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writ

writ

writ Sentence Examples

  • The writ in which the title was conferred was called a diploma.

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  • The writ in which the title was conferred was called a diploma.

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  • The bailiff then becomes liable for non-execution, mis-execution or insufficient return of any writs, and in the case of non-return of any writ, if the sheriff returns that he has delivered the writ to a bailiff of a liberty, the sheriff will be ordered to execute the writ notwithstanding the liberty, and must cause the bailiff to attend before the high court of justice and answer why he did not execute the writ.

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  • The bailiff then becomes liable for non-execution, mis-execution or insufficient return of any writs, and in the case of non-return of any writ, if the sheriff returns that he has delivered the writ to a bailiff of a liberty, the sheriff will be ordered to execute the writ notwithstanding the liberty, and must cause the bailiff to attend before the high court of justice and answer why he did not execute the writ.

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  • The Falls of Princes, again, is merely the Monk's Tale " writ large."

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  • In ecclesiastical law, the contempt of the authority of an ecclesiastical court is dealt with by the issue of a writ de contumace capiendo from the court of chancery at the instance of the judge of the ecclesiastical court; this writ took the place of that de excommunicato capiendo in 1813, by an act of George III.

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  • Their remedy was to apply for a little writ of right in the first case and for a writ of monstraverunt in the second.

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  • In June Shaftesbury applied for a writ of habeas corpus, but could get no release until the 26th of February 1678, after his letter and three petitions to the king.

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  • limits the use of the writ known as Praecipe.

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  • This writ was one transferring cases concerning the ownership of property from the courts of the feudal lords to those of the king.

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  • A writ for the election of a member to parliament was issued in the reign of Edward III., but no return was made.

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  • ' The Hierozoicon of Bochart - a treatise on the animals named in Holy Writ - was published in 1619.

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  • The writ was abolished by 29 Car.II.

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  • Five times he was expelled and five times re-elected by his constituents, till at last the government refused to issue a writ, and for three years York was without one of its representatives.

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  • The wish expressed by the Whigs, that a member of the electoral family should be invited to England, had already aroused the queen's indignation in 1708; and now, in 1714, a writ of summons for the electoral prince as duke of Cambridge having been obtained, Anne forbade the Hanoverian envoy, Baron Schutz, her presence, and declared all who supported the project her enemies; while to a memorial on the same subject from the electress Sophia and her grandson in May, Anne replied in an angry letter, which is said to have caused the death of the electress on the 8th of June, requesting them not to trouble the peace of her realm or diminish her authority.

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  • The wish expressed by the Whigs, that a member of the electoral family should be invited to England, had already aroused the queen's indignation in 1708; and now, in 1714, a writ of summons for the electoral prince as duke of Cambridge having been obtained, Anne forbade the Hanoverian envoy, Baron Schutz, her presence, and declared all who supported the project her enemies; while to a memorial on the same subject from the electress Sophia and her grandson in May, Anne replied in an angry letter, which is said to have caused the death of the electress on the 8th of June, requesting them not to trouble the peace of her realm or diminish her authority.

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  • Early in Henry II.'s time it had become the custom of England for the court Christian: to "signify" its sentence of excommunication to the king and to demand from him a writ of significavit to the sheriff, to imprison the person excommunicated.

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  • limits the use of the writ known as Praecipe.

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  • Typhon: a Burlesque Poem (1704); Aesop Dress'd, or a Collection of Fables writ in Familiar Verse (1704); The Planter's Charity (1704); The Virgin Unmasked (1709, 1724, 1731, 1742), a work in which the coarser side of his nature is prominent; Treatise of the Hypochondriack and Hysterick Passions (1711, 1715, 1730) admired by Johnson (Mandeville here protests against merely speculative therapeutics, and advances fanciful theories of his own about animal spirits in connexion with "stomachic ferment": he shows a knowledge of Locke's methods, and an admiration for Sydenham); Free Thoughts on Religion (1720); A Conference about Whoring (1725); An Enquiry into the Causes of the Frequent Executions at Tyburn (1725); The Origin of Honour and the Usefulness of Christianity in War (1732).

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  • Charles directed a writ quo warranto against the corporation of London in 1683, and the Court of King's Bench declared its charter forfeited.

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  • Some have supposed that a writ of that name is as old as the common law, but its execution might be arrested by a pardon from the crown.

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  • Disobedience to or contempt of the ecclesiastical courts is to be punished by a new writ, de contumace capiendo, to follow on the certificate of the judge that the defender is contumacious and in contempt.

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  • The pamphlet is supposed to have been written by Chrysostomus Dudulaeus of Westphalia and printed by one Christoff Crutzer, but as no such author or printer is known at this time - the latter name indeed refers directly to the legend - it has been conjectured that the whole story is a myth invented to support the Protestant contention of a continuous witness to the truth of Holy Writ in the person of this "eternal" Jew; he was to form, in his way, a counterpart to the apostolic tradition of the Catholic Church.

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  • and Edward VI., and was enforced by ecclesiastical censures and the writ De excommunicate capiendo; and an act 2 & 3 Edw.

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  • After the conquest of the Hausa States in1902-1903the king's writ ran - with the exception of a few districts inhabited by primitive savages - through the whole area known as Northern Nigeria.

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  • Immediately the powers protested against this infraction of the law of liquidation, and the Caisse applied for a writ to the Mixed Tribunals.

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  • Feudalism was not yet dead, and in the north and west there were medieval franchises in which the royal writ and common law hardly ran at all.

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  • Rep. 190, 217); Notes on the King's Writ for choosing Members of Parliament ...

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  • Charles directed a writ quo warranto against the corporation of London in 1683, and the Court of King's Bench declared its charter forfeited.

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  • Disobedience to or contempt of the ecclesiastical courts is to be punished by a new writ, de contumace capiendo, to follow on the certificate of the judge that the defender is contumacious and in contempt.

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  • Monitions to amend may be decreed and be enforced by significavit and writ de contumace capiendo, or by excommunication with imprisonment not to exceed six months (53 Geo.

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  • No charter has been found, but a judgment given under a writ of quo warranto in 1578 confirms to the burgesses freedom from toll, passage and pontage, the tolls and stallage of the quay and the right to hold two fairs - privileges which they claimed under charters of Baldwin de Redvers and Isabel de Fortibus, countess of Albemarle, in the 13th century, and Edward Courtenay, earl of Devon, in 1405.

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  • In civil arbitration, the decision or award may be made a rule of court, after which it becomes enforceable by writ of execution against person or property.

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  • These writs entitled them to appear as plaintiffs against the lord in his own manorial court and, eventually, to have the question at issue examined by way of appeal, on a writ of error, or by reservation on some legal points in the upper courts of the king.

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  • This kind of writ allowed a man to refer the question of his guilt or innocence to the verdict of his neighbours instead of proving his innocence by the duel.

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  • (k) In England the Constitutions of Clarendon added a provision for appeal to the king, " and if the archbishop shall have failed in doing justice recourse is to be had in the last resort (postremo) to our lord the king, that by his writ the controversy may be ended in the court of the archbishop; because there must be no further process without the assent of our lord the king."

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  • A royal writ of the 16th century cited by Covarruvias (c. xxxv.) prohibits execution of the sentence of a Spanish court Christian pending an appeal to the pope.

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  • The writ apparently issued for no court inferior to the bishop's, unless upon the bishop's request.

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  • After washing our hands and lighting the lamps, each is invited to sing a hymn before all to God, either taken from holy writ or of his own composition.

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  • Tithes were generally recovered by a writ against the owner of the tithable property usually brought in the ecclesiastical courts (questions of title to tithes being reserved to the temporal courts), the jurisdiction of which in this respect was confirmed by the statutes Circumspecte agatis (13 Edw.

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  • 208 the emperor Septimius Severus carried out an extensive punitive expedition against the northern tribes, but while it is doubtful how far he penetrated, it is certain that after his death the Roman writ never again ran north of Cheviot.

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  • A royal writ of the 16th century cited by Covarruvias (c. xxxv.) prohibits execution of the sentence of a Spanish court Christian pending an appeal to the pope.

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  • After washing our hands and lighting the lamps, each is invited to sing a hymn before all to God, either taken from holy writ or of his own composition.

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  • Peck, led an unsuccessful movement to increase the number of Supreme Court judges and to relieve them of their circuit duties, and succeeded in defeating an attempt to repeal the twenty-fifth section of the Judiciary Act of 1789, which gave the Supreme Court appellate jurisdiction by writ of error to the state courts in cases where federal laws and treaties are in question.

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  • 1 The writ is a remedial mandatory writ of right existing by the common law, i.e.

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  • There are various other forms of the writ according to the purpose for which it is granted.

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  • The Brahman priest (brahma) being thus the recognized head of the sacerdotal order (brahma), which itself is the visible embodiment of sacred writ and the devotional spirit pervading it (brahma), the complete realization of theocratic aspirations required but a single step, which was indeed taken in the theosophic speculations of the later Vedic poets and the authors of the Brahmanas (q.v.), viz.

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  • He merely corrects slackness or lack of doing justice (Si archiepiscopus defecerit in justitia exhibenda) and by his writ (precepto) directs the controversy to be determined in the metropolitan's court.

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  • In some sense the king's writ of significavit was discretionary; but its issue could be enforced by excommunication or interdict.

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  • He was summoned to the Irish House of Peers as Viscount Valentia, but was denied his writ to the parliament of Great Britain by a majority of one vote.

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  • Gherardo, however, did not say, as has been supposed, that Joachim's books were the new gospel, but merely that the Calabrian abbot had supplied the key to Holy Writ, and that with the help of that intelligentia mystica it would be possible to extract from the Old and New Testaments the eternal meaning, the gospel according to the Spirit, a gospel which would never be written; as for this eternal sense, it had been entrusted to an order set apart, to the Franciscan order announced by Joachim, and in this order the ideal of the third age was realized.

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  • In Sigismund's reign the feudal system, for the first time, became deeply rooted in Magyar soil, and it is a lamentable fact that in 15th-century Hungary it is to be seen at its very worst, especially in those wild tracts, and they were many, in which the king's writ could hardly be said to run.

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  • The protector, hearing of his "grievous complaint," sent him a writ, and Lenthall was elated at believing he had secured a peerage.

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  • In the law of England sentence of excommunication, upon being properly certified by the bishop, was followed by the writ de excommunicato capiendo for the arrest of the offender.

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  • In March 1604 Bancroft, on Whitgift's death, was appointed by royal writ president of convocation then assembled; and he there presented a book of canons collected by himself.

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  • During the war that followed the west section was generally loyal to the north while the south section favoured the Confederacy and furnished many soldiers for its army; but most of the state was kept under Federal control, the writ of habeas corpus being suspended.

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  • In the reign of Edward I., whose warlike enterprises after he was king were confined within the four seas, this alteration does not seem to have proceeded very far, and Scotland and Wales were subjugated by what was in the main, if not exclusively, a feudal militia raised as of old by writ to the earls and barons and the sheriffs.'

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  • He was convicted (February 1844) after the trials that followed, but they were not good specimens of equal justice, and the sentence of imprisonment for a year and a fine of £2000 was reversed on a writ of error by the House of Lords (September 1844), and he and his colleagues were again free.

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  • In consequence of these conflicting verdicts, the whole matter was brought, by a writ of scire facias, before the court of King's Bench, to have the validity of the patent finally settled, and it was not till this third trial, which took place in June 1785, that Arkwright's claim to the inventions which formed the subject of the patent was disputed.

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  • Randolph sent back many charges, especially against Massachusetts, with the effect that, in 1684, the charter of that colony was annulled by a decree in Chancery on a writ of quo warranto.

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  • Gherardo, however, did not say, as has been supposed, that Joachim's books were the new gospel, but merely that the Calabrian abbot had supplied the key to Holy Writ, and that with the help of that intelligentia mystica it would be possible to extract from the Old and New Testaments the eternal meaning, the gospel according to the Spirit, a gospel which would never be written; as for this eternal sense, it had been entrusted to an order set apart, to the Franciscan order announced by Joachim, and in this order the ideal of the third age was realized.

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  • In March 1604 Bancroft, on Whitgift's death, was appointed by royal writ president of convocation then assembled; and he there presented a book of canons collected by himself.

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  • Randolph sent back many charges, especially against Massachusetts, with the effect that, in 1684, the charter of that colony was annulled by a decree in Chancery on a writ of quo warranto.

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  • brahma), in the sense of "sacred utterance or rite," in which case it might mean a comment on a sacred text, or explanation of a devotional rite, calculated to bring out its spiritual or mystic significance and its bearing on the Brahma, the world-spirit embodied in the sacred writ and ritual.

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  • So little was the collection considered as a literary work with a definite text that every one assumed a right to abridge or enlarge, to insert ideas of his own, or fresh scriptural quotations; nor were the scribes and translators by any means scrupulous about the names of natural objects, and even the passages from Holy Writ.

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  • c. 23 provided for the better execution of this writ.

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  • cannot be proved by holy writ.

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  • Rhode Island offered no resistance to the writ against its charter and Andros extended his authority over it immediately after his arrival.

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  • If it should prevail, it perverts justice; 1 A somewhat similar case is that of the writ De Rege inconsulto brought forward by Bacon.

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  • 1566), he obtained an opinion from Protestant theologians that bigamy was not forbidden by Holy Writ.

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  • Persia of the present day is not only, in the matter of geographical definition, far from the vast empire of Sacred Writ and remote history, but it is not even the less extensive dominion of the Safawi kings and Nadir Shah.

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  • )ld Persian inscriptions are writ ten in the cuneiform character the simplest form, known as the first class.

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  • In 1319 Glastonbury received a writ of summons to parliament, but made no return, and has not since been represented.

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  • It is addressed to the person in whose custody another is detained, and commands him to bring his prisoner before the court immediately after the receipt of the writ, together with the day and cause of his being taken and detained, to undergo and receive (ad subjiciendum et recipiendum) whatsoever the court awarding the writ "may consider of concerning him in that behalf."

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  • It is often stated that the writ is founded on the article of the Great Charter already quoted; but there are extant instances 1 See Hallam, Const.

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  • the writ de odio et acid, used as early as the 12th century to prevent imprisonment on vexatious appeals of felony, and the writ of mainprise (de manucaptione), long obsolete if not abolished in England but which it was attempted to use in India so late as 1870.

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  • In the case of imprisonment on accusation of crime the writ issued from the court of king's bench (or from the chancery), and on its return the court judged of the legality of the imprisonment, and discharged the prisoner or admitted him to bail or remanded him to his former custody according to the result of the examination.

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  • the writ was fully established as the appropriate process for checking illegal imprisonment by inferior courts or by public officials.

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  • Though the authority of the courts had been strengthened by the Petition of Right and the act of 1640, it was still rendered insufficient by reason of the insecurity of judicial tenure, the fact that only the chancellor (a political as well as a legal officer) and the court of king's bench had undoubted right to issue the writ, and the inability or hesitation of the competent judges to issue the writ except during the legal term, which did not cover more than half the year.

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  • In Jenkes's case (1676) Lord Chancellor Nottingham refused to issue the writ in vacation in a case in which a man had been committed by the king in council for a speech at Guildhall, and could get neither bail nor trial.

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  • Indeed as early as 1 591 the judges had complained of the difficulty of enforcing the writ in the case of imprisonment at the instance of magnates of the realm.

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  • It is to be observed that neither at common law nor under the act of 1679 was the writ the appropriate remedy in the case of a person convicted either on indictment or summarily.

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  • As regards persons imprisoned for debt or on civil process the writ was available at common law to test the legality of the detention: but the practice in these cases is unaffected by the act of 1679, and is of no present interest, since imprisonment on civil process is almost abolished.

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  • The appropriate writ for such cases was that known as de homine replegiando.

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  • The use of this writ in most if not all criminal cases was forbidden in 1553; but it was used in the 17th century in a case of kidnapping (Designy's case, 1682), and against Lord Grey for abducting his wife's sister (1682), and in the earl of Banbury's case to recover his wife (1704).

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  • In the same year the writ was used to release the wife of Earl Ferrers from his custody and maltreatment, and was unsuccessfully applied for by John Wilkes to get back his wife, who was separated from him by mutual agreement.

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  • It will appear from the foregoing statement that the issue and enforcement of the writ rests on the common law as strengthened by the acts of 1627,1640, 1679 and 1816, and subject also to the regulations as to procedure contained in the Crown Office Rules, 1906.

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  • The effect of the statutes is to keep the courts always open for the issue of the writ.

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  • In cases where martial law exists the use of the writ is ex hypothesi suspended during conditions amounting to a state of war within the realm or the British possession affected (e.g.

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  • As regards civil proceedings, this form of the writ is now rarely used, owing to the abolition of arrest on mesne process and the restriction of imprisonment for debt, or in execution of a civil judgment.

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  • The right to issue the writ depends on the common law, supplemented by an act of 1802.

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  • The above forms are now of little or no importance; but the procedure for obtaining them and the forms of writ are included in the Crown Office Rules 1906.

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  • The writ has in past times been issued from the English court of king's bench into Ireland; but does not now so issue.

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  • The court of king's bench has also issued the writ to the king's foreign dominions beyond seas, e.g.

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  • In Australasia and Canada and in most if not all the British possessions whose law is based on the common law, the power to issue and enforce the writ is possessed and is freely exercised by colonial courts, under the charters or statutes creating and regulating the courts.

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  • The writ is freely resorted to in Canada, and in 1905, 1906, two appeals came to the privy council from the dominion, one with reference to an extradition case, the other with respect to the right to expel aliens.

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  • Under the Roman-Dutch law as applied in British Guiana the writ was unknown and no similar process existed (2nd report of West Indian law commissioners).

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  • The laws of Ceylon being derived from the Roman-Dutch law, the writ of habeas corpus is not indigenous: but, under s.

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  • On the other hand, the courts of the union issue the writ only in those cases in which the power is expressly conferred on them by the constitution.

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  • (" the Fat ") is noteworthy for the first meeting of the Portuguese cortes, to which the upper hierarchy of the Church and the nobles (fidalgos and ricos homens) were summoned by royal writ.

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  • After the threat of a Quo Warranto writ in 1683 for the surrender of the Massachusetts charter, Mather used all his tremendous influence to persuade the colonists not to give up the charter; and the Boston freemen unanimously voted against submission.

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  • The latter, however, would seem to be the case, since a bishop was entitled to his writ of summons after confirmation and before doing homage for his barony.

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  • An order of the council for the payment of money out of the borough fund must be signed by three members of the council and countersigned by the town clerk, and any such order may be removed into the king's bench division of the High Court of Justice by writ of certiorari, and may be wholly or partly disallowed or confirmed on the hearing.

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  • At Praed Street chapel he gradually obtained a ' The original writ of summons (1299) was addressed in Latin, Roberto domino de Clif f ord, i.e.

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  • With regard to parliamentary representation, the first original writ which has been discovered was issued in 1290 when two members were returned for the county.

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  • Certainty and legal protection were so essential that even villain holdings were treated as villain socage when legal protection was obtainable for it, as was actually the case with the peasants on Ancient demesne who could sue their lords by the little writ of right and the Monstraverunt.

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  • On the loth, of June 1686 Newton wrote to Halley the following letter: " Sir, - In order to let you know the case between Mr Hooke and me, I give you an account of what passed between us in our letters, so far as I could remember; for 'tis long since they were writ, and I do not know that I have seen them since.

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  • That in one of my papers writ (I cannot say in what year, but I am sure some time before I had any correspondence with Mr Oldenburg, and that's above fifteen years ago), the proportion of the forces of the planets from the sun, reciprocally duplicate of their distances from him, is expressed, and the proportion of our gravity to the moon's conatus recedendi a centro terrae is calculated, though not accurately enough.

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  • Poole is first mentioned in a writ of 1224, addressed to the bailiffs and good men of La Pole, ordering them to retain all ships within their port.

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  • The corporation was suspended after a writ of quo warranto in 1686, the town being governed by the commission of the peace until the charters were renewed in 1688.

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  • the service of a writ) where that was impossible without apparent actual rebellion against the authority of the legislature, and therefore of Congress.

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  • The kings writ only ran in and about Dublin and a few other harbour fortresses.

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  • fiegn Johns writ of 1213, bidding discreet men from each nings of shire to present themselves at Oxford, found its parilaparallel in another writ of 1253 which bids four knightly meat.

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  • This inquest was made by the writ Quo Warranto, by which each landholder was invited to show the charter or warrant in which his claims rested.

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  • When the imprisoned gentlemen appealed to the kings bench for a writ of habeas corpus, it appeared that no cause of committal had been assigned, and the judges therefore refused to liberate them.

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  • He fled to France, and a convention parliament, summoned without the royal writ, declared that his flight was equivalent to abdication, and offered the crown in joint sovereignty to William and Mary (1689).

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  • Thomas, son of Maurice, was allowed to succeed his father in the lands, and, having a writ of summons to parliament in 1295, he is reckoned the first hereditary baron of the line.

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  • Under the will of his father, Colonel William Berkeley, the eldest illegitimate son, had the castle and estates, and on the failure of his claim to the earldom he demanded a writ of summons as a baron by reason of his tenure of the castle.

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  • 1899), daughter and heir of Thomas Moreton Fitzhardinge Berkeley, 6th earl de jure, was declared by letters patent under the great seal to have succeeded to the ancient barony of Berkeley created by the writ of 1421; and she was succeeded by her daughter.

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  • Her application for a writ of habeas corpus was refused, and on the 16th of March she left London, progressing however, on account of illness and prostration, only as far as Barnet.

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  • Writ Of Mandamus >>

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  • The market, formerly held on Sunday, was changed in 1218 to Wednesday, and in answer to a writ of Quo Warranto Maud de Holand claimed in 1330 that her family had held a fair on St Andrew's day from time immemorial.

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  • The justices were also ordered to try proprietary actions commenced by the king's writ for the recovery of land held by the service of half a knight's fee or less.

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  • The liberties were those districts in which the great vassals of the crown exercised palatinate jurisdiction, and the crosses were the church lands, where alone the royal writ usually ran.

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  • The Nationalist leader seemed to stand higher than ever, but the writ in the divorce proceedings, brought by Captain O'Shea against his wife, with the Irish leader as co-respondent, was hanging over him.

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  • Galileo's answer, written, as he said himself, currente calamo, was an exposition of a formal theory as to the relations of physical science to Holy Writ, still further developed in an elaborate apology addressed by him in the following year (1614) to Christina of Lorraine, dowager grand-duchess of Tuscany.

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  • obtained a new charter and a writ of supersedeas.

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  • It may transfer any case to the supreme court or the supreme court may assume jurisdiction of any of its cases by issuing a writ of certiorari, but otherwise its decrees are final.

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  • The short and simple annals of the poor Are now writ long on forms obscure.

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  • Think last year's Sony rootkit debacle writ large.

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  • He also granted decree for removing against the defender in terms of the second crave of the initial writ.

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  • inquisition post mortem was held by virtue of a writ issued on 16 May 1236.

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  • libel writ against " Street " magazine.

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  • Beside, the editions of Holy Writ are so numerous that he could hardly suppose that two copies would have the same pagination.

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  • petitioning for a writ of certiorari.

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  • You can't say the pope 's writ demanded something without quoting a papal demand.

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  • rosy lips and cheeks I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

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  • The obstruction of an authorized enforcement officer in enforcing a writ will continue to be a criminal offense.

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  • May your pen serve the writ of justice.. .

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  • The current fee of £ 20 will still be payable for sealing the writ.

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  • He issues a libel writ against " Street " magazine.

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  • There is no form for this and you will need a lawyer to draft an initial writ.

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  • For that, I received a writ with a penal notice.

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  • His lecture that night was like an exposition of holy writ.

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  • A careful examination of the thirty-two rolls from 1272 to 1307 reveals that behind almost every completed action was a royal writ.

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  • He also granted decree for removing against the defender in terms of the second crave of the initial writ.

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  • It is a legal writ, a legal form.

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  • In particular, any such question of jurisdiction was reviewable by the High Court by way of prerogative writ.

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  • Lancaster had its own justices and the king's writ did not run within the palatine county.

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  • writ of fieri facias.

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  • writ of mandamus, relying on section 13 of the Judiciary Act of 1789.

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  • writ of certiorari.

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  • writ of sequestration being granted in accordance with CPR Part 23 under the auspices of a judge.

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  • writ of habeas corpus for Foster's release.

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  • writ of summons to Parliament?

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  • In June Shaftesbury applied for a writ of habeas corpus, but could get no release until the 26th of February 1678, after his letter and three petitions to the king.

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  • The Falls of Princes, again, is merely the Monk's Tale " writ large."

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  • By a natural extension of the original meaning, the term brahma, in the sense of sacred utterance, was subsequently likewise applied to the whole body of sacred writ, the tri-vidya or "triple lo re" of the Veda; whilst it also came to be commonly used as the abstract designation of the priestly function and the Brahmanical order generally, in the same way as the term kshatra, " sway, rule," came to denote the aggregate of functions and individuals of the Kshatriyas or Rajanyas, the nobility or military class.

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  • The Brahman priest (brahma) being thus the recognized head of the sacerdotal order (brahma), which itself is the visible embodiment of sacred writ and the devotional spirit pervading it (brahma), the complete realization of theocratic aspirations required but a single step, which was indeed taken in the theosophic speculations of the later Vedic poets and the authors of the Brahmanas (q.v.), viz.

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  • brahma), in the sense of "sacred utterance or rite," in which case it might mean a comment on a sacred text, or explanation of a devotional rite, calculated to bring out its spiritual or mystic significance and its bearing on the Brahma, the world-spirit embodied in the sacred writ and ritual.

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  • This writ was one transferring cases concerning the ownership of property from the courts of the feudal lords to those of the king.

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  • This kind of writ allowed a man to refer the question of his guilt or innocence to the verdict of his neighbours instead of proving his innocence by the duel.

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  • (k) In England the Constitutions of Clarendon added a provision for appeal to the king, " and if the archbishop shall have failed in doing justice recourse is to be had in the last resort (postremo) to our lord the king, that by his writ the controversy may be ended in the court of the archbishop; because there must be no further process without the assent of our lord the king."

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  • He merely corrects slackness or lack of doing justice (Si archiepiscopus defecerit in justitia exhibenda) and by his writ (precepto) directs the controversy to be determined in the metropolitan's court.

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  • Thus when a writ of significavit issued on the mandate of a bishop, an appeal to Rome availed not to stay execution; but if there were an appeal to the archbishop it was otherwise.

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  • Early in Henry II.'s time it had become the custom of England for the court Christian: to "signify" its sentence of excommunication to the king and to demand from him a writ of significavit to the sheriff, to imprison the person excommunicated.

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  • The writ apparently issued for no court inferior to the bishop's, unless upon the bishop's request.

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  • In some sense the king's writ of significavit was discretionary; but its issue could be enforced by excommunication or interdict.

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  • Monitions to amend may be decreed and be enforced by significavit and writ de contumace capiendo, or by excommunication with imprisonment not to exceed six months (53 Geo.

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  • In ecclesiastical law, the contempt of the authority of an ecclesiastical court is dealt with by the issue of a writ de contumace capiendo from the court of chancery at the instance of the judge of the ecclesiastical court; this writ took the place of that de excommunicato capiendo in 1813, by an act of George III.

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  • He was summoned to the Irish House of Peers as Viscount Valentia, but was denied his writ to the parliament of Great Britain by a majority of one vote.

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  • So little was the collection considered as a literary work with a definite text that every one assumed a right to abridge or enlarge, to insert ideas of his own, or fresh scriptural quotations; nor were the scribes and translators by any means scrupulous about the names of natural objects, and even the passages from Holy Writ.

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  • No charter has been found, but a judgment given under a writ of quo warranto in 1578 confirms to the burgesses freedom from toll, passage and pontage, the tolls and stallage of the quay and the right to hold two fairs - privileges which they claimed under charters of Baldwin de Redvers and Isabel de Fortibus, countess of Albemarle, in the 13th century, and Edward Courtenay, earl of Devon, in 1405.

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  • A writ for the election of a member to parliament was issued in the reign of Edward III., but no return was made.

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  • 1857) of the United States Circuit Court for a writ of habeas corpus; this was granted and the prisoner was released.

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  • The Presbyterian model was, for instance, as sacerdotal in its essence as the Catholic; Milton complained with justice that "new presbyter is but old priest writ large," and declared that "the Title of Clergy St Peter gave to all God's people," its later restriction being a papal and prelatical usurpation (i.e.

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  • The city's police force was unable to cope with the situation created by the influx of soldiers, gamblers and adventurers, and on the 1st of March 1862 President Davis (by authority of a secret Act of the Confederate Congress passed on the 2nd of February) declared martial law in the city and the country within a radius of io m., suspended the writ of habeas corpus, and appointed General John H.

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  • ' The Hierozoicon of Bochart - a treatise on the animals named in Holy Writ - was published in 1619.

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  • The uninitiated cannot perceive them; but they are plainly revealed to the A ntiquity spiritually minded, who discern the profound import of this theosophy beneath the surface of the letters and words of Holy Writ.

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  • In civil arbitration, the decision or award may be made a rule of court, after which it becomes enforceable by writ of execution against person or property.

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  • In Sigismund's reign the feudal system, for the first time, became deeply rooted in Magyar soil, and it is a lamentable fact that in 15th-century Hungary it is to be seen at its very worst, especially in those wild tracts, and they were many, in which the king's writ could hardly be said to run.

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  • "Protesting, that if any man will note in this our Confession any article or sentence repugning to God's Holy Word, that it would please him, of his gentleness, and for Christian charity's sake, to admonish us of the same in writ, and we of our honour and fidelity do promise unto him satisfaction from the mouth of God; that is, from His Holy Scripture, or else reformation of that which he shall prove to be amiss.

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  • Some have supposed that a writ of that name is as old as the common law, but its execution might be arrested by a pardon from the crown.

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  • The writ was abolished by 29 Car.II.

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  • The protector, hearing of his "grievous complaint," sent him a writ, and Lenthall was elated at believing he had secured a peerage.

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  • Among other features of interest the constitution forbids the suspension of the writ of habeas corpus, makes duelling a disqualification for holding office or exercising the right to vote, and authorizes the exclusion of atheists from office.

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  • In the law of England sentence of excommunication, upon being properly certified by the bishop, was followed by the writ de excommunicato capiendo for the arrest of the offender.

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  • c. 23 provided for the better execution of this writ.

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  • During the war that followed the west section was generally loyal to the north while the south section favoured the Confederacy and furnished many soldiers for its army; but most of the state was kept under Federal control, the writ of habeas corpus being suspended.

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  • cannot be proved by holy writ.

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  • § 9, and first ten amendments): It may not suspend the writ of habeas corpus (except in time of war or public danger) or pass a bill of attainder or an ex post facto law; give any state a commercial preference over another; grant any title of nobility; establish or prohibit any religion, or impose any religious test as a condition of holding office; abridge the freedom of speaking or writing, or of public meeting, or of bearing arms; try any person for certain offences except on the presentment of a grand jury, or otherwise than by a jury of his state and district; decide any common law action where the value in dispute exceeds $20 except by a jury.

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  • It was mainly the opposition to the Homoousios, as a formula open to heretical misinterpretation, and not borne out by Holy Writ, which kept together the large party known as Semiarians, who under the leadership of the two Eusebiuses carried on the strife against the Nicenes and especially Athanasius.

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  • the court did not know how to adjudge because the wound was new, and then the defendant took issue and prayed the court that the maihem might be examined, on which a writ was sent to the sheriff to cause to come medicos chirurgieos de melioribus London, ad informandum dominum regem et curiam de his quae eis ex parte domini regis injungerentur (Year Book, 21 Hen.

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  • In the reign of Edward I., whose warlike enterprises after he was king were confined within the four seas, this alteration does not seem to have proceeded very far, and Scotland and Wales were subjugated by what was in the main, if not exclusively, a feudal militia raised as of old by writ to the earls and barons and the sheriffs.'

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  • The pamphlet is supposed to have been written by Chrysostomus Dudulaeus of Westphalia and printed by one Christoff Crutzer, but as no such author or printer is known at this time - the latter name indeed refers directly to the legend - it has been conjectured that the whole story is a myth invented to support the Protestant contention of a continuous witness to the truth of Holy Writ in the person of this "eternal" Jew; he was to form, in his way, a counterpart to the apostolic tradition of the Catholic Church.

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  • Tithes were generally recovered by a writ against the owner of the tithable property usually brought in the ecclesiastical courts (questions of title to tithes being reserved to the temporal courts), the jurisdiction of which in this respect was confirmed by the statutes Circumspecte agatis (13 Edw.

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  • and Edward VI., and was enforced by ecclesiastical censures and the writ De excommunicate capiendo; and an act 2 & 3 Edw.

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  • Vernon, Ohio, on the 1st of May against the war and military proceedings, was arrested on the 5th of May by General Burnside, tried by military commission, and sentenced on the 16th to imprisonment; a writ of habeas corpus had been refused, and the sentence was changed by the president to transportation beyond the military lines.

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  • Prominent Democrats and a committee of the Convention having appealed for his release, Lincoln wrote two long letters in reply discussing the constitutional question, and declaring that in his judgment the president as commander-in-chief in time of rebellion or invasion holds the power and responsibility of suspending the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus, but offering to release Vallandigham if the committee would sign a declaration that rebellion exists, that an army and navy are constitutional means to suppress it, and that each of them would use his personal power and influence to prosecute the war.

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  • After the conquest of the Hausa States in1902-1903the king's writ ran - with the exception of a few districts inhabited by primitive savages - through the whole area known as Northern Nigeria.

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  • Immediately the powers protested against this infraction of the law of liquidation, and the Caisse applied for a writ to the Mixed Tribunals.

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  • Peck, led an unsuccessful movement to increase the number of Supreme Court judges and to relieve them of their circuit duties, and succeeded in defeating an attempt to repeal the twenty-fifth section of the Judiciary Act of 1789, which gave the Supreme Court appellate jurisdiction by writ of error to the state courts in cases where federal laws and treaties are in question.

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  • Five times he was expelled and five times re-elected by his constituents, till at last the government refused to issue a writ, and for three years York was without one of its representatives.

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  • 208 the emperor Septimius Severus carried out an extensive punitive expedition against the northern tribes, but while it is doubtful how far he penetrated, it is certain that after his death the Roman writ never again ran north of Cheviot.

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  • Feudalism was not yet dead, and in the north and west there were medieval franchises in which the royal writ and common law hardly ran at all.

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  • Rep. 190, 217); Notes on the King's Writ for choosing Members of Parliament ...

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  • the Democratic Party, adopted resolutions that condemned the suspension of the writ of Habeas Corpus, endorsed the doctrine of state sovereignty, demanded a national assembly to determine terms of peace, and asked President Lincoln to withdraw the proclamation that emancipated the slaves, and so to permit the people of Illinois to fight only for "Union, the Constitution and the enforcement of the laws."

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  • In the case of ex parte John Merryman (1861, Campbell's Reports, 646), he protested against the assumption of power by the President to suspend the privileges of the writ of habeas corpus or to confer that power upon a military officer without the authorization of Congress.

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  • He was convicted (February 1844) after the trials that followed, but they were not good specimens of equal justice, and the sentence of imprisonment for a year and a fine of £2000 was reversed on a writ of error by the House of Lords (September 1844), and he and his colleagues were again free.

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  • Their remedy was to apply for a little writ of right in the first case and for a writ of monstraverunt in the second.

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  • These writs entitled them to appear as plaintiffs against the lord in his own manorial court and, eventually, to have the question at issue examined by way of appeal, on a writ of error, or by reservation on some legal points in the upper courts of the king.

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  • It also took away all patronage from the governor, reduced his term to two years, forbade him to proclaim martial law or suspend the writ of habeas corpus, and abolished all registration laws: all these provisions being reflections of Reconstruction struggles.

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  • Typhon: a Burlesque Poem (1704); Aesop Dress'd, or a Collection of Fables writ in Familiar Verse (1704); The Planter's Charity (1704); The Virgin Unmasked (1709, 1724, 1731, 1742), a work in which the coarser side of his nature is prominent; Treatise of the Hypochondriack and Hysterick Passions (1711, 1715, 1730) admired by Johnson (Mandeville here protests against merely speculative therapeutics, and advances fanciful theories of his own about animal spirits in connexion with "stomachic ferment": he shows a knowledge of Locke's methods, and an admiration for Sydenham); Free Thoughts on Religion (1720); A Conference about Whoring (1725); An Enquiry into the Causes of the Frequent Executions at Tyburn (1725); The Origin of Honour and the Usefulness of Christianity in War (1732).

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  • In consequence of these conflicting verdicts, the whole matter was brought, by a writ of scire facias, before the court of King's Bench, to have the validity of the patent finally settled, and it was not till this third trial, which took place in June 1785, that Arkwright's claim to the inventions which formed the subject of the patent was disputed.

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  • Rhode Island offered no resistance to the writ against its charter and Andros extended his authority over it immediately after his arrival.

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  • If it should prevail, it perverts justice; 1 A somewhat similar case is that of the writ De Rege inconsulto brought forward by Bacon.

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  • 1566), he obtained an opinion from Protestant theologians that bigamy was not forbidden by Holy Writ.

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  • Persia of the present day is not only, in the matter of geographical definition, far from the vast empire of Sacred Writ and remote history, but it is not even the less extensive dominion of the Safawi kings and Nadir Shah.

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  • )ld Persian inscriptions are writ ten in the cuneiform character the simplest form, known as the first class.

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  • In 1319 Glastonbury received a writ of summons to parliament, but made no return, and has not since been represented.

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  • HABEAS CORPUS, in English law, a writ issued out of the High Court of Justice commanding the person to whom it is directed to bring the body of a person in his custody before that or some other court for a specified purpose.

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  • There are various forms of the writ, of which the most famous is that known as habeas corpus ad subjiciendum, the well-established remedy for violation of personal liberty.

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  • 1 The writ is a remedial mandatory writ of right existing by the common law, i.e.

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  • It is addressed to the person in whose custody another is detained, and commands him to bring his prisoner before the court immediately after the receipt of the writ, together with the day and cause of his being taken and detained, to undergo and receive (ad subjiciendum et recipiendum) whatsoever the court awarding the writ "may consider of concerning him in that behalf."

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  • It is often stated that the writ is founded on the article of the Great Charter already quoted; but there are extant instances 1 See Hallam, Const.

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  • the writ de odio et acid, used as early as the 12th century to prevent imprisonment on vexatious appeals of felony, and the writ of mainprise (de manucaptione), long obsolete if not abolished in England but which it was attempted to use in India so late as 1870.

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  • In the case of imprisonment on accusation of crime the writ issued from the court of king's bench (or from the chancery), and on its return the court judged of the legality of the imprisonment, and discharged the prisoner or admitted him to bail or remanded him to his former custody according to the result of the examination.

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  • the writ was fully established as the appropriate process for checking illegal imprisonment by inferior courts or by public officials.

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  • In Darnel's case (1627) the judges held that the command of the king was a sufficient answer to a writ of habeas corpus.

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  • In 1668 a writ of habeas corpus was issued to test the legality of an imprisonment in Jersey.

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  • Though the authority of the courts had been strengthened by the Petition of Right and the act of 1640, it was still rendered insufficient by reason of the insecurity of judicial tenure, the fact that only the chancellor (a political as well as a legal officer) and the court of king's bench had undoubted right to issue the writ, and the inability or hesitation of the competent judges to issue the writ except during the legal term, which did not cover more than half the year.

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  • In Jenkes's case (1676) Lord Chancellor Nottingham refused to issue the writ in vacation in a case in which a man had been committed by the king in council for a speech at Guildhall, and could get neither bail nor trial.

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  • It recites that great delays have been used by sheriffs and gaolers in making returns of writs of habeas corpus directed to them; and for the prevention thereof, and the more speedy relief of all persons imprisoned for criminal or supposed criminal matters, it enacts in substance as follows: (r) When a writ of habeas corpus is directed to a sheriff or other person in charge of a prisoner, he must within 3, 10 or 20 days, according to the distance of the place of commitment, bring the body of his prisoner to the court, with the true cause of his detainer or imprisonment - unless the commitment was for treason or felony plainly expressed in the warrant of commitment.

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  • Indeed as early as 1 591 the judges had complained of the difficulty of enforcing the writ in the case of imprisonment at the instance of magnates of the realm.

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  • It is to be observed that neither at common law nor under the act of 1679 was the writ the appropriate remedy in the case of a person convicted either on indictment or summarily.

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  • error or certiorari to which a writ of habeas corpus might be used as ancillary.

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  • As regards persons imprisoned for debt or on civil process the writ was available at common law to test the legality of the detention: but the practice in these cases is unaffected by the act of 1679, and is of no present interest, since imprisonment on civil process is almost abolished.

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  • The appropriate writ for such cases was that known as de homine replegiando.

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  • The use of this writ in most if not all criminal cases was forbidden in 1553; but it was used in the 17th century in a case of kidnapping (Designy's case, 1682), and against Lord Grey for abducting his wife's sister (1682), and in the earl of Banbury's case to recover his wife (1704).

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  • In the same year the writ was used to release the wife of Earl Ferrers from his custody and maltreatment, and was unsuccessfully applied for by John Wilkes to get back his wife, who was separated from him by mutual agreement.

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  • It enacts (r) that a writ of habeas corpus shall be issued in vacation time in favour of a person restrained of his liberty otherwise than for some criminal or supposed criminal matter (except persons imprisoned for debt or by civil process); (2) that though the return to the writ be good and sufficient in law, the judge shall examine into the truth of the facts set forth in such return, and if they appear doubtful the prisoner shall be bailed; (3) that the writ shall run to any port, harbour, road, creek or bay on the coast of England, although not within the body of any county.

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  • It will appear from the foregoing statement that the issue and enforcement of the writ rests on the common law as strengthened by the acts of 1627,1640, 1679 and 1816, and subject also to the regulations as to procedure contained in the Crown Office Rules, 1906.

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  • The effect of the statutes is to keep the courts always open for the issue of the writ.

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  • In cases where martial law exists the use of the writ is ex hypothesi suspended during conditions amounting to a state of war within the realm or the British possession affected (e.g.

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  • There are various other forms of the writ according to the purpose for which it is granted.

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  • As regards civil proceedings, this form of the writ is now rarely used, owing to the abolition of arrest on mesne process and the restriction of imprisonment for debt, or in execution of a civil judgment.

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  • The right to issue the writ depends on the common law, supplemented by an act of 1802.

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  • The above forms are now of little or no importance; but the procedure for obtaining them and the forms of writ are included in the Crown Office Rules 1906.

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  • The writ has in past times been issued from the English court of king's bench into Ireland; but does not now so issue.

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  • The writ of habeas corpus is unknown to Scots law, nor will it issue from English courts into Scotland.

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  • The court of king's bench has also issued the writ to the king's foreign dominions beyond seas, e.g.

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  • In consequence of the last decision it was provided by the Habeas Corpus Act 1862 that no writ of habeas corpus should issue out of England by authority of any court or judge "into any colony or foreign dominion of the crown where the crown has a lawfully established court of justice having authority to grant or issue the writ and to ensure its due execution in the 'colony' or dominion" (25 & 26 V.

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  • In Australasia and Canada and in most if not all the British possessions whose law is based on the common law, the power to issue and enforce the writ is possessed and is freely exercised by colonial courts, under the charters or statutes creating and regulating the courts.

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  • The writ is freely resorted to in Canada, and in 1905, 1906, two appeals came to the privy council from the dominion, one with reference to an extradition case, the other with respect to the right to expel aliens.

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  • Under the Roman-Dutch law as applied in British Guiana the writ was unknown and no similar process existed (2nd report of West Indian law commissioners).

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  • But by the Supreme Court Ordinance of 1893 that court possesses (inter alia) all the authorities, powers and functions belonging to or incident to a superior court of record in England, which appears to include the power to issue the writ of habeas corpus.

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  • Under the Roman-Dutch law as applied to South Africa free persons appear to have a right to release under a writ de libero homine exhibendo, which closely resembles the writ of habeas corpus, and the procedure described as "manifestation" used in the kingdom of Aragon (Hallam, Middle Ages, vol.

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  • The writ of habeas corpus has not been formally adopted or the Habeas Corpus Acts formally extended to South Africa; but in the Cape Colony, under the charter of justice and colonial legislation, the supreme court on petition grants a remedy equivalent to that obtained in England by writ of habeas corpus; and the remedy is sometimes so described (Koke v.

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  • The laws of Ceylon being derived from the Roman-Dutch law, the writ of habeas corpus is not indigenous: but, under s.

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  • The chartered high courts in India have power to issue and enforce the writ of habeas corpus.

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  • The common law as to the writ of habeas corpus has been inherited from England, and has been generally made to apply to commitments and detentions of all kinds.

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  • Thus the constitution provides that "the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspended unless when, in cases of rebellion or invasion, the public safety may require it"; and it has been the subject of much dispute whether the power of suspension under this provision is vested in the president or the congress.

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  • On the other hand, the courts of the union issue the writ only in those cases in which the power is expressly conferred on them by the constitution.

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  • (" the Fat ") is noteworthy for the first meeting of the Portuguese cortes, to which the upper hierarchy of the Church and the nobles (fidalgos and ricos homens) were summoned by royal writ.

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  • After the threat of a Quo Warranto writ in 1683 for the surrender of the Massachusetts charter, Mather used all his tremendous influence to persuade the colonists not to give up the charter; and the Boston freemen unanimously voted against submission.

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  • The latter, however, would seem to be the case, since a bishop was entitled to his writ of summons after confirmation and before doing homage for his barony.

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  • An order of the council for the payment of money out of the borough fund must be signed by three members of the council and countersigned by the town clerk, and any such order may be removed into the king's bench division of the High Court of Justice by writ of certiorari, and may be wholly or partly disallowed or confirmed on the hearing.

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  • At Praed Street chapel he gradually obtained a ' The original writ of summons (1299) was addressed in Latin, Roberto domino de Clif f ord, i.e.

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  • With regard to parliamentary representation, the first original writ which has been discovered was issued in 1290 when two members were returned for the county.

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  • Certainty and legal protection were so essential that even villain holdings were treated as villain socage when legal protection was obtainable for it, as was actually the case with the peasants on Ancient demesne who could sue their lords by the little writ of right and the Monstraverunt.

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  • On the loth, of June 1686 Newton wrote to Halley the following letter: " Sir, - In order to let you know the case between Mr Hooke and me, I give you an account of what passed between us in our letters, so far as I could remember; for 'tis long since they were writ, and I do not know that I have seen them since.

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  • That in one of my papers writ (I cannot say in what year, but I am sure some time before I had any correspondence with Mr Oldenburg, and that's above fifteen years ago), the proportion of the forces of the planets from the sun, reciprocally duplicate of their distances from him, is expressed, and the proportion of our gravity to the moon's conatus recedendi a centro terrae is calculated, though not accurately enough.

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  • Poole is first mentioned in a writ of 1224, addressed to the bailiffs and good men of La Pole, ordering them to retain all ships within their port.

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  • The corporation was suspended after a writ of quo warranto in 1686, the town being governed by the commission of the peace until the charters were renewed in 1688.

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  • the service of a writ) where that was impossible without apparent actual rebellion against the authority of the legislature, and therefore of Congress.

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  • The kings writ only ran in and about Dublin and a few other harbour fortresses.

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  • fiegn Johns writ of 1213, bidding discreet men from each nings of shire to present themselves at Oxford, found its parilaparallel in another writ of 1253 which bids four knightly meat.

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  • This inquest was made by the writ Quo Warranto, by which each landholder was invited to show the charter or warrant in which his claims rested.

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  • When the imprisoned gentlemen appealed to the kings bench for a writ of habeas corpus, it appeared that no cause of committal had been assigned, and the judges therefore refused to liberate them.

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  • He fled to France, and a convention parliament, summoned without the royal writ, declared that his flight was equivalent to abdication, and offered the crown in joint sovereignty to William and Mary (1689).

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  • Thomas, son of Maurice, was allowed to succeed his father in the lands, and, having a writ of summons to parliament in 1295, he is reckoned the first hereditary baron of the line.

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  • Under the will of his father, Colonel William Berkeley, the eldest illegitimate son, had the castle and estates, and on the failure of his claim to the earldom he demanded a writ of summons as a baron by reason of his tenure of the castle.

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  • 1899), daughter and heir of Thomas Moreton Fitzhardinge Berkeley, 6th earl de jure, was declared by letters patent under the great seal to have succeeded to the ancient barony of Berkeley created by the writ of 1421; and she was succeeded by her daughter.

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  • Her application for a writ of habeas corpus was refused, and on the 16th of March she left London, progressing however, on account of illness and prostration, only as far as Barnet.

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  • Writ Of Mandamus >>

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  • The market, formerly held on Sunday, was changed in 1218 to Wednesday, and in answer to a writ of Quo Warranto Maud de Holand claimed in 1330 that her family had held a fair on St Andrew's day from time immemorial.

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  • The justices were also ordered to try proprietary actions commenced by the king's writ for the recovery of land held by the service of half a knight's fee or less.

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  • The liberties were those districts in which the great vassals of the crown exercised palatinate jurisdiction, and the crosses were the church lands, where alone the royal writ usually ran.

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  • The Nationalist leader seemed to stand higher than ever, but the writ in the divorce proceedings, brought by Captain O'Shea against his wife, with the Irish leader as co-respondent, was hanging over him.

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  • Galileo's answer, written, as he said himself, currente calamo, was an exposition of a formal theory as to the relations of physical science to Holy Writ, still further developed in an elaborate apology addressed by him in the following year (1614) to Christina of Lorraine, dowager grand-duchess of Tuscany.

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  • obtained a new charter and a writ of supersedeas.

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  • It may transfer any case to the supreme court or the supreme court may assume jurisdiction of any of its cases by issuing a writ of certiorari, but otherwise its decrees are final.

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  • Love 's not time 's fool, tho rosy lips and cheeks I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

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  • The obstruction of an authorized enforcement officer in enforcing a writ will continue to be a criminal offense.

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  • May your pen serve the writ of justice...

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  • The current fee of £ 20 will still be payable for sealing the writ.

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  • There is no form for this and you will need a lawyer to draft an initial writ.

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  • For that, I received a writ with a penal notice.

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  • His lecture that night was like an exposition of holy writ.

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  • A careful examination of the thirty-two rolls from 1272 to 1307 reveals that behind almost every completed action was a royal writ.

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  • It is a legal writ, a legal form.

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  • Lancaster had its own justices and the king 's writ did not run within the palatine county.

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  • For example, paragraph 11 dealt with enforcement of a judgment debt in foreign currency by writ of fieri facias.

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  • He applied to the Supreme Court for a writ of mandamus, relying on section 13 of the Judiciary Act of 1789.

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  • The proceedings are launched with a writ of sequestration being granted in accordance with CPR Part 23 under the auspices of a judge.

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  • Later in the day, Superior Judge Elliot Craig signed a writ of habeas corpus for Foster 's release.

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  • Scholars apply three tests to determine the validity of baronies ~ (1) does the holder receive a writ of summons to Parliament?

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  • While sci-fi movies of the fifties typically employed robots as threats to either the individual characters or to mankind writ large, the literature and early TV presented much more benign views of robothood.

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