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writer

writer

writer Sentence Examples

  • Surely the writer must become as a little child to see things like that.

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  • The duties of a young "writer" were then such as are implied in the name.

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  • He particularly reverenced the writer and the preacher.

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  • Neat writer, ain't he?

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  • We met Mr. Warner, the writer, Mr. Mabie, the editor of the Outlook and other pleasant people.

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  • DINARCHUS, last of the "ten" Attic orators, son of Sostratus (or, according to Suidas, Socrates), born at Corinth about 361 B.C. He settled at Athens early in life, and when not more than twenty-five was already active as a writer of speeches for the law courts.

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  • No one has better understood or more skilfully portrayed the artistic temperament - the musician, the actor, the poet - and no French writer before her had so divined and laid bare the heart of a girl.

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  • Jonathan Swift, often called Dean Swift, was famous as a writer on many subjects.

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  • "Another forfeit for a Gallicism," said a Russian writer who was present.

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  • To him Homer was a great writer, though what his writing was about he did not know.

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  • Miss Keller has a braille writer on which she keeps notes and writes letters to her blind friends.

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  • Bonaparte and Professor Schlegel (1850), though it excludes many birds which an English writer would call "grosbeaks."

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  • The seventeenth-century Spanish writer Baltasar Gracián once offered this advice: "Never contend with a man who has nothing to lose."

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  • Ethel Reagan, the writer, noted the tips were telephoned from various locations across the country and provided by both men and women.

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  • To a Rechabite (the clan is allied to the Kenites) is definitely ascribed a hand in Jehu's sanguinary measures, and, though little is told of the obviously momentous events, one writer clearly alludes to a bloody period when reforms were to be effected by the sword (1 Kings xix.

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  • But it is to be remembered that Miss Keller has written many things in her autobiography for the fun of writing them, and the disillusion, which the writer of the editorial took seriously, is in great part humorous.

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  • The young writer, as Stevenson has said, instinctively tries to copy whatever seems most admirable, and he shifts his admiration with astonishing versatility.

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  • No writer can be less intrinsically worthy of study than Wolff.

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  • Langen was more celebrated as a writer than as a speaker.

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  • Taking opossums to have been the ancestors of the group, the author considers that the present writer may be right in his view that marsupials entered Australia from Asia by way of New Guinea.

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  • Maximilian was also a writer of books, and his writings display his inordinate vanity.

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  • The episode had a deadening effect on Helen Keller and on Miss Sullivan, who feared that she had allowed the habit of imitation, which has in truth made Miss Keller a writer, to go too far.

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  • Raynaudus's authorities, in favour of the recognition of a natural theology and against it, do not, so far as the present writer has been able to consult them, use the expression.

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  • An orator and writer of Latin verse, he left three books of graceful Latin poems (printed with Salmon Macrin's Odes, 1546, by R.

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  • Soc. Arts, March 5, 1880), but the present writer is unable to accept it.

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  • THEODORET, bishop of Cyrrhus, an important writer in the domains of exegesis, dogmatic theology, church history and ascetic theology, was born in Antioch, Syria, about 386.

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  • 12.53), comparing these writers with the old Ionic logographers, says that they paid no attention to ornament, and considered the only merits of a writer to be intelligibility and conciseness.

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  • Brissot became known as a facile and able writer, and was engaged on the Mercure, on the Courrier de l'Europe, and on other papers.

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  • The Wassermann twins, sainted boys according to the stilted account, had been all but ignored, accord­ing to the writer, Linda Segal, a name Dean didn't recognize.

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  • Pierre de Saint Cloud, the writer of the fourth section of the romance, was evidently acquainted with the Historia de proeliis.

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  • Pierre de Saint Cloud, the writer of the fourth section of the romance, was evidently acquainted with the Historia de proeliis.

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  • Obviously this writer is harder to focus than Kant or Hegel.

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  • Cynthia surmised that when they did appear, they were oversights on the part of the writer who unconsciously placed them as if she were writing in a normal, un-coded fashion.

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  • She had a short career as a writer.

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  • See also the present writer's article in the Dict.

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  • He was an enthusiastic, but a fickle and ambitious demagogue, and he achieved a better reputation as a writer.

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  • He had married in 1905 Miss Ethel Annikin, who became well known as a speaker and writer on social subjects.

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  • "The kittens," observes a lady writer, "are born absolutely white, and in about a week a faint pencilling comes round the ears, and gradually all the points come.

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  • ETIENNE VACHEROT (1809-1897), French philosophical writer, was born of peasant parentage at Torcenay, near Langres, on the 29th of July 1809.

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  • de Tencin, but they are above all of interest in the picture they afford of the writer's own tenderness and fidelity.

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  • Lydgate is a most voluminous writer.

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  • It is from a similar standpoint that Aaron is condemned for the manufacture of the golden calf, and a compiler (not the original writer) finds its sequel in the election of the faithful Levites.'

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  • For it is impossible to accept the theory of one writer that they sailed or rowed round the continent - a journey requiring enormous maritime skill, which, according to the theory, they must have promptly lost.

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  • Thus he came at length to stand on the verge of the Indian Ocean; " gazing upon it," a writer has said, " with as much delight as Balboa, when he crossed the Isthmus of Darien from the Atlantic to the Pacific."

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  • He commenced his work as a writer for the London newspaper press in connexion with the Morning Chronicle, and he afterwards became a leading contributor to the Examiner and the Daily News.

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  • The writer of Acts ii., anxious to prove that Providence from the first included the Gentiles in the Messianic Kingdom, assumes that the gift of tongues was a miraculous faculty of talking strange languages without having previously learned them.

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  • Arnobius (Writer) >>

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  • 181 letters of Theodoret have come down to us, partly in a separate collection, partly in the Acta of the councils, and partly in the Latin of Marius Mercator; they are of great value not only for the biography of the writer, but also for the history of his diocese and of the church in general.

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  • At present we can only be certain that the criterion according to which Brahms, being a symphonic writer, has no mastery of orchestration whatever, is not a criterion compatible with any sense of symphonic style.

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  • This method has the advantage of distinctness, and so is writer less trying to the eyes of the operators.

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  • It was found impossible to make the Morse ink writer so sensitive that it could record signals sent over land lines of several hundred miles in length, if the speed of transmission was very much faster than that which could be effected by hand, and this led to the adoption of automatic methods of transmission.

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  • The Creed system is a development of the Morse-Wheatstone system, and provides a keyboard perforator which punches Morse letters or figures on a paper strip by depressing type writer keys.

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  • 5 The writer recommended the use of a flexible plate at the source of sound, which would vibrate in response to the varying pressure of the bons' air, and thus open and close an electric circuit, and of a similar plate at the receiving station, which would be acted on electromagnetically and thus give out as many pulsations as there are breaks in the current.

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  • 3, 1899) is very remarkable; indeed, though this writer is as little ecclesiastically-minded as Sabatier himself, his general picture of the state of religion in Italy at the time is far truer; here also Sabatier has given way to the usual temptation of biographers to exalt their hero by depreciating everybody else.

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  • He was regarded as the most careful writer on the war with Hannibal, and one who did not allow himself to be blinded by partiality in considering the evidence of other writers (Cicero, De Oratore, ii.

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  • Reid - certainly a very unsystematic thinker - furnishes long and random lists of " first principles "; a later writer, J.

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  • Empiricism is restated by Paley, who is Kant's younger contemporary as a man and also on the whole as a writer.

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  • The theistic writers are usually intuitionalists; but it has been urged above that a fruitful study of theism must in each case inquire what is the writer's philosophical basis.

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  • This idea of the air as the original principle and source of life and intelligence is much more clearly expressed by a later writer, Diogenes of Apollonia.

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  • By this writer the world is explained as a product of three principles - dead matter, and two active forces, heat and cold.

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  • - Another writer of this transition period deserves a passing reference here, namely, Jacob Boehme the mystic, who by his conception of a process of inner diremption as the essential character of all mind, and so of God, prepared the way for later German theories of the origin of the world as the self-differentiation and self-externalization of the absolute spirit.

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  • There is, however, one writer who sets forth so clearly the alternative suppositions respecting the origin of the world that he claims a brief notice.

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  • According to this writer, existence is nothing but a becoming, and matter is simply the momentary product of the process of becoming, while force is this process constantly revealing itself in these products.

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  • Huffer, Alfred von Reumont (Cologne, 1904); and the same writer's article in the Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie, Band xxviii.

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  • This writer traces their origin to the 14th century; but the procedure does not seem to have become regularized or common till the reigns of Louis XII.

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  • HARRIET ELIZABETH STOWE [BEECHER] (1811-1896), American writer and philanthropist, seventh child of Lyman and Roxana (Foote) Beecher, was born at Litchfield, Connecticut, U.S.A., on the, 4th of June 1811.

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  • The present writer has suggested that the word Pali should be reserved for the language of the canon, and other words used for the earlier and later forms of it; 1 but the usage generally followed is so convenient that there is little likelihood of the suggestion being followed.

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  • ADELARDO LOPEZ DE AYALA Y HERRERA (1828-1879), Spanish writer and politician, was born at Guadalcanal on the 1st of May 1828, and at a very early age began writing for the theatre of his native town.

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  • the opinion of the writer, to be interpreted as a true mitosis.

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  • This argument was tacitly accepted or explicitly avowed by almost every writer on the theory of geography, and Carl Ritter distinctly recognized and adopted it as the unifying principle of his system.

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  • HUGO KOLLONTAJ (1750-1812), Polish politician and writer, was born in 1750 at Niecislawice in Sandomir, and educated at Pinczow and Cracow.

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  • All subsequent studies vary according to the writer's standpoint; W.

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  • and in the case of a writer like Tertullian who left the Church in middle life, are we to admit certain of his works into our patrology and refuse a place to others ?

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  • - The earliest writer on patristics was Jerome, whose book De viris illustribus gives a brief account of one hundred and thirty-five Church writers, beginning with St Peter and ending with himself.

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  • Jerome's work was continued successively by Gennadius of Marseilles, Isidore of Seville, and Ildefonsus of Toledo; the last-named writer brings the list down to the middle of the 7th century.

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  • In one of the testimonials which accompanied his application to the trustees of Rugby, the writer stated it as his conviction that "if Mr Arnold were elected, he would change the face of education all through the public schools of England."

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  • 1034), was a voluminous writer on law, translated the Pentateuch into Arabic, commented on much of the Bible, and composed an Arabic introduction to the Talmud, of which the existing Hebrew introduction (by Samuel the Nagid) is perhaps a translation.

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  • 1310), a prolific writer of Talmudic and polemical works (against the Kabbalists and Mahommedans) as well as of responsa.

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  • The latter was a prolific writer of great influence, chiefly known for his Responsa, but also for his halakhic treatiseE, hiddushin and tosaphot.h.

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  • But no great writer and no great administrator came from Narbonensis; itinerant lecturers and journalists alone were produced in plenty, and at times minor poets.

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  • Some idea of his activity as a writer on mathematical and physical subjects during these early years may be gathered from the fact that previous to this appointment he had contributed no less than three important memoirs to the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, and eight to the Cambridge Philosophical Society.

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  • The strictness of the principle of admission or exclusion differs at the various German courts, and has tended to be modified by the growth of a new aristocracy of wealth; but a single instance known to the present writer may serve to illustrate the fundamental divergence of German (a fortiori Austrian) ideas from English in this matter.

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  • The writer nowhere finds consolation in any Christian belief, and Christ is never named in the work.

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  • 1 may or may not be affected by Philo; it is almost or quite solitary in the N.T.) Similarly, the immortality of the soul may be maintained on Platonic or quasi-Platonic lines, as by St Athanasius (Contra Gentes, § 33) - a writer who repeatedly quotes the Alexandrian Book of Wisdom, in which Platonism and the Old Testament had already joined partnership. This.

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  • Miracle could not be to a 3rd century writer what it was to W.

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  • Certainly no early writer thought of providing material for such use.

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  • There remain two other dramatic works, of very different kinds, in which Ford co-operated with other writers, the mask of The Sun's Darling (acted 1624, printed 1657), hardly to be placed in the first rank of early compositions, and The Witch of Edmonton (printed 1658, but probably acted about 1621), in which we see Ford as a joint writer with Dekker and Rowley of one of the most powerful domestic dramas of the English or any other stage.

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  • As to the library of Peisistratus, we have no good evidence; it may perhaps be a fiction of an Alexandrian writer.

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  • and li., and in Greek literature the striking words which Porphyry quotes from an earlier writer, "We ought, then, having been united and made like to God, to offer our own conduct as a holy sacrifice to Him, the same being also a hymn and our salvation in passionless excellence of soul" (Euseb.

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  • Fill our hearts with joy and gladness, that ever having of all things a sufficiency, we may superabound in all good works, in Christ Jesus our Lord, &c.'" The writer then enjoins that, "if two or three other virgins are present, they also shall give thanks over the bread set out, and join in the prayers.

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  • The writer " evinces a warm regard for the priestly tribe; he guards its privileges (xviii.

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  • A confused notice in Suidas mentions three persons of the name: the first, the inventor of the alphabet; the second, the son of Pandion, "according to some" the first prose writer, a little later than Orpheus, author of a history of the Foundation of Miletus and of Ionia generally, in four books; the third, the son of Archelaus, of later date, author of a history of Attica in fourteen books, and of some poems of an erotic character.

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  • In bringing about this " fall," however, Parsons the Jesuit appears to have had a considerable share; at least Lord Sheffield has recorded that on the only occasion on which Gibbon talked with him on the subject he imputed the change in his religious views principally to that vigorous writer, who, in his opinion, had urged all the best arguments in favour of Roman Catholicism.

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  • An attack on Christianity laid a writer open to prosecution and penalties under the statutes of the realm (9 and io William III.

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  • JOHN FISKE (1842-1901), American historical, philosophical and scientific writer, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, on the 30th of March 1842, and died at Gloucester, Massachusetts, on the 4th of July 1901.

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  • WILLIAM WOLLASTON (1659-1724), English philosophical writer, was born at Coton-Clanford in Staffordshire, on the 26th of March 1659.

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  • At the request of Mir `Alishirr, himself a distinguished statesman and writer, Mirkhond began about 1474, in the quiet convent of Khilasiyah, which his patron had founded in Herat as a house of retreat for literary men of merit, his great work on universal history, Rauzat-ussafa fi sirat-ulanbia walmuluk walkhulafa or Garden of Purity on the Biography of Prophets, Kings and Caliphs.

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  • The writer had the opportunity of perusing the MS. of " On Faraday's Lines of Force," in a form little different from the final one, a year before Maxwell took his degree.

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  • But Suarez is much more moderate on this point than a writer like Mariana, approximating to the modern view of the rights of ruler and ruled.

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  • During this time, it is the judgment of the most recent Protestant writer on St Dominic that, though keeping on good terms with Simon de Montfort, the leader, and praying for the success of the crusaders' arms during the battle of Muret, "yet, so far as can be seen from the sources, Dominic took no part in the crusade, but endeavoured to carry his spiritual activity on the same lines as before.

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  • The writer claims to have treated his subject impartially, and though written from the narrow point of view of one to whom Monophysite "orthodoxy" was all-important, it is evidently a faithful reproduction of events as they occurred.

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  • 4 For the sections which follow the present writer may be permitted to refer to his introductory contributions in the Expositor (June, 1906; " The Criticism of the 0.T."); the Jewish Quarterly Review (July 1905-January 1907 = Critical Notes on 0.T.

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  • The best historical narratives belong to Israel and Gilead; Judah scarcely appears, and in a relatively old poetical account of a great fight of the united tribes against a northern adversary lies outside the writer's horizon or interest (Judg.

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  • Hazael of Damascus, Jehu of Israel and Elisha the prophet are the three men of the new age linked together in the words of one writer as though commissioned for like ends (1 Kings xix.

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  • That the writer (2 Kings xxii.

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  • The account of Josiah's work, like that of Hezekiah, is written by one of the Deuteronomic school: that is to say, the writer describes the promulgation of the teaching under which he lives.

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  • Accordingly, in handling Josiah's successors the writer no longer refers to the high places.

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  • The book of Kings gives the standpoint of a later Judaean writer, but Josiah's authority over a much larger area than Judah alone is suggested by xxiii.

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  • According to this writer (Ant.

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  • What book Ezra really brought from Babylon is uncertain; the writer, it seems, is merely narrating the introduction of the Law ascribed to Moses, even as a predecessor has recounted the discovery of the Book of the Law, the Deuteronomic code subsequently included in the Pentateuch.

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  • By 1718 he had made some reputation as a writer of occasional verse, which he published in broadsheets, and then (or a year earlier) he turned bookseller in the premises where he had hitherto plied his craft of wig-making.

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  • As a pastoral writer ("in some respects the best in the world," according to Leigh Hunt) he contributed, at an early stage, to the naturalistic reaction of the 18th century.

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  • speaks for some writer to record, is to be distinguished) - has been assisted by the historical use of the term, in ancient times, for an extraordinary magistrate in the Roman commonwealth.

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  • That he displayed considerable classical knowledge, was a good linguist, a ready and versatile writer of verse, and above all that he possessed an astounding memory, seems certain, not only from the evidence of men of his own time, but from the fact that even Joseph Scaliger (Prima Scaligerana, p. 58, 1669) speaks of his attainments with the highest praise.

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  • The tradition of the mitre as an episcopal ornament has, nevertheless, been continuous in the Church of England, " and that on three lines: (i) heraldic usage; (2) its presence on the head of effigies of bishops, of which a number are extant, of the 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th centuries; (3) its presence in funeral processions, where 1 In Father Braun's opinion, expressed to the writer, this mitre, which was formerly at Sens, belongs probably to the 13th century.

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  • Then followed another charming writer, E.

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  • But this passage is the sequel to the rejection of Saul in xv., and Samuel's position agrees with that of the late writer in vii., viii.

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  • His character is perhaps best described by a writer who says "his strength was not equal to his goodness."

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  • He was called to the bar four years later, and practised as a barrister for a short time; but in 18-61, after two comparatively false starts in poetry and fiction, he made his first noteworthy appearance as a writer with a satire called The Season, which contained incisive lines, and was marked by some promise both in wit and observation.

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  • In the interval the claims of one writer and another were much canvassed, but eventually, in 1896, Mr Austin was appointed.

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  • About this time began his connexion with Mme de Nehra, the daughter of Zwier van Haren, a Dutch statesman and political writer, and a woman of a far higher type than Sophie, more educated, more refined, and more capable of appreciating Mirabeau's good points.

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  • Luard supposes that Matthew never intended his work to see the light in its present form, and many passages of the autograph have against them the note offendiculum, which shows that the writer understood the danger which he ran.

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  • Blue eyes in Eleanor's modern portrait come from a contemporary writer's description.

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  • ANTONIO GENOVESI (1712-1769), Italian writer on philosophy and political economy, was born at Castiglione, near Salerno, on the 1st of November 1712.

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  • But nothing has really been more unfortunate for the reputation of Jordanes as a writer than the extreme preciousness of the information which he has preserved to us.

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  • Concerning Byrd's style as a writer, Professor Bassett says: " It would be hard to find before Franklin a better master of the art of writing clear, forceful and charming English."

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  • One Greek writer, Achemachus, identified Proserpine with the Egyptian Isis.'

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  • The writer does not approve of the common practice of cutting wheat high and then mowing the stubbles.

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  • Several of the deficiencies which the writer complains of in English agriculture must be placed to the account of climate, and never have been or can be supplied.

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  • This writer seems to differ a good deal from Blith about the advantage of interchanging tillage and pasture.

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  • The next writer of note is John Mortimer, whose Whole Art of Husbandry, a regular, systematic work of considerable merit, was published in 1707.

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  • Under this management the produce seems to have been three times the seed; and yet, says the writer, " if in East Lothian they did not leave a higher stubble than in other places of the kingdom, their grounds would be in a much worse condition than at present they are, though bad enough."

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  • The writer of this article is much indebted to the works of Schmoller, particularly his Grundris der allgemeinen Volkswirtschaftslehre (1900), and Adolph Wagner, particularly his Grundlegung der politischen Okonomie.

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  • The Spartans were happy, said the writer, because they had plenty of good, suitable clothing and lodging, robust women, and were able to meet their requirements both physical and mental.

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  • It purports to be a conversation at the little town of Beaucaire between a soldier (obviously the writer himself) and three men, citizens of Marseilles, Nimes and Montpellier, who oppose the Jacobinical government and hope for victory over its forces.

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  • These numbers are valuable as an exhibition not so much of events as of the feelings of the Parisian people; they are adorned, moreover, by the erudition, the wit and the genius of the author, but they are disfigured, not only by the most biting personalities and the defence and even advocacy of the excesses of the mob, but by the entire absence of the forgiveness and pity for which the writer was afterwards so eloquently to plead.

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  • COLUMBAN (543-615), Irish saint and writer, was born in Leinster in 543, and was educated in the monastery of Bangor, Co.

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  • Flavin Biondo, the first Renaissance writer on the topography of ancient Rome (1388-1463), was a native of Forli.

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  • RICHARD AUNGERVYLE (1287-1345), commonly known as Richard De Bury, English bibliophile, writer and bishop, was born near Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, on the 24th of January 1287.

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  • In the following year Vigors returned to the subject in some papers published in the recently established Zoological Journal, and found an energetic condisciple and coadjutor in Swainson, who, for more than a dozen years - to the end, in fact, of his career as an ornithological writer was instant in season and out of season in pressing on all his readers the views he had, through Vigors, adopted from Macleay, though not without some modification of detail if not of principle.

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  • A very fairly executed compilation on the subject by an anonymous writer is to be found in a late edition of the Cyclopaedia of India, published at Madras, and W.

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  • Like Gloger, Sundevall in his ideal system separated the true passerines from all other birds, calling them Volucres; but he took a step further, for he assigned to them the highest rank, wherein nearly every recent authority agrees with him; out of them, however, he chose the thrushes and warblers to stand first as his ideal " Centrum " - a selection which, though in the opinion of the present writer erroneous, is still largely followed.

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  • The division seems to have been instituted by this author a couple of years earlier in the second edition of his Handbuch der Naturgeschichte (a work not seen by the present writer), but not then to have received a scientific name.

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  • As a theologian, he is of wide sympathies; as a writer, he is often diffuse and somewhat dull.

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  • This anonymous writer,' he says, acquired his learning by teaching others, and adopted a dogmatic tone, which has caused him to be received at Paris with applause as the equal of Aristotle, Avicenna, or Averroes.

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  • Priestley was a most voluminous writer, and his works (excluding his scientific writings) as collected and edited by his friend J.

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  • According to this writer the Druids held the mistletoe in the highest veneration.

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  • GIOVANNI PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA, Count (1463-1494), Italian philosopher and writer, the youngest son of Giovanni Francesco Pico, prince of Mirandola, a small territory about 30 Italian miles west of Ferrara, afterwards absorbed in the duchy of Modena, was born on the 24th of February 1463.

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  • Considerable interest attaches to his early companionship with Wilhelm Neumann and certain others, among whom were the writer Karl August Varnhagen von Ense and the poet Adelbert von Chamisso.

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  • But no writer has surpassed him in the clearness and brevity with which he could sum up the characteristics of an epoch in the history of the world, or present and define the great forces by which the world has been influenced.

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  • Theodosius Harnack was a staunch Lutheran and a prolific writer on theological subjects; his chief field of work was practical theology, and his important book on that subject, summing up his long experience and teaching, appeared at Erlangen (1877-1878, 2 vols.).

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  • Harnack, both as lecturer and writer, was one of the most prolific and most stimulating of modern critical scholars, and trained up in his "Seminar" a whole generation of teachers, who carried his ideas and methods throughout the whole of Germany and even beyond its borders.

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  • It is a chapter very difficult to write, for while on the one hand an ingenious and speculative historian may refer to the influence of the Crusades almost everything which was thought or done between r too and 1300, a cautious writer who seeks to find Brehier, L'Eglise et l'Orient, p. 347.

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  • There seems no doubt that it is a piece of plagiary, and that its writer, Richard, "canon of the Holy Trinity" in London, stands to the Carmen as Tudebod to the Gesta, or Albert of Aix to his supposed original.

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    0
  • Poggio, it may be observed, was a fluent and copious writer in the Latin tongue, but not an elegant scholar.

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    0
  • He was a most prolific writer, 364 papers appearing under his name in the Royal Society's Catalogue, and he carried on a large correspondence with other men of science, such as Berzelius, Faraday, Liebig and Wohler.

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    0
  • As a writer he displayed great versatility.

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    0
  • JOHN GAUDEN (1605-1662), English bishop and writer, reputed author of the Eikon Basilike, was born in 1605 at Mayland, Essex, where his father was vicar of the parish.

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  • It is not necessary to suppose that the writer has here any particular case in mind.

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    0
  • This may be so; but it would be strange if a writer who could say," in much wisdom is much grief,"should deliberately laud wisdom.

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  • First, Koheleth is endorsed as an industrious, discriminating and instructive writer.

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  • AUGUSTE HILARION KERATRY, COMTE DE (1769-1859), French writer and politician, was born at Rennes on the 28th of December 1769.

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    0
  • FENESTELLA, Roman historian and encyclopaedic writer, flourished in the reign of Tiberius.

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    0
  • Its concluding words suggest that its production was due to Khalid ben Yezid (died in 708), who was a pupil of the Syrian monk Marianus, and according to the Kitab-al-Fihrist was the first Mussulman writer on alchemy.

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    0
  • Biot was an extremely prolific writer, and besides a great number of scientific memoirs, biographies, &c., his published works include: Analyse de la mecanique celeste de M.

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    0
  • At one time it was regarded as the work of a priest of Liege, named Amelgard, but it is now practically certain that Basin was the writer.

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  • (His merits as a writer are dealt with in the article Spain: Literature).

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  • As a dogmatic writer he belonged to the school of Schleiermacher.

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  • lutheranae, 1665), and as a writer of polemics he had few equals.

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  • Besides the State papers, the main sources for his biography are The Life and Death of that renowned John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester (London, 1655), by an anonymous writer, the best edition being that of Van Ortroy (Brussels, 1893) Bridgett's Life of Blessed John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester (London, 1880 and 1890); and Thureau, Le bienheureux Jean Fisher (Paris, 1907).

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  • In the intervening body of the epistle the writer also follows the regular form of a letter.

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  • First, in chapters i.-iii., under the mask of a conventional congratulatory paragraph, the writer declares at length the privileges which this great fact confers upon those who by faith receive the gift of God, and he is thus able to touch on the various aspects of his subject.

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  • (a) The writer of Eph.

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  • 11-22 was a Jew, not less proud of his race than was the writer of Rom.

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  • 3 Now as these beads are admittedly worked metallic iron and must date before 4000 B.C., it is obvious that they are a remarkable confirmation of those who, like the present writer, have in opposition to Prof. Montelius always maintained that iron was known to and occasionally used in a worked state by the Egyptians at a period long anteridr to its general introduction and replacing of bronze for weapons and tools.

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  • Newberry, with whom on early Egyptian connexion with Syria the writer agrees.

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  • But from a strong sense of duty he continued at his post; and ere long the general condemnation of the despatch was so strong that the writer felt it necessary to retire from office.

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  • He was an indefatigable writer, and the first germ of his future socialism is contained in a letter of the 21st of March 1787, one of a series - mainly on literature - addressed to the secretary of the Academy of Arras.

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    0
  • About 500 B.C. he competed with Choerilus and Aeschylus, when the latter made his first appearance as a writer for the stage.

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    0
  • Pratinas was also a writer of dithyrambs and the choral odes called hyporchemata (a considerable fragment of one of these is preserved in Athenaeus xiv.

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  • The Jewish expectations are adopted for example, by Papias, by the writer of the epistle of Barnabas, and by Justin.

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  • The writer already sees the Messianic kingdom established, under the sway of which the Gentiles will in due course be saved, Beliar overthrown, sin disappear from the earth, and the righteous dead rise to share fr1 the blessedness of the living.

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  • This second writer singles out three of the Maccabean priest kings for attack, the first of whom he charges with every abomination; the people itself, he declares, is apostate, and chastisement will follow speedily - the temple will be laid waste, the nation carried afresh into captivity, whence, on their repentance, God will restore them again to their own land, where they shall enjoy the blessedness of God's presence and be ruled by a Messiah sprung from Judah.

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  • When we contrast the expectations of the original writer and the actual events that followed, it would seem that the chief value of his work would consist in the light that it throws on this obscure and temporary revolution in the Messianic expectations of Judaism towards the close of the 2nd century.

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    0
  • ARISTOXENUS, of Tarentum (4th century B.C.), a Greek peripatetic philosopher, and writer on music and rhythm.

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    0
  • The only German writer who seems to have known anything of Brown is Beneke, who found in him anticipations of some of his own doctrines.

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    0
  • JULIUS CHARLES HARE (1795-1855), English theological writer, was born at Valdagno, near Vicenza, in Italy, on the 13th of September 1795.

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  • A sceptic in philosophy and a revolutionist in politics, rejoicing in controversy of all kinds, he was admired as a man, as an orator, and as a writer.

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    0
  • A man of literary taste and culture, familiar with the classics, a facile writer of Latin verses' as well as of Ciceronian prose, he was as anxious that the Roman clergy should unite human science and literature with their theological studies as that the laity should be educated in the principles of religion; and to this end he established in Rome a kind of voluntary school board, with members both lay and clerical; and the rivalry of the schools thus founded ultimately obliged the state to include religious teaching in its curriculum.

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  • Dio Chrysostom, the adviser of Trajan, is the first Greek writer who has pronounced the principle of slavery to be contrary to the law of nature " (Mark Pattison).

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    0
  • The story of the destruction of the library by the Arabs is first told by Bar-hebraeus (Abulfaragius), a Christian writer who lived six centuries later; and it is of very doubtful authority.

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    0
  • Bede has the artist's instinct of proportion, the artist's sense for the picturesque and the pathetic. His style too, modelled largely, in the present writer's opinion, on that of Gregory in the Dialogues, is limpid and unaffected.

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  • - The above sketch is largely based on the present writer's essay on Bede's Life and Works,prefixed to his edition of Bede's Historia Ecclesiastica, &c. (2 vols., Clarendon Press, 1896).

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  • It is a monument of learning and scholarship. The most recent edition is that with notes and introduction by the present writer, u.s. It includes also the History of the Abbots, and the Epistle to Egbert.

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    0
  • MARSILIO FICINO (1433-1499), Italian philosopher and writer, was born at Figline, in the upper Arno valley, in the year 1 433.

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    0
  • Vigour of reasoning and originality of view were not his characteristics as a writer; nor will the student who has raked these dust-heaps of miscellaneous learning and oldfashioned mysticism discover more than a few sentences of genuine enthusiasm and simple-hearted aspiration to repay his trouble and reward his patience.

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  • It ' Preger is the only writer who has maintained that the three books in their primitive form date from 1254.

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    0
  • Galloway was a voluminous, though, for the most part, an anonymous writer.

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    0
  • The Arabic writer Shahrastani endeavours to bridge the divergence between the two traditions by means of the following.

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    0
  • SAMUEL FINLEY BREESE MORSE (1791-1872), American artist and inventor, was born at Charlestown, Massachusetts, on the 27th of April 1791, son of Jedidiah Morse (1761-1826), Congregational minister there and a writer on geography, and a grandson of Samuel Finley, president of the college of New Jersey.

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    0
  • He was a voluminous writer, but nothing remains.

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    0
  • He was a voluminous writer on subjects directly connected with his chair, and, besides contributing almost weekly to the technical journals, such as the Engineer, brought out a series of standard textbooks on Civil Engineering, The Steam-Engine and other Prime Movers, Machinery and Millwork, and Applied Mechanics, which have passed through many editions, and have contributed greatly to the advancement of the subjects with which they deal.

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  • He was an enthusiastic and most useful leader of the volunteer movement from its beginning, and a writer, composer and singer of humorous and patriotic songs, some of which, as "The Three Foot Rule" and "They never shall have Gibraltar," became well known far beyond the circle of his acquaintance.

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  • 4 the writer, in his polemic against the prosperous ungodly men of his time, denies that death, short life and lack of children are to be considered misfortunes for the righteous - over against these things the possession of wisdom is declared to be the supreme good.

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  • The total number of species of the island flora was estimated in 1892 by a writer in the Revista Cubana (vol.

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  • 450), an ecclesiastical writer of the Western Church of whose personal history hardly anything is known, except that he was a native of Gaul, possibly brother of St Loup, bishop of Troyes, that he became a monk and priest at Lerinum, and that he died in or about 450.

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  • HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1817-1862), American recluse, naturalist and writer, was born at Concord, Massachusetts, on the 12th of July 1817.

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    0
  • His weakness as a writer is the too frequent striving after antithesis and paradox.

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  • Law was a bus y writer under three heads :- 1.

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  • Thomas Sherlock declared that " Mr Law was a writer so considerable that he knew but one good reason why his lordship did not answer him."

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  • The table on the following page, for which the writer is indebted to the kindness of Carolidi Effendi, formerly professor of history in the university of Athens, and in 1910 deputy for Smyrna in the Turkish parliament, shows the various races of the Ottoman Empire, the regions which they inhabit, and the religions which they profess.

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  • He struck out a new line for himself, and was indebted for his inspiration to no previous writer, whether Turk or Persian.

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    0
  • The Persianizing tendency of this school reached its highest point in the productions of Veysi, who left a Life of the Prophet, and of Nergisi, a miscellaneous writer of prose and verse.

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  • The most distinguished prose writers of this period are perhaps Rashid, the imperial historio grapher, 'Asim, who translated into Turkish two great lexicons, the Arabic Itamus and the Persian Burhan-i and Kani, the only humorous writer of merit belonging to the old school.

    0
    0
  • As distinguished from Livius Andronicus, Naevius was a native Italian, not a Greek; he was also an original writer, not a mere adapter or translator.

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  • While he is never ranked as a writer of tragedy with Ennius, Pacuvius or Accius, he is placed in the canon of the grammarian Volcaaus Sedigitus third (immediately after Caecilius and Plautus) in the rank of Roman comic authors.

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  • and miscellaneous writer, was born at Paris on the 22nd of April 1766.

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  • No other writer of such eminence is so rarely quoted; none is so entirely destitute of the tribute of new and splendid editions.

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  • 206), while blaming the diffuseness of these commentaries, praises the writer's learning and style, which, however, he considers too ornate for the purpose.

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  • The earliest writer after himself who gives us any information with regard to him is Eusebius.

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  • 6), and a modern writer imagined that he reconciled this discordance by the supposition that he was born at Athens, but lived at Alexandria.

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  • Two works are incorporated in the editions of Clement which are not mentioned by himself or any ancient writer.

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  • 869), Arabian writer.

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  • Aristides (Writer) >>

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  • "WINSTON CHURCHILL (1871-), American writer, was born in St.

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  • JOHN HILL BURTON (1809-1881), Scottish historical writer, the son of an officer in the army, was born at Aberdeen on the 22nd of August 1809.

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    0
  • The Silverado Squatters was published in 1883, and also the more important Treasure Island, which made Stevenson for the first time a popular writer.

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  • So far, however, as it is possible to disengage one's self from this captivation, it may be said that the mingling of distinct and original vision with a singularly conscientious handling of the English language, in the sincere and wholesome self-consciousness of the strenuous artist, seems to be the central feature of Stevenson as a writer by profession.

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  • PAUL JANET (1823-1899), French philosophical writer, was born in Paris on the 30th of April 1823.

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  • Various charges had been brought against him by his enemies, among them that of illiteracy, the truth of which is borne out by the crudeness of his style, and is fully admitted by the writer himself.

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  • Lastly a life by an otherwise unknown Irish writer named Probus occurs in the Basel edition of Bede's works (1563) and was reprinted by Colgan.

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  • It was not until the Christian writer Salvian (who was born about 400) had already reached a fairly advanced age that they were able to seize Cologne.

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  • 279) alludes to him as a signal instance of a successful humorist who entirely failed as a serious writer.

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  • Father Braun, to whose kindness the writer is indebted for the above account of the causes of the ritual changes in the Carolingian epoch, adds that the papacy was never narrowminded in its attitude towards local rites, and that it was not until the close of the middle ages, when diversity had become confusion and worse, that it began to insist upon uniformity.

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  • ARETHAS (c. 860-940), Byzantine theological writer and scholar, archbishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia, was born at Patrae.

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  • He was an accomplished writer and scholar, contributed largely to William Hutchinson's History of the County of Cumberland (2 vols., 1794 seq.), and published A View of the Causes and Consequences of the American Revolution (1797), dedicated to George Washington, and consisting of thirteen discourses delivered in America between 1763 and 1775.

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  • John Hales (1584-1656); Edmund Calamy (1600-1666); the Cambridge Platonist, Benjamin Whichcote (1609-1685); Richard Baxter (1615-1691); the puritan John Owen (1616-1683); the philosophical Ralph Cudworth (1617-1688); Archbishop Leighton (1611-1684) - each of these holds an eminent position in the records of pulpit eloquence, but all were outshone by the gorgeous oratory and art of Jeremy Taylor (1613-1667), who is the most illustrious writer of sermons whom the British race has produced.

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  • But the first printed copy reached Frauenburg barely in time to be laid on the writer's death-bed.

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  • The best hypothesis in the writer's opinion is that maintained by Charles Tissot, who sees in the word " Africa " the name of the great Berber tribe, the Aourigha (whose name would have been pronounced Afarika), the modern Aouraghen, now driven back into the Sahara, but in ancient times the principal indigenous element of the African empire of Carthage (Tissot, Geogr.

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  • Recent scholarship, however, asserts that More was no writer, and that the Vita et mors is an extract from Geoffrey's Chronicon, and was attributed to More, who was the author's patron.

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  • ALAIN CHARTIER (c. 1392 - C.1430), French poet and political writer, was born at Bayeux about 1392.

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  • The property of orientation, in virtue of which a freely suspended magnet points approximately to the geographical north and south, is not referred to by any European writer before the 12th century, though it is said to have been known to the Chinese at a much earlier period.

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  • 49), would throw light on this matter; but the specimen recently carefully studied by the writer and Pocock reveals neither gill-bearing limbs nor stigmata.

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  • The present writer is of opinion that it will be found most convenient to treat this evanescent somite as something special, and not to attempt to reckon it to either the prosoma or the mesosoma.

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  • It has been held that the forms with a small number of somites marked in the posterior carapace and numerous free somites between the anterior and posterior carapace, must be considered as anterior to those in which a great number of posterior somites are traceable in the metasomatic carapace, and that those in which the traces of distinct somites in the posterior or metasomatic carapace are most completely absent must be regarded as derived from those in which somites are well marked in the posterior 1 The writer is indebted to R.

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  • The general scheme and some of the details have been brought by the writer into agreement with the views maintained in this article.

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  • The writer also desires to express his thanks to Messrs.

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  • The genuineness and inspiration of Enoch were believed in by the writer of the Ep. of Barnabas, Irenaeus, Tertullian and Clement of Alexandria.

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  • They are attributed to Leucius, a Docetic writer, by Augustine (c. Felic. Manich.

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  • The object of the writer is to embody in St Paul the model ideal of the popular Christianity of the 2nd century.

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  • On the Coptic fragment, which Schmidt maintains is an original constituent of these Acts, see that writer's work: Die alten Petrusakten im Zusammenhang der apokryphen Apostelliteratur nebst einem neuentdeckten Fragment, and Texte and Untersuch.

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  • The writer was in all probability the bishop of Rome of that name.

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  • - This so-called letter of Clement is not mentioned by any writer before Eusebius (H.E.

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  • The writer is a Gentile.

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  • Thorpe also prints a continuation by John Taxter (died c. 1295), a 13th-century writer and a monk of Bury St Edmunds.

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  • 3 As a mathematical writer Lagrange has perhaps never been surpassed.

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  • CHALCONDYLES 1 (or [[Chalcocondylas), Laonicus]], the only Athenian Byzantine writer.

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  • In historical literature Brazil has produced one writer of high standing - Francisco Adolpho Varnhagen (Visconde de Porto Seguro), whose Historia Geral do Brazil is a standard authority on that subject.

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  • In Dean cemetery, partly laid out on the banks of the Water of Leith, and considered the most beautiful in the city (opened 1845), were interred Lords Cockburn, Jeffrey and Rutherford; " Christopher North," Professor Aytoun, Edward Forbes the naturalist, John Goodsir the anatomist; Sir William Allan, L Sam Bough, George Paul Chalmers, the painters; George Combe, the phrenologist; Playfair, the architect; Alexander Russel, editor of the Scotsman; Sir Archibald Alison, the historian; Captain John Grant, the last survivor of the old Peninsular Gordon Highlanders; Captain Charles Gray, of the Royal Marines, writer of Scottish songs; Lieutenant John Irving, of the Franklin expedition, whose remains were sent home many years after his death by Lieut.

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  • JAMES LORRAINE GEDDES (1827-1887), American soldier and writer, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on the 19th of March 1827.

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  • To the 15th century belongs Aeneas Sylvius Piccolomini (Pius II.), humanist, historian and political writer.

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  • In the 17th century we find Ludovico Sergardi (Quinto Settano), a Latinist and satirical writer of much talent and culture; but the most original and brilliant figure in Sienese literature is that of Girolamo Gigli (1660-1722), author of the Gazzettino, La Sorellina di Don Pilone, Il Vocabolario cateriniano and the Diario ecclesiastico.

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  • in the Campo Santo of Pisa; Agostino and Agnolo, who in 1330 carved the fine tomb of Bishop Guido Tarlati in the cathedral of Arezzo; Lando di Pietro (14th century), architect, entrusted by the Sienese commune with the proposed enlargement of the cathedral (1339), and perhaps author of the famous Gothic reliquary containing the head of S Galgano in the Chiesa del Santuccio, which, however, is more usually attributed to Ugolino di Vieri, author of the tabernacle in the cathedral at Orvieto; Giacopo (or Jacopo) della Quercia, whose lovely fountain, the Fonte Gaia, in the Piazza del Campo has been recently restored; Lorenzo di Pietro (Il Vecchietta), a pupil of Della Quercia and an excellent artist in marble and bronze; Francesco d'Antonio, a skilful goldsmith of the 1 6th century; Francesco di Giorgio Martini (1439-1502), painter, sculptor, military engineer and writer on art; Giacomo Cozzarelli (15th century); and Lorenzo Mariano, surnamed 11 Marrina (16th century).

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  • LUDVIG HOLBERG HOLBERG, Baron (1684-1754), the great Scandinavian writer, was born at Bergen, in Norway, on the 3rd of December 1684.

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  • Holberg was not only the founder of Danish literature and the greatest of Danish authors, but he was, with the exception of Voltaire, the first writer in Europe during his own generation.

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    0
  • The Continuatio was carried on, after his death, by an anonymous writer to the year 1380.

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  • But this principle of the subordination of the reason wears a different aspect according to the century and writer referred to.

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    0
  • LUIS DE GRANADA (1504-1588), Spanish preacher and ascetic writer, born of poor parents named Sarria at Granada.

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    0
  • HEINRICH VON TREITSCHKE (1834-1896), German historian and political writer, was born at Dresden on the 15th of September 1834.

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    0
  • Of these the best and most prolific writer was Tinodi.

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    0
  • During the latter part of the 16th century and the beginning of the 17th two poets of a higher order appeared in Valentine Balassa, the earliest Magyar lyrical writer, and his contemporary John Rimay, whose poems are of a contemplative and pleasing character.

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  • But the most celebrated writer of this period was the Jesuit Francis Faludi, the translator, through the Italian, of William Darrell's works.

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    0
  • Other precursors of the modern school were the poet and philologist Francis Verseghy, whose works extend to nearly forty volumes; the gifted didactic prose writer, Joseph 'Carman; the metrical rhymster, Gideon Raday; the lyric poets, Ssentjebi Szabo, Janos Bacsanyi, and the short-lived Gabriel Dayka, whose posthumous " Verses " were published in 1813 by Kazinczy.

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  • As a sonnet writer none stands higher than Paul Szemere, known also for his rendering of Korner's drama Zrinyi (1818), and his contributions to the Elet es Literatura (Life and Literature).

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    0
  • His genuine simplicity as a lyrical writer is shown by the fact that several of his shorter pieces have passed into popular song.

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    0
  • The laborious John Garay in his Szent Ldszlo shows considerable ability as an epic poet, but his greatestmerit was rather as a romancist and ballad writer, as shown by the, " Pen Sketches " or Tollrajzok (1845), and his legendary series Arpddok (1847).

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  • A less prolific but more classical writer appeared in Charles Obernyik, whose George Brankovics is, next to Katona's Bank Bdn, one of the best historical tragedies in the language.

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    0
  • Another popular writer of great originality was Joseph Radakovics alias Vas-Gereben.

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    0
  • The fertile writer Paul Kovacs excels more particularly in humorous narration.

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    0
  • To this linguistic excellence the writer owed the place accorded to him 1 "Plan de l'Ouvrage," Ouvres, tom.

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  • But before taking further steps he retired to Versailles, then a hunting lodge, and there, listening to two of Richelieu's friends, Claude de Saint-Simon, father of the memoir writer, and Cardinal La Valette, sent for Richelieu in the evening, and while the salons of the Luxembourg were full of expectant courtiers the king was reassuring the cardinal of his continued favour and support.

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  • He followed as his chief source the prose history of Myron of Priene, an untrustworthy writer, probably of the 2nd century B.C.; hence a good deal of his story must be regarded as fanciful, though we cannot distinguish accurately between the true and the fictitious.

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  • i., Cambridge, 1898) (a very comprehensive work, to which the writer of this article is in many ways indebted); and the Encyclopadie d.

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    0
  • This writer, after having published an edition of Stevin's works in 1625, published in 1629 at Amsterdam a small tract on algebra which shows a considerable advance on the work of Vieta.

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    0
  • His notation is based primarily on that of Harriot; but he differs from that writer in retaining the first letters of the alphabet for the known quantities and the final letters for the unknowns.

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  • 1845), who became well known as a scientific writer and lecturer, editor of the Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science from 1853 to 1871, and from 1862, in succession to Thomas Wakley, coroner for Central Middlesex.

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    0
  • The main divisions which, writing in 1910, the present writer prefers, are those adopted in his Treatise on Zoology (Part II.

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    0
  • These subdivisions of the larger groups are not necessarily those theoretically approved by the present writer, but they have the valuable sanction of the individual experts who have given special attention to different of the vast field represented by the animal kingdom.'

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    0
  • The present writer has, for many years, urged the importance of this consideration.

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    0
  • But this instance is really fully explained (as the present writer has shown) by the theory of natural selection acting on congenital fortuitous variations.

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    0
  • It is a remarkable fact that it was overlooked alike by the supporters and opponents of Lamarck's views until pointed out by the present writer (Nature, 1894, p. 127), that the two statements called by Lamarck his first and second laws are contradictory one of the other.

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  • This newly discovered inheritance of " variation in the tendency to react " has a wide application and has led the present writer to coin the word " educability."

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    0
  • We have hitherto supposed that the light is incident perpen 1 The last sentence is repeated from the writer's article " Wave Theory " in the 9th edition of this work, but A.

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  • 1371), Byzantine mystic and theological writer.

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  • The present writer believes that they were a horde which came down from upper Asia, conquered an Iranian-speaking people, and in time adopted the speech of its subjects.

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  • The present writer has never met with either.

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  • His brother, Johann Friedrich Hugo von Dalberg (1752-1812), canon of Trier, Worms and Spires, had some vogue as a composer and writer on musical subjects.

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  • La Rochefoucauld's character of the cardinal is on the whole harsh but scarcely unjust, and one of its sentences formulates, though in a manner which has a certain recoil upon the writer, the great defect of Retz's conduct: "Il a suscite les plus grands desordres dans l'etat sans avoir un dessein forme de s'en prevaloir."

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  • Roger Bacon's reference to Neckam as a grammatical writer (in multis vera et utilia scripsit: sed.

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  • Even in the older Davidic psalm-book there is a whole series of hymns in which the writer identifies himself with the poor and needy, the righteous people of God suffering in silence at the hands of the wicked, without other hope than patiently to wait for the interposition of Jehovah (Ps.

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  • In the judgment of the present writer however, the results of Old Testament study (particularly in the Prophets) since Professor Robertson Smith's death have shown that this theory is untenable.

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  • According to this writer Gerbert's fame began to spread over Gaul, Germany and Italy, till it roused the envy of Otric of Saxony, in whom we may recognize Octricus of Magdeburg, the favourite scholar of Otto I., and, in earlier days, the instructor of St Adalbert, the apostle of the Bohemians.

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  • The medicinal properties of the sulphur water were discovered, or perhaps rediscovered, in 1732 by a famous Welsh writer, the Rev. Theophilus Evans, then vicar of Llangammarch (to which living Llanwrtyd was a chapelry till 1871).

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  • RUGGERO BONGHI (1828-1895), Italian scholar, writer' and politician, was born at Naples on the 20th of March 1828.

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  • A third hypothesis is that advanced by Karl Rieder (Der Gottesfreund von Oberland, Innsbruck, 1905), who thinks that not even Merswin himself wrote any of the literature, but that his secretary and associate Nicholas of Lowen, head of the House of St John at Griinenworth, the retreat founded by Merswin for the circle, worked over all the writings which emanated from different members of the group but bore no author's names, and to glorify the founder of the house attached Merswin's name to some of them and out of his imagination created "the Friend of God from the Oberland," whom he named as the writer of the others.

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  • i is (like those of the Psalms) the work of one or more of the Sopherim (or students and editors of Scripture) in post-exilic times, apparently the same writer (or company of writers) who prefixed the headings of Hosea and Micah, and perhaps of some of the other books.

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  • As a writer he is chiefly known as the reputed author of a collection of martyrologies which cover the reigns of Sapor II., Yazdegerd I.

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  • He was a copious writer, especially in verse.

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  • One of his followers, Joseph Hazzaya, was also a prolific writer.

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  • - Special mention may be made of `Ananisho` of Hedhaiyabh (middle of 7th century) well known as the author of a new recension of the Paradise of Palladius, and also the author of a volume on philosophical divisions and definitions; Romanus the physician 0-896), who wrote a medical compilation, a commentary on the Book of Hierotheus, a collection of Pytha - gorean maxims and other works; Moses bar Kepha, the voluminous writer above referred to; the famous physician Honain ibn Islhn See O.

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  • The first Armenian writer who notices them is the patriarch Nerses II.

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  • Similarly the Armenian writer Gregory Magistros (c. 1040) accuses the Thonraki of teaching that "Moses saw not God, but the devil," and infers thence that they held Satan to be creator of heaven and earth, as well as of mankind.

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  • Wallis Budge, to whom the present writer owes his information, was shown the stream in which their last christ had been baptized.

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  • The learning and insight which this book displays are unquestionable: it is well planned, and its contents are well arranged; but constitutional history is not a lively subject, and, in spite of the skill with which Stubbs handled it and the genius displayed in his narrative 04 chapters, the book does not afford an adequate idea of his place as a writer of history.

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  • In the judgment of the present writer, Xenophanes was neither a philosopher nor a sceptic. He was not a philosopher, for he despaired of knowledge.

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  • Fauchet has the reputation of an impartial and scrupulously accurate writer; and in his works are to be found important facts not easily accessible elsewhere.

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  • No writer in any literature, who has contented himself with so limited a function, has gained so great a reputation as Terence.

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  • The importance of his position in Roman literature consists in this, that he was the first writer who set before himself a high ideal of artistic perfection, and was the first to realize that perfection in style, form, and consistency of conception and execution.

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  • Eustathius (Writer) >>

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  • He was a prolific writer and enjoyed a very high reputation (Horace, Epistles, ii.

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  • Their contents falls far short of the writer's great reputation.

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  • As a prose writer Lamartine was very fertile.

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  • It was not meant for the physicians, and was certainly little read by them, as Celsus is quoted by no medical writer, and when referred to by Pliny, is spoken of as an author not a physician.

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  • Of Pliny, another encyclopaedic writer, a few words must be said, though he was not a physician.

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  • We now come to the writer who, above all others, gathered up into himself the divergent and scattered threads of ancient medicine, and out of whom again the greater part of modern European medicine has flowed.

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  • He had, in fact, every quality necessary for an encyclopaedic writer, or even for a literary and professional autocrat.

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  • As a writer he was worthy of a better period of medical literature.

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  • A writer with the (perhaps assumed) name of Apuleius Platonicus produced a herbal which held its ground till the 15th century at least, and was in the 9th translated into Anglo-Saxon.

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  • writers of this century need not be mentioned here; but the next, the 11th century, is given as the probable though uncertain date of a writer who had a great influence on European medicine, Mesua the younger of Damascus, whose personality is obscure, and of whose very existence some historians have doubted, thinking that the name was assumed by some medieval Latin writer.

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  • As in the case of Galen, the formal and encyclopaedic character of Avicenna's works was the chief cause of his popularity and ascendancy, though in modern times these very qualities in a scientific or medical writer would rather cause him to become more speedily antiquated.

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  • In England the first important name in this field is at the same time that of the first writer of a systematic work in any language on morbid anatomy, Matthew Baillie (1761-1823), a nephew of John and William Hunter, who published his treatise in 1795.

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  • Cicero, by his professed antagonism to the doctrines of Epicurus, by his inadequate appreciation of Lucretius himself and by the indifference which he shows to other contemporary poets, seems to have been neither fitted for the task of correcting the unfinished work of a writer whose genius was so distinct from his own, nor likely to have cordially undertaken such a task.

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  • No writer certainly is more purely Roman in personal character and in strength of understanding.

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  • It is more difficult to infer the moral than the intellectual characteristics of a great writer from the personal impress left by him on his work.

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  • No writer shows a juster scorn of all mere rhetoric and exaggeration.

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  • His literary capacity was early shown in the remarkable fiction of his Memoirs of Arthur Hamilton (1886) under the pseudonym of "Christopher Carr," and his Poems (1893) and Lyrics (1895) established his reputation as a writer of verse.

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  • He, who had been for years admittedly the first writer in France, had been repeatedly passed over in elections to the Academy.

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  • Vast and various as the work of Voltaire is, its vastness and variety are of the essence of its writer's peculiar quality.

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  • The various title-words of the several articles are often the merest stalkinghorses, under cover of which to shoot at the Bible or the church, the target being now and then shifted to the political institutions of the writer's country, his personal foes, &c., and the whole being largely seasoned with that acute, rather superficial, common-sense, but also commonplace, ethical and social criticism which the 18th century called philosophy.

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  • Stubbs denounced suburban gardens and garden houses in his Anatomy of Abuses, and another writer observed " how happy were cities if they had no suburbs."

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  • HERO OF ALEXANDRIA, Greek geometer and writer on mechanical and physical subjects, probably flourished in the second half of the 1st century.

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  • This tradition is important in spite of the fact that it first comes clearly before us in a writer belonging to the latter part of the 2nd century, because the prominence and fame of Luke were not such as would of themselves have led to his being singled out to have a Gospel attributed to him.

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  • The writer is more versed than any other New Testament writer except the author of the Epistle to the Hebrews, and very much more than most of them, in the literary Greek of the period of the rise of Christianity; and he has, also, like other writers, his favourite words, turns of expression and thoughts.

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  • Indeed it is easier to explain some of the differences between the Acts and St Paul's Epistles on this assumption than on that of authorship by a writer who would have felt more dependent upon the information which might be gathered from those Epistles, and who would have been more likely to have had a collection of them at hand, if his work was composed c. A.D.

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  • If we may assume that the writer who uses the first person plural in Acts xvi.

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  • According to ancient authorities, the writer was very outspoken in his denunciations, and his relatives considered it necessary to strike out the most offensive passages of the work before it was widely circulated (Quintilian, Instit.

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  • The writer was known, and it was in this connexion that Napoleon referred to him as "a wretched scribe named Gentz, one of those men without honour who sell themselves for money."

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  • As a matter of fact, no man was more free or outspoken in his criticism of the policy of his employers than this apparently venal writer.

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  • Allowance must of course be made for his point of view, but less so perhaps than in the case of any other writer so intimately concerned.

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  • Kolbe was a very successful teacher, a ready and vigorous writer, and a brilliant experimentalist whose work revealed the nature of many compounds the composition of which had not previously been understood.

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  • An American writer has expressed his satisf action that the day-labourer can now have on his table at a nominal price glass dishes of elaborate design, which only an expert can distinguish from hand-cut crystal.

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  • A writer in the early part of the 15th century states that " glassmaking is an important industry at Haleb (Aleppo)."

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  • A writer in the Memoires concernant les Chinois (ii.

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  • A Chinese writer, however, mentions the manufacture of a huge vase in A.D.

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  • Notwithstanding Cournot's just reputation as a writer on mathematics, the Recherches made little impression.

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  • 1853), is well known as a writer of light verse and of some charming children's books.

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  • PETER BARLOW (1776-1862), English writer on pure and applied mathematics, was born at Norwich in 1776 and died on the 1st of March 1862.

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  • The systems with the highest dates are placed first in the list; where a writer has produced more than one system, these are grouped together, the highest dates proposed by him determining his place in the series.

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  • 269, and another appended to the same writer's school edition of the Lex Ribuaria.

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  • On the other hand the reality of the visions is to some extent guaranteed by the writer's intense earnestness and by his manifest belief in the divine origin of his message.

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  • But the difficulty of regarding the visions as actual experiences, or as in any sense actual, is intensified, when full account is taken of the artifices of the writer; for the major part of his visions consists of what is to him really past history dressed up in the guise of prediction.

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  • Moreover, the writer no doubt intended that his reader should take the accuracy of the prediction (?) already accomplished to be a guarantee for the accuracy of that which was still unrealized.

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  • However we may explain the inconsistency, we are precluded by the moral earnestness of the writer from assuming the visions to be pure inventions.

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  • But the inconsistency has in part been explained by Gunkel, who has rightly emphasized that the writer did not freely invent his materials but derived them in the main from tradition, as he held that these mysterious traditions of his people were, if rightly expounded, forecasts of the time to come.

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  • The apocalyptic writer on the other hand despairs of the present, and directs his hopes absolutely to the future, to a new world standing in essential opposition to the present.

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  • Under the guidance of such a principle the writer naturally expected the world's culmination in evil to be the immediate precursor of God's intervention on behalf of the righteous, and every fresh growth in evil to be an additional sign that the time was at hand.

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  • The apocalyptic writer could obtain no hearing from his contemporaries, who held that, though God spoke in the past, "there was no more any prophet."

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  • Each fresh apocalypse would in the eyes of its writer be in some degree but a fresh edition of the traditions naturally attaching themselves to great names in Israel's past, and thus the books named respectively Enoch, Noah, Ezra would to some slight extent be not pseudonymous.

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  • These events belonged in the main to the past, but the writer represented them as still in the future, arranged under certain artificial categories of time definitely determined from the beginning in the counsels of God and revealed by Him to His servants the prophets.

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  • nrov: so named by the anonymous 5th-century writer in Buresch, Klaros, 1889, p. 95) is mentioned in conjunction with the Sibyllines by Justin (Apol.

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  • The writer belongs really to the prophetic and not to the apocalyptic school.

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  • It is true that these might have been due to the writer's borrowings from earlier Greek works ultimately of Hebrew origin.

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  • The date is late, for the writer speaks of the "venerable and holy images," as well as "the glorious and precious crosses and the sacred things of the churches" (xiv.), which points to the 5th century, when such things were first introduced into churches.

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  • 1.4, 1), along with Cratinus and Aristophanes, as the greatest writer of his school.

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  • Tha`alibi, a writer of the 11th century, says that Askar-Mokram had no equal for the quality and quantity of its sugar, " notwithstanding the great production of `Irak, Jorjan and India."

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  • Linguet was a prolific writer in many fields.

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  • The writer has found that many pasture soils containing less than.

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  • - c. 1521?), known also as Corneto from his birthplace, Italian cardinal and writer, was sent by Innocent VIII.

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  • As a writer, he was one of the first to restore the Latin tongue to its pristine purity; and among his works are De Vera Philosophia ex quatuor doctoribus ecclesiae (Bologna, 1507), De Sermone Latino (Basel, 1513), and a poem, De Venatione (Venice, 1534).

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  • Also Bible Sidelights from the Mound of Gezer, by the same writer.

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  • To the writer it seems clear that the latter is the most that can be asserted.

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  • He rendered into verse all the most important parts of the Bible with admirable skill, dividing his work into vitteas, a term which, the writer says, may be rendered by "lectiones" or "sententias."

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  • The picture, too, which it gives of the danger lest the Christianity of its readers should be unduly Judaic in feeling and practice, suits well the experiences of a writer living in Alexandria, where Judaism was immensely strong.

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  • Further, he shows an "astonishing familiarity with the Jewish rites," in the opinion of a modern Jew (Kohler in the Jewish Encycl.); so much so, that the latter agrees with another Jewish scholar in saying that "the writer seems to have been a converted Jew, whose fanatic zeal rendered him a bitter opponent of Judaism within the Christian Church."

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  • These opinions must overrule the view of some Christian scholars that the writer often blunders in Jewish matters, the fact being that his knowledge is derived from the Judaism of Alexandria' rather than Palestine.

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  • Its opening shows it to have been addressed to a Church, or rather a group of Churches, recently visited by the writer, who, while not wishing to write as an authoritative "teacher" so much as one who has come to love them as a friend (i.

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  • On the other hand Ibn ul-Mo`tazz (son of the caliph) was the writer of brilliant occasional verse, free of all imitation.

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  • Abu Firas (932-968) was a member of the family of Saif ud-Daula, a soldier whose poems have all the charm that comes from the fact that the writer has lived through the events he narrates (ed.

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  • The writer, therefore, exercises no independent criticism except as regards the choice of authorities; for he rejects accounts of which the first author or one of the intermediate links seems to him unworthy of credit, and sometimes he states which of several accounts seems to him the best.

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  • In this case the writer recurs to the first method, already described, only when the different traditions are greatly at variance with one another.

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  • The writer, therefore, keeps as close as he can to the letter of his sources, so that quite a late writer often reproduces the very words of the first narrator.

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  • `Arib of Cordova made an abridgment, adding the history of the West and continuing the story to about 975.1 Ibn 1Vlashkawaih wrote a history from the creation to 980, with the purpose of drawing the lessons of the story, following Tabari closely, as far as his book is known, and seldom recurring to other sources before the reign of Moqtadir; what follows is his own composition and shows him to be a writer of talent.

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  • Biruni, a Mahommedan writer, who lived at Khiva c. A.D.

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  • the evidence tabulated in The New Testament in the Apostolic 6 To the details furnished in the present writer's Historical New Testament (2nd ed., 1901, pp. 6 346 35) may be added references to Volter's Paulus u.

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  • 849), German monk and theological writer, was born about 808 in Swabia.

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  • The present writer believes that the date palm was really indigenous to this district of the Jerid, as it is to countries of similar description in southern Morocco, southern Algeria, parts of the Tripolitaine, Egypt, Mesopotamia, southern Persia and north-western India; but that north of the latitude of the Jerid the date did not grow naturally in Mauretania, just as it was foreign to all parts of Europe, in which, as in true North Africa, its presence is due to the hand of man.

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  • The present writer, riding up to these frontier mountains from the thoroughly Saharan country round Gafsa, found himself surrounded by a flora very reminiscent of Switzerland or England.

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  • In 1880 the present writer saw lions killed in the north-west of Tunisia, but by 1902 the lion was regarded as practically extinct in the regency, though occasional rumours of his appearance come from the Khmir Mountains and near Feriana.

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  • The Alexandrians prepared oil of turpentine by distilling pine-resin; Zosimus of Panopolis, a voluminous writer of the 5th century A.D., speaks of the distillation of a "divine water" or "panacea" (probably from the complex mixture of calcium polysulphides, thiosulphate, &c., and free sulphur, which is obtained by boiling sulphur with lime and water) and advises "the efficient luting of the apparatus, for otherwise the valuable properties would be lost."

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  • Some Greek-Latin exercises by an unknown writer of the 3rd century, to be learnt by heart and translated, were added to the grammar.

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  • Vincent has thus hardly any claim to be reckoned as an original writer.

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  • The Liber de Institutione Principum, a treatise on the duties of kings and their functionaries, has never yet been printed, and the only MS. copy the writer of this article has been able to consult does not contain in its prologue all the information which Echard seems to imply is to be found there.

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  • Clement was a polished writer, and a generous patron of art and letters.

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  • LACTANTIUS FIRMIANUS (c. 260 - c. 340), also called Lucius Caelius (or Caecilius) Lactantius Firmianus, was a Christian writer who from the beauty of his style has been called the "Christian Cicero."

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  • discipline), is the work of another writer (best edition by G.

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  • In addition to these and other laborious researches, Kopp was a prolific writer.

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  • IBN PAQUDA BAHYA, a Jewish ethical writer who flourished at Saragossa in the 11th century.

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  • He was called "Xenophon the younger" from his imitation of that writer, and he even speaks of himself as Xenophon.

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  • 90) awards him qualified praise as a writer of epics.

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  • Here at least, in the slender volume of 1830, was a new writer revealed, and in "Mariana," "The Poet," "Love and Death," and "Oriana," a singer of wonderful though still unchastened melody.

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  • This writer had already won a name, and in young Herder he found a mind well fitted to be the receptacle and vehicle of his new ideas on literature.

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  • From this vague, incoherent, yet gifted writer our author acquired some of his strong feeling for the naive.

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  • The writer does not make that use of the fact of man's superior organic endowments which one might expect from his general conception of the relation of the physical and the mental in human development.

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  • In the Waverley Market at Edinburgh, which is said to hold 20,000 people, he could be heard without difficulty; and as late as 1895 he said to the present writer: " What difference does it make to me whether I speak to 400 or 4000 people ?

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  • Vitruvius Cerdo, possibly a pupil and freedman of the famous writer on architecture.

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  • This was at one time claimed as the original source of all the Perceval romances, but this theory cannot be maintained in face of the fact that the writer gives in one place what is practically a literal translation of Chretien's text in a passage which there is strong reason to believe was borrowed by Chretien from an earlier poem.

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  • KARL HILLEBRAND (1829-1884), German author, was born at Giessen on the 17th of September 1829, his father Joseph Hillebrand (1788-1871) being a literary historian and writer on philosophic subjects.

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  • From Dublin he was called to Liverpool, and there for a quarter of a century he exercised extraordinary influence as a preacher, and achieved a high reputation as a writer in religious philosophy.

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  • Within the English Church men with whom he had both personal and religious sympathy rose - Whately, of whom he said, " We know no living writer who has proved so little and disproved so much ";2 and Thomas Arnold, " a man who could be a hero without romance ";3 F.

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  • 1843), a son of Anthony, and a journalist and writer on architecture.

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  • JACQUES AMYOT (1513- 1 593), French writer, was born of poor parents, at Melun, on the 30th of October 1513.

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  • The roll of contributors numbers almost every American writer of note.

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  • After its suppression and the falling off in interest of the Biblioteca italiana the next of any merit to appear was the Antologia, a monthly periodical brought out at Florence in 1820 by Gino Capponi and Giampetro Vieusseux, but suppressed in 1833 on account of an epigram of Tommaseo, a principal writer.

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  • Apart from his redoubtable powers as a controversialist, Philoxenus deserves commemoration as a scholar, an elegant writer, and an exponent of practical Christianity.

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  • JUAN ESCOIQUIZ (1762-1820), Spanish ecclesiastic, politician and writer, was born in Navarre in 1762.

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  • After publishing The Mock Mourners, intended to satirize and rebuke the outbreak of Jacobite joy at the king's death, he turned his attention once more to ecclesiastical subjects, and, in an evil hour for himself, wrote the anonymous Shortest Way with the Dissenters (1702), a statement in the most forcible terms of the extreme "high-flying" position, which some high churchmen were unwary enough to endorse, without any suspicion of the writer's ironical intention.

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  • At a later period he was unjustly described as "a scurrilous party writer," which he certainly was not; but, on the other hand, Johnson spoke of his writing "so variously and so well," and put Robinson Crusoe among the only three books that readers wish longer.

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  • Scott justly observed that Defoe's style "is the last which should be attempted by a writer of inferior genius; for though it be possible to disguise mediocrity by fine writing, it appears in all its naked inanity when it assumes the garb of simplicity."

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  • His political and economical pamphlets are almost unmatched as clear presentations of the views of their writer.

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  • LUCAS HOLSTENIUS, the Latinized name of Luc Holste (1596-1661), German humanist, geographer and theological writer, was born at Hamburg.

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  • The Priestly Writer in the Pentateuch also a p pears to be acquainted with this doctrine; it is the first of four ages which begins with the Creation and ends with the Deluge.

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  • For the Iranian parallel, see § 8, and on the Hebrew Priestly Writer, Gunkel, Genesis 2, pp. 2 33 ff.

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  • a docile Israelitish writer accepted one of the chief forms of the Babylonian cosmogony, merely omitting its polytheism and substituting " Yahweh " for " Marduk."

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  • For nearly three years, however, he was enabled to study and to experiment in verse without any active pressure or interruption from his family - three precious years in which the first phase of his art as a writer of idylls and bucolics, imitated to a large extent from Theocritus, Bion and the Greek anthologists, was elaborated.

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  • HENRY ST JOHN BOLINGBROKE, VISCOUNT (1678-1751), English statesman and writer, son of Sir Henry St John, Bart.

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  • On the first occasion which offered itself, that of Pulteney's rupture with Walpole in 1726, he endeavoured to organize an opposition in conjunction with the former and Windham; and in 1727 began his celebrated series of letters to the Craftsman, attacking the Walpoles, signed an "Occasional Writer."

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  • Cato was the first historical writer of Rome to use his native tongue.

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  • It is generally known as the Ciceronian age from the name of its greatest literary representative, whose activity as as peaker and writer was unremitting during nearly the whole period.

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  • marked contrast to another prose writer of that age - the historian C. Sallustrius Crispus or Sallust (c. 87-36).

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  • For that work the Augustan age, as the end of one great cycle of events and the beginning of another, was eminently suited, and a writer who, by his gifts of imagination and sympathy, was perhaps better fitted than any other man of antiquity for the task, and who through the whole of this period lived a life of literary leisure, was found to do justice to the subject.

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  • Propertius is a less accomplished artist and a less equably pleasing writer than either Tibullus or Ovid, but he shows more power of dealing gravely with a great or tragic situation than either of them, and his diction and rhythm give frequent proof of a concentrated force of conception and a corresponding movement of imaginative feeling which remind us of Lucretius.

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  • We know him in the intense liveliness of his feeling and the human weakness of his nature more intimately than any other writer of antiquity, except perhaps Cicero.

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  • The value of the work consists not in any power of critical investigation or weighing of historical evidence but in the intense sympathy of the writer with the national ideal, and the vivid imagination with which under the influence of this sympathy he gives life to the events and personages, the wars and political struggles, of times remote from his own.

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  • But no important writer of antiquity has less literary charm than Persius.

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  • The most important writer in the age succeeding Juvenal was the biographer C. Suetonius Tranquillus (c. 7 5-160), whose work is more valuable for its matter than its manner.

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  • Two epitomists of previous histories may be mentioned: Justinus (of uncertain date) who abridged the history of Pompeius Trogus, an Augustan writer; and P. Annius Florus, who wrote in the reign of Hadrian a rhetorical sketch based upon Livy.

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  • The last pagan prose writer who need be mentioned is Q.

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  • The last juristical writer of note was Herennius Modestinus (c. 240).

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  • HIPPOCRATES, Greek philosopher and writer, termed the " Father of Medicine," was born, according to Soranus, in Cos, in the first year of the Both Olympiad, i.e.

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  • 1154), bishop of St Asaph and writer on early British history, was born about the year 1100.

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  • SOPHRON, of Syracuse, writer of mimes, flourished about 43 o B.C. He was the author of prose dialogues in the Doric dialect, containing both male and female characters, some serious, others humorous in style, and depicting scenes from the daily life of the Sicilian Greeks.

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  • After some slight successes as a writer, a Salisbury publisher commissioned him to compile an account of Wiltshire and, in conjunction with his friend Edward Wedlake Brayley, Britton produced The Beauties of Wiltshire (1801; 2 vols., a third added in 1825), the first of the series The Beauties of England and Wales, nine volumes of which Britton and his friend wrote.

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  • JOHN HUTCHINSON (1674-1737), English theological writer, was born at Spennithorne, Yorkshire, in 1674.

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  • 1 A number of examples occurring during experiments made by the present writer and by his acquaintances in 1897 were carefully recorded and attested by the signatures of all concerned.

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  • By way of facts, we have only a large body of unattested anecdotes of supra-normal successes in crystal-gazing, in many lands and ages; and the scanty records of modern amateur investigators, like the present writer.

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  • The writer is acquainted with no experiments in which it was attempted to discern the future (except in trivial cases as to events on the turf, when chance coincidence might explain the successes), and only with two or three cases in which there was an attempt to help historical science and discern the past by aid of psychical methods.

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  • The writer has no experience of trance, sleep or auto-hypnotization produced in such experiments; scryers have always seemed to retain their full normal consciousness.

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  • In the foregoing account only those particulars which bear directly on Villehardouin himself have been detailed; but the chronicle is as far as possible from being an autobiography, and the displays of the writer's personality, numerous as they are, are quite involuntary, and consist merely in his way of handling the subject, not in the references (as brief as his functions as chronicler will admit) to his own proceedings.

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  • HUBERT LANGUET (1518-1581), French Huguenot writer and diplomat, was born at Vitteaux in Burgundy, of which town his father was governor.

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  • Pirminius, who was far from being an original writer, made great use of a treatise by Martin of Braga, but substituted a Roman form of Renunciation, and refers to the Roman rite of Unction in a way which leads us to suppose that the form of creed which he substituted for Martin's form was also Roman.

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  • Further, Caesarius was in the habit of putting some words of a distinguished writer at the head of his compositions, which would account for the fact that the name of Athanasius was subsequently attached to the creed.

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  • The writer of the Oratorian Commentary (Theodulf of Orleans?) addressing a synod which instructed him to provide an exposition of this work on the faith, writes of it, as " here and there recited in our churches, and continually made the subject of meditation by our priests."

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  • In the popular mind, Shaftesbury is generally regarded as a writer hostile to religion.

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  • It is the latest writer (P) who mentions Abram (the original form of the name), Nahor and Haran, sons of Terah, at the close of a genealogy of the sons of Shem, which includes among its members Eber the eponym of the Hebrews.

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  • Chase has pointed out: (r) the terms KX?Jtol, awrnpia, IrLaTCS, have attained their later technical sense; (2) " the writer is steeped in the language of the LXX.," employing its phraseology independently of other N.T.

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  • The Egyptian writer Hermes Trismegistus (c. 250), in a work called Asclepius (cited by Augustine, De civit.

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  • Lists of kings found on the temple wall at Abydos, in the fragments of the Turin papyrus and elsewhere, have cleared up many doubtful points in the lists of Manetho, and at the same time, as Professor Petrie has pointed out, have proved to us how true a historian that much-discussed writer was.

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  • For most of the period in question Thucydides is the only source; and despite the inherent merits of a great writer, it can hardly be doubted that the tribute of almost unqualified praise that successive generations of scholars have paid to Thucydides must have been in some measure qualified if, for example, a Spartan account of the Peloponnesian War had been preserved to us.

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  • Porcius Cato places it in the first year of the seventh Olympiad, that is, in 3963 of the Julian period, and 751 B.C. (4) Verrius Flaccus places it in the fourth year of the sixth Olympiad, that is, in the year 3962 of the Julian period, and 752 B.C. (5) Terentius Varro places it in the third year of the sixth Olympiad, that is, in the year 3961 of the Julian period, and 753 B.C. A knowledge of these different computations isnecessary, in order to reconcile the Roman historians with one another, and even any one writer with himself.

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  • Probably no writer ever possessed a juster view of the relative importance of men and things.

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  • It is sincere and straightforward, and obviously innocent of any motive beyond that of clearly expressing the writer's meaning.

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  • That position the writer now abandons.

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  • Brit., it should, however, be stated that the writer of this article regards "Tyrol" as more correct.

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  • The Mahommedan writer Alberuni states that in former times the kings of the Hindus (among whom he mentions Kanik or Kanishka) were Turks by race, and this may represent a native tradition as to the affinities of the Yue-Chi.

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  • He had some reputation as a skilful disputant, excelled in mathematics, and gained some credit as a writer of verses.

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  • Niccolo MACHIAVELLI (1469-1527), Italian statesman and writer, was born at Florence on the 3rd of May 1469.

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  • But Castruccio, being farther from the writer's own experience, bears weaker traits of personality.

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  • The style of the whole book is nervous, vivid, free from artifice and rhetoric, obeying the writer's thought with absolute plasticity.

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  • detulerit, by an iith-century writer.

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  • The present writer has successfully used a similar plan in measuring position angles of a Centauri with the heliometer, viz.

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  • According to Ibn Khaqan, a contemporary writer, he became a student of the exact sciences and was also a musician and a poet.

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  • 397-418) that no church writer in the West subsequently except Jerome seriously called in question the authorship of our book.

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  • Instead of the above complex theory this writer now offers another (Die Offenbarung Johannis, 1904), 1 in which he distinguishes an apocalypse of John, A.D.

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  • This writer seeks to establish the existence of an original Christian apocalypse written before A.D.

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  • The symbols and myths in these are not the creation of the writer, but borrowed from the past, and in not a few instances the materials are too foreign to his subject to lend themselves to his purpose without the help of artificial and violent expedients.

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  • From this standpoint it may be argued that every apocalypse is in a certain sense pseudonymous; for the materials are not the writer's own, but have come down to him as a sacred deposit - full of meaning for the seeing eye and the understanding heart.

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  • The presence of such details is strong evidence of the writer's use of foreign material.

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  • 463-76) holds mainly to the contemporary-historical method in his earlier works, though recognizing signs of a double historical background; but in his last work the importance of tradition as a source of the writer's materials is fully acknowledged.

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  • To these works the present writer is indebted for many a suggestion.

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  • The main problem, which so far has not been satisfactorily solved, may be shortly put as follows: Are the visions in the Apocalypse the genuine results of spiritual experiences, or are they artificial productions, mere literary vehicles of the writer's teaching?

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  • The writer's belief in his prophetic office and his obvious conviction of the inviolable sanctity of his message make it impossible to accept Weizsacker's opinion.

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  • 4-8, in which the writer salutes the Seven Churches of Asia.

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  • i 1, and the writer is bidden to write down what he has seen and" the things which are and the things which shall be hereafter,"i.

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  • The insertion of the alien matter 7-12 between 1-5 and 13-17 may be due to our author's wish to show that the expulsion of Satan from heaven after Christ's birth and ascension to heaven was owing in some measure to Christ, although he has allowed Michael's name to remain in the borrowed passage, 7-12 - a fact which shows how dependent the writer was on tradition.

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  • The figure of the first beast presents many difficulties, owing to the fact that it is not freely invented but largely derived from traditional elements and is by the writer identified with the seventh wounded head.

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  • The writer throws this introduction into his favourite scheme of seven acts, in this case symbolized by seven bowls.

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  • Nevertheless, the book exhibits a relative unity; for, whatever digressions occur in the development of its theme, the main object of the writer is never lost sight of.

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  • Not till the last years of Domitian is it possible to discover conditions which would explain the apprehensions and experiences of our writer.

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  • The writer manifests the most burning hatred towards Rome and the worship of its head - the beast and the false prophet, who are actual embodiments of Satan.

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  • Some scholars are of opinion that this writer identified Domitian with the eighth emperor, the Nero redivivus, the beast from the abyss.

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