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worn

worn

worn Sentence Examples

  • He always looked nice, but normally he would have worn a suit for the occasion.

  • She was so worn out that she fell asleep at the table.

  • Beginning at his dusty oxfords and indigo blue jeans, her scrutiny continued up to a neatly tucked in worn white cotton shirt with the sleeves rolled up to mid arm.

  • Following a long drive that consisted of little more than two ruts worn by vehicle tires, they came to the Marsh ranch.

  • She noted the worn but relatively new clothes that clung to his lean frame.

  • Tossing her worn clothing into the brown paper, she tied it up and left the room.

  • Talon hauled her along until he, too, was worn out and she dropped behind both.

  • The walls were bare, the curtains drawn even during daylight, and the heavy wooden furniture solid and worn.

  • As if worn out, he rested his head against the cushions.

  • Either they were all huge enough to come straight out of an action movie, or her drugs had not yet worn off.

  • Inside sparkled a diamond choker with an unusually worn, plain charm of a half-sun, half-moon pierced by an arrow.

  • In spite of the protective gear worn, the challenge definitely excluded the weak of heart, and, in Dean's estimation, the strong of brain.

  • She'd worn either sandals or tennis shoes.

  • But then, I never expected you to get up at night and take care of the baby when I was worn out.

  • I've always worn that.

  • I've never worn a bikini in my life.

  • He glanced at her, noticing for the first time that she was worn out.

  • Soul power rippled through him and with it, the sensation of the invisible shackles he'd worn his entire adult life melting away.

  • He was dressed in worn clothing and shoes and flattened his palms against the window, as if he'd never been on a train before.

  • He was taller than average, over six and a half feet, built like a rock with wide shoulders and tapered abdomen and hips beneath a jumpsuit similar to those worn by the prisoners.

  • The house was cozy and simple, with creaky wooden floors covered in rugs, a pot-bellied stove still warm, and worn furniture.

  • For an extra few Euros, the hostel manager gave her a clean though worn sleeping bag that matched the clean but worn bunk beds in the women's section.

  • She wore a rich tanzanite blue-purple that was darker than the colors worn by the people of this planet.

  • She had changed to the white dress, the one she'd worn to dinner that night and the hem touched the tops of her bare feet, which pointed downward.

  • Both had matched missing buttons on their worn winter coats.

  • He then reached into his pocket for his snap-top purse and extracted five worn twenty-dollar bills.

  • He was obviously as worn out as Dean, feeling all of his seventy-six years.

  • "I don't have time," she replied, feeling worn despite the charge.

  • Looking around, she realized her life was filled with nothing but government-issued clothing and a cheap, worn bedspread.

  • The feeling of the angel's soft, cold hand in his own reminded Rhyn of the first thing he'd touched in Hell that hadn't been stone.  Gabriel had brought him a book with a worn, leather-like cover, and he'd lost himself dwelling on the sensation of buttery leather under his fingertips after the hazy nightmare that had been his existence in Hell.

  • Kris pursed his lips, wanting to release the curses coiled on his tongue.  He looked her over.  She'd at least worn sturdy shoes, long pants and shirt.  She was in decent shape, slender and toned from Pilates and the gym.

  • Her hair was short and dark and worn in an easy style that seemed to require little care.

  • While Dean's assailant had not worn gloves, surprisingly, to Dean at least, there were no trace­able fingerprints on the weapon.

  • Grabbing the worn roots of an old tree, she climbed out of the pool.

  • Most of her bedding was worn and made for a double bed.

  • And Dad, worn out from working the farm all day; disgruntled by years of fighting a losing battle with nature - of never having enough money to take care of his family properly.

  • Breakfast had long since worn off and they were hungry.

  • Jenn felt worn from the inside as her internal magic tried to connect with that of the world.

  • The furniture was worn and rustic with wooden frames and upholstered cushions.

  • Jenn leaned against the sink counter, one hand taking the worn, ancient medallion around her neck.

  • She did not look angry this morning, only worn and like a man sentenced to death.

  • Hilden suddenly appeared haggard, ancient, and worn.

  • This day, it looked old and worn, like a tunic worn one summer too many.

  • It was the first time she had worn a long dress, but Katie assured her it would make her look taller.

  • The drive consisted of two tire tracks worn into the grass.

  • She was still beautiful, even worn down by the life she'd been forced into.

  • She'd worn it his whole life.

  • Aware of his dirty appearance, Xander wiped his hands on his worn breeches.

  • The normally upbeat girl with raven-colored hair and gray eyes appeared tired and worn down.

  • Two were in the cozy living area with its worn furniture.

  • He followed them into the worn down building, senses alert.

  • She crossed to the living room and tucked her legs beneath her as she sat across from him in an oversized, worn chair.

  • Jessi's breathing was deep; he'd worn her out and had no fear of her waking up with his quiet movements.

  • The stone beneath her feet was uneven and worn, old.

  • The plates are compressed from before backwards, the anterior and posterior surfaces (as seen in the worn grinding face of the tooth) being nearly parallel.

  • The latter are dug up with the tusks; the left one being generally employed in this service, and thus becoming much more worn than its fellow.

  • Autumn is warmer than spring, especially in the coastal regions, and this is exaggerated in the eastern region by local land winds, which replace the cool sea-breezes of summer: overcoats are ordinarily worn in Spain and Italy till July, and are then put aside till October.

  • The Vallee Noire, so it seemed to me, was part and parcel of myself, the framework in which my life was set, the native costume that I had always worn - what worlds away from the silks and satins that are suited for the public stage.

  • When the summits of these are worn by mastication their surfaces present circles of dentine surrounded by a border of enamel, and as attrition proceeds different patterns are produced by the union of the bases of the cusps, a trefoil form being characteristic of some species.

  • During the period when the hair or wig was worn "powdered" or whitened, houses had a special room set apart for the process, known as the powdering-room or closet.

  • It is worn by bishops, priests, deacons and subdeacons under the other eucharistic vestments, either at Mass or at functions connected with it.

  • It is now worn in a considerable number of churches not only by the clergy but by acolytes and servers at the Communion.

  • As such it was worn.

  • It is worn girdled by bishops and priests in all rites, by subdeacons in the Greek and Coptic rites.

  • By deacons and lectors it is worn ungirdled in all the rites.

  • In the south-east they have largely gone out of use, but elsewhere, especially in the mountainous districts, they are still habitually worn.

  • At its close the green must be carefully examined, weeds uprooted, worn patches re-turfed, and the whole laid under a winter blanket of silver-sand.

  • The fez is worn by both races,.

  • Summits of the lower incisors, before they are worn, with a deep transverse groove, dividing it into an anterior and a posterior cusp. Canines long, strong and conical.

  • The higher Australian peaks in the south-east look just what they are, the worn and denuded stumps of mountains, standing for untold ages above the sea.

  • No headgear is worn, except sometimes a net to confine the hair, a bunch of feathers, or the tails of small animals.

  • Akhmim has several mosques and two Coptic churches, maintains a weekly market, and manufactures cotton goods, notably the blue shirts and check shawls with silk fringes worn by the poorer classes of Egypt.

  • Sella, the real head of the Lanza cabinet, was worn out by four years continuous work and disheartened by the perfidious misrepresentation in which Italian politicians, particularly those of the Left, have ever excelled.

  • In November the ship was wrecked on Bering Island; and the gallant Dane, worn out with scurvy, died there on the 8th of December 1741.

  • In the 17th century the corms were worn by some of the German peasantry as a charm against the plague.

  • On all sides there was danger and revolt, even Baber's own soldiers, worn out with the heat of this new climate, longed for Kabul.

  • Roman armies began to enter it about 218 B.C. In 121 B.C. the coast from 1 When Cisalpine Gaul became completely Romanized, it was often known as "Gallia Togata," while the Province was distinguished as "Gallia Bracata" (bracae, incorrectly braccae, " trousers"), from the long trousers worn by the inhabitants, and the rest of Gaul as "Gallia Comata," from the inhabitants wearing their hair long.

  • If the outer races become worn, the complete cage and bearings are reversed; the strain of the line is then transferred to what had previously been the inner with practically unworn balls and races.

  • Coat-armour was in itself not necessarily a badge of nobility at all; it could be, and was, worn by people having no pretensions to be "gentlemen," and this is true both of England and the continent.

  • It may be supposed that originally the public roads, when worn by the cartage of the coal, were repaired by laying planks of timber at the bottom of the ruts, and that then the planks were laid on the surface of special roads or ways' formed between the collieries and the river.

  • But this was not to be; he was worn out by the incessant toils and fatigues and austerities of his laborious life, and he died at his monastery at Bologna, on the 6th of August 1221.

  • The cock has a fine yellow bill and a head bearing a rounded crest of filamentous feathers; lanceolate scapulars overhang the wings, and from the rump spring the long flowing plumes which are so characteristic of the species, and were so highly prized by the natives before the Spanish conquest that no one was allowed to kill the bird when taken, but only to divest it of its feathers, which were to be worn by the chiefs alone.

  • - In the Western Church its actual form is that of a sort of folding cap consisting of two halves which, when not worn, lie flat upon each other.

  • These sides are stiffened, and when the mitre is worn, they rise in front and behind like two horns pointed at the tips (cornua mitrae).

  • In the case of these latter, however, the mitre is worn only in the church to which the privilege is attached and on certain high festivals.

  • The auriphrygiata is worn during Advent, and from Septuagesima to Maundy Thursday, except on the third Sunday in Advent (Gaudete), the fourth in Lent (Laetare) and on such greater festivals as fall within this time.

  • It is worn, too, on the vigils of fasts, Ember Days and days of intercession, on the Feast of Holy Innocents (if on a week-day), at litanies, penitential processions, and at other than solemn benedictions and consecrations.

  • The simplex is worn on Good Friday, and at masses for the dead; also at the blessing of the candles at Candlemas, the singing of the absolution at the coffin, and the solemn investiture with the pallium.

  • Lastly, the mitre, though a liturgical vestment, differs from the others in that it is never worn when the bishop addresses the Almighty in prayer - e.g.

  • 2 On the other hand, the Roman ordines of the 8th and 9th centuries make no mention of the mitre; the evidence goes to prove that this liturgical head-dress was first adopted by the popes some time in the 10th century; and Father Braun shows convincingly that it was in its origin nothing else than the papal regnum or phrygium which, originally worn only at outdoor processions and the like, was introduced into the church, and thus developed into the liturgical mitre, while outside it preserved its original significance as the papal 1 Father Braun, S.

  • Mitres with horns on either side seem to have been worn till about the end of the 12th century, and Father Braun gives examples of their appearances on episcopal seals in France until far into the 13th.

  • They have continued to be worn, however, by the bishops of the Scandinavian Lutheran Y P Churches.

  • 1667), which is preserved, is judged from the state of the lining to have been worn.

  • The biruna of the Chaldaean Nestorians, on the other hand, worn by all bishops, is a sort of hood ornamented with a cross.

  • A hundred years later the mitre, originally confined to the patriarch, was worn by all bishops.

  • TAWDRY, an adjective used to characterize cheap finery, and especially things which imitate in a cheap way that which is rich or costly, or adornments of which the freshness and elegance have worn off.

  • His last days were spent in a cave in the parish of Sorn, near his birthplace, and there he died in 1686, worn out by hardship and privation.

  • The couch was worn out by ceaseless jumping by the children.

  • While engaged on this task he died, worn out with disease, on the 3rd of March 1703 in London, and was buried in St Helen's Church, Bishopsgate Street.

  • almucia, almucium, armucia, &c.), a hooded cape of fur, or fur-lined, worn as a choir vestment by certain dignitaries of the Western Church.

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