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wretched

wretched

wretched Sentence Examples

  • The condition of slaves at Athens was not in general a wretched one.

    494
    88
  • He returned to a wretched kingdom, torn with civil war.

    254
    63
  • It proved a wretched exchange.

    245
    97
  • The wretched captives were then chained and left in the court.

    78
    64
  • If we were in Vienna it would be easy, but here, in this wretched Moravian hole, it is more difficult, and I beg you all to help me.

    77
    44
  • Atar is inhabited by Arab and Berber tribes, and is described as a wretched spot.

    76
    58
  • Johnson was a wretched etymologist.

    75
    28
  • My wretched lawsuit takes all I have and makes no progress.

    50
    32
  • This wretched fiasco was hardly less satisfactory to the majority of Germans than the manner in which the national claims in Schleswig-Holstein were maintained.

    43
    37
  • Her husband was a wretched creature.

    38
    28
  • Indeed, as he himself said afterwards, it was a wretched time for chemistry in Germany.

    28
    26
  • When at the end of this wretched time he left for Gastein, in May 1824, he had almost entirely lost the hearing of his right ear.

    26
    26
  • The remaining history of the dynasty is a wretched story of the struggle of different claimants, while the different factors of the kingdom, the cities and barbarian races, more and more assert their independence.

    25
    26
  • Meantime the uttermost farthing was wrung from the wretched fellahin, while they were forced to the building of magnificent public works by unpaid labor.

    21
    20
  • His portion is illustrated by two hundred and ninety-nine coloured plates that, wretched as they are, have been continually reproduced in various text-books - a fact possibly due to their subjects having been judiciously selected.

    20
    11
  • Young coupled his prose with the poetry of the wretched D'Urfey.

    20
    20
  • Young coupled his prose with the poetry of the wretched D'Urfey.

    20
    20
  • No means of eschewing this wretched state of decay?

    19
    20
  • But Mr Lang's answer on that point is that this humble supernumerary in Roux de Marsilly's conspiracy simply became one more wretched victim of the "red tape" of the old French absolute monarchy.

    17
    14
  • Then a higher God, hitherto unknown, and concealed even from the Demiurge, took pity on the wretched, condemned race of men.

    17
    18
  • Their squadron remained in reserve and Nicholas Rostov spent that day in a dull and wretched mood.

    16
    11
  • He screwed up his eyes with a dissatisfied look as he gazed attentively and fixedly at these prisoners, who presented a specially wretched appearance.

    16
    17
  • Having borrowed money from his brother-in-law, Nicholas tried to hide his wretched condition from him.

    16
    17
  • They were shunned and hated; were allotted separate quarters in towns, called cagoteries, and lived in wretched huts in the country distinct from the villages.

    16
    18
  • Thus surrounded by dangers on all sides the wretched shah was bewildered.

    15
    17
  • Thus surrounded by dangers on all sides the wretched shah was bewildered.

    15
    17
  • In medieval times it was evidently still a strong place, but it has now sunk, in the general decay of Pamphylia, to a wretched hamlet.

    14
    10
  • By 1086 the number of houses had decreased to too, and of these 20 were in such a wretched condition that they could not pay geld.

    14
    14
  • By 1086 the number of houses had decreased to too, and of these 20 were in such a wretched condition that they could not pay geld.

    14
    14
  • "If we get to Vienna I'll get rid of it there but in these wretched little towns there's nowhere to spend it," said he.

    14
    15
  • What a wretched idea to go and bury themselves in the steppes when the French army is in Moscow.

    14
    15
  • Then came the stress of war in Europe, a wretched neutrality at home, fierce outbreaks of human passions, and the fair structure of government by a priori theories based on the goodness of unoppressed humanity came to the ground.

    14
    16
  • To have done so would have been impossible, in spite of his brilliant gifts, had he been no more than the "wretched scribe" sneered at by Napoleon.

    14
    16
  • But he finally passed on the wretched fiction as a heritage of his descendants, to cause untold woes in the 15th century.

    13
    14
  • Unable to rise, the wretched people multiplied on their potato plots with perfect recklessness.

    13
    14
  • Not only the nobility, but many others who had no legal claim to exemption, paid no taxes; the weight of the burden fell on the wretched country-folk.

    13
    15
  • The wretched inmates were dependent for food upon the caprice of their gaolers or the charity of the benevolent; water was denied them except in the scantiest proportions; their only bedding was putrid straw.

    12
    14
  • Therefore he seems to me a very foolish man, and very wretched, who will not increase his understanding while he is in the world, and ever wish and long to reach that endless life where all shall be made clear.

    11
    12
  • From this place he again fled and wandered about for some time in a wretched fashion, still writing the Confessions, constantly receiving generous help, and always quarrelling with, or at least suspecting, the helpers.

    11
    13
  • Ahvaz reached the height of its prosperity in the 12th and 13th centuries and is now a collection of wretched hovels, with a small rectangular fort in a state of ruin, and an Arab population of about 400.

    10
    11
  • After liberation the hard-labour convicts are settled in villages; but nearly all are in a wretched condition, and more than one-third have disappeared without being accounted for.

    8
    10
  • He made a wretched emissary, and there was no limit to his arrogance, noisiness and indiscretion.

    7
    8
  • The so-called coast towns are commonly at some distance from the seashore, and their shipping ports are little more than a straggling collection of wretched habitations in the vicinity of the landing-stage and its offices and warehouses.

    7
    9
  • The French halted, somewhat loosened by pursuit, between Rossomme and Genappe and spent a wretched night in the sodden fields.

    7
    9
  • The so-called coast towns are commonly at some distance from the seashore, and their shipping ports are little more than a straggling collection of wretched habitations in the vicinity of the landing-stage and its offices and warehouses.

    7
    9
  • It can make the game fairly wretched, even in its early stages.

    1
    0
  • The result was a whole series of wars with the Teutonic Order, which now acknowledged Swidrygiello, another brother of Jagiello, as grand-duke of Lithuania; and though Swidrygiello was defeated and driven out by Witowt, the Order retained possession of Samogitia, and their barbarous methods of "converting" the wretched inhabitants finally induced Witowt to rescue his fellow-countrymen at any cost from the tender mercies of the knights.

    0
    0
  • The south-eastern counties were the earliest improved, and yet in 1660 their condition seems to have been very wretched.

    0
    0
  • Many towns were founded, among which were Dresden, Leipzig and Freiburg; Chemnitz began its textile industry; and although the condition of the peasants was wretched, that of the townsmen was improving.

    0
    0
  • The conception of this work is magnificent; its execution wretched.

    0
    0
  • The writer was known, and it was in this connexion that Napoleon referred to him as "a wretched scribe named Gentz, one of those men without honour who sell themselves for money."

    0
    0
  • Lord Macaulay's description of Roxana, Moll Flanders and Colonel Jack as "utterly nauseous and wretched" must be set aside as a freak of criticism.

    0
    0
  • The Confederates concentrated above 40,000 men at Corinth and advanced on Pittsburg Landing with a view to beating Grant before Buell's arrival, but their concentration had left them only a narrow margin of time, and the advance was further delayed by the wretched condition of the roads.

    0
    0
  • la Haya y Fernandez, governor in 1718, reported to the crown that no province of Spanish America was in so wretched a condition.

    0
    0
  • His strong hand kept the inevitable strife of the parliamentary factions within due limits, and it was entirely owing to his provident care that Sweden so rapidly recovered from the wretched condition in which the wars of Charles had plunged her.

    0
    0
  • There are some very fertile regions in the level portions of the county, but in the mountainous districts the soil is poor, the holdings are subdivided beyond the possibility of affording proper sustenance to their occupiers, and, except where fishing is combined with agricultural operations, the circumstances of the peasantry are among the most wretched of any district of Ireland.

    0
    0
  • Like most of the papal armies of the last three centuries, Urban's troops distinguished themselves by wretched strategy, cowardice in rank and file, and a Fabian avoidance of fighting which, discreet as it may be in the field of diplomacy, has invariably failed to save Rome on the field of battle.

    0
    0
  • Both, however, greatly declined in the 18th century; and towards the beginning of the 19th, the peasants, ruined by their proprietors, 'or abandoned to the Jews, were in a more wretched condition than even their Russian neighbours.

    0
    0
  • certainty that their condition was sufficiently wretched to drive them to revolt without any serious pressure from outside.

    0
    0
  • From the first, too, he was hampered by wretched health; at the age of sixteen he was subjected to one of those terrible attacks of neuralgia which were to torment him to the last; physically and mentally alike he stood in tragic contrast with his grandfather, in whose gigantic personality the vigour of his race seems to have been exhausted.

    0
    0
  • The wretched leper king meanwhile died, his successor, Baldwin V.

    0
    0
  • Philopator (reigned 221-204), son of the preceding, was a wretched debauchee under whom the decline of the Ptolemaic kingdom began.

    0
    0
  • In 1741 the Swedes made an effort to recover the ceded province, but through wretched management suffered disaster, and were compelled to capitulate in August 1742, ceding by the peace of Abo, next year, the towns of Villmanstrand and Fredrikshamn.

    0
    0
  • Erik Sjoberg, who called himself " Vitalis " (1794-1828), was another gifted poet whose career was short and wretched.

    0
    0
  • The wretched 1-losain was himself wounded in endeavouring vainly to save his infant son, only five years of age.

    0
    0
  • when the wretched dauphin died and left Burgundy heirapparent to the throne.

    0
    0
  • It is a just remark of Thackeray's that he everywhere half-consciously recognizes her as his better angel, and dwells on her wit and her tenderness with a fondness he never exhibits for any other topic. On the 28th of January 1728, she died, and her wretched lover sat down the same night to record her virtues in language of unsurpassed simplicity, but to us who know the story more significantly for what it conceals than for what it tells.

    0
    0
  • But he spent what small energy he possessed in a wretched strife of chicanery and broken promises with Thomas of Lancaster and his party, dismissing and recalling Gaveston according to the exigencies of the moment, while he let the Scottish war shift for itself.

    0
    0
  • During each of the following eleven years, the Danes, materially assisted by the universal and shameless disloyalty of the Saxon ealdormen, systematically ravaged England, and from 991 to 1014 the wretched land is said to have paid its invaders in ransoms alone L158,000.

    0
    0
  • Latham issued a wretched figure of the species from a half-grown specimen in the Leverian Museum, and twenty years later said he had seen only one other, and that still younger, in Bullock's collection (Gen.

    0
    0
  • Many authorities such as Keating and MacFirbis admit that descendants of the Firbolgs were still to be found in parts of Ireland in their own day, though they are characterized as " tattling, guileful, tale-bearing, noisy, contemptible, mean, wretched, unsteady, harsh and inhospitable."

    0
    0
  • " The site now occupied by wide quays extending several miles in length was then entirely covered with water when the sea rose a few inches above ordinary level, and that even in a perfect calm; the banks of the river near the mouth were only indicated by clusters of wretched hovels built on piles and by narrow patches of sand skirted by tall weeds, the only vegetable product of the vast swamps beyond.

    0
    0
  • The subjects are: (1) Years past no;longer ours; (2) Man a sojourner on earth; (3) Advantage of frequent contemplation of eternity; (4) Preparation for judgment by such contemplation; (5) The good man not desirous of talking; (6) Abstinence, and its distinction from the prohibition to take life; (7) Selfexamination and self-reproof inconsistent with inaction; (8) Future reward and punishment; (9) Prying into futurity hastens calamity; (ro) Wealth with covetousness more wretched than poverty with contentment.

    0
    0
  • Add to this that Louis XIII., like Richelieu himself, had wretched health, aggravated by the extravagant medicines of the day; and it is easy to understand how this pliable disposition which offered itself to the yoke caused Richelieu always to fear that his king might change his master, and to declare that the four square feet of the kings cabinet had been more difficult for him to conquer than all the battlefields of Europe.

    0
    0
  • By a twofold coup detat, parliamentary and military, he culled the fruits of the Directorys systematic aggression and unpopularity, and realized the universal desires of the rich bourgeoisie, tired of warfare; of the wretched populace; of landholders, afraid of a return to the old order of things; of royalists, who looked upon Bonaparte as a future Monk; of priests and their people, who hoped for an indulgent treatment of Catholicism; and finally of the immense majority of the French, who love to be ruled and for long had had no efficient government.

    0
    0
  • In vain the wretched astrologer protested that he was alive, got a literary friend to write a pamphlet to prove it, and published his almanac for 1709.

    0
    0
  • disguised as a wretched old beggar.

    0
    0
  • She lives in a wretched, filthy hovel with two grown up daughters whom she will not suffer to work or learn anything.

    0
    0
  • And therefore the apostle showeth the wretched estate of the Galatians, chap. IV.

    0
    0
  • Oh what a wonderful thing is this, that the King of all kings talketh here most familiarly with a poor wretched leper!

    0
    0
  • miserable as sin, and he gave me a wretched time all evening.

    0
    0
  • Increase of knowledge only discovered to me more clearly what a wretched outcast I was.

    0
    0
  • Wretched is the likeness of folk who deny the revelations of Allah.

    0
    0
  • Many go into a wretched downward spiral, passed from owner to owner.

    0
    0
  • In Africa, the continent's wretched stared in disbelief that a white westerner could be in worse shape than them.

    0
    0
  • Lo, lo, the wretched wight, Who God disdaining, His mischief made his might, His guard his gaining.

    0
    0
  • It can make the game fairly wretched, even in its early stages.

    0
    0
  • wretched, filthy hovel with two grown up daughters whom she will not suffer to work or learn anything.

    0
    0
  • wretched sinner.

    0
    0
  • wretched creature lost in the cruel fantasies of his mind?

    0
    0
  • wretched beasts ' neck in a vain effort to reduce post-death spasms.

    0
    0
  • wretched existence.

    0
    0
  • wretched souls to what is below jail allowance.

    0
    0
  • Truth is, I had a pretty wretched childhood.

    0
    0
  • I never had seen so wretched a looking creature.

    0
    0
  • I usually went alone and in spite of the kindness of the hospital staff, I felt very wretched and isolated by my deafness.

    0
    0
  • I was banded in May 2005 when I weighed 14.7 stone and felt absolutely wretched.

    0
    0
  • Isn't it a advance boy game video perfectly wretched situation?

    0
    0
  • In his experience, if a patient was feeling too wretched, a meeting might achieve very little.

    0
    0
  • Or was the above supposed to make me feel wretched for having a go at your command of English?

    0
    0
  • He looked positively wretched for the first couple of weeks alone in his nest.

    0
    0
  • One small boy, however, goes home - an unhappy home made wretched by ' abrasive loss ' .

    0
    0
  • wretched in the extreme.

    0
    0
  • wretched of the earth - why not help them instead?

    0
    0
  • The wretched subterfuge of Cosmas ages' (c. A.D.

    0
    0
  • The result was a whole series of wars with the Teutonic Order, which now acknowledged Swidrygiello, another brother of Jagiello, as grand-duke of Lithuania; and though Swidrygiello was defeated and driven out by Witowt, the Order retained possession of Samogitia, and their barbarous methods of "converting" the wretched inhabitants finally induced Witowt to rescue his fellow-countrymen at any cost from the tender mercies of the knights.

    0
    0
  • The south-eastern counties were the earliest improved, and yet in 1660 their condition seems to have been very wretched.

    0
    0
  • The remaining history of the dynasty is a wretched story of the struggle of different claimants, while the different factors of the kingdom, the cities and barbarian races, more and more assert their independence.

    0
    0
  • His portion is illustrated by two hundred and ninety-nine coloured plates that, wretched as they are, have been continually reproduced in various text-books - a fact possibly due to their subjects having been judiciously selected.

    0
    0
  • Then came the stress of war in Europe, a wretched neutrality at home, fierce outbreaks of human passions, and the fair structure of government by a priori theories based on the goodness of unoppressed humanity came to the ground.

    0
    0
  • The condition of slaves at Athens was not in general a wretched one.

    0
    0
  • After liberation the hard-labour convicts are settled in villages; but nearly all are in a wretched condition, and more than one-third have disappeared without being accounted for.

    0
    0
  • Ahvaz reached the height of its prosperity in the 12th and 13th centuries and is now a collection of wretched hovels, with a small rectangular fort in a state of ruin, and an Arab population of about 400.

    0
    0
  • Many towns were founded, among which were Dresden, Leipzig and Freiburg; Chemnitz began its textile industry; and although the condition of the peasants was wretched, that of the townsmen was improving.

    0
    0
  • The conception of this work is magnificent; its execution wretched.

    0
    0
  • The younger Dionysius came back and from his island fortress again oppressed the citizens; the plight of the city, torn by faction and conflicts and plundered by foreign troops, was so utterly wretched that all Greek life seemed on the verge of extinction (Plato, Epist.

    0
    0
  • The writer was known, and it was in this connexion that Napoleon referred to him as "a wretched scribe named Gentz, one of those men without honour who sell themselves for money."

    0
    0
  • To have done so would have been impossible, in spite of his brilliant gifts, had he been no more than the "wretched scribe" sneered at by Napoleon.

    0
    0
  • Indeed, as he himself said afterwards, it was a wretched time for chemistry in Germany.

    0
    0
  • Lord Macaulay's description of Roxana, Moll Flanders and Colonel Jack as "utterly nauseous and wretched" must be set aside as a freak of criticism.

    0
    0
  • They were shunned and hated; were allotted separate quarters in towns, called cagoteries, and lived in wretched huts in the country distinct from the villages.

    0
    0
  • The Confederates concentrated above 40,000 men at Corinth and advanced on Pittsburg Landing with a view to beating Grant before Buell's arrival, but their concentration had left them only a narrow margin of time, and the advance was further delayed by the wretched condition of the roads.

    0
    0
  • The French halted, somewhat loosened by pursuit, between Rossomme and Genappe and spent a wretched night in the sodden fields.

    0
    0
  • At the conclusion of the war, while the troops were still in camp in the South, Mr Roosevelt joined in a "round robin" of protest against the mismanagement in the War Department, which had resulted in widespread suffering among the troops from wretched food and bad sanitary arrangements.

    0
    0
  • From this place he again fled and wandered about for some time in a wretched fashion, still writing the Confessions, constantly receiving generous help, and always quarrelling with, or at least suspecting, the helpers.

    0
    0
  • la Haya y Fernandez, governor in 1718, reported to the crown that no province of Spanish America was in so wretched a condition.

    0
    0
  • On the 15th of June 1.566 the unfortunate youth, bruised and bleeding from shocking ill-treatment, was placed upon a wretched hack, with a crown of straw on his head, and led in derision through the streets of Stockholm.

    0
    0
  • His strong hand kept the inevitable strife of the parliamentary factions within due limits, and it was entirely owing to his provident care that Sweden so rapidly recovered from the wretched condition in which the wars of Charles had plunged her.

    0
    0
  • There are some very fertile regions in the level portions of the county, but in the mountainous districts the soil is poor, the holdings are subdivided beyond the possibility of affording proper sustenance to their occupiers, and, except where fishing is combined with agricultural operations, the circumstances of the peasantry are among the most wretched of any district of Ireland.

    0
    0
  • Like most of the papal armies of the last three centuries, Urban's troops distinguished themselves by wretched strategy, cowardice in rank and file, and a Fabian avoidance of fighting which, discreet as it may be in the field of diplomacy, has invariably failed to save Rome on the field of battle.

    0
    0
  • Her husband was a wretched creature.

    0
    0
  • Both, however, greatly declined in the 18th century; and towards the beginning of the 19th, the peasants, ruined by their proprietors, 'or abandoned to the Jews, were in a more wretched condition than even their Russian neighbours.

    0
    0
  • Johnson was a wretched etymologist.

    0
    0
  • certainty that their condition was sufficiently wretched to drive them to revolt without any serious pressure from outside.

    0
    0
  • This wretched fiasco was hardly less satisfactory to the majority of Germans than the manner in which the national claims in Schleswig-Holstein were maintained.

    0
    0
  • The wretched captives were then chained and left in the court of the pashas house; and on the following morning the heads of their comrades who had perished the day before were skinned and stuffed with straw before their eyes.

    0
    0
  • Meantime the uttermost farthing was wrung from the wretched fellahin, while they were forced to the building of magnificent public works by unpaid labor.

    0
    0
  • Johan Nordahl Brun (1745-1816), a young writer who did better things later on, gave the finishing touch to the exotic absurdity by bringing out a wretched piece called Zarina, which was hailed by the press as the first original Danish tragedy, although Ewald's exquisite Rolf Krage, which truly merited that title, had appeared two years before.

    0
    0
  • " Therefore he seems to me a very foolish man, and very wretched, who will not increase his understanding while he is in the world, and ever wish and long to reach that endless life where all shall be made clear."

    0
    0
  • In medieval times it was evidently still a strong place, but it has now sunk, in the general decay of Pamphylia, to a wretched hamlet.

    0
    0
  • From the first, too, he was hampered by wretched health; at the age of sixteen he was subjected to one of those terrible attacks of neuralgia which were to torment him to the last; physically and mentally alike he stood in tragic contrast with his grandfather, in whose gigantic personality the vigour of his race seems to have been exhausted.

    0
    0
  • The wretched leper king meanwhile died, his successor, Baldwin V.

    0
    0
  • (Blanchet died in Senegal on the 6th of October 1900, a few days after his return from Adrar.) Atar is inhabited by Arab and Berber tribes, and is described as a wretched spot.

    0
    0
  • The wretched inmates were dependent for food upon the caprice of their gaolers or the charity of the benevolent; water was denied them except in the scantiest proportions; their only bedding was putrid straw.

    0
    0
  • He returned to a wretched kingdom, torn with civil war.

    0
    0
  • Philopator (reigned 221-204), son of the preceding, was a wretched debauchee under whom the decline of the Ptolemaic kingdom began.

    0
    0
  • In 1741 the Swedes made an effort to recover the ceded province, but through wretched management suffered disaster, and were compelled to capitulate in August 1742, ceding by the peace of Abo, next year, the towns of Villmanstrand and Fredrikshamn.

    0
    0
  • Not only the nobility, but many others who had no legal claim to exemption, paid no taxes; the weight of the burden fell on the wretched country-folk.

    0
    0
  • But Mr Lang's answer on that point is that this humble supernumerary in Roux de Marsilly's conspiracy simply became one more wretched victim of the "red tape" of the old French absolute monarchy.

    0
    0
  • When at the end of this wretched time he left for Gastein, in May 1824, he had almost entirely lost the hearing of his right ear.

    0
    0
  • Erik Sjoberg, who called himself " Vitalis " (1794-1828), was another gifted poet whose career was short and wretched.

    0
    0
  • The wretched 1-losain was himself wounded in endeavouring vainly to save his infant son, only five years of age.

    0
    0
  • Then a higher God, hitherto unknown, and concealed even from the Demiurge, took pity on the wretched, condemned race of men.

    0
    0
  • when the wretched dauphin died and left Burgundy heirapparent to the throne.

    0
    0
  • No means of eschewing this wretched state of decay?

    0
    0
  • It proved a wretched exchange.

    0
    0
  • It is a just remark of Thackeray's that he everywhere half-consciously recognizes her as his better angel, and dwells on her wit and her tenderness with a fondness he never exhibits for any other topic. On the 28th of January 1728, she died, and her wretched lover sat down the same night to record her virtues in language of unsurpassed simplicity, but to us who know the story more significantly for what it conceals than for what it tells.

    0
    0
  • His pleading in defence of a wretched creature accused of witchcraft brought him many clients and some reputation.

    0
    0
  • But he spent what small energy he possessed in a wretched strife of chicanery and broken promises with Thomas of Lancaster and his party, dismissing and recalling Gaveston according to the exigencies of the moment, while he let the Scottish war shift for itself.

    0
    0
  • But he finally passed on the wretched fiction as a heritage of his descendants, to cause untold woes in the 15th century.

    0
    0
  • He made a wretched emissary, and there was no limit to his arrogance, noisiness and indiscretion.

    0
    0
  • During each of the following eleven years, the Danes, materially assisted by the universal and shameless disloyalty of the Saxon ealdormen, systematically ravaged England, and from 991 to 1014 the wretched land is said to have paid its invaders in ransoms alone L158,000.

    0
    0
  • It is a state in which every one has a right to everything that may conduce to his preservation; but it is therefore also a state of war - a state so wretched that it is the first dictate of rational self-love to emerge from it into social peace and order.

    0
    0
  • Latham issued a wretched figure of the species from a half-grown specimen in the Leverian Museum, and twenty years later said he had seen only one other, and that still younger, in Bullock's collection (Gen.

    0
    0
  • Many authorities such as Keating and MacFirbis admit that descendants of the Firbolgs were still to be found in parts of Ireland in their own day, though they are characterized as " tattling, guileful, tale-bearing, noisy, contemptible, mean, wretched, unsteady, harsh and inhospitable."

    0
    0
  • Unable to rise, the wretched people multiplied on their potato plots with perfect recklessness.

    0
    0
  • " The site now occupied by wide quays extending several miles in length was then entirely covered with water when the sea rose a few inches above ordinary level, and that even in a perfect calm; the banks of the river near the mouth were only indicated by clusters of wretched hovels built on piles and by narrow patches of sand skirted by tall weeds, the only vegetable product of the vast swamps beyond.

    0
    0
  • The subjects are: (1) Years past no;longer ours; (2) Man a sojourner on earth; (3) Advantage of frequent contemplation of eternity; (4) Preparation for judgment by such contemplation; (5) The good man not desirous of talking; (6) Abstinence, and its distinction from the prohibition to take life; (7) Selfexamination and self-reproof inconsistent with inaction; (8) Future reward and punishment; (9) Prying into futurity hastens calamity; (ro) Wealth with covetousness more wretched than poverty with contentment.

    0
    0
  • Add to this that Louis XIII., like Richelieu himself, had wretched health, aggravated by the extravagant medicines of the day; and it is easy to understand how this pliable disposition which offered itself to the yoke caused Richelieu always to fear that his king might change his master, and to declare that the four square feet of the kings cabinet had been more difficult for him to conquer than all the battlefields of Europe.

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  • By a twofold coup detat, parliamentary and military, he culled the fruits of the Directorys systematic aggression and unpopularity, and realized the universal desires of the rich bourgeoisie, tired of warfare; of the wretched populace; of landholders, afraid of a return to the old order of things; of royalists, who looked upon Bonaparte as a future Monk; of priests and their people, who hoped for an indulgent treatment of Catholicism; and finally of the immense majority of the French, who love to be ruled and for long had had no efficient government.

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  • In vain the wretched astrologer protested that he was alive, got a literary friend to write a pamphlet to prove it, and published his almanac for 1709.

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  • The Latin ex augurio appears in the Italian sciagura, sciagurato, softened into sciaura, sciaurato, wretchedness, wretched.

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  • Noble, wretched, magnanimous, heartless, petty, generous, self-sacrificing, and selfish.

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  • A member of the Hofkriegsrath from Vienna had come to Kutuzov the day before with proposals and demands for him to join up with the army of the Archduke Ferdinand and Mack, and Kutuzov, not considering this junction advisable, meant, among other arguments in support of his view, to show the Austrian general the wretched state in which the troops arrived from Russia.

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  • Count!... Don't ruin a young fellow... here is this wretched money, take it...

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  • He did not even remember how formerly, on the strength of similar wretched logical arguments, it had seemed obvious that he would be degrading himself if he now, after the lessons he had had in life, allowed himself to believe in the possibility of being useful and in the possibility of happiness or love.

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  • With a sinking heart, wretched as she always was now when she found herself in a crowd, Natasha in her lilac silk dress trimmed with black lace walked- -as women can walk--with the more repose and stateliness the greater the pain and shame in her soul.

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  • The woman had a black eye, and was in a wretched condition, whilst the house was reeking with filth and dirt.

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  • Wretched is the likeness of folk who deny the revelations of Allah.

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  • Many go into a wretched downward spiral, passed from owner to owner.

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  • In Africa, the continent 's wretched stared in disbelief that a white westerner could be in worse shape than them.

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  • Lo, lo, the wretched wight, Who God disdaining, His mischief made his might, His guard his gaining.

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  • For whatever reason, the psalmist has been made deeply aware that he is a wretched sinner.

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  • You believe that I am some wretched creature lost in the cruel fantasies of his mind?

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  • This was never an easy task - frequently I over wrung the wretched beasts ' neck in a vain effort to reduce post-death spasms.

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  • The operation continued for another four months, with trench warfare proving a wretched existence.

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  • They pare down the wretched souls to what is below jail allowance.

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  • Truth is, I had a pretty wretched childhood.

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  • I never had seen so wretched a looking creature.

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  • I usually went alone and in spite of the kindness of the hospital staff, I felt very wretched and isolated by my deafness.

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  • I was banded in May 2005 when I weighed 14.7 stone and felt absolutely wretched.

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  • Is n't it a advance boy game video perfectly wretched situation?

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  • In his experience, if a patient was feeling too wretched, a meeting might achieve very little.

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  • Or was the above supposed to make me feel wretched for having a go at your command of English?

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  • He looked positively wretched for the first couple of weeks alone in his nest.

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  • One small boy, however, goes home - an unhappy home made wretched by ' abrasive loss '.

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  • The cottages in Strata Florida are wretched in the extreme.

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  • Why not stop competing with the wretched of the earth - why not help them instead?

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  • In a damp climate where the soil is deep and moist it thrives but in dry soils soon in a wretched condition.

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  • In the Eversong Woods, quest to rid the land of the Wretched and assassinate an Alliance spy.

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  • There are several ways to avoid sporting a truly wretched look.

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  • The times were about to make an abrupt change, but there was still one more surprise to be wretched from an already over stretched (if you'll pardon the pun) Spandex industry: slingshot swimsuits.

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