.

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  • For a long time, when I wrote a letter, even to my mother, I was seized with a sudden feeling of terror, and I would spell the sentences over and over, to make sure that I had not read them in a book.

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  • What her good friend, Charles Dudley Warner, wrote about her in Harper's Magazine in 1896 was true then, and it remains true now:

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  • It was their ancestor who wrote the letters I've got!

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  • "We can't be sure Annie Quincy wrote this," Cynthia protested.

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  • I wrote timidly, fearfully, but resolutely, urged on by my teacher, who knew that if I persevered, I should find my mental foothold again and get a grip on my faculties.

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  • Long corrections she wrote out on her typewriter, with catch-words to indicate where they belonged.

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  • I wrote the story when I was at home, the autumn after I had learned to speak.

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  • That Edgar Poe guy wrote a story about the obvious being overlooked.

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  • In a previous letter I think I wrote you that "mug" and "milk" had given Helen more trouble than all the rest.

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  • Kutuzov wrote that the Russians had not retreated a step, that the French losses were much heavier than ours, and that he was writing in haste from the field of battle before collecting full information.

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  • The letters written from Boston are answering correspondence Annie presumably wrote to her sister.

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  • By the tone of the letters Rachael wrote to her, the family appeared somewhat estranged from one another.

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  • I have read "The Frost Fairies" since, also the letters I wrote in which I used other ideas of Miss Canby's.

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  • In a composition which I wrote about the old cities of Greece and Italy, I borrowed my glowing descriptions, with variations, from sources I have forgotten.

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  • The thought that what I wrote might not be absolutely my own tormented me.

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  • The papers were difficult, and I felt very anxious as I wrote out my answers on the typewriter.

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  • I sat down immediately and wrote to Mr. Vining, asking him to explain the signs.

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  • Just at the time Prince Andrew was living unoccupied at Drissa, Shishkov, the Secretary of State and one of the chief representatives of this party, wrote a letter to the Emperor which Arakcheev and Balashev agreed to sign.

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  • To Sonya he wrote separately.

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  • I know about the letter she wrote about Howie.

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  • She really wrote it.

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  • If he didn't like what she wrote, he didn't have to respond.

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  • And that's the name she wrote on her clothes.

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  • Who says she wrote it?

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  • It's a suicide note she wrote 'cause she killed herself.

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  • Helen wrote another letter to the little girls yesterday, and her father sent it to Mr. Anagnos.

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  • Even he knows she wrote it.

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  • After showering and dressing, he wrote a short note explaining he would be at police headquarters until midmorning and slipped it under her door.

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  • The way in which Miss Keller wrote her story shows, as nothing else can show, the difficulties she had to overcome.

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  • Lathum scribbled on the pad, confirming as he wrote.

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  • And the woman who wrote this, whoever she is, isn't any dunce.

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  • I sure wish this young lady wrote a date on her writings.

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  • Then he wrote her sister Rachael in Boston affirming her lies.

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  • He showed it to me but he wrote on his pad it was yours and he just borrowed it 'cause you left it around.

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  • She wrote her name in the condensation on the side of her tea glass.

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  • He wrote something on her chart.

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  • Judging by the position of his computer, he'd been on it last night, and the black notebook where he wrote notes to himself about his duties was missing.

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  • I wrote my number on the note and when you didn't call, I thought you were through with me.

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  • "I wrote down the rules," she continued.

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  • You wrote the rules down.

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  • You wrote a book?

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  • Benjamin Hoadly, the newly-appointed bishop of Bangor, scented the opportunity and wrote a speedy and able reply, Preservative against the Principles and Practices of Non-Jurors, in which his own Erastian position was recommended and sincerity proposed as the only test of truth.

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  • He soon, however, turned his attention to metaphysics and psychology, and for the North American Review and later for the National he wrote philosophical essays on the lines of Mill, Darwin and Spencer.

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  • Giovan Vincenzo Gravina wrote a history of Roman law, specially distinguished for its accuracy and elegance.

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  • He wrote letters to the cities of Italy, asking them to send representatives to an assembly which would meet on the 1st of August, when the formation of a great federation under the headship of Rome would be considered.

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  • The story was unknown to Arthur Duck, fellow of All Souls, who wrote Chicheley's life in 1617.

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  • But in the end they became less fanatical than the Murabtis, and Ya`kub el Mansur was a highly accomplished man, who wrote a good Arabic style and who protected the philosopher Averroes.

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  • "Tell Consalvi," wrote the conqueror, still flushed with Austerlitz, "that if he loves his country he must either resign or do what I demand."

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  • I was compelled to write and I wrote.

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  • she wrote to Sainte-Beuve.

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  • Liszt, in after years when they had drifted apart, wrote of her: " George Sand catches her butterfly and tames it in her cage by feeding it on flowers and nectar - this is the love period.

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  • She wrote with the rapidity of Walter Scott and the regularity of Anthony Trollope.

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  • She wrote a la diable, starting with some central thesis to set forth or some problem to investigate, but with no predetermined plot or plan of action.

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  • Elizabeth Barrett Browning wrote sonnets to " the large-brained woman and large-hearted man, self-named George Sand."

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  • The king of Spain wrote to his ambassador at Rome "that His Holiness had hitherto played a double game and that all his zeal to drive the French from Italy had been only a mask"; this reproach seemed to receive some confirmation when Leo X.

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  • In October 1847 he wrote to Pius IX., offering his services to the Church, whose cause he for a moment believed to be that of national liberty.

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  • He wrote a pitiful reply to his father, offering to renounce the succession in favour of his baby half-brother Peter, who had been born the day after the princess Charlotte's funeral.

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  • As if this were not enough, in January 1716 he wrote to his father for permission to become a monk.

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  • On the 26th of August 1716 he wrote to Alexius from abroad urging him, if he desired to remain tsarevich, to join him and the army without delay.

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  • is Ashestiel, where Sir Walter Scott resided from 1804 to 1812, where he wrote his most famous poems and began Waverley, and which he left for Abbotsford.

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  • Hostius, who wrote a poem on the Illyrian War of 178 B.C., of which some fragments are preserved.

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  • She there wrote her Appel a l'impartiale posterite, those memoirs which display a strange alternation between self-laudation and patriotism, between the trivial and the sublime.

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  • When Roland heard of his wife's condemnation, he wandered some miles from his refuge in Rouen; maddened by despair and grief, he wrote a few words expressive of his horror at those massacres which could only be inspired by the enemies of France, protesting that "from the moment when I learned that they had murdered my wife I would no longer remain in a world stained with enemies."

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  • In October he wrote offering to retire to Carolina if he were released.

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  • (Turin, 18 53); he also wrote Il Partito nazionale italiano (Turin, 1856), L'Impero, it papato, e la democrazia in Italia (Florence, 1859): and Dell' ordinamento nazionale in Italia (Florence, 1862).

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  • Laschitzer wrote an introduction to Sir Teuerdank, Q.

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  • He subsequently wrote an account of his experiences.

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  • Coleridge wrote to Charles Lamb averring that the book must be his work.

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  • He wrote in this connexion a number of articles collected in 1887 under the title Treu and Frei.

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  • It excited the admiration of Gonzales Clavijo, the Spanish envoy, when he passed through it on his way to visit the court of Timur at Samarkand (Clavijo, Historia del gran Tamorlan, p. 84); and Cardinal Bessarion, who was a native of the place, in the latter part of his life, when the city had passed into the hands of the Mahommedans, and he was himself a dignitary of the Roman Church, so little forgot the impression it had made upon him that he wrote a work entitled "The Praise of Trebizond" ('E-yac c uLovTpaire oiivros), which exists in manuscript at Venice.

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  • He wrote Practical Sermons (1858; edited by Noah Porter); Lectures on the Moral Government of God (2 vols., 1859), and Essays and Lectures upon Select Topics in Revealed Theology (1859), all published posthumously.

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  • He wrote a large work on the Christian doctrine of justification and atonement, Die Christliche Lehre von der Rechtfertigung and Versohnung, published during the years 1870-74, and in 1880-86 a history of pietism (Die Geschichte des Pietismus).

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  • At Falmouth he wrote his Laboratorium portabile and at Truro the Alphabetum minerale.

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  • In 1682 he returned to London, where he wrote the Chemischer Gliickshafen oder grosse Concordanz and Collection von 1500 Processen and died in October of the same year.

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  • he wrote the article Drama, and biographies of Ben Jonson and other dramatists; and he became an important contributor to the present work.

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  • The earliest known French romance of Alexander, by Alberic of Besancon (or more properly Briancon), was, until the discovery of a fragment of ioq lines at Florence in 1852, known only through the German adaptation by Lamprecht the preacher, who wrote towards the end of the 12th century, and by the version made by a Poitevin poet named Simon in decasyllabic lines.

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  • The Talmudic tradition (Baba Batlara 14b) that the men of the Great Synagogue " wrote " Ezekiel, may refer to editorial work by later scholars.'

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  • Powell wrote several treatises and also some hymns, but his chief gifts were those of a preacher.

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  • He wrote at least one treatise on alchemy, but several others have been falsely attributed to him.

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  • He was specially devoted to the Virgin Mary, and wrote an Officium Beatae Virginis, in addition to many letters, sermons, and other writings.

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  • If it be true, as Bishop Alcock of Ely affirms, that Lydgate wrote a poem on the loss of France and Gascony, it seems necessary to suppose that he lived two years longer, and thus indications point to the year 1451, or thereabouts, as the date of his death.

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  • These interviews took place in October 15 93, and on the 29th of the following January Napier wrote to the king the letter which forms the dedication of the Plaine Discovery.

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  • His usual signature was "Jhone Neper," but in a letter written in 1608, and in all deeds signed after that date, he wrote "Jhone Nepair."

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  • In Latin he always wrote his name "Neperus."

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  • He retained this position until 1517, wrote a Latin grammar, and other manuals for the use of his pupils, and in 1515 travelled in Italy with Ernest.

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  • Aventinus, who has been called the "Bavarian Herodotus," wrote other books of minor importance, and a complete edition of his works was published at Munich (188'- 1886).

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  • In 1819 she wrote A Plan for Improving Female Education, submitted to the governor of New York state; and in 1821 she removed to Troy.

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  • She prepared many textbooks and wrote Journal and Letters from France and Great Britain (1833).(1833).

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  • On the appointment of Lord Halifax as lord lieutenant in the same year Lucas wrote him a long letter (19th of Sept.

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  • Thietmar wrote a Chronicon in eight books, which deals with the period between 908 and 1018.

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  • Philomelion was probably a Pergamenian foundation on the great Graeco-Roman highway from Ephesus to the east, and to its townsmen the Smyrniotes wrote the letter that describes the martyrdom of Polycarp. Cicero, on his way to Cilicia, dated some of his extant correspondence there; and the place played a considerable part in the frontier wars between the Byzantine emperors and the sultanate of Rum.

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  • Dinarchus wrote, for one or more of these prosecutors, the three speeches which are still extant - Against Demosthenes, Against Aristogeiton, Against Philocles.

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  • According to Suidas, Dinarchus wrote 160 speeches; and Dionysius held that, out of 85 extant speeches bearing his name, 58 were genuine,-28 relating to public, 30 to private causes.

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  • Timocreon was also known as a composer of scolia (drinking-songs) and, according to Suidas, wrote plays in the style of the old comedy.

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  • He wrote also Bellum scodrense (1474), on account of the siege of Scodra (Scutari) by the Turks, and Antiquitates vicecomitum, the history of the Visconti, dukes of Milan, down to the death of Matteo the Great (1322).

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  • Note the curious old tradition that Ezra wrote out the law which had been burnt (2 Esdr. xiv.

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  • After successfully observing the transit from the island of Tahiti, or Otaheite, as Cook wrote it, the " Endeavour's " head was turned south, and then north-west, beating about the Pacific in search of the eastern coast of the great continent whose western shores had been so long known to the Dutch.

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  • He also wrote the introduction to the collected edition of Clifford's Mathematical.

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  • The three subjects to which Smith's writings relate are theory of numbers, elliptic functions and modern geometry; but in all that he wrote an "arithmetical" made of thought is apparent, his methods and processes being arithmetical as distinguished from algebraic. He had the most intense admiration of Gauss.

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  • The marshal wrote to Mathieu de Lesseps on the 18th of December 1830: "I have had the pleasure of meeting your son, who gives promise of sustaining with great credit the name he bears."

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  • In the same year he wrote a very popular treatise against drunkenness.

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  • 469) in North Germany; and in 1536 he wrote a preface to Gardiner's De vera Obedientia, which asserted the royal, denied the papal, supremacy, and was received with delight by the Lutherans.

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  • Here also he wrote Lucinde (1799), an unfinished romance, which is interesting as an attempt to transfer to practical ethics the Romantic demand for complete individual freedom, and Alarcos, a tragedy (1802) in which, without much success, he combined romantic and classical elements.

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  • As Milton wrote: "Cromwell!

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  • Bordeaux, the French envoy in England, wrote that, in spite of the severe laws, the Romanists received better treatment under the Protectorate than under any other government.

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  • "It was hard to discover," wrote Clarendon, "which feared him most, France, Spain or the Low Countries."

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  • "He once more joined us to the continent," wrote Marvell, while Dryden describes him as teaching the British lion to roar.

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  • "Your father," wrote Sir Francis Russell to Henry Cromwell, "hath of late made more wise men fools than ever; he laughs and is merry, but they hang down their heads and are pitifully out of countenance."

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  • "Desire earnestly the greater gifts," he wrote to the Corinthians.

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  • It faded away in the great Church, and probably Celsus was describing Montanist circles (though Origen assumed that they were ordinary believers) when he wrote 3 of the many Christians of no repute who at the least provocation, whether within or without their temples, threw themselves about like inspired persons; while others did the same in cities or among armies in order to collect alms, roaming about cities or camps.

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  • An able pamphlet attacking the administration of the marquess of Buckingham in 17 9 0 brought him to the notice of the Whig club; and in September 1791 he wrote a remarkable essay over the signature "A Northern Whig," of which Io,000 copies are said to have been sold.

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  • During the succeeding ten years he wrote the six works which are ascribed to him and were published under his name by P. Mandonnet in 1899.

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  • Sir Kenneth Clark, in Another Part of the Wood, wrote of the Eleventh Edition:

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  • We do intend to keep the names of the editors in those cases, but it will usually not be possible to specify who exactly wrote which part of the text.

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  • 50) that he was an old man when he wrote his Truculentus and Pseudolus.

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  • He wrote several other works of the same nature which exhibit scholarly research and lucid arrangement.

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  • After two years of preaching Francis wrote to the duke (Ouvres comp'.

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  • Considering the time at which he wrote, Reis seems to have understood very well the nature of the vibrations he had to reproduce, but he failed to comprehend how they could be reproduced by electricity.

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  • Leo, the saint's favourite disciple and companion on Mount Alverno at the time, which describes the circumstances of the stigmatization; Elias of Cortona, the acting superior, wrote on the day after his death a circular letter wherein he uses language clearly implying that he had himself seen the Stigmata, and there is a considerable amount of contemporary authentic second hand evidence.

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  • He wrote tragedies also, which Virgil (Ed.

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  • He wrote light verse to celebrate the incidents of court life in the manner of Desportes, but his verse is more fantastic and fuller of conceits than his master's.

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  • A Bourbon at Versailles, a Habsburg at Vienna, or a thick-lipped Lorrainer, with a stroke of his pen, wrote off province against province, regarding not the populations who had bled for him or thrown themselves upon his mercy.

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  • Your Holiness (he wrote) is sovereign of Rome, but I am its emperor; and he threatened to annul the presumed donation of Rome by Charlemagne, unless the pope yielded implicit obedience to him in all temporal affairs.

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  • There was great resentment throughout Italy, and in answer to the popes request Charles Albert declared that he was with him in everything, while from South America Giuseppe Garibaldi wrote to offer his services to Hi~ Holiness.

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  • He then requested Charles Albert to take the papal troops under his command, and also wrote to the emperor of Austria asking him voluntarily to relinquish Lombardy and Venetia.

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  • He suggested an international congress on the question; inspired a pamphlet, Le Pape el le Con grs, which proposed a reduction of the papal territory, and wrote to the pope advising him to cede Romagna in order to obtain better guarantees for the rest of his dominions.

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  • King Victor Emmanuel and Cavour both wrote to Garibaldi urging him not to spoil all by aiming at too much.

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  • They wrote the history of Rome from the earliest times (in most cases) down to their own days, the events of which were treated in much greater detail.

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  • As a general rule the annalists wrote in a spirit of uncritical patriotism, which led them to minimize or gloss over such disasters as the conquest of Rome by Porsena and the compulsory payment of ransom to the Gauls, and to flatter the people by exaggerated accounts of Roman prowess, dressed up in fanciful language.

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  • At first they wrote in Greek, partly because a national style was not yet formed, and partly because Greek was the fashionable language amongst the educated, although Latin versions were probably published as well.

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  • Like Fabius Pictor, he wrote in Greek.

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  • Cassius Hemina (about 146), in the fourth book of his Annals, wrote on the Second Punic War.

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  • Claudius Quadrigarius (about 80 B.C.) wrote a history, in at least twenty-three books, which began with the conquest of Rome by the Gauls and went down to the death of Sulla or perhaps later.

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  • Valerius Antias, a younger contemporary of Quadrigarius, wrote the history of Rome from the earliest times, in a voluminous work consisting of seventy-five books.

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  • C. Licinius Macer (died 66), who has been called the last of the annalists, wrote a voluminous work, which, although he paid great attention to the study of his authorities, was too rhetorical, and exaggerated the achievements of his own family.

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  • He wrote twenty-three books on the period between the Social War and the dictatorship of Sulla.

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  • He was visited by Dykvelt, William of Orange's agent; and in June 1687 he wrote to William assuring him of his support.

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  • Wolff, in the intervals of his chequered theological career, lectured and wrote as a jurist upon the Law of Nature.

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  • Hegel wrote extensively upon religion, especially in his Philosophy of Religion.

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  • Corbulo wrote an account of his Asiatic experiences, which is lost.

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  • His advocacy of an American episcopate, in connexion with which he wrote the Answer to Dr Mayhew's Observations on the Charter and Conduct of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (London 1764), raised considerable opposition in England and America.

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  • He spoke, read and wrote twentyfive languages.

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  • Since Huxley and Sully wrote their masterly essays in the 9th edition of this encyclopaedia, the doctrine of evolution has outgrown the trammels of controversy and has been accepted as a fundamental principle.

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  • He remembered his connexion with Florence when he wrote Romische Briefe von einem Florentiner (Leipzig, 1840-44), and his residence in Rome was also responsible for his Geschichte der Stadt Rom (3 vols., 1867-70)..

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  • Turning his attention to the history of Naples, he wrote Die Carafa von Maddaloni: Neapel unter spanischer Herrschaft (1851; Eng.

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  • In the midst of privation and anxiety, due largely to her husband's precarious health, she wrote continually, and in 1843 published The Mayflower, a collection of tales and sketches.

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  • In the quiet of a country town, far removed from actual contact with painful scenes, but on the edge of the whirlwind raised by the Fugitive Slave Bill, memory and imagination had full scope, and she wrote for serial publication in The National Era, an anti-slavery paper of Washington, D.C., the story of "Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life among the Lowly."

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  • But when Pali first became known to Europeans it was already used also, by those who wrote in Pali, of the language of the later writings, which bear the same relation to the standard literary Pali of the canonical texts as medieval does to classical Latin.

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  • It receives the support of Mahanama, the author of the Great Chronicle, who wrote in Ceylon in the 5th century A.D.

    0
    0
  • At p. 66 of the Gandha Vamsa, a modern catalogue of Pali books and authors, written in Pali, there is given a list of ten authors who wrote Pali books in India, probably southern India.

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  • The first is Dhammapala, who wrote in Kancipura, the modern Conjevaram in south India, in the 5th century of our era.

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  • Dhammapala wrote also a commentary on the Netti mentioned above.

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    0
  • The second is Buddhadatta, who wrote the Jindlankara in the 5th century A.D.

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    0
  • These scholars (most of them members of the Buddhist Order, but many of them laymen) not only copied and recopied the Indian Pali books, but wrote a very large number themselves.

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    0
  • The most famous of these was Buddhaghosa, from Behar in North India, who studied at the Minster in the 5th century A.D., and wrote there all his well-known works.

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    0
  • It is believed that he wrote also an autobiography, which has perished.

    0
    0
  • He also wrote a life of Caesar and the elder Scipio.

    0
    0
  • Luria himself wrote no mystical works; what we know of his doctrines and habits comes chiefly from his Boswell, Ilayim Vital.

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    0
  • He took part in the revolution of 1868, wrote the "Manifesto of Cadiz," took office as colonial minister, favoured the candidature of the duc de Montpensier, resigned in 1871, returned to his early Conservative principles, and was a member of Alfonso XII.'s first cabinet.

    0
    0
  • From the 9th to the 13th century intelligent Arab travellers wrote accounts of what they had seen and heard in distant lands.

    0
    0
  • Abu Zaid also wrote on India, and his work is the most important that we possess before the epoch-making discoveries of Marco Polo.

    0
    0
  • Amongst his contemporaries were Istakhri, who travelled through all the Mahommedan countries and wrote his Book of Climates in 950, and Ibn Haukal, whose Book of Roads and Kingdoms, based on the work of Istakhri, was written in 976.

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  • Vespucci afterwards made three voyages to the Brazilian coast; and in 1504 he wrote an account of his four voyages, which was widely circulated, and became the means of procuring for its author at the hands of the cartographer Waldseemi ller in 1507 the disproportionate distinction of giving his name to the whole continent.

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    0
  • He was followed by a Spanish mission under Garcia de Silva, who wrote an interesting account of his travels; and to Sir Dormer Cotton's mission, in 1628, we are indebted for Sir Thomas Herbert's charming narrative.

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    0
  • He was in the Persian Gulf, India and Java, and resided for more than two years in Japan, of which he wrote a history.

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    0
  • Longfellow wrote "A Psalm of Life" (1839), which was an intimate confession of the religious aspirations of the author.

    0
    0
  • He wrote Famous and Decisive Battles (1884), Campaigning with Crook (1890), and many popular romances of military life.

    0
    0
  • For this he wrote the first adequate account in German of the Darwinian theory of natural selection, which drew a warm letter of appreciation from Darwin himself.

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    0
  • He wrote too some excellent tales of adventure, notably The Thirty-Nine Steps (1915) and Greenmantle (1916).

    0
    0
  • Although of Dorian stock, he wrote in the Ionic dialect, like all the physiologi (physical philosophers).

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    0
  • His most important work was 11Epi cuo ew (De natura), of which considerable fragments are extant (chiefly in Simplicius); it is possible that he wrote also Against the Sophists and On the Nature of Man, to which the well-known fragment about the veins would belong; possibly these discussions were subdivisions of his great work.

    0
    0
  • Thus Athanasius writes (ad Afros vi.): "We have the testimony of fathers (the two Dionysii, bishops of Alexandria and Rome, who wrote in the previous century) for the use of the word oµoouatos."

    0
    0
  • Are all the Christian writers of a given period to be included among the "fathers," or those only who wrote on religious subjects, and of whose orthodoxy there is no doubt ?

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  • His mind was as well cultivated as his bodily powers; he wrote well, and his observations are generally acute and accurate; he was brave, kindly and generous.

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  • 1038), a man of wide learning, wrote 1 For the history of the very extensive literature of this class, Zunz, Literaturgeschichte der synagogalen Poesie (Berlin, 1865), is indispensable.

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    0
  • In the 10th century Jacob al-Qirqisani wrote his Kitab al-anwar, on law, Solomon ben Yeruham (against Seadiah) and Yefet ben 'Ali wrote exegetical works; in the 11th century Abu'l-faraj Furgan, exegesis, and Yusuf al-Basir against Samuel ben Hophni.

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    0
  • Most of these wrote in Arabic. In the 12th century and in S.

    0
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  • Other writers are Aaron (the elder) ben Joseph, 13th century, who wrote the commentary Sepher ha-mibhhar; Aaron (the younger) of Nicomedia (14th century), author of `E Ilayyim, on philosophy, Gan `Eden, on law, and the commentary Kether Torah; in the 15th century Elijah Bashyazi, on law (Addereth Eliyahu), and Caleb Efendipoulo, poet and theologian; in the 16th century Moses Bashyazi, theologian.

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    0
  • In the 9th century IIivi of Balkh wrote a rationalistic treatise 3 on difficulties in the Bible, which was refuted by Seadiah.

    0
    0
  • 1050) wrote a commentary on (probably all) the Talmud, and one now lost on the Pentateuch.

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    0
  • in 1089 at Cordova) wrote on ritual.

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    0
  • about 1140), wrote in Arabic a philosophical work based on Greek and Arabic as well as Jewish authorities, known by the name of the Hebrew translation as Arugath ha-bosem, and the Kitab al-Mahadarah, of great value for literary history.

    0
    0
  • In Arabic he wrote his philosophical work, called in the Hebrew translation Sepher ha-Kuzari, a defence of revelation as against non-Jewish philosophy and Qaraite doctrine.

    0
    0
  • 1141 at Lucena), a friend of Judah Ha-levi and of Moses ben Ezra, wrote Responsa and IIiddushin (annotations) on parts of the Talmud.

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    0
  • about 1190), who wrote short notes of his journeys.

    0
    0
  • He was distinguished in his profession as a physician, and wrote a number of medical works in Arabic (including a commentary on the aphorisms of Hippocrates), all of which were translated into Hebrew, and most of them into Latin, becoming the text-books of Europe in the succeeding centuries.

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    0
  • Maimonides also wrote an Arabic commentary on the Mishnah, soon afterwards translated into Hebrew, commentaries on parts of the Talmud (now lost), and a treatise on Logic. His breadth of view anti- and his Aristotelianism were a stumbling-block to the orthodox, and subsequent teachers may be mostly classified as Maimonists or anti-Maimonists.

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  • 1234), also a great Talmudist, wrote in Arabic Ma`aseh Yerushalmi, on oaths, and Kitab al-Kifayah, theology.

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    0
  • He wrote numerous translations, of Galen, Aristotle, Ilariri, IIunain ben Isaac and Maimonides, as well as several original works, a Sepher Anaq in imitation of Moses ben Ezra, and treatises on grammar and medicine (Rephuath geviyyah), but he is best known for his Talzkemoni, a diwan in the style of Ilariri's Magimat.

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  • He wrote on grammar (Sepher ha-galui and Sepher Zikkaron), commentaries on Proverbs and the Song of Solomon, an apologetic work, Sepher ha-berith, and a translation of Balhya's Ilobhoth ha-lebhabhoth.

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  • about 1190) also wrote on grammar and some commentaries, wrongly attributed to Ibn Ezra.

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    0
  • 1171), the grandson of Rashi, wrote the Sepher ha-yashar (hiddushin and responsa) and was one of the chief Tosaphists.

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    0
  • about 1270), who had studied in France, wrote the fan.ous Or Zarua` (from which he is often called), an halakhic work somewhat resembling Maimonides' Mishneh Torah, but more diffuse.

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    0
  • about 1330), perhaps the friend and certainly the imitator of Dante, wrote his diwan, of which the last part, "Topheth ve-`Eden," is suggested by the Divina Commedia.

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    0
  • About the same time Isaac Israeli wrote his Yesodh `Olam and other astronomical works which were much studied.

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  • after 1340), wrote a commentary on the liturgy.

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    0
  • about 1340), wrote poems (Behinath ha-`olam), commentaries on agada and a defence of Maimonides against Solomon Adreth.

    0
    0
  • 1344), called Ralbag, the great commentator on the Bible and Talmud, in philosophy a follower of Aristotle and Averroes, known to Christians as Leo Hebraeus, wrote also many works on halakhah, mathematics and astronomy.

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    0
  • 1340), wrote a large number of treatises on grammar and philosophy (mystical), besides commentaries and piyyutim.

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  • At the end of the century Isaac ben Moses, called Profiat Duran (Efodi), is chiefly known as an antiChristian controversialist (letter to Me'ir Alguadez), but also wrote on grammar (Ma`aseh Efod) and a commentary on the Moreh.

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  • 1410) wrote against Christianity and in his Or Adonai against the Aristotelianism of the Maimonists.

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    0
  • after 1510), astronomer, wrote the Sephei Yuhasin, an historical work of importance.

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    0
  • 1508) wrote commentaries (not of the first rank) on the Pentateuch and Prophets and on the Moreh, philosophical treatises and apologetics, such as the Yeshu`oth Meshiho, all of which had considerable influence.

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    0
  • In the East, Joseph Karo (Qaro) wrote his Beth Yoseph (Venice, 1550), a commentary on the Tur, and his Shulhan `Arukh (Venice, 1564) an halakhic work like the Tur, which is still a standard authority.

    0
    0
  • In Germany David Gans wrote on astronomy, and also the historical work Zemah David (Prag, 1592).

    0
    0
  • Foremost among these was Ilayyim Vital, author of the 'Ez hayyim, and his son Samuel, who wrote an introduction to the Kabbalah, called Shemoneh She`arim.

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    0
  • 1648) wrote his Beth Yehudah, and probably Qol Sakhal, against traditionalism, besides many controversial works and commentaries.

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  • 1655), wrote almost entirely on scientific subjects.

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  • about 1685) wrote the historical work Qore ha-doroth (Venice, 1746), using Jewish and other sources; Jacob ben Hayyim Zemah, kabbalist and student of Luria, wrote Qol be-ramah, a commentary on the Zohar and on the liturgy; Abraham Hayekini, kabbalist, chiefly remembered as a supporter of the would-be Messiah, Shabbethai Zebhi, wrote Hod Malkuth (Constantinople, 1655) and sermons.

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    0
  • 1865), a distinguished scholar and opponent of the philosophy of Maimonides, wrote much in Italian; M.

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  • 1895), scholar, wrote only in Hebrew.

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    0
  • In this respect they differ from the personal and intimate note which Paul wrote to Philemon.

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  • He also wrote incidental music to Hamlet, a symphony, and other works.

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  • 188), wrote a sketch of geography in six books.

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    0
  • He wrote many short stories and novels, and has also contributed to the Figaro, Gaulois and Libre Parole.

    0
    0
  • Besides these five books, Fordun wrote part of another book, and collected materials for bringing down the history to a later period.

    0
    0
  • These materials were used by a continuator who wrote in the middle of the 15th century, and who is identified with Walter Bower,' abbot of the monastery of Inchcolm.

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    0
  • The most valuable of the works of Lomonosov are those relating to physical science, and he wrote upon many branches of it.

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    0
  • It was during his confinement in this prison that he wrote his famous work De Consolatione Philosophiae.

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  • Pietro in Ciel d'Oro within a splendid tomb, for which Gerbert, afterwards Pope Silvester II., wrote an inscription.

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  • It should be mentioned also that some have given him a decidedly Christian wife, of the name of Elpis, who wrote hymns, two of which are still extant (Daniel, Thes.

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  • He translated into Latin Aristotle's Analytica Priora et Posteriora, the Topica, and Elenchi Sophistici; and he wrote commentaries on Aristotle's Categories, on his book lrEpi Epµnvcias, also a commentary on the Isagoge of Porphyrius.

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  • It will be seen from this statement that Peiper bases his conclusions on grounds far too narrow; and on the whole it is perhaps more probable that Boetius wrote none of the four Christian treatises, particularly as they are not ascribed to him by any of his contemporaries.

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    0
  • He wrote for that work the Discours preliminaire on the rise, progress and affinities of the various sciences, which he read to the French Academy on the day of his admission as a member, the 18th of December 1754.

    0
    0
  • He also wrote several literary articles for the first two volumes of the Encyclopaedia, and to the remaining volumes he contributed mathematical articles chiefly.

    0
    0
  • During the time he was engaged on the Encyclopaedia he wrote a number of literary and philosophical works which extended his reputation and also exposed him to criticism and controversy, as in the case of his M�nges de Philosophic, d'Histoire, et de Litterature.

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    0
  • Alembert was much interested in music both as a science and as an art, and wrote Elements de musique theorique et pratique (1779), which was based upon the system of P. Rameau with important modifications and differences.

    0
    0
  • 7 §§ 6-8, Agrippa Castor, who lived under Hadrian (117-138), already wrote a polemic against him, so that his activity may perhaps be set back to a date earlier than 138.

    0
    0
  • Basilides wrote an exegetical work in twenty-four books on "his" gospel, but which this was is not known.

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    0
  • He travelled much in North Africa, Mexico and South America, and wrote a number of short stories and vivid studies of life in those regions.

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    0
  • With Thomas Dekker he wrote The Fairy Knight and The Bristowe Merchant (licensed in 1624, but both unpublished), with John Webster A late Murther of the Sonne upon the Mother (licensed in 1624).

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    0
  • With Dekker Ford also wrote the mask of The Sun's Darling; or, as seems most probable, they founded this production upon Phaeton, an earlier mask, of which Dekker had been sole author.

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  • ALFRED ARNETH, Ritter voN (1819-1897), Austrian historian, born at Vienna on the 10th of July 1819, was the son of Joseph Calasanza von Arneth (1791-1863), a well-known historian and archaeologist, who wrote a history of the Austrian empire (Vienna, 18 27) and several works on numismatics.

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  • In order to reply to accusations brought against them, or in order to be confirmed in their functions, they had to travel to the Golden Horde on the Volga or even to the camp of the grand khan in some distant part of Siberia, and the journey was considered so perilous that many of them, before setting out, made their last will and testament and wrote a parental admonition for the guidance of their children.

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  • 19 B.C.), but was no longer alive when Ovid wrote (c. A.D.

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  • As it was put by Mr Stainton Moses, a leading spiritualist and himself a medium, who wrote under the nom de plume of "M.A.

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  • He wrote (1) Antapodoseos, seu rerum per Europem gestarum, Libri VI, an historical narrative, relating to the events from 887 to 949, compiled with the object of avenging himself upon Berengar and Willa his queen; (2) Historia Ottonis, a work of greater impartiality and merit, unfortunately covering only the years from 960 to 964; and (3) the Relatio de Legatione Constantinopolitana (968-969).

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  • It was His " finger " that wrote the brief code which has come down to us in the decalogue.

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    0
  • With an exceptional range of information thus afforded him, he wrote the opening of his history in July 1849; but, finding himself still unsettled in his work, he decided in the spring of the following year to carry out a long projected visit to England.

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  • Although he wrote poetry, also an anthology of verses on the monasteries of Mesopotamia and Egypt, and a genealogical work, his fame rests upon his Book of Songs (Kitab ul-Aghani), which gives an account of the chief Arabian songs, ancient and modern, with the stories of the composers and singers.

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  • Caird wrote also an excellent study of Spinoza, in which he showed the latent Hegelianism of the great Jewish philosopher.

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    0
  • "I have seen many men" (wrote Sir William Kingston, governor of the Tower) "and also women executed, and all they have been in great sorrow, and to my knowledge this lady has much joy and pleasure in death."

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  • But while it may be doubted whether his presence in parliament was of any direct utility to the legislative business of the country, there can be no question of the present advantage which he derived from it in the prosecution of the great work of his life - an advantage of which he was fully conscious when he wrote: " The eight sessions that I sat in parliament were a school of civil prudence, the first and most essential virtue of an historian."

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  • The feelings with which he brought his labours to a close must be described in his own inimitable words: " It was on the day, or rather night, of the 27th of June 1787, between the hours of eleven and twelve, that I wrote the last lines of the last page in a summer house in my garden.

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  • For instance, Mirabeau wrote thus to Sir Samuel Romilly: " I have never been able to read the work of Mr Gibbon without being astounded that it should ever have been written in English; or without being tempted to turn to the author and say, ` You an Englishman ?

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    0
  • At the London International Exhibition of 1851 he had charge of the department of machinery, and wrote a report on the machinery and tools on view at that exhibition.

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    0
  • He wrote both on psychology and on metaphysics, but is known especially as a historian of philosophy.

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    0
  • He wrote essays on Les Legistes et leur influence sur la societe francaise (1878); Le Comte de Montlosier et le Gallicanisme (1880; and published in 1882 his Dix Annees de vie politique.

    0
    0
  • - The most important authority for the history of Ravenna is Bishop Agnellus, who wrote, about 840, the Liber Pontificalis Ecclesiae Ravennatis.

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    0
  • At the request of Castor,bishopof Apt, he wrote two monumental and influential treatises on the monastic life.

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    0
  • At the desire of Leo (then archdeacon of Rome) he wrote against Nestorius his De Incarnatione Domini in seven books.

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    0
  • He took a prominent part in the dispute in 1671 between the two Houses concerning the right of the Lords to amend money bills, and wrote a learned pamphlet on the question entitled The Privileges of the House of Lords and Commons (1702), in which the right of the Lords was asserted.

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    0
  • In 1681 Anglesey wrote A Letter from a Person of Honour in the Country, as a rejoinder to the earl of Castlehaven, who had published memoirs on the Irish rebellion defending the action of the Irish and the Roman Catholics.

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    0
  • In 1682 he wrote The Account of Arthur, Earl of Anglesey.

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    0
  • Besides the pamphlets already mentioned, he wrote: - A True Account of the Whole Proceedings betwixt.

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    0
  • Of one part of the argument of this work Fiske wrote in the preface of one of his later books (Through Nature to God, 1899): "The detection of the part played by the lengthening of infancy in the genesis of the human race is my own especial contribution to the Doctrine of Evolution."

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    0
  • After studying at the Ecole Normale Superieure he was sent to the French school at Athens in 1853, directed some excavations in Chios, and wrote an historical account of the island.

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    0
  • Gregory wrote Hints for the Use of Teachers of Elementary Mathematics (1840, new edition 1853), and Mathematics for Practical Men (1825), which was revised and enlarged by Henry Law in 1848, and again by J.

    0
    0
  • He made no attempt at a critical examination of historical traditions, and wrote in a flowery and often bombastic style, but in spite of this drawback, Mirkhond's Rauzat remains one of the most marvellous achievements in literature.

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    0
  • In 1841 he urged the publication of the celebrated "Tract XC.," and wrote in defence of it.

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    0
  • He wrote articles on free will, the philosophy of theism, on science, prayer and miracles for the Dublin Review.

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    0
  • He wrote an admirable textbook of the Theory of Heat (1871), and a very excellent elementary treatise on Matter and Motion (1876).

    0
    0
  • In 1613, at the instigation of Pope Paul V., Suarez wrote a treatise dedicated to the Christian princes of Europe, entitled Defensio catholicae fidei contra anglicanae sectae errores.

    0
    0
  • Released in 1652 on the representation of the Spanish ambassador that O'Neill was a Spanish subject, he repaired to Spain, whence he wrote to Charles II.

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    0
  • For the next two decennial censuses he acted as assistant-commissioner; for that of 1871 he was a commissioner, and he wrote the greater part of the reports of all.

    0
    0
  • A great part of Farr's literary production is to be found in the papers which, from 1839 to 1880, he wrote for each annual report of the registrar-general on the cause of the year's deaths in England.

    0
    0
  • In his last illness he wrote to express his confidence in their loyalty.

    0
    0
  • In The Ever Green, being a Collection of Scots Poems wrote by the Ingenious before 1600, Ramsay had another purpose, to reawaken an interest in the older national literature.

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    0
  • Ramsay wrote little afterwards, though he published a few shorter poems, and new editions of his earlier work.

    0
    0
  • In June Crichton was once more in Venice, and while there wrote two Latin odes to his friends Lorenzo Massa and Giovanni Donati, but after this date the details of his life are obscure.

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  • An ardent anti-renter in his boyhood and youth, he wrote A History of Delaware County and the Border Wars of New York, containing a Sketch of the Early Settlements in the County, and A History of the Late Anti-Rent Difficulties in Delaware (Roxbury, 1856).

    0
    0
  • Note: When writers, wrote in latin they automatically become part of the writers geographic region of birth.

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    0
  • While in prison he wrote the "Fort Warren letter" (August 11th), in which he urged the people of Texas to recognize their defeat, grant civil rights to the freedmen, and try to conciliate the North.

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    0
  • Agrippina wrote memoirs of her times, referred to 'by Tacitus (Ann.

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    0
  • He also wrote Don Karlos (Berlin, 1876); Gri ndung des deutschen Reiches 1859-1871 (Leipzig, 1892, and again 1902); and Geschichte der deutschen Kiinigswahlen (Leipzig, 1889).

    0
    0
  • - Robertson Smith's later views subsequent to 1877 (when he wrote the article on David for this Encyclopaedia) were expressed partly in the Old Test.

    0
    0
  • In addition, he wrote a number of scientific memoirs and papers, including two on the integration of partial differential equations (Jour.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, he wrote an article in the Edinburgh Review of July 1805 criticizing Sir William Gill's Topography of Troy, and these circumstances led Lord Byron to refer to him in English Bards and Scotch Reviewers as "the travell'd thane, Athenian Aberdeen."

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    0
  • He wrote An Inquiry into the Principles of Beauty in Grecian Architecture (London, 1822), and the Correspondence of the Earl of Aberdeen has been printed privately under the direction of his son, Lord Stanmore.

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    0
  • His wild extravagance, however, forced his father to forestall his creditors by securing his detention in semi-exile in the country, where he wrote his earliest extant work, the Essai sur le despotisme.

    0
    0
  • He wrote in his autobiography that he was impressed with her beauty.

    0
    0
  • The Considerations sur l'ordre de Cincinnatus which Romilly translated was the only important work Mirabeau wrote in the year 1785, and it is a good specimen of his method.

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    0
  • When he could speak no more he wrote with a feeble hand the one word "dormir," and on the and of April 1791 he died.

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    0
  • Dumont was a Genevese exile, and an old friend of Romilly's, who willingly prepared for him those famous addresses which Mirabeau used to make the Assembly pass by sudden bursts'of eloquent declamation; Claviere helped him in finance, and not only worked out his figures, but even wrote his financial discourses; Lamourette wrote the speeches on the civil constitution of the clergy; Reybaz not only wrote for him his famous speeches on the assignats, the organization of the national guard, and others, which Mirabeau read word for word at the tribune, but even the posthumous speech on succession to the estates of intestates, which Talleyrand read in the Assembly as the last work of his dead friend.

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    0
  • For this purpose he wrote the necessary school-books himself, including his well-known History of England.

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    0
  • "He is," wrote the Venetian ambassador Giustiniani, "very handsome, learned, extremely eloquent, of vast ability and indefatigable.

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    0
  • "He is," wrote another diplomatist, "the proudest prelate that ever breathed."

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    0
  • Matthew Paris also wrote a life of Edmund Rich (q.v.), which is probably the work printed in W.

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    0
  • Lord Capel, who was much beloved, and who was a man of deep religious feeling and exemplary life, wrote Daily Observations or Meditations: Divine, Morall, published with some of his letters in 1654, and reprinted, with a short life of the author, under the title Excellent Contemplations, in 1683.

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  • This, according to the manner of speaking of that day, is the meaning of his words ante conversionem meam, though it is quite possible that he may at the same time have renounced the Arian creed of his forefathers, which it is clear that he no longer held when he wrote his Gothic history.

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    0
  • Whether he was a Greek, a Roman or a Goth we do not know; nor can we say when he wrote, though his work may be dated conjecturally in the early part of the reign of Theodoric the Great.

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    0
  • We can only say that he wrote on the origin and history of the Goths, using both Gothic saga and Greek sources; and that if Jordanes used Cassiodorus, Cassiodorus used, if to a less extent, the work of Ablabius.

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    0
  • Oldham wrote other satires, notably one "addressed to a friend about to leave the university," which contains a well-known description of the state of slavery of the private chaplain, and another "dissuading from poetry," describing the ingratitude shown to Edmund Spenser, whose ghost is the speaker, to Samuel Butler and to Abraham Cowley.

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    0
  • To the transactions of various learned societies he contributed from first to last between three and four hundred papers, and few of his contemporaries wrote so much for the various reviews.

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    0
  • In 1769 he wrote his Memoire sur les prrts a interet, on the occasion of a scandalous financial crisis at Angouleme, the peculiar interest of which is that in it the question of lending money at interest was for the first time treated scientifically, and not merely from the ecclesiastical point of view.

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    0
  • It was in 1770 that he wrote his famous Lettres sur la liberte du commerce des grains, addressed to the comptroller-general, the abbe Terray.

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    0
  • In 1785 Bentham started, by way of Italy and Constantinople, on a visit to his brother, Samuel Bentham, a naval engineer, holding the rank of colonel in the Russian service; and it was in Russia that he wrote his Defence of Usury.

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    0
  • He wrote also Elements de metaphysique (1724), a "French Grammar on a new plan," and a number of historical essays.

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    0
  • In 1727 he was appointed one of the commission (of which William Fitzwilliams and William Dandridge were the other members) to mark the boundary between North Carolina and Virginia, concerning which undertaking he wrote (probably in 1737) The History of the Dividing Line.

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    0
  • Among his articles may be mentioned those which he wrote for the ninth edition of this Encyclopaedia on Light, Mechanics, Quaternions, Radiation and Thermodynamics, besides the biographical notices of Hamilton and Clerk Maxwell.

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  • Copious extracts from a diary kept by him at this time are given by Bain; they show how methodically he read and wrote, studied chemistry and botany, tackled advanced mathematical problems, made notes on the scenery and the people and customs of the country.

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  • In the course of the next few years he wrote comparatively little, but he continued his reading, and also derived much, benefit from discussions held twice a week at Grote's house in Threadneedle Street.

    0
    0
  • Much of what he wrote then was subsequently incorporated in his systematic works: some of his essays were reprinted in his first two volumes of Dissertations and Discussions (1859).

    0
    0
  • While his great systematic works were in progress, Mill wrote very little on events or books of the day.

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  • But a little reflection will show that he wrote with his usual accuracy and sobriety when he described her influence on him.

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    0
  • His little cottage was filled with books and newspapers; the beautiful country round it furnished him with a variety of walks; he read, wrote, discussed, walked, botanized.

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    0
  • "Helen," he wrote to W.

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    0
  • He wrote in the Examiner and made a public speech in favour of the association a few months before his death.

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    0
  • When he wrote his Logic he had learned from Comte that the a posteriori method - in the form which he chose to call "inverse deduction" - was the only mode of arriving at truth in general sociology; and his admission of this at once renders the essay obsolete.

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    0
  • Their works frequently contain information given nowhere else, and throw much light on the state of opinion in the age in which they wrote.

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    0
  • Of economic students, many are unaware of the fact that he wrote any other book than the Essay on the Principle of Population, and what is of permanent importance in that work is contained in the generalization which it suggested to Darwin.

    0
    0
  • Latimer wrote to him in that year urging him not to fall short of the expectations which had been formed of his ability.

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    0
  • He got into some trouble with the chancellor, Gardiner, over a ribald play, "Pammachius," performed by the students, deriding the old ecclesiastical system, though Bonner wrote to Parker of the assured affection he bore him.

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    0
  • He distrusted popular enthusiasm, and he wrote in horror of the idea that "the people" should be the reformers of the Church.

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    0
  • But Mahmud had by this time heard of his asylum at the court of the caliph, and wrote a letter menacing his liege lord, and demanding the surrender of the poet.

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  • Firdousi confided to him that he contemplated writing a bitter exposition of his shameful treatment at the hands of the sultan of Ghazni; but Nasir Lek, who was a personal friend of the latter, dissuaded him from his purpose, but himself wrote and remonstrated with Mahmud.

    0
    0
  • At Valence also he wrote an essay for a prize instituted by his friend and literary adviser, Raynal, at the academy of Lyons.

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    0
  • "People," he wrote, "remember the Terror only as a dream."

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    0
  • "Everything is connected with this event," he wrote on the 2nd of August, "Germany, Poland, Italy."

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    0
  • The value of that unseen ally he well knew: "Once again, let me tell you," he wrote to General Clarke on the 10th of October 1809, "in war moral and opinion are more than half of the reality."

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  • Metternich thereupon wrote to his master: "He (Napoleon), has possibly more weaknesses than many other men, and if the empress continues to play upon them, as she begins to realize the possibility of doing, she can render the greatest services to herself and all Europe."

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  • If Prussian towns "behaved badly" (he wrote on the 4th of March), they were to be burnt; Eugene was not to spare even Berlin.

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    0
  • Prussia (he wrote on the 14th of March) was a weak country.

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  • At last, on the nth of April, he wrote the deed of abdication.

    0
    0
  • In addition to these he compiled several volumes of excerpts from ancient authors, and wrote a number of works on geography, music and other subjects, many of which still exist in MS. in various European libraries.

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  • Callisthenes wrote an account of Alexander's expedition, a history of Greece from the peace of Antalcidas (387) to the Phocian war (3S7), a history of the Phocian war and other works, all of which have perished.

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    0
  • An enthusiastic disciple of Descartes, he wrote several works in philosophy and theology, which by their freedom of thought aroused considerable hostility.

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    0
  • "Theology," he wrote to a friend, "I can bring myself to study no more.

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    0
  • Farel wrote much, but usually in haste, and for an immediate purpose.

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    0
  • Sundevall - equally proficient in classical as in ornithological knowledge - was, in 1863, compelled to leave more than a score of the birds of which Aristotle wrote unidentified.

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    0
  • Gesner brought an amount of erudition, hitherto unequalled, to bear upon his subject; and, making due allowance for the times in which he wrote, his judgment must in most respects be deemed excellent.

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  • Contemporary with these three men was Ulysses Aldrovandus, a Bolognese, who wrote an Historia Naturalium in sixteen folio volumes, most of which were not printed till after his death in 1605; but those on birds appeared between 1599 and 1603.

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  • A comparison of the relation of created beings to a number of intersecting circles is as old as the days of Nieremberg, who in 1635 wrote (Historia naturae, lib.

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  • Thus he (prompted very likely by Macgillivray) wrote: " I believe the time to be approaching when much of the results obtained from the inspection of the exterior alone will be laid aside; when museums filled with stuffed skins will be considered insufficient to afford a knowledge of birds; and when the student will go forth, not only to observe the habits and haunts of animals, but to preserve specimens of them to be carefully dissected" (Ornith.

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  • Pithou wrote a great number of legal and historical books, besides preparing editions of several ancient authors.

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    0
  • He wrote both words and music in a fit of patriotic excitement after a public dinner.

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    0
  • Rouget de Lisle wrote a few other songs of the same kind, and in 1825 he published Chants frangais, in which he set to music fifty songs by various authors.

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    0
  • Camden, about the end of the 17th century, wrote that "the people are very industrious, so that though the soil about it be barren and improfitable, not fit to live on, they have so flourished..

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  • Beside the works already named Tyndale wrote A Prologue on the Epistle to the Romans (1526), An Exposition of the 1st Epistle of John (1531), An Exposition of Matthew v.-vii.

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    0
  • In the following year he wrote to Bacon, ordering him notwithstanding any injunctions from his superiors, to write out and send to him a treatise on the sciences which he had already asked of him when papal legate.

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  • During this time, it is said, he wrote the small tract De Retardandis Senectutis Accidentibus, but this is merely a tradition.

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  • The people met, not as usual in the Pnyx, but in the Agora, in the presence of the Archons, and recorded their votes by placing in urns small fragments of pottery (which in the ancient world served the purpose of waste-paper) (ostraca) on which they wrote the name of the person whom they wished to banish.

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  • He also edited Gay's Fables, and wrote a Life of John Gay (Salisbury, 1797), Anecdotes of G.

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  • 865), who wrote that "the substance of the Bread and Wine is efficaciously changed interiorly into the Flesh and Blood of Christ," and that after the consecration what is there is "nothing else but Christ the Bread of Heaven."

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    0
  • In 1767 he was appointed to the charge of Mill Hill Chapel at Leeds, where he again changed his religious opinions from a loose Arianism to definite Socinianism and wrote many political tracts hostile to the attitude of the government towards the American colonies.

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  • At one time, indeed, he found Lavoisier's views so specious that he was much inclined to accept them, but he overcame this wavering, and so late as 1800 he wrote to the Rev. Theophilus Lindsey (1723-1808), "I have well considered all that my opponents have advanced and feel perfectly confident of the ground I stand upon....

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  • Longfellow (who married Nathan Appleton's daughter) wrote his poem "The Old Clock on the Stairs."

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  • He wrote nothing but a critical examination of the story of Don Carlos, but he returned to Germany a master of his craft.

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  • In the quieter years that followed he wrote the third of his masterpieces, Franzosische Geschichte, vornehmlich im 16 and 17 Jahrhundert (Stuttgart, 1852-61), which was followed by his Englische Geschichte, vornehmlich 16 and 17 Jahrhundert (1859-68).

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  • He also wrote biographies of Frederick the Great and Frederick William IV.

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  • Here he wrote his Chronicle, containing the history of the house of the Palaeologi from 1258-1476.

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    0
  • From the first he had an Eastern principality in his mind's eye; and if we may judge from the follower of Bohemund who wrote the Gesta Francorum, there had already been some talk at Constantinople of Antioch as the seat of this principality.

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  • According to the story of the legists who wrote these books - e.g.

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    0
  • The difficulties between Frederick and Isaac Angelus became acute: in November 1189 Frederick wrote to his son Henry, asking him to induce the pope to preach a Crusade against the schismatic Greeks.

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  • But for Innocent these outbursts of the revivalist element, which always accompanied the Crusades, had their moral: "the very children put us to shame," he wrote; "while we sleep 1 Already under Innocent III.

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    0
  • 18 the theorists who speculated and wrote on the Crusades), he attempted to revive the old crusading spirit throughout the west of Europe.

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  • Finally he was an eye-witness throughout, and absolutely contemporary, in the sense that he wrote his account of each great event practically at the time of the event.

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  • He wrote the book at different times between 1170 and 1183, when it abruptly ends, and its author as abruptly disappears from sight.

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  • during the Second Crusade; and he wrote home to Suger during the Crusade seven short letters, afterwards pieced together in a single work.

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  • The various continuations of William of Tyre above mentioned represent the opinion of the native Franks (which is hostile to Richard I.); while in Nicetas, who wrote a history of the Eastern empire from 1118 to 1206, we have a Byzantine authority who, as Professor Bury remarks, "differs from Anna and Cinnamus in his tone towards the crusaders, to whom he is surprisingly fair."

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  • It is important to notice that Archytas must have been famous as a philosopher, inasmuch as Aristotle wrote a special treatise (not extant) On the Philosophy of Archytas.

    0
    0
  • Maecenas himself wrote in both prose and verse.

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  • He also wrote some papers on the Sabbath, which brought him into controversy with Joseph Priestley, who published the whole discussion (1792).

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    0
  • He was a man of considerable intellectual attainments, of prodigious memory, master of both Latin and Greek, and wrote prose and verse with equal facility.

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  • He composed an autobiography, published under the name of his freedman Phlegon; wrote speeches, fragments of two of which are preserved in inscriptions (a panegyric on his mother-in-law Matidia, and an address to the soldiers at Lambaesis in Africa).

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  • In imitation of Antimachus he wrote a work called Catachannae, probably a kind of miscellanea.

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  • His early friend and school companion, Adelmann, archdeacon of Liege, wrote to him letters of expostulation on the subject of this report in 1046 and 1048; and a bishop, Hugo of Langres, wrote (about 1049) a refutation of the views which he had himself heard Berengar express in conversation.

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  • Berengar's belief was not shaken by their arguments and exhortations, and hearing that Lanfranc, the most celebrated theologian of that age, strongly approved the doctrine of Paschasius and condemned that of " Scotus " (really Ratramnus), he wrote to him a letter expressing his surprise and urging him to reconsider the question.

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  • Certain it is that he wrote a treatise on burning-glasses.

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    0
  • He eloquently advocated Charles's authorship. Since he wrote in 1829, some further evidence has been forthcoming in favour of the Naseby copy.

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  • Biog.; Christopher Wordsworth, Who wrote Eikon Basilike?

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  • By about the beginning of our era the Jews had given up Hebrew and wrote in Aramaic; the process of expulsion had been going on, doubtless, for some time; but comparison with the later extant literature (Chronicles, the Hebrew Ecclesiasticus or Ben-Sira, Esther) makes it improbable that such Hebrew as that of Koheleth would have been written earlier than the 2nd century B.C. (for details see Driver's Introduction).

    0
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  • To-day, however, fuller data are available than when Wallace wrote, and the more generally accepted theory is that the Malayan race is distinct, and came from the south, until it was stayed by the Mongolian races living on the mainland of southern Asia.

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  • After some further vicissitudes in 1378 he entered the service of the sultan of his native town of Tunis, where he devoted himself almost exclusively to his studies and wrote his history of the Berbers.

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  • In 1721 he wrote a supplement to the Geometria organica, which he afterwards published, with extensions, in the Philosophical Transactions for 1735.

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    0
  • In 1866 he wrote in the Fortnightly Review (April and May) an essay on "Kinship in Ancient Greece," in which he proposed to test by early Greek facts the theory of the history of kinship set forth in Primitive Marriage; and three years later appeared a series of essays on "Totemism" in the same periodical for 1869-1870 (the germ of which had been contained in the paper just named), which mark the second great step in his systematic study of early society.

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  • Besides the works already cited, M'Lennan wrote a Life of Thomas Drummond (1867).

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  • He spent the rest of his days in various parts of Italy, chiefly in Venice, and wrote a statement of the claims of the Florentine exiles against the Medici, addressed to the emperor Charles V.

    0
    0
  • The making of these began about the 11th century, one of the earliest of the translators, Constantinus Africanus, wrote about 1075, and another, Gerard of Cremona, lived from 1114 to 1187.

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  • Drew had begun to meditate a greater attempt before he wrote his Remarks on Paine; and, encouraged by the antiquary John Whitaker, he published his Essay on the Immateriality and Immortality of the Soul in 1802.

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  • The work which he then wrote, and which in his own judgment was his best, was published in 1820, under the title of An Attempt to demonstrate from Reason and Revelation the Necessary Existence, Essential Perfections, and Superintending Providence of an Eternal Being, who is the Creator, the Supporter, and the Governor of all Things (2 vols.

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  • He wrote in French, Advis de Monseigneur de Lysieux au roi (Paris, 1677).

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    0
  • Our knowledge of Lanfranc's polemics is chiefly derived from the tract De cor pore et sanguine Domini which he wrote many years later (after 1079) when Berengar had been finally condemned.

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    0
  • He wrote and edited many works for the use of his scholars.

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    0
  • The earliest known description of Athens was that of Diodorus, o ireptryris, who lived in the second half of the 4th century B.C. Among his successors were Polemon of Ilium (beginning of 2nd century B.C.),whose great irepco)ynvcs gave a minute account of thevotiveofferings'on the Acropolis and the tombs on the Sacred Way; and Heliodorus (second half of the 2nd century) who wrote fifteen volumes on the monuments of Athens.

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  • In 1395 Niccolo da Martoni, a pilgrim from the Holy Land, visited Athens and wrote a description of a portion of the city.

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  • The Dutchman Joannes Meursius (1579-1639) wrote three disquisitions on Athenian topography.

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  • Ignatius wrote originally in Spanish, but the book was twice translated into Latin during his lifetime.

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    0
  • Ribadeneira, who as a youth had been associated with the founder, wrote his Vida del S.

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  • Bartole, the official biographer, wrote his Della vita e dell' instituto di S.

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    0
  • Ignatio (Rome, 1650, 1659) Genelli wrote Das Leben des heiligen Ignatius von Loyola (Innsbruck, 1848); Nicolas Orlandinus gives a life in the first volume of the Historiae Societatis Jesu (Rome, 1615).

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  • His autobiography was published at New York in 1867-1869, and his son Ramon Paez wrote Public Life of J.

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  • Besides being a contributor to the magazines and encyclopedias on educational and philosophical subjects, he wrote An Introduction to the Study of Philosophy (1889); The Spiritual Sense of Dante's Divina Commedia (1889); Hegel's Logic (1890); and Psychologic Foundations of Education (1898); and edited Appleton's International Education Series and 'Webster's International Dictionary.

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  • At this period he wrote two important works which, owing to the distracted state of public affairs, remained unpublished, Institutiones juris ecclesiastici and Praelectiones juris ecclesiastici.

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    0
  • Besides many contributions to periodical literature he wrote,.

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  • He wrote a Notice historique sur la vie et les ouvrages du comte de Lanjuinais, which was prefixed to an edition of his father's Ouvres (4 vols., 1832).

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  • In July 1774 he wrote for a convention in Fairfax county a series of resolutions known as the Fairfax Resolves, in which he advocated a congress of the colonies and suggested non-intercourse with Great Britain, a policy subsequently adopted by Virginia and later by the Continental Congress.

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    0
  • Two words I wrote to Liszt; his answer was the news that preparations were being made for the performance of the work, on the grandest scale that the limited means of Weimar would permit.

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    0
  • Though Meyerbeer wrote much that is intrinsically more dull and vulgar than the overture to Rienzi, he never combined such serious efforts with a technique so like that of a military bandmaster.

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    0
  • In point of time the poet whose name is first connected with the region is Gray, who wrote a journal of his tour in 1769.

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  • He appeared on her behalf before the legates at Blackfriars; and wrote a treatise against the divorce that was widely read.

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  • Like its sister Epistle to the Colossians, it represents, whoever wrote it, deep experience and bold use of reflection on the meaning of that experience; if it be from the pen of the Apostle Paul, it reveals to us a distinct and important phase of his thought.

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  • It must further be supposed that the name and the very existence of this genius were totally forgotten in Christian circles fifty years after he wrote.

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  • He also wrote: Della Causa delle Febbri maligni (Pisa, 1658); De Renum usu Judicium (Strassburg, 1664); Euclides Restitutus (Pisa, 1658); Apollonii Pergaei Conicorum libri v., vi.

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  • He also wrote Commemoratio abbatum Lemovicensium basilicae S.

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  • It must have been between 1160 and 1209 that he held this position; but the date at which he lived and wrote cannot be more accurately determined.

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  • Some authorities hold that Walsingham himself only wrote the section between 1377 and 1392, but this view is controverted by James Gairdner in his Early chroniclers of Europe (1879).

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  • Covering some of the same ground Walsingham wrote a Chronicon Angliae; this deals with English history from 1328 to 1388 and has been edited by Sir E.

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  • Among the travellers of whose information he was thus able to avail himself were Pytheas of Massilia, Patroclus, who had visited the Caspian (285-282 B.C.), Megasthenes, who visited Palibothra on the Ganges, as ambassador of Seleucus Nicator (302-291 B.C.), Timosthenus of Rhodes, the commander of the fleet of Ptolemy Philadelphus (284-246 B.C.) who wrote a treatise " On harbours," and Philo, who visited Meroe on the upper Nile.

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  • Leontius, who wrote a book on the manufacture of globes (first published at Basel in 1539), is identified by Fiorini with a bishop of Neapolis (Cyprus) of the time of Constantine III.

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  • The map or diagram of which Leonardo Dati in his poem on the Sphere (Della Spera) wrote in 1422 " un T dentre a uno 0 mostra it disegno " (a T within an 0 shows the design) is one of the most persistent types among the circular or wheel maps of the world.

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  • In the violent controversy that ensued he wrote many pamphlets, often anonymous, and frequently not in the best of taste.

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    0
  • Victorinus wrote a commentary on the Apocalypse of John; and all these theologians, especially Lactantius, were diligent students of the ancient Sibylline oracles of Jewish and Christian origin, and treated them as divine revelations.

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  • In the early periods of the history of other countries this seems to have been the case even where the dog was esteemed and valued, and had become the companion, the friend and the defender of man and his home; and in the and century of the Christian era Arrian wrote that "there is as much difference between a fair trial of speed in a good run, and ensnaring a poor animal without an effort, as between the secret piratical assaults of robbers at sea and the victorious naval engagements of the Athenians at Artemisium and at Salamis."

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  • Jaquet wrote The Kennel Club: a History and Record of its Work, and an edition de luxe of Dogs is edited by Mr Harding Cox; Mr Sidney Turner, the chairman of the Kennel Club committee, edited The Kennel Encyclopaedia, the first number of which was issued in 1907.

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  • Early in the 18th century William Sewel, a Dutch Quaker, wrote a history of the Society and published an English translation; modern (small) histories have been written by T.

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    0
  • He wrote his lectures at high pressure, and devoted much time to the editing and publication of the numerous poems which he had written at various times during his life.

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  • Brown wrote a criticism of Darwin's Zoonomia (1798), and was one of the first contributors to the Edinburgh Review, in the second number of which he published a criticism of the Kantian philosophy, based entirely on Villers's French account of it.

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  • He wrote many similar works, among which is a Vindication of Luther against his recent English Assailants (1854).

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    0
  • Together with these larger works Dahn wrote many monographs and studies upon primitive German society.

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    0
  • When Edwards wrote (1791), the number of European factories on the coasts of Africa was 40; of these 14 were English, 3 French, 15 Dutch, 4 Portuguese and 4 Danish.

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    0
  • Washington in his will provided for the emancipation of his own his first wishes to see some plan adopted by which slavery in his country might be abolished by law," and again he wrote that to this subject his own suffrage should never be wanting.

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  • She edited a monthly magazine; and wrote at least two dramatic works, The Marriage of Fabian, and a comedy entitled Toissiokoff.

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  • When the churches were closed against him he spoke to the Kingswood colliers in the open air, and after six memorable weeks wrote urging Wesley to come and take up the work.

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    0
  • On the 1st of May 1738 he wrote in his journal: "This evening our little society began, which afterwards met in Fetter Lane."

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  • He preached his last sermon in Mr Belson's house at Leatherhead on Wednesday, the 23rd of February 1791; wrote next day his last letter to Wilberforce, urging him to carry on his crusade against the slave trade; and died in his house at City Road on the 2nd of March 1791, in his eighty-eighth year.

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  • About the same time he wrote for the Cabinet Cyclopaedia a "History of England from the Earliest Times to the Final Establishment of the Reformation."

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  • And though Bede makes no pretensions to originality, least of all in his theological works, freely taking what he needed, and (what is very rare in medieval writers) acknowledging what he took, "out of the works of the venerable Fathers," still everything he wrote is informed and impressed with his own special character and temper.

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  • It is known that at this early period of his life, while he was yet a novice, he wrote voluminous treatises on the great philosopher, which he afterwards, however, gave to the flames.

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  • He became involved in a controversy with Joseph Justus Scaliger, formerly his intimate friend, and others, wrote Ecclesiasticus auctoritati Jacobi regis oppositus (1611), an attack upon James I.

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  • Besides the works already noticed, he wrote De arte critica (1597); De Antichristo (1605); Pro auctoritate ecclesiae in decidendis fidei controversiis libellus; Scaliger hypololymaeus (1607), a virulent attack on Scaliger; and latterly the anti-jesuitical works, Flagellum Jesuiticum (1632); Mysteria patrum jesuitorum (1633); and Arcana societatis Jesu (1635).

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  • He contributed largely to the seventh edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, and also wrote several scientific papers for the Edinburgh Review and various scientific journals.

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    0
  • After a fortnight more at Shawbury, he wrote to John Newton and another clergyman friend in London for advice.

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  • He wrote Correlation Papers - Archaean and Algonkian (1892), Some Principles Controlling the Deposition of Ores (1901).

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  • He wrote Essai politique sur le revenue des peuples de l'antiquite, du moyen age, &c. (1808); Des systemes d'economie politique (1809); Theorie d'economie politique (1815); Dictionnaire analytique de l'economie politique (1826).

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  • At Oxford he formed a close friendship with Arnold Toynbee, and was associated with his schemes of social work; and subsequently he wrote a tribute to his friend, Arnold Toynbee: a Reminiscence (1895).

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    0
  • "It may seem a paradox," he wrote, "but it is true that the only way for protecting our subjects is to help them to cease to be our subjects."

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  • In 434, three years after the council of Ephesus, he wrote the Commonitorium adversus profanas omnium haereticorum novitates, in which he ultimately aims at Augustine's doctrine of grace and predestination.

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  • He read considerably, wrote abundantly, thought actively if not widely, and came to know beasts, birds and fishes with an intimacy more extraordinary than was the case with St Francis of Assisi.

    0
    0
  • Thoreau's fame will rest on Walden; or, Life in the Woods (Boston, 1854) and the Excursions (Boston, 1863), though he wrote nothing which is not deserving of notice.

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  • Richard Tighe wrote a short account of Law's life in 1813.

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    0
  • He wrote an account of this three years' journey, for which he was rewarded by Suleiman with an office and a pension.

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  • Sheikhi of Kermiyan, a contemporary of Mahommed I.and Murad II., wrote a lengthy and still esteemed mesnevi on the ancient Persian romance of Khusrev and Shirin; and about the same time Yaziji-oghlu gave to the world a long versified history of the Prophet, the Muha.mmediya.

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  • Afewyearsafter Constantinople passed into the hands of the Ottomans, some ghazels, the work of the contemporary Tatar prince, Mir `Ali Shir, who under the nom de plume of Nevayi wrote much that shows true talent and poetic feeling, found their way to the Ottoman capital, where they were seen and copied by Ahmed Pasha, one of the viziers of Mahommed II.

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  • His influence upon his successors has scarcely been as far-reaching as might have been expected - a circumstance which is perhaps in some measure owing to the unfamiliar dialect in which he wrote.

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  • 1599) of Constantinople, though far from rivalling his contemporary Fuzuli, wrote much good poetry, including one piece of great excellence, an elegy on Suleiman I.

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  • 1599), the preceptor of Murad III., wrote a valuable history of the empire from the earliest W riters.

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  • Coming now to the post-classical period, we find among poets worthy of mention Beligh, Nevres, Hishmet and Sunbuli-zada Vehbi, each of whom wrote in a style peculiar to himself.

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  • He wrote with conspicuous success in almost every branch of literature - history, romance, ethics, poetry and the drama; and his influence on the Young Turk party of later days was profound.

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  • All march discipline disappeared, the men dissolved into hordes of marauders and even the sternest of the marshals wrote piteous appeals to the emperor for supplies, and for permission to shoot some of their stragglers.

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  • In reply he immediately wrote: " You do not inform me what has rendered necessary such an extraordinary measure which weakens and divides my troops "- and - " I cannot quite grasp the meaning of your letter yet, I should have preferred to see my army concentrated between Ingolstadt and Augsburg, the Bavarians in the first line, with the duke of Danzig in his old position, until we know what the enemy is going to do.

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  • The submission to censorship which this entailed was sufficiently inconsistent and she wrote to the emperor one of the unfortunate letters, at once undignified and provoking, of which she had the secret.

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  • He also wrote an essay on Nachmanides, and a biography and critical appreciation of Rashba (1863).

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  • In the Stromateis, while attempting to show that the Jewish Scriptures were older than any writings of the Greeks, he invariably brings down his dates to the death of Commodus, a circumstance which at once suggests that he wrote in the reign of the emperor Severus, from 193 to 211 A.D.

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