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worn

worn

worn Sentence Examples

  • I'm quite worn out by these callers.

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  • She'd worn either sandals or tennis shoes.

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  • She was so worn out that she fell asleep at the table.

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  • Most of her bedding was worn and made for a double bed.

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  • Soul power rippled through him and with it, the sensation of the invisible shackles he'd worn his entire adult life melting away.

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  • Either they were all huge enough to come straight out of an action movie, or her drugs had not yet worn off.

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  • I have worn it only once, but then I felt that Solomon in all his glory was not to be compared with me!

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  • I've never worn a bikini in my life.

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  • Talon hauled her along until he, too, was worn out and she dropped behind both.

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  • She noted the worn but relatively new clothes that clung to his lean frame.

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  • Aware of his dirty appearance, Xander wiped his hands on his worn breeches.

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  • But then, I never expected you to get up at night and take care of the baby when I was worn out.

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  • This day, it looked old and worn, like a tunic worn one summer too many.

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  • She wore a rich tanzanite blue-purple that was darker than the colors worn by the people of this planet.

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  • The latter are dug up with the tusks; the left one being generally employed in this service, and thus becoming much more worn than its fellow.

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  • That morning Kutuzov seemed worn and irritable.

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  • The furniture was worn and rustic with wooden frames and upholstered cushions.

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  • Beginning at his dusty oxfords and indigo blue jeans, her scrutiny continued up to a neatly tucked in worn white cotton shirt with the sleeves rolled up to mid arm.

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  • I've always worn that.

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  • Her hair was short and dark and worn in an easy style that seemed to require little care.

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  • Kris pursed his lips, wanting to release the curses coiled on his tongue.  He looked her over.  She'd at least worn sturdy shoes, long pants and shirt.  She was in decent shape, slender and toned from Pilates and the gym.

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  • The thick wood is not just at our door, nor the pond, but somewhat is always clearing, familiar and worn by us, appropriated and fenced in some way, and reclaimed from Nature.

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  • However that may be, I was struck by the peculiar toughness of the steel which bore so many violent blows without being worn out.

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  • Breakfast had long since worn off and they were hungry.

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  • As if worn out, he rested his head against the cushions.

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  • She had changed to the white dress, the one she'd worn to dinner that night and the hem touched the tops of her bare feet, which pointed downward.

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  • It was the first time she had worn a long dress, but Katie assured her it would make her look taller.

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  • Napoleon, in the blue cloak which he had worn on his Italian campaign, sat on his small gray Arab horse a little in front of his marshals.

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  • In spite of the protective gear worn, the challenge definitely excluded the weak of heart, and, in Dean's estimation, the strong of brain.

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  • With a pair of felt boots on his thin bony legs, and keeping on a worn, nankeen-covered, sheepskin coat, the traveler sat down on the sofa, leaned back his big head with its broad temples and close-cropped hair, and looked at Bezukhov.

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  • Looking around, she realized her life was filled with nothing but government-issued clothing and a cheap, worn bedspread.

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  • Looking around, she realized her life was filled with nothing but government-issued clothing and a cheap, worn bedspread.

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  • The drive consisted of two tire tracks worn into the grass.

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  • His thin, worn, sallow face was covered with deep wrinkles, which always looked as clean and well washed as the tips of one's fingers after a Russian bath.

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  • She'd worn it his whole life.

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  • "What do the doctors say?" asked the princess after a pause, her worn face again expressing deep sorrow.

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  • Having dressed for his attendance at court in full parade uniform, which he had not worn for a long time, he went into Bilibin's study fresh, animated, and handsome, with his hand bandaged.

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  • There was one pilgrim, a quiet pockmarked little woman of fifty called Theodosia, who for over thirty years had gone about barefoot and worn heavy chains.

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  • How worn and dusty, then, must be the highways of the world, how deep the ruts of tradition and conformity!

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  • He then reached into his pocket for his snap-top purse and extracted five worn twenty-dollar bills.

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  • Worn out by sleeplessness and anxiety they threw their burden of sorrow on one another and reproached and disputed with each other.

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  • Trying to convict her, he told her she had worn him out, had caused his quarrel with his son, had harbored nasty suspicions of him, making it the object of her life to poison his existence, and he drove her from his study telling her that if she did not go away it was all the same to him.

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  • Following a long drive that consisted of little more than two ruts worn by vehicle tires, they came to the Marsh ranch.

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  • While Dean's assailant had not worn gloves, surprisingly, to Dean at least, there were no trace­able fingerprints on the weapon.

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  • She was still beautiful, even worn down by the life she'd been forced into.

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  • Two were in the cozy living area with its worn furniture.

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  • Two were in the cozy living area with its worn furniture.

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  • Again on all the bright faces of the squadron the serious expression appeared that they had worn when under fire.

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  • For an extra few Euros, the hostel manager gave her a clean though worn sleeping bag that matched the clean but worn bunk beds in the women's section.

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  • Speranski, wearing a gray swallow-tail coat with a star on the breast, and evidently still the same waistcoat and high white stock he had worn at the meeting of the Council of State, stood at the table with a beaming countenance.

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  • Autumn is warmer than spring, especially in the coastal regions, and this is exaggerated in the eastern region by local land winds, which replace the cool sea-breezes of summer: overcoats are ordinarily worn in Spain and Italy till July, and are then put aside till October.

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  • If you find yourself worn out from a busy day of camping or hiking, try some of the restaurants in the nearby town.

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  • He was obviously as worn out as Dean, feeling all of his seventy-six years.

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  • The countess was a woman of about forty-five, with a thin Oriental type of face, evidently worn out with childbearing--she had had twelve.

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  • He opened the door softly and saw her, in the lilac dress she had worn at church, walking about the room singing.

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  • The normally upbeat girl with raven-colored hair and gray eyes appeared tired and worn down.

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  • He followed them into the worn down building, senses alert.

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  • Jessi's breathing was deep; he'd worn her out and had no fear of her waking up with his quiet movements.

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  • "I don't have time," she replied, feeling worn despite the charge.

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  • Both had matched missing buttons on their worn winter coats.

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  • She crossed to the living room and tucked her legs beneath her as she sat across from him in an oversized, worn chair.

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  • I think that was all; but I read them over and over, until the words were so worn and pressed I could scarcely make them out.

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  • Its members will be distinguished by a red ribbon worn across the shoulder, and the mayor of the city will wear a white belt as well.

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  • The soldiers, who are worn out with hunger and fatigue, need these supplies as well as a few days' rest.

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  • Grabbing the worn roots of an old tree, she climbed out of the pool.

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  • She did not look angry this morning, only worn and like a man sentenced to death.

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  • Though tattered, hungry, worn out, and reduced to a third of their original number, the French entered Moscow in good marching order.

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  • Jenn felt worn from the inside as her internal magic tried to connect with that of the world.

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  • The stone beneath her feet was uneven and worn, old.

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  • He had worn the home-made Vermont gray, he said, and that was good.

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  • Or perhaps your flints are giving out, or are worn out--that happens sometimes, you know.

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  • But Dolokhov, who in Moscow had worn a Persian costume, had now the appearance of a most correct officer of the Guards.

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  • I say, aren't the flints in your pistols worn out?

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  • On his face, besides the look of joyful emotion it had worn yesterday while telling the tale of the merchant who suffered innocently, there was now an expression of quiet solemnity.

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  • He was dressed in worn clothing and shoes and flattened his palms against the window, as if he'd never been on a train before.

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  • Kozlovski's face looked worn--he too had evidently not slept all night.

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  • At that moment the flames flared up and showed his young master's pale worn face.

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  • To the men of both sides alike, worn out by want of food and rest, it began equally to appear doubtful whether they should continue to slaughter one another; all the faces expressed hesitation, and the question arose in every soul: For what, for whom, must I kill and be killed?...

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  • The feeling of the angel's soft, cold hand in his own reminded Rhyn of the first thing he'd touched in Hell that hadn't been stone.  Gabriel had brought him a book with a worn, leather-like cover, and he'd lost himself dwelling on the sensation of buttery leather under his fingertips after the hazy nightmare that had been his existence in Hell.

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  • Jenn leaned against the sink counter, one hand taking the worn, ancient medallion around her neck.

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  • The plates are compressed from before backwards, the anterior and posterior surfaces (as seen in the worn grinding face of the tooth) being nearly parallel.

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  • He always looked nice, but normally he would have worn a suit for the occasion.

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  • Tossing her worn clothing into the brown paper, she tied it up and left the room.

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  • Inside sparkled a diamond choker with an unusually worn, plain charm of a half-sun, half-moon pierced by an arrow.

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  • He glanced at her, noticing for the first time that she was worn out.

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  • He was taller than average, over six and a half feet, built like a rock with wide shoulders and tapered abdomen and hips beneath a jumpsuit similar to those worn by the prisoners.

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  • The house was cozy and simple, with creaky wooden floors covered in rugs, a pot-bellied stove still warm, and worn furniture.

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  • When such holes freeze, and a rain succeeds, and finally a new freezing forms a fresh smooth ice over all, it is beautifully mottled internally by dark figures, shaped somewhat like a spider's web, what you may call ice rosettes, produced by the channels worn by the water flowing from all sides to a centre.

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  • Deep ruts and "cradle-holes" were worn in the ice, as on terra firma, by the passage of the sleds over the same track, and the horses invariably ate their oats out of cakes of ice hollowed out like buckets.

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  • He had on a shabby cadet jacket, decorated with a soldier's cross, equally shabby cadet's riding breeches lined with worn leather, and an officer's saber with a sword knot.

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  • Nothing's cleared away down there and Vasilich is worn out.

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  • And Dad, worn out from working the farm all day; disgruntled by years of fighting a losing battle with nature - of never having enough money to take care of his family properly.

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  • The ground was sawdust and the pebbles scattered around were hard knots from trees, worn smooth in course of time.

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  • He was dressed plainly, his coat was worn, and his hat was dingy.

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  • The walls were bare, the curtains drawn even during daylight, and the heavy wooden furniture solid and worn.

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  • Hilden suddenly appeared haggard, ancient, and worn.

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  • The Vallee Noire, so it seemed to me, was part and parcel of myself, the framework in which my life was set, the native costume that I had always worn - what worlds away from the silks and satins that are suited for the public stage.

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  • When the summits of these are worn by mastication their surfaces present circles of dentine surrounded by a border of enamel, and as attrition proceeds different patterns are produced by the union of the bases of the cusps, a trefoil form being characteristic of some species.

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  • During the period when the hair or wig was worn "powdered" or whitened, houses had a special room set apart for the process, known as the powdering-room or closet.

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  • It is worn by bishops, priests, deacons and subdeacons under the other eucharistic vestments, either at Mass or at functions connected with it.

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  • It is now worn in a considerable number of churches not only by the clergy but by acolytes and servers at the Communion.

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  • As such it was worn.

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  • It is worn girdled by bishops and priests in all rites, by subdeacons in the Greek and Coptic rites.

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  • By deacons and lectors it is worn ungirdled in all the rites.

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  • In the south-east they have largely gone out of use, but elsewhere, especially in the mountainous districts, they are still habitually worn.

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  • At its close the green must be carefully examined, weeds uprooted, worn patches re-turfed, and the whole laid under a winter blanket of silver-sand.

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  • The fez is worn by both races,.

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  • Summits of the lower incisors, before they are worn, with a deep transverse groove, dividing it into an anterior and a posterior cusp. Canines long, strong and conical.

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  • The higher Australian peaks in the south-east look just what they are, the worn and denuded stumps of mountains, standing for untold ages above the sea.

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  • No headgear is worn, except sometimes a net to confine the hair, a bunch of feathers, or the tails of small animals.

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  • Akhmim has several mosques and two Coptic churches, maintains a weekly market, and manufactures cotton goods, notably the blue shirts and check shawls with silk fringes worn by the poorer classes of Egypt.

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  • Sella, the real head of the Lanza cabinet, was worn out by four years continuous work and disheartened by the perfidious misrepresentation in which Italian politicians, particularly those of the Left, have ever excelled.

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  • In November the ship was wrecked on Bering Island; and the gallant Dane, worn out with scurvy, died there on the 8th of December 1741.

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  • In the 17th century the corms were worn by some of the German peasantry as a charm against the plague.

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  • On all sides there was danger and revolt, even Baber's own soldiers, worn out with the heat of this new climate, longed for Kabul.

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  • Roman armies began to enter it about 218 B.C. In 121 B.C. the coast from 1 When Cisalpine Gaul became completely Romanized, it was often known as "Gallia Togata," while the Province was distinguished as "Gallia Bracata" (bracae, incorrectly braccae, " trousers"), from the long trousers worn by the inhabitants, and the rest of Gaul as "Gallia Comata," from the inhabitants wearing their hair long.

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  • If the outer races become worn, the complete cage and bearings are reversed; the strain of the line is then transferred to what had previously been the inner with practically unworn balls and races.

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  • Coat-armour was in itself not necessarily a badge of nobility at all; it could be, and was, worn by people having no pretensions to be "gentlemen," and this is true both of England and the continent.

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  • It may be supposed that originally the public roads, when worn by the cartage of the coal, were repaired by laying planks of timber at the bottom of the ruts, and that then the planks were laid on the surface of special roads or ways' formed between the collieries and the river.

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  • But this was not to be; he was worn out by the incessant toils and fatigues and austerities of his laborious life, and he died at his monastery at Bologna, on the 6th of August 1221.

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  • The cock has a fine yellow bill and a head bearing a rounded crest of filamentous feathers; lanceolate scapulars overhang the wings, and from the rump spring the long flowing plumes which are so characteristic of the species, and were so highly prized by the natives before the Spanish conquest that no one was allowed to kill the bird when taken, but only to divest it of its feathers, which were to be worn by the chiefs alone.

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  • - In the Western Church its actual form is that of a sort of folding cap consisting of two halves which, when not worn, lie flat upon each other.

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  • These sides are stiffened, and when the mitre is worn, they rise in front and behind like two horns pointed at the tips (cornua mitrae).

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  • In the case of these latter, however, the mitre is worn only in the church to which the privilege is attached and on certain high festivals.

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  • The auriphrygiata is worn during Advent, and from Septuagesima to Maundy Thursday, except on the third Sunday in Advent (Gaudete), the fourth in Lent (Laetare) and on such greater festivals as fall within this time.

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  • It is worn, too, on the vigils of fasts, Ember Days and days of intercession, on the Feast of Holy Innocents (if on a week-day), at litanies, penitential processions, and at other than solemn benedictions and consecrations.

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  • The simplex is worn on Good Friday, and at masses for the dead; also at the blessing of the candles at Candlemas, the singing of the absolution at the coffin, and the solemn investiture with the pallium.

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  • Lastly, the mitre, though a liturgical vestment, differs from the others in that it is never worn when the bishop addresses the Almighty in prayer - e.g.

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  • 2 On the other hand, the Roman ordines of the 8th and 9th centuries make no mention of the mitre; the evidence goes to prove that this liturgical head-dress was first adopted by the popes some time in the 10th century; and Father Braun shows convincingly that it was in its origin nothing else than the papal regnum or phrygium which, originally worn only at outdoor processions and the like, was introduced into the church, and thus developed into the liturgical mitre, while outside it preserved its original significance as the papal 1 Father Braun, S.

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  • Mitres with horns on either side seem to have been worn till about the end of the 12th century, and Father Braun gives examples of their appearances on episcopal seals in France until far into the 13th.

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  • They have continued to be worn, however, by the bishops of the Scandinavian Lutheran Y P Churches.

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  • 1667), which is preserved, is judged from the state of the lining to have been worn.

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  • The biruna of the Chaldaean Nestorians, on the other hand, worn by all bishops, is a sort of hood ornamented with a cross.

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  • A hundred years later the mitre, originally confined to the patriarch, was worn by all bishops.

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  • TAWDRY, an adjective used to characterize cheap finery, and especially things which imitate in a cheap way that which is rich or costly, or adornments of which the freshness and elegance have worn off.

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  • His last days were spent in a cave in the parish of Sorn, near his birthplace, and there he died in 1686, worn out by hardship and privation.

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  • The couch was worn out by ceaseless jumping by the children.

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  • While engaged on this task he died, worn out with disease, on the 3rd of March 1703 in London, and was buried in St Helen's Church, Bishopsgate Street.

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  • almucia, almucium, armucia, &c.), a hooded cape of fur, or fur-lined, worn as a choir vestment by certain dignitaries of the Western Church.

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  • The almuce was originally a head-covering only, worn by the clergy, but adopted also by the laity, and the German word Miitze, " cap," is later than the introduction of the almuce in church, and is derived from it (M.

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  • This latter was reserved for the more important canons, and was worn over surplice or rochet in choir.

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  • The almuce has now been almost entirely superseded by the mozzetta, but it is still worn at some cathedrals in France, e.g.

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  • He died on the 14th of July 1850, worn out and nearly blind with incessant study.

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  • CRUSADES, the name given to the series of wars for delivering the Holy Land from the Mahommedans, so-called from the cross worn as a badge by the crusaders.

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  • Another compound, properly of mixed sex, appears in the Aramaean Atargatis (`At[t]ar-`athe), worn down to Derketo, who is specifically associated with sacred pools and fish (Ascalon, Hierapolis-Mabog).

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  • This is worn round the waist folded in a knot, the women allowing it to fall to the ankle, the men, when properly dressed in accordance with ancient custom, folding it over the hilt of their waist-weapon, and draping it around them so that it reaches nearly to the knee.

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  • In the hall of a raja on state occasions a head-kerchief twisted into a peak is worn, and the coat is furnished with a high collar extending round the back of the neck only.

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  • The typical fighting costume of the Malay is a sleeveless jacket with texts from the Koran written upon it, short tight drawers reaching to the middle of the thigh, and the sarong is then bound tightly around the waist, leaving the hilt of the dagger worn in the girdle exposed to view.

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  • Most of these are perforated for mounting on threads or wires, and had been, no doubt, originally connected together to form one or more of the elaborate girdles, necklaces and breast ornaments then worn by the women.3 On the bottom of the stone box there was similar dust, pieces of bone and jewelry, and also remains of what had been vessels of wood.

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  • radius lies on the lesser heights between Langstrath and Dunmail Raise, which may, however, be the crown of an ancient dome of rocks, "the dissected skeleton of which, worn by the warfare of air and rain and ice, now alone remains" (Dr H.

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  • The king's state dress was the same in principle as that worn by the Macedonian or Thessalian horsemen, as the uniform of his own cavalry officers.

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  • The diadem could be worn round the kausia; the chlamys offered scope for gorgeous embroidery; and the boots might be crimson felt.

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  • The dress was of crimson (7ropcbupa); this and the badges were the king's gift, and except by royal grant neither crimson nor gold might, apparently, be worn at court (1 Macc. ro, 20; 62; 89; 11, 58; Athen.

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  • A ceremonial " tobe " of red, white and blue, each colour in two shades, with a narrow fringe of light yellow, is sometimes worn.

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  • Effective superintendence even by overseers became less easy; the use of chains was introduced, and these were worn not only in the field during working hours but at night in the ergastulum where the slaves slept.

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  • - Grinding Surface of moderately worn Right Upper Second Molars of Rhinoceros.

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  • The foundation of the island is formed of metamorphic and igneous rocks, which appear in the Sierra Maestra and are exposed in other parts of the island wherever the comparatively thin covering of later beds has been worn away.

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  • Boots were worn out, greatcoats deficient, transport almost unattainable and, according to modern ideas, the army would have been considered incapable of action.

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  • afterwards worn down to a more nearly level surface, except in the extreme north-east corner, where ridges of harder rock resisted erosion.

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  • The rather level surface of the " worn down mountains " of the north of the state and the coastal plain beds of the southern and western parts are now dissected by rivers, which make most of the state a rolling or hilly country, without strong relief.

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  • The golden circlet worn on the head by the patricius as a symbol of his dignity was called a patricialis circulus.

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  • Round the waist over the tunic was worn a leathern girdle having a broad iron buckle damascened with silver.

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  • Ecclesiastical vestments, with which the present article is solely concerned, are the special articles of costume worn by the officers of the Christian Church "at all times of their ministration" - to quote the Ornaments Rubric of the English Book of Common Prayer, i.e.

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  • as distinct from the "clerical costume" worn in everyday life.

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  • Of these again, according to the fully developed rules of the Catholic Church, there are three classes: (I) vestments worn only at the celebration of mass - chasuble, maniple, pontifical gloves, pontifical shoes, the pallium and the papal fanone and subcinctorium; (2) vestments never worn at mass, but at other liturgical functions, such as processions, administration of the sacraments, solemn choir services, i.e.

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  • It will deal briefly (I) with the general idea and the historical evolution of ecclesiastical vestments, (2) with the vestments as at present worn (a) in the Roman Catholic Church, (b) in the Oriental Churches, (c) in the Reformed Churches, (d) in the Anglican Church.

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  • - The liturgical vestments of the Catholic Church, East and West, are not, as was at one time commonly supposed, borrowed from the sacerdotal ornaments of the Jewish ritual, although the obvious analogies of this ritual doubtless to a certain extent determined their sacral character; they were developed independently out of the various articles of everyday dress worn by citizens of the Graeco-Roman world under the Empire.

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  • The tunica, a loose sack-like tunic with a hole for the head, was the innermost garment worn by all classes of Roman citizens under the republic and empire.

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  • This was originally worn only by slaves, soldiers and other people of low degree; in the 3rd century, however, it was adopted by fashionable people as a convenient riding or travelling cloak; and finally, by the sumptuary law of 382 (Cod.

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  • By the 4th century the garments worn at liturgical functions had been separated from those in ordinary use, though still identical in form.

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  • By this time, moreover, the liturgical character of the vestments was so completely established that they were no longer worn instead of, but over, the ordinary dress.

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  • By the 12th century, mitre and gloves were worn by all bishops, and in many cases they had assumed a new ornament, the rationale, a merely honorific decoration (supposed to symbolize doctrine and wisdom), sometimes of the nature of a highly ornamental broad shoulder collar with dependent lappets; sometimes closely resembling the pallium; rarely a "breast-plate" on the model of that of the Jewish high priest.'

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  • Hitherto the chasuble had been worn indifferently by all ministers at the eucharist, even by the acolytes; it had been worn also at processions and other non-liturgical functions; it was now exalted into the mass vestment par excellence, worn by the celebrant only, or by his immediate assistants (deacon and subdeacon) only on very special occasions.

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  • During the first centuries both branches of the Church had used vestments substantially the same, developed from common originals; the alb, chasuble, stole and pallium were the equivalents of the anxItinov, e t fvoXcov, copapcov and 1 The rationale is worn only over the chasuble.

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  • Before discussing the changes made in the various Reformed Churches, due to the doctrinal developments of the 16th century, we may therefore give here a list of the vestments now worn by the various orders of clergy in the Roman Catholic Church and the Oriental Churches.

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  • The vestments worn by the priest when celebrating mass are then the most important.

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  • The cassock, which must always be worn under the vestments, is not itself a liturgical garment.

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    0
  • Finally, the pope, when celebrating mass, wears the same vestments as an ordinary bishop, with the addition of the subcinctorium, a dalmatic, worn over the tunicle and under the chasuble, and the orale or fanone.

    0
    0
  • the cappa of the Lateran basilica worn by the canons of Westminster cathedral, or the almuce worn, by concession of Pope Pius IX., by the members of the Sistine choir.

    0
    0
  • The character of the vestments, the method of putting them on, and the occasions on which they are severally to be worn, are regulated with the minutest care in the Missal and the Caeremoniale.

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  • An Orthodox bishop, vested for the holy liturgy, wears over his cassock - (i) the rnxcipcov, or alb (q.v.); the E7nrpay,Acov, or stole (q.v.); (3) the a narrow stuff girdle clasped behind, which holds together the two vestments above named; (4) the E7 n, uaviexa, liturgical cuffs, corresponding, possibly, to the pontifical gloves of the West;' (5) the i 7rtyovarcov, a stiff lozengeshaped piece of stuff hanging at the right side by a piece of riband from the girdle or attached to the o-AKKos, the equivalent of the Western maniple (q.v.); (6) the like the Western dalmatic (q.v.), worn instead of the 4acv6Acov, or chasuble; (7) the c?µocp6pcov, the equivalent of the Western pallium (q.v.).

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  • The kalimaukion is also worn by the other clergy in ordinary life, and with their vestments at processions, &c.

    0
    0
  • White is also worn during the octaves of these festivals, on ordinary days (for which no special colour is provided) between Easter and Whitsuntide, at certain special masses connected with the saints falling under the above category, and at bridal masses.

    0
    0
  • White is worn at the funerals of children.

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    0
  • In England red vestments are worn at the mass (of the Holy Spirit) attended by the Roman Catholic judges and barristers at the opening of term, the so-called "Red Mass."

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    0
  • Violet vestments are also worn on days of intercession, at votive masses of the Passion, at certain other masses of a pronouncedly intercessory and penitential character, at intercessory processions, at the blessing of candles on Candlemas Day, and at the blessing of the baptismal water.

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  • A violet stole is worn by the priest when giving absolution after confession, and when administering Extreme Unction.

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    0
  • at Leipzig) the surplice is still worn; but the pastors now usually wear a barret cap, a black gown of the type worn by Luther himself, and white bands.

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    0
  • As for copes, in some places they were ordered to be worn, and were worn at the Holy Communion, 4 while elsewhere they were thrown into the bonfires with the rest.5 The difficulty seems to have been not to suppress the chasuble, of the use of which after 1559 not a single authoritative instance has been adduced, but to save the surplice, which the more zealous Puritans looked on with scarcely less disfavour.

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  • Prudentius describes it in Peristephanon (x., 1066 ff.): the priest of the Mother, clad in a toga worn cinctu Gabino, with golden crown and fillets on his head, takes his place in a trench covered by a.

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    0
  • The young Brachiopod in all its species is protected by an embryonic shell called the " protegulum," which sometimes persists in the umbones of the adult shells but is more usually worn off.

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    0
  • But morality at different times has worn very different dresses.

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    0
  • It is probable that certain privileges of the equites were due to Gracchus; that of wearing the gold ring, hitherto reserved for senators; that of special seats in the theatre, subsequently withdrawn (probably by Sulla) and restored by the lex Othonis (67 B.C.); the narrow band of purple on the tunic as distinguished from the broad band worn by the senators.

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    0
  • The town was once famous for its pistols and sporrans (as the purses worn with the kilt are called), which were in great request by the clansmen of the Highlands.

    0
    0
  • These chapadas and elevations, which are usually described as mountain ranges, are capped by horizontal strata of sandstone and show the original surface, which has been worn away by the rivers, leaving here and there broad flat-topped ridges between river basins and narrower ranges of hills between river courses.

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  • It serves for the thatching of roofs, for a papermaking material, for ornamenting small surfaces as a "strawmosaic," for plaiting into door and table mats, mattresses, &c., and for weaving and plaiting into light baskets, artificial flowers, &c. These applications, however, are insignificant in comparison with the place occupied by straw as a raw material for the straw bonnets and hats worn by both sexes.

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  • It is worn by solution into caves and swallow-holes (Wondergarten).

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    0
  • consuetudinem, acc. of consuetudo, custom, habit, manner, &c.), dress or clothing, especially the distinctive clothing worn at different periods by different peoples or different classes of people.

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    0
  • Many forms of clothing, moreover, seem to call attention to those parts of the body of which, under the conditions of Western civilization at the present day, it aims at the concealment; certain articles of dress worn by the New Hebrideans, the Zulu-Xosa tribes, certain tribes of Brazil and others, are cases in point.

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    0
  • Amongst the most northerly races the latter garb is worn by both sexes alike; farther south by the men, the women retaining the tropical form; farther south still the latter reigns supreme.

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    0
  • Speaking generally, it has been found that the East as opposed to the West has undergone relatively little alteration in the principal constituents of dress among the bulk of the population, and, although it is often difficult to interpret or explain some of the details as represented (one may contrast, for example, worn sculptures or seals with the vivid Egyptian paintings), comparison with later descriptions and even with modern usage is frequently suggestive.

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  • It was the usual garb of scribes, servants and peasants, and in the earlier dynasties was worn even by men of rank.

    0
    0
  • In the Middle Kingdom an outer fine light skirt was worn over the loin-cloth; ordinary people, however, used thicker material.

    0
    0
  • This plain diaphanous garment, without distinction of colour (white, red or yellow), and with perhaps only an embroidered hem at the top, was worn by the whole nation, princess and peasant, from the IVth to the XVIIIth Dynasties (Erman, Life in Ancient Egypt, p. 212).

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  • As worn by gods and men it was a long and rather loose kind of skirt suspended from a girdle.

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  • 81), a woollen mantle was worn over the fringed linen skirt, wool was forbidden to the priests in the temple.

    0
    0
  • Long fringed robes were worn by Hittites of both sexes, and the women represented at Mar`ash and Zenjirli wear FIG.

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    0
  • Nevertheless veils were not usually worn out of doors, the countrywoman of to-day is not veiled, and it is uncertain whether there is any early parallel for the yashmak, the narrow strip which covers the face below the eyes and hangs down to the feet.

    0
    0
  • Xc-reev, tunica), like its Greek counterpart, was apparently of two kinds, for, although essentially a simple and probably sleeveless garment, there was a special variety worn by royal maidens and men of distinction, explicitly described as a tunic of palms or soles (passim), that is, one presumably reaching to the hands and feet (Gen.

    0
    0
  • This was worn by both sexes, though obviously there was some difference as regards length, &c. (Deut.

    0
    0
  • The more ornate variety, called abnet, was worn by prominent officials (Isa.

    0
    0
  • Zeitung, August, 1908 Aegean scenes, and it is noteworthy that the Arab mi'zar (drawers such as were worn by wrestlers or sailors) takes its name from the izar or loin-cloth (Ency.

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    0
  • cheek, neck and throat, is worn FIG.

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    0
  • It is worn by gods and men, and with the latter sometimes has ear-flaps (at Lachish, with other varieties, Ball, 190) or is surmounted by a feather or crest.

    0
    0
  • Elongated and more pointed it is the archaic crown of the Pharaohs (symbolical of upper Egypt), is worn by a Hittite god of the 14th century, and finds parallels upon old FIG.

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    0
  • Long garments ornamented with symbolical designs (stars, &c.) are worn by Marduk and Adad.

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  • 4 Ordinary folk could not claim these honours, and in Egypt, where shaving was practically universal, artificial beards were worn upon solemn occasions as a peculiar duty.

    0
    0
  • It must suffice, therefore, to record the Pharaoh's simple girdle (with or without a tunic) from which hangs the lion's tail, or the tail-like band suspended from the extremity of his head-dress (above), or the panther or leopard skin worn over the shoulders by the high priest at Memphis, subsequently a ceremonial dress of men of rank.

    0
    0
  • His head-dress was as distinctive as that of the high priest at Hierapolis, who wore a golden tiara and a purple dress, while the ordinary priests had a pilos (conical cap, also worn in Israel, Ex.

    0
    0
  • 21) have been plausibly compared with the Babylonian tablets of destiny worn by the gods and the mystic lots upon the bosom of Noah.

    0
    0
  • 12), and when in the middle ages they marked out the Jew for persecution they were transferred to a small under-garment (the little talith), the proper talith being worn over the head in the synagogue.

    0
    0
  • The i-Eir)os was worn in a variety of colours and often decorated with bands of ornament, both horizontal and vertical; Homer uses the epithets KpoK61ren-Aos and Kvav01r€7rXos, which show that yellow and dark blue 7r41rAot were worn, and speaks of embroidered 717rXoc (roctcLRoc).

    0
    0
  • The XfTwviaKOS, worn in active exercise, as by the so-called " Atalanta " of the Vatican, or the well-known Amazon statues (Greek Art, fig.

    0
    0
  • If worn without a girdle it went by the name of XeTWV 6pOour6.

    0
    0
  • The long linen chiton, which had been worn by men as well as women, was now only retained by the male sex on religious and festival occasions; a short chiton was, however, worn at work or in active exercise (Greek Art, fig.

    0
    0
  • But the garment usually worn by men of mature age was the iµaTCov, which was (like the rbrXos) a plain square of woollen stuff.

    0
    0
  • The iµaTCov was also worn by women over the linen chiton, and draped in a great variety of ways, which may be illustrated by the terracotta figurines from Tanagra (4th-3rd cent.

    0
    0
  • The XXaiva was a heavy woollen cloak worn in cold weather.

    0
    0
  • When the object was only to hold up the hair from the neck, the o-¢Evbovn was used, which, as its name implies, was in the form of a sling; but in this case it was called more particularly 67reQBov¢EVbovrt, as a distinction from the sphendone when worn in front of the head.

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  • The head ornaments include the bcabrtµa, a narrow band bound round the hair a little way back from the brow and temples, and fastened in the knot of the hair behind; the ciµ7ry a variety of the diadem; the QTE¢avrt, a crown worn over the forehead, its highest point being in the centre, and narrowing at each side into a thin band which is tied at the back of the head.

    0
    0
  • Ear-rings (Evwrta, X¦o13ta, Exckt'7pES) of gold, silver, or bronze plated with gold, and frequently ornamented with pearls, precious stones, or enamel, were worn attached to the lobes of the ear.

    0
    0
  • For the feet the sandal (o-avbaXov, Ti&Xov) was the usual wear; for hunting and travelling high boots were worn.

    0
    0
  • The hunting-boot (EVbpoµis) was laced up the front, and reached to the calves; the K60opvos (cothurnus) was a high boot reaching to the middle of the leg, and as worn by tragic actors had high soles.

    0
    0
  • Slippers (irepauKai) were adopted from the East by women; shoes (E e13a&ES) were worn by the poorer classes.

    0
    0
  • Gloves (XECpCbEs) were worn by the Persians, but apparently never by the Greeks unless to protect the hands when working (Odyssey, xxiv.

    0
    0
  • Hats, which were as a rule worn only by youths, workmen and slaves, were of circular shape, and either of some stiff material, as the Boeotian hat observed in terra-cottas from Tanagra, or of pliant material which could be bent down at the sides like the irETaaos worn by Hermes and sometimes even by women.

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  • - The female dress of the Etruscans did not differ in any important respect from that of the Greeks; it consisted of the chiton and himation, which was in earlier times usually worn as a shawl, not after the fashion of the Doric7r7rXos.

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  • 20), the female figure reclining on the lid wears a Greek chiton of a thin white material, with short sleeves fastened on the outside of the arm, by means of buttons and loops; a himation of dark purple thick stuff is wrapped round her hips and legs; on her feet are sandals, consisting of a sole apparently of leather, and attached to the foot and leg with leather straps; under the straps are thin socks which do not cover the toes; she wears a necklace of heavy pendants; her ears are pierced for ear-rings; her hair is partly gathered together with a ribbon at the roots behind, and partly hangs in long tresses before and behind; a flat diadem is bound round her head a little way back from the brow and 2 The tutulus was worn at Rome by the flaminica.

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  • We are told by ancient writers that the toga praetexta, with its purple border (lreplirop4wpos n'i13evva), as worn by Roman magistrates and priests, had been derived from the Etruscans (Pliny, N.H.

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  • The male head-dress was the galerus, a hat of leather, said to have been worn by the Lucumos in early times, or the apex, a pointed hat corresponding to the tutulus worn by females.

    0
    0
  • The fashion of shoes worn by Roman senators was said to have been derived from Etruria.

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    0
  • - We are told that the toga, the national garment of the Romans, was originally worn both by men and by women; and though the female dress of the Romans was in historical times essentially the same as that of the Greeks, young girls still wore the toga on festal occasions, as we see from the reliefs of the Ara Pacis Augustae.

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  • In this period, however, the tunica, corresponding to the Greek chiton, was universally worn in ordinary life, and the toga gradually became a full-dress garment which was only worn over the tunica on important social occasions; Juvenal (iii.

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  • One end of this garment was thrown over the left shoulder and allowed to hang down in front; the remainder 1 It was also worn by Roman children.

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  • The plain white toga (toga Pura) was the ordinary dress of the citizen, but the toga praetexta, which had a border of purple, was worn by boys till the age of sixteen, when they assumed the plain toga virilis, and also by curule magistrates and some priests.

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    0
  • A purple toga with embroidery (toga pieta) was worn together with a gold-embroidered tunic (tunica palmata) by generals while celebrating a triumph and by magistrates presiding at games; it represented the traditional dress of the kings and was adopted by Julius Caesar as a permanent costume.

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    0
  • The trabea, which in historical times was worn by the consuls when opening the temple of Janus, by the equites at their yearly inspection and on some other occasions, and by the Salii at their ritual dances, and had (according to tradition) formed the original costume of the augurs and flamens (who afterwards adopted the toga praetexta), was apparently a toga smaller in size than the ordinary civil dress, decorated with scarlet stripes (trabes).

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    0
  • It was fastened with brooches (fibulae) anch appears to have been worn by the equites, e.g.

    0
    0
  • A woollen undergarment (subucula) was often worn by men; the women's under-tunic was of linen (indusium).

    0
    0
  • A variety of cloaks were worn by men during inclement weather; in general they resembled the Greek chlamys, but often had a hood (cucullus) which could be drawn over the head.

    0
    0
  • The paenula, which was the garment most commonly worn, especially by soldiers when engaged on peace duties, was an oblong piece of cloth with a hole in the centre for the neck; a hood was usually attached to the back.

    0
    0
  • the Greek himation, was at first worn only by Romans addicted to Greek fashions, but from the time of Tiberius, who wore it in daily life, its use became general.

    0
    0
  • Long robes bearing Greek names (synthesis, syrma, &c.) were worn at dinner-parties.

    0
    0
  • For personal ornament finger-rings of great variety in the material and design were worn by men, sometimes to the extent of one or more on each finger, many persons possessing small cabinets of them.

    0
    0
  • The tore (torques), or cord of gold worn round the neck, was introduced from Gaul.

    0
    0
  • In ancient Ireland a king's mantle was dyed with saffron, and even down to the 17th century the "lein-croich," or saffron-dyed shirt, was worn by persons of rank in the Hebrides.

    0
    0
  • Both sides had suffered very severely in the furious encounters that had been in progress since the evening of the 6th, and the troops were completely worn out by their efforts.

    0
    0
  • The hair of males is sometimes, but not always, worn in pigtail.

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    0
  • None the less, since it is used at choir services and is ordered to be worn over the everyday dress at Mass (Missa rom.

    0
    0
  • - In the English Church the rochet is a vestment peculiar to bishops, and is worn by them, with the chimere both "at all times of their ministration" in church and also on ceremonial occasions outside, e.g.

    0
    0
  • The ribbon by which the wrist is confined is black, except when convocation robes are worn, when it is scarlet.

    0
    0
  • The rochet is worn without the chimere under the cope by those bishops who use this vestment.

    0
    0
  • Silk is largely worn even by the lowest classes of the inhabitants.

    0
    0
  • Arminius died, worn out by uncongenial controversy and ecclesiastical persecution, before his system had been elaborated into the logical consistency it attained in the hands of his celebrated successor, Simon Episcopius; but though inchoate in detail, it was in its principles clear and coherent enough.

    0
    0
  • Vestments are worn only at the ministration of the sacraments; incense is used invariably at the Eucharist and frequently at other services.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes linings of enamelled iron or other material are employed, which when worn can be replaced at a far lower cost than that of a new still.

    0
    0
  • According to contemporary writers he was worn to a shadow.

    0
    0
  • is the measure of the amount of myopia, and this fully correcting glass may be worn in the slighter forms of short-sight.

    0
    0
  • The tail is short, broad and depressed, and covered with coarse hairs, which in old animals generally become worn off from the under (From Gould's Mammals of Australia.) Platypus.

    0
    0
  • The region of which Rhode Island is a part was at one time worn down to a gently rolling plain near sealevel, but has since been uplifted and somewhat dissected by stream action.

    0
    0
  • Costumes of the utmost magnificence were worn, and the chiselling of masks for the use of the performers occupied scores of artists and ranked as a high glyptic accomplishment.

    0
    0
  • of swords worn on ceremonial occasions, the ishime (stone-pitting) orjimigaki (polished) styles being considered less aristocratic.

    0
    0
  • Worn out by continuous fighting and weakened by dropsy, Heraclius failed to show sufficient energy against the new peril that menaced his eastern provinces towards the end of his reign.

    0
    0
  • Tortrix scytale, one of the "coral-snakes" of tropical South America, is beautiful coral-red with black rings, grows to nearly a yard in length, and is said sometimes to be worn as a necklace by native ladies.

    0
    0
  • The lift is effected by cams acting on the under surface of tappets, and formed by cylindrical boxes keyed on to the stems of the lifter about onefourth of their length from the top. As, however, the cams, unlike those of European stamp mills, are placed to one side of the stamp, the latter is not only lifted but turned partly round on its own axis, whereby the shoes are worn down uniformly.

    0
    0
  • long, the edge of the upper one was worn back into a deep indentation, probably by running water, possibly by quarrying.

    0
    0
  • 2) differ from the corresponding organs of allied species in great breadth of the crown as compared with the length, the narrowness and crowding or close approximation of the ridges, the thinness of the enamel, and its straightness, parallelism and absence of " crimping," as seen on the worn surface or in a horizontal section of the tooth.

    0
    0
  • Flying from the country, he encountered the plague at Pinczoff; three of his four children were carried off; and he himself, worn out by age and misfortune, died in solitude and obscurity at Schlakau in Moravia, about the end of 1564.

    0
    0
  • This Edmund received in his own day the surname of Crouchback, not, as was afterwards supposed, from a personal deformity, but from having worn a cross upon his back in token of a crusading vow.

    0
    0
  • A closer investigation of the numerous long, narrow banks which lie off the Flemish coast and the Thames estuary shows that they are composed of fragments of rock abraded and transported by tidal currents and storms in the same way that the chalk and limestone worn off from the eastern continuation of the island of Heligoland during the last two centuries has been reduced to the coarse gravel of the off-lying Dune.

    0
    0
  • Similar effects are produced along the boulder-clay cliffs of the Baltic. Where the force of the waves on the beach produces its full effect the coarser material gets worn down to gravel, sand and silt, the finest particles remaining long suspended in the water to be finally deposited as mud in quiet bays.

    0
    0
  • The latter's enormous numerical superiority was neutralized by Sulla's judicious choice of ground and the steadiness of his legionaries; the Asiatics after the failure of their attack were worn down and almost annihilated.

    0
    0
  • CROWN and Coronet, an official or symbolical ornament worn on or round the head.

    0
    0
  • The diadem, which was of eastern origin, was a fillet or band of linen or silk, richly embroidered, and was worn tied round the forehead.

    0
    0
  • The linen or silk diadem was eventually exchanged for a flexible band of gold, which was worn in its place round the forehead.

    0
    0
  • in width, that doubts have been felt as to whether it was originally intended to be worn on the head or was merely meant to be a votive crown.

    0
    0
  • The papal tiara (a Greek word, of Persian origin, for a form of ancient Persian popular head-dress, standing high erect, and worn encircled by a diadem by the kings), the triple crown worn by the popes, has taken various forms since the 9th century.

    0
    0
  • Pictorial representations in early manuscripts, and the rude effigies on their coins, are not very helpful in deciding as to the form of crown worn by the Anglo-Saxon and Danish kings of England before the Norman Conquest.

    0
    0
  • In some cases it would appear as if the diadem studded with pearls had been worn, and in others something more of the character of a crown.

    0
    0
  • Those crowns were the personal crowns, worn by the different kings on various state occasions, but they were all crowned before the Commonwealth with the ancient crown of St Edward, and the queens consort with that of Queen Edith.

    0
    0
  • Edward's crown" as that with which the late queen was to be crowned, it was actually the state or imperial crown worn by the sovereign when leaving the church after the ceremony that was used.

    0
    0
  • The crown of Scotland, preserved with the Scottish regalia at Edinburgh, is believed to be composed of the original circlet worn by King Robert the Bruce.

    0
    0
  • This brings us to the crowns of lesser dignity, known for that reason as coronets, and worn by the five orders of peers.

    0
    0
  • The picturesque costume of the women is now worn only at festivals.

    0
    0
  • pieces of bone, stone, shell, &c., were worn as ornaments in the lip (Latin, labrum) or cheek by Eskimo, Tlinkit, Nahuatlas and tribes on the Brazilian coast.

    0
    0
  • In return, the Mint receives at its nominal value for recoinage the worn gold and silver coin which is withdrawn from circulation by the Bank of England and some other banks.

    0
    0
  • Silver coins are not weighed but are selected for withdrawal when they present a worn appearance.

    0
    0
  • The average deficiency in weight of worn silver coin received at the Mint is from 8 to 10%, and the mean age somewhat less than 50 years.

    0
    0
  • He died on the 12th of December 1894, worn out with overwork.

    0
    0
  • A lion's skin is generally worn or carried.

    0
    0
  • Parts of the crystalline area are worn down to a condition of low relief, but in the main mountain mass, although greatly worn, there are still elevations of truly mountainous proportions.

    0
    0
  • Even the higher summits are worn to a rounded condition, and are therefore for the most part forest covered up to the timber line which, on Mount Marcy, is at an elevation of about 4900 ft.

    0
    0
  • Even as it was the resistance of the Maori was utterly worn out at last.

    0
    0
  • The badges were generally worn fastened to the pilgrim's hat or cape.

    0
    0
  • Its colour varies with the liturgical colour of the day, or of the function at which it is worn.

    0
    0
  • The stole is worn immediately over the alb; by deacons, scarf-wise over the left shoulder, across the breast and back to the right side; by priests and bishops, dependent from the neck, the two ends falling over the breast.

    0
    0
  • In southern Italy, probably under Greek influence, and in Milan (where the custom still survives) the diaconal stole was put on over the dalmatic. Similarly in Spain and Gaul, anterior to the Carolingian age, the stole was worn by deacons over the alba or outer tunic.

    0
    0
  • According to the Roman use the stole is now only worn at mass, in administering the sacraments and sacramentalia, when touching the Host, &c., but not e.g.

    0
    0
  • It is noteworthy that at Rome, until the 10th century, the stole was worn by the lower orders of the clergy also.

    0
    0
  • The stole of priests and bishops, decorated with crosses, was worn originally in all rites as in the West, i.e.

    0
    0
  • The diaconal stole was and continues to be worn usually hanging over the left shoulder, the ends falling straight down before and behind.

    0
    0
  • Extensive and deep-seated crumpling was necessarily accompanied by vertical uplift throughout the zone affected, but once at least since their birth the mountains have been worn down to a lowland, and the mountains of to-day are the combined product of subsequent uplift of a different sort, and dissection by erosion.

    0
    0
  • Some curious memorials of the superstition have survived in rings and amulets, engraven with the various signs, and worn as a kind of astral defensive armour.

    0
    0
  • The panung is common to both sexes, the women supplementing it with a scarf worn round the body under the arms. Among the better classes both sexes wear also a jacket buttoned to the throat, stockings and shoes, and all the men, except servants, wear hats.

    0
    0
  • As a rule the crests of the ranges are worn down by aerial denudation and have the general appearance of rounded domes.

    0
    0
  • Worn out by internal strife fostered by Haakon's emissaries, the Icelandic chiefs acknowledged the Norwegian king as overlord in 1262.

    0
    0
  • At last, worn out by age, he accepted an amnesty and returned to the city of Mexico, where he died in obscurity on the 10th of June 1876.

    0
    0
  • It was a very richly decorated object of coloured threads interwoven with gold, worn outside the luxurious mantle or robe; it was kept in place by a girdle, and by shoulder-pieces (?), to which were attached brooches of onyx (fastened to the robe) and golden rings from which hung the "breastplate" (or rather pouch) containing the sacred lots, Urim and Thummim.

    0
    0
  • Like the teraphim it was part of the common stock of Hebrew cult; it is borne (rather than worn) by persons acting in a priestly character (Samuel at Shiloh, priests of Nob, David), it is part of the worship of individuals (Gideon at Ophrah), and is found in a private shrine with a lay attendant (Micah; Judg.

    0
    0
  • In some cases the whole object is a modern reproduction in electro-plate, but more often really old articles from which the original plating has been worn off in course of time have been replated, both equally being in the eyes of the connoisseur, unworthy of serious attention and comparatively valueless.

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  • An important branch of this industry is the manufacture of " zarapes " (called ponchos " in other parts of Spanish America) - a blanket slit in the centre for the head to pass through, and worn in place of a coat by men of the lower classes.

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  • Considerable attention is given to the manufacture of " rebozos," the long shawls worn by women.

    0
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  • Ornaments of gold and silver, and jewels of polished quartz and green chalchihuite were worn - not only the ears and nose but the lips being pierced for - ornaments.

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  • In 1534 Lord Thomas Fitzgerald, better known as Silken Thomas (so called because of a fantastic fringe worn in the helmet of his followers), a young man of rash courage and good abilities, son of the Lord Deputy Kildare, believing his father, who was imprisoned in the Tower of London, to have been beheaded, organized a rebellion against the English Government, and marched with his followers from the mansion of the earls of Kildare in Thomas Court, through Dame's Gate to St Mary's Abbey, where, in the council chamber, he proclaimed himself a rebel.

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  • It is the outermost garment worn by bishops and priests at the celebration of the Mass, forming with the alb the most essential part of the eucharistic vestments.

    0
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  • By the 13th century, with the final development of the ritual of the Mass, the chasuble became definitely fixed as the vestment of the celebrating priest; though to this day in the Roman Church relics of the earlier general use of the chasuble survive in the planeta plicata worn by deacons and subdeacons in Lent and Advent, and other penitential seasons.

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  • Its use, however, survived in the Lutheran churches; and though in those of Germany it is no longer worn, it still forms part of the liturgical costume of the Scandinavian Evangelical churches.

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  • in England, where it is now considered distinctive of the chasuble as worn in the Anglican Church.

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  • Father Braun, however, makes it quite clear that this was not the case, and gives proof that this decoration was not even originally conceived as a cross at all, citing early instances of its having been worn by laymen and even by non-Christians (p. 210).

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  • burros, felonion, kuklion) is confined to the priests in the Armenian, Syrian, Chaldaean and Coptic rites; in the Greek rite it is worn also by the lectors.

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  • It is not in the East so specifically a eucharistic vestment as in the West, but is worn at other solemn functions besides the liturgy, e.g.

    0
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  • Moreover, it would be further necessary to prove that the birrus, in contradistinction to the paenula, was always open in front; whereas, per contra, the paenula, both as worn by soldiers and in ordinary life, was, like the modern Arab burnus, often slit up the front to the neck.

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  • Oftener, however, they were mere masques worn at funerals by men who personated the ancestors and wore their robes of office.

    0
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  • When the peneplain was uplifted the weaker strata were worn down almost to a lowland of a second generation, while the resistant sandstones, of which there a1~- three chief members, retained a great part of their new-gained altitude in the form of long, narrow, even-crested ridges, well deserving of the name of Endless Motintains given them by the Indians, but here and there bending sharply in peculiar zigzags which give this Alleghany section of the mountains an unusual individuality.

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  • still more, it is discontinuous, because of the inclusion of certain belts of weak non-crystalline rock; here the rolling uplands are worn down to lowland belts, the longest of which reaches from the southern corner of New York, across New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Maryland, into central Virginia.

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  • Itis determined The Great structurally by a belt of topographically weak limestones VaJie and shales (or slates) next inland from the crystalline ~ uplands; hence, whatever the direction of the rivers which drain the belt, it has been worn down by Tertiary erosion to a continuous lowland from the Gulf of St Lawrence to central Alabama.

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  • The feature referred to results from the occurrence here of a weak basal formation of clay overlaid by more resistant sandy strata; the clay belt has been stripped for a score or more of miles from its original inland overlap, and worn down in a longitudinal inner lowland, while the sandy belt retains a significant altitude of 200 or 300 ft.

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  • There is good reason for believing that at least along the southern border of New England a narrow coastal plain was for a time added to the continental border; and that, as in the New Jersey section the plain was here stripped from a significant breadth of inland overlap and worn down so as to form an inner lowland enclosed by a longitudinal upland or cuesta; and that when this stage was reached a submergence, of the kind which has produced the many embayments of the New England coast, drowned the outer part of thy plain and the inner lowland, leaving only the higher parts of the cuesta as islands.

    0
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  • As is always the case in the broad denudation of the gently inclined strata of such plains, the weaker layers are worn down in sub-parallel belts of lower land between the oldiand and the belts of more resistant strata, which rise in uplands.

    0
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  • Its relief is seldom more than 200 or 300 ft., and is commonly of small measure, but its continuity and its contrast with the associated lowlands worn on the underlying and overlying weak strata suffice to sake it a feature of importance.

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  • The arrangement of the Great Lakes is thus seen to he closely synipathetic with the course of the lowlands worn on the two belts of weaker strata on either side of the Niagara cuesta; Ontario, Georgian Bay and Green Bay occupy depressions in the lowland on the inner side of the cuesta; Erie, Huron and Michigan lie in depressions in the lowland on the outer side.

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  • innermost extension and worn down to a flat inner lowland of rich black soil, thus gaining the name of the black belt.

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  • The swiftest current te,-ids, by reason of centrifugal force, to follow the outer side of every significant curve in the channel; hence the concave bank, against which the rapid current sweeps, is worn away; thus any chance irregularity is exaggerated, and in time a series of large serpentines or meanders is developed,, the most-symmetrical examples at present being those near Greenville, Miss.

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  • Along the eastern side of the Front Range in Colorado most of the upturned stratified formations have been so well worn down that, except for a few low piedmont ridges, their even surface may now be included with that of the plains, and the crystalline core of the range is exposed almost to the mountain base.

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  • The results of the first cycle of erosion are seen in the widespread exposure of the resistant Carboniferous limestone as a broad platform in the south-western area of greater uplift through central Arizona, where the higher formations were worn away; and in the development of a series of huge, south-facing, retreating escarpments of irregular outline on the edges of the higher formations farther north.

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  • During the current cycle of erosion, several of the faults, whose scarps had been worn away in the previous cycle, have been brought to light again as topographic features by the removal of the weak strata along one side of the fault line, leaving the harder strata on the other side in relief; such scarps are known as fault-line scarps, in distinction from the original fault scarps.

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  • They are peculiar in having their altitude dependent on the depth of revived erosion, instead of the amount of faulting, and they are sometimes topographically reversed, in that the revived scarp overlooks a lowland worn on a weak formation in the upheaved fault-block.

    0
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  • In Western Utah and through most of Nevada many of the blocks exhibit deformed structures, involving folds and faults of relatively ancient (Jurassic) date; so ancient that the moun~ tains then formed by the folding were worn down to the lowland stage of old age before the block-faulting occurred.

    0
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  • Either this part of the continent was largely land at this time, or the Silurian formations here have been worn away or remain undifferentiated.

    0
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  • These mountains have since been worn down, so that, in spite of their subsequent periods of growth, their height is not great.

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  • Closely adjoining to this, so that the eye of the father of the whole establishment should be constantly over those who stood the most in need of his watchful care, - those who were training for the monastic life, and those who had worn themselves out in its duties, - was a fourth cloister (0), with annexed buildings, devoted to the aged and infirm members of the establishment.

    0
    0
  • The mountain structures originated in three great orogenic periods, the earliest in the Archean, the second at the end of the Palaeozoic and the third at the end of the Mesozoic. The Archean mountain chains, which enclosed the present region of Hudson Bay, were so ancient that they had already been worn down almost to a plain before the early Palaeozoic sediments were laid down.

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  • The Story Rambles Rather Far From Its Well Worn Plot.

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  • It is impermeable to water, and is therefore used in northern countries for roofing, for domestic utensils, for boxes and jars to contain both solid and liquid substances, and for a kind of bark shoes, of which it is estimated 25 millions of pairs are annually worn by the Russian peasantry.

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  • The rocks composing the cliffs are worn into caves, and around the island are many fantastic arches and columns.

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    0
  • The Piedmont Plateau is a lowland worn down by erosion on hard crystalline rocks, then uplifted to form a plateau.

    0
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  • torquis, torques, a twisted collar, torquere, to twist), the term given by archaeologists to the twisted collars or armlets of gold or other metal worn particularly by the ancient Gauls and other allied Celtic races.

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  • The typical torque is a circlet with twisted rope-like strands, the ends not joined together; the torque was usually worn with the opening in the front as seen in a figure of a Gaul in a sculptured sarcophagus in the Capitoline Museum at Rome.

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  • SOUTANE, the French term adopted into English for a cassock especially used for the general daily dress worn by the secular Roman clergy in France, Italy, Spain and Portugal.

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  • 13, B); in the upper teeth the outer cusps and in the lower the inner ones are the higher, and when worn the crown surfaces show oblique dentineareas; in shape the third molar is like the second, but it is smaller.

    0
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  • In the typical Australian and Papuan Hydromys, locally known as water-rats, the molars originally have transverse ridges, the enamel folds between which form cutting edges whose sharpness depends upon the degree to which the teeth have been worn, while the large hind feet are webbed.

    0
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  • China and Japan, both of which contribute so largely to the supplies that appear in European and American statistics, only export their excess growth, silk-weaving being carried on and native silk worn to an enormous extent in both countries.

    0
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  • Blackie was a Radical and Scottish nationalist in politics, but of a fearlessly independent type; he was one of the "characters" of the Edinburgh of the day, and was a well-known figure as he went about in his plaid, worn shepherd-wise, wearing a broadbrimmed hat, and carrying a big stick.

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  • He died, worn out and wasted with labour and absorbing care, while still in the prime of life, on the 7th of December 1834.

    0
    0
  • The ukaz of the 1st of September 1698 allowed as a compromise that beards should be worn, but a graduated tax was imposed .upon their wearers.

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  • Thus the downfall of the monarchy and of the ancient cults have been nearly fatal to some of the more beautiful birds; feather ornaments, formerly worn only by nobles, came to be a common decoration; and many species (for example the Hawaiian gallinule, Gallinula sandwicensis, which, because of its crimson frontal plate and bill, was said by the natives to have played the part of Prometheus, burning its head with fire stolen from the gods and bestowed on mortals) have been nearly destroyed by the mongoose, or have been driven from their lowland homes to the mountains, such being the fate of the mamo, mentioned above, and of the Sandwich Island goose (Bernicla sandwicensis), which is here a remarkable example of adaptation, as its present habitat is quite arid.

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  • In the days of idolatry the only dress worn by the men was a narrow strip of cloth wound around the loins and passed between the legs.

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  • A coloured handkerchief is twisted around the head or a straw hat is worn.

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  • C. Dumont d'Urville had seen its skin, which the naturalists of his expedition procured, worn as a tippet by a Maori chief at Tolaga Bay (Houa-houa), 2 and in 1830 gave what proves to be on the whole very accurate information concerning it (Voy.

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  • - Of these the most interesting are the brooches which were worn by both sexes and of which large numbers have been found in heathen cemeteries.

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  • They did not change their clothes or their shoes till they were torn in pieces or worn completely away.

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  • On the 19th of April 1791 he died, worn out with suffering and disease.

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  • Dhootie is a name taken from a Hindu word of similar sound and referred originally to the loin-cloth worn by Hindus.

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  • After the folding the whole region was worn down nearly to sea-level, forming a low plain which bevelled across the geological structure of the entire state, including the Piedmont area to the south-east and the plateau area to the north-west.

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  • The beard is sparse, and, with the exception of the moustache, which is sometimes worn, especially in central Tibet, it is plucked out with tweezers.

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  • patriarchs and bishops, have taken monkish vows and worn the cowl.

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  • (314-335), who ordered it to be worn by the deacons; but Braun (Liturg.

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  • However this may be, the dalmatic remained for centuries the vestment distinctive of the pope and his deacons, and - according at least to the view held at Rome - could be worn by other clergy only by special concession of the pope.

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  • According to the actual use of the Roman Catholic Church dalmatic and tunicle are worn by deacon and subdeacon when assisting at High Mass, and at solemn processions and benedictions.

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  • Dalmatic and tunicle are never worn by priests, as priests, but both are worn by bishops under the chasuble (never under the cope) and also by those prelates, not being bishops, to whom the pope has conceded the right to wear the episcopal vestments.

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  • In the Eastern churches the only vestment that has any true analogy with the dalmatic or liturgical upper tunic is the sakkos, the tunic worn by deacons and subdeacons over their everyday clothes being the equivalent of the Western alb.

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  • churches it is confined to the patriarchs and metropolitans; in the Russian, Ruthenian and Bulgarian churches it is worn by all bishops.

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  • Unlike the practice of the Latin church, it is not worn under, but has replaced the phelonion (chasuble).

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  • 3 tells a story about Tyre during this period: the city, after being worn out though not defeated in long wars with the Persians, was so enfeebled that it was seized by the slaves, who rose and massacred their masters; one Straton alone escaped and was afterwards made king.

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  • upwards; these being very sharp, with cutting hinder edges, and completely covered with enamel until worn.

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  • Such a circumstance occurring at a time of general festivity, when devices, mottoes and conceits of all kinds were adopted as ornaments or badges of the habits worn at jousts and tournaments, would naturally have been commemorated as other royal expressions seem to have been by its conversion into a device and motto for the dresses at an approaching hastilude."

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  • Generally speaking, the insignia of the " knights grand cross " consist of a star worn on the left breast and a badge, usually some form either of the cross patee or of the Maltese cross, worn suspended from a ribbon over the shoulder or, in certain cases, on days of high ceremonial from a collar.

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  • The ribbon is garter blue and crimson and is worn round the neck.

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  • The collar, only worn by the knights grand cross, is of gold, and consists of Hungarian crowns linked together alternately by the monograms of St Stephen, S.S., and the foundress, M.T.; the centre of the collar is formed by a flying lark encircled by the motto Stringit amore.

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  • The older form is worn with the collar by the grand-crosses.

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  • The Order of St Lazarus is not a general order, the cross and collar being only worn by the king.

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  • As a rule, however, these subsidiary forms of surplice were worn mostly by the lower clergy.

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  • It is worn in choir at the solemn offices; it is the official sacral dress of the lower clergy in their liturgical functions; it is worn by the priest when administering the sacraments, undertaking benedictions, and the like; the use of the alb being nowadays almost exclusively confined to the mass and functions connected with this.

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  • Its name is derived, as Durandus and Gerland also affirm, from the fact that it was formerly put on over the fur garments which used to be worn in church and at divine service as a protection against the cold.

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  • It has been maintained that the surplice was known in the 5th century, the evidence being the garments worn by the two clerics in attendance on Bishop Maximian represented in the mosaics of S.

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  • Its use has never been confined to clerks in holy orders, and it has been worn since the Reformation by all the "ministers" (including vicars-choral and choristers) of cathedral and collegiate churches, as well as by the fellows and scholars of colleges in chapel.

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  • The surplice was formerly only worn by the clergy when conducting the service, being exchanged during the sermon for the "black gown," i.e.

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  • The amice is now worn under the alb, except at Milan and Lyons, where it is put on over it.

    0
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  • The Latin word amictus was applied to any wrap-like garment, and, according to Father Braun, the liturgical amice originated in the ordinary neck-cloth worn by all classes of Romans.

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  • The first record of its ecclesiastical use is at Rome in the 8th century, when it was worn only with-the dalmatic and was known as the anabolagium (anagolaium, anagolagium, from Gr.

    0
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  • The amice was worn first simply as a shoulder-cloth, but at the end of the 9th century the custom grew up of putting it on over the head and of wearing it as a hood, either while the other vestments were being put on or, according to the various uses of local churches, during part of the Mass, though never during the canon.

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  • century, moreover, it was not worn with the amice.

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  • Since then, however, both vestments have been worn, one under, the other over, the alb.

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  • It is worn by the popes only on certain special days or occasions, and forms part of the vestments in which they are buried.

    0
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  • By the middle of the 19th century the peninsula on which Jamestown had been situated had become an island, and by 1900 the James River had worn away the shore but had hardly touched the territory of the " New Towne " (1619), immediately E.

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  • The ancient district of the Hernicans, of which Alatri is regarded as the centre, is known as the Ciociaria, from a kind of sandals (cioce) worn by the peasants.

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  • The Hungarian peasants are very fond of their natural brown sheep coats, the leather side of which is not lined, but embellished by a very close fancy embroidery, worked upon the leather itself; these garments are reversible, the fur being worn inside when the weather is cold.

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  • Belgium lies upon the northern side of an ancient mountain chain which has long been worn down to a low level and the remnants of which rise to the surface in the Ardennes, and extend eastward into Germany, forming the Eifel and Westerwald, the Hunsriick and the Taunus.

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  • Boots and shoes are worn only by the upper classes.

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  • Since the heavy minerals of the cascalho in the river beds are more worn than those of the terraces, it is highly probable that they have been derived by the cutting down of the older river gravels represented by the terraces; and since in both deposits the heavy minerals are more abundant near the heads of the valleys in the plateau, it is also highly probable that both have really been derived from the plateau deposit.

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  • In the latter, especially at Sao Joao da Chapada, the minerals accompanying the diamond are scarcely worn at all; in the terraces and the river beds they are more worn and more abundant; the terraces, therefore, are to be regarded as a first concentration of the plateau material by the old rivers; and the cascalho as a second concentration by the modern rivers.

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  • Macaulay's prediction that the interest in the man would supersede that in his "Works" seemed and seems likely enough to justify itself; but his theory that the man alone mattered and that a portrait painted by the hand of an inspired idiot was a true measure of the man has not worn better than the common run of literary propositions.

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  • iSo called from the badge worn by the knights (Lwenritter) who composed it.

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  • The reasor for this was not that the Empire was stronger, but that in crown was worn by a succession of princes who were greal sovereigns in their own right.

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  • I should be inclined to believe rather that these tusks were once useful, and were then worn Old Male Babirusa (Babirusa alfurus).

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  • His remaining years were full of troubles and persecutions nobly borne, till at last, worn out by them, he died on the 17th of November 1668; and the mourners, remembering their beloved minister's words while yet with them, "If I should die fifty miles away, let me be buried at Taunton," found a grave for him in St Mary's chancel.

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  • The agitation spread throughout the country; great meetings were held at Eger and Aussig, which were attended by Germans from across the frontier, and led to serious disturbances; the cornflower, which had become the symbol of German nationality and union with Germany, was freely worn, and the language used was in many cases treasonable.

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  • He had in his favour the mass of the inhabitants, who were worn out by the oppressive taxation imposed by their spendthrift rulers.

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  • In general little clothing is worn, but none of the tribes go absolutely nude.

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  • Formed mostly of horizontal strata of varying hardness, they present a series of terraces of minor plateaus, rising one above the other, and intersected by small ravines worn by the occasional rainstorms which burst in their neighborhood.

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  • Moustaches are worn, while the head is shaved save for a small tuft (called shusheh) upon the crown.

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  • Above these are generally worn a waistcoat without sleeves, and a long vest of silk, called e.

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  • Over all is worn a long cloth robe, the gibbeh (or jibbeh) somewhat resembling the kaftan in shape, but having shorter sleeves, and being open in front.

    0
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  • The head-dress is the red cloth fez or tarbush round which a turban is usually worn.

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  • A small tarbush is worn on the back of the head, sometimes having a plate of gold fixed on the crown, and a handkerchief is tastefully bound round the temples.

    0
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  • Cuirasses of bronze scales were worn by the kings and other leaders.

    0
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  • Ultimately the new religion spread to the Egyptians; their own creed was worn out, and they found in Christianity a doctrine of the future life for which their old belief had made them not unready; while the social teaching of Christianity came with special fitness to a subject race.

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  • While the laminated portion of the thallus is being gradually worn off in our latitudes during the autumnal storms, a vigorous new growth appears at the junction of the stipe and the blade, as the result of which a new piece is added to the stipe and the lamina entirely renovated.

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  • These various rocky masses, presenting great differences in their powers of resisting decay, have yielded unequally to disintegration: the harder portions project in rocky knolls, crags and cliffs, while the softer parts have been worn down into more flowing outlines.

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  • Thousands of feet of basalt have been worn away from many parts of its surface; deep and wide valleys have been carved out of it; and so enormously has it been wasted, that it has been almost entirely stripped from wide tracts which it formerly covered and where only scattered outliers remain to prove that it once existed.

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  • Denudation has continued active ever since, and now, owing to greater hardness and consequent power of resistance, the glassy lava stands up as the prominent and picturesque ridge of the Scuir, while the basalts which formerly rose high above it have been worn down into terraced declivities that slope away from it to the sea.

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  • Yet, in spite of these causes making for union, and in spite of the manifest advantages of union, it was by a mere dynastic accident that, in the defect of nearer heirs to the English throne, the crowns of both kingdoms were worn by James VI.

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  • There are woollen factories, especially for the universally worn "poncho."

    0
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  • It is probable that the lakes themselves are evidence of (geologically) a comparatively recent deliverance from the thraldom of the ice covering, which has worn and rounded the lower ridges into the smooth outlines of undulating downs.

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  • On the west side the slope is gradual, especially in the broad plain that skirts the coast for the greater part cf its length; on the east side it is steep - precipitous indeed, towards the southern end - and intersected by valleys worn to a tremendous depth by the force of the torrents that once ran down them.

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  • At last the government awoke to its own responsibility in the matter of education, after the long and acrimonious controversy between the advocates of English and vernacular teaching had worn itself out.

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  • This is of two kinds: the turban and the cap. The former is chiefly worn in northern India, the latter in Oudh and the United Provinces.

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  • The sela is gaudier and more ornamental generally; it is worn by the nobles and wealthier classes.

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  • 1 This head-dress is of Hindu origin but is much worn by Mahommedans.

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  • The methods of binding the pagri are innumerable, each method having a distinctive name as arabi (Arab fashion); mansabi (official fashion, much used in the Deccan); mushakhi (sheik fashion); chakridar (worn by hadjis, that is those who have made the pilgrimage to Mecca); khirki-dar (a fashion of piling the cloth high, adopted by retainers of great men); latudar (top-shaped, worn by kayasths or writers); joridar (the cloth twisted into rope shape) (Plate I.

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  • 6); siparali (shield-shaped, worn by the Shia sect); murassa, or nastalikh (ornately bound), latpati (carelessly bound) (Plate I.

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  • The mandil is of gold or highly ornamented cloth; it is worn by nobles and persons of distinction.

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  • A form of cap much worn in Bengal and western India is known as Irani kullah, or Persian cap. It is made of goatskin and is shaped like a tarbush but has no tassel.

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  • The cap worn in cold weather is called top, topa, or kantop (ear-cover) (Plate I.

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  • Caps are much worn by Mussulmans of Delhi, Agra, Lucknow and other cities of the United provinces.

    0
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  • Coloured clothing, gold ornaments and silken raiment began to be worn commonly by Mussulman men in his reign.

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  • The varieties of cut are sharai or canonical, orthodox, which reach to the ankles and fit as close to the leg as European trousers; rumi or ghararedar, which reach to the ankles but are much wider than European trousers (this pattern is much worn by the Shias); and tang or chust, reaching to the ankles, from which to the knee they fit quite close.

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  • - Rajput wearing chapkan, which is worn both by Mussulmans and Hindus, buttoning on different sides.

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  • very large round the waist and hanging in folds, is worn by Pathans, Baluchis, Sindis, Multanis, &c.

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  • The tight drawers worn by wrestlers are called janghiah.

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  • The anga is now considered old-fashioned, and is chiefly worn by elderly men or religious persons.

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  • Both anga and achkan reach to a little below the knee, as also does the chapkan, a relic of Mogul court dress, best known as the shield-like and highly adorned coat worn by government chaprasis (Plate II.

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  • Over the anga is sometimes worn an overcoat called a choga; this is made of any material, thick or thin, plain or ornamented; it has one or two fastenings only, loops below the breast whence it hangs loosely to below the knees.

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  • The choga is sometimes known by its Arabic names aba or kabd, terms applied to it when worn by priests or ulemas.

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  • In India farther south in cold weather an overcoat called dagla is worn; this is an anga padded with cotton wool.

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  • A sleeveless waistcoat generally made of silk is called a sadari; when it has half sleeves it is called nimastin; the full-sleeved waistcoat worn in winter padded with cotton is called mirzai.

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  • For ceremonial purposes a coat called jama is worn.

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  • It is worn over the head and thrown over the left shoulder.

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  • In Kashmir a small round cap, goltopi, is worn.

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  • A short jacket fastened at the back and with short sleeves is worn.

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  • When this is worn with the angiya it is worn over it.

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  • This combination of dress is worn only by young married women.

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  • In Kashmir and northern India generally the angiya is not worn, and the kurta is worn instead.

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  • Among Pathans there are two kinds of kurta (kamis or khat); one worn by married women called giradana khat is dark red or blue, embroidered with silk in front; the jalana khat worn by unmarried women is less conspicuous for colour and ornament.

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  • In Rajputana, Gujarat and the southern Punjab, Mahommedan women sometimes wear a lhenga or ghagra skirt without trousers; in the Sirsa district and parts of Gujarat the ghagra is worn over the trousers.

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  • The sadari or waistcoat is worn by women as well as men.

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  • Meman women wear also the aba, or overcoat, which differs from that worn by men in that it has loose half sleeves, and fastens with two buttons at each side of the neck over the shoulders; it is embroidered on the breast, and adorned with gold lace on the skirts.

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  • In Delhi, Lucknow, Agra and other towns in the Punjab and the United Provinces a special wedding dress is worn by the bride, called rit-kajora, the " dress of custom."

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  • It is worn on the wedding night only; and it is a rule that no scissors are employed in making it.

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  • When the turban is worn it is always of the pagri form, never the amamah.

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  • In Bengal a sort of turban is worn which can be taken off like a hat.

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  • When Hindus wear caps or topis they resemble those worn by Mahommedans, but they never wear the fez, tarbush or irani topi.

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  • In Gaya a peculiar cap made of tal leaves is worn in rainy weather, called ghunga.

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  • The small form of dhoti worn by men of the lower class is called langoti.

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  • When the kurta is worn it is worn under the anga.

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  • It is worn across the shoulders, or wrapped round the body, but when bathing, round the loins.

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  • It is worn over the left shoulder and hangs down to the right hip. It is of three strands till the wearer is married, when it becomes six or nine.

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  • The hair is sometimes worn plaited (choti), usually an odd number of thin plaits made into one large one, falling down the back and fastened at the end with ribbons.

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  • Another style is wearing it in a knot after the ancient Grecian fashion; it is always worn smooth in front and parted in the middle.

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  • Over the head is worn the orhna or veil.

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  • On the upper part of the body the kurta is sometimes worn.

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  • A bodice called angiya is worn.

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  • The skirt is called lhenga or ghagrc. It is worn mostly in Rajputana hanging in full flounces to the knee or a little below.

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  • Over the sadra a white cotton coat is worn, reaching to a little below the waist.

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  • - There is no distinction between the shoes worn by Hindus, Moslems, Sikhs or Parsis, but Hindus will not wear them when made of cow's leather.

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  • On the northern frontier the pattern known as the kafshi is worn; this is a slipper having neither sides nor back; the sole towards the heel is narrow and raised by a small iron-shod heel.

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  • In the hills shoes resembling sandals, called chaplis, made of wood, straw or grass are worn.

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  • The babus of Bengal have taken to English-made shoes of patent leather worn over white socks or stockings.

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  • Hort died on the 30th of November 1892, worn out by intense mental labour.

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  • There are three principal varieties: sinamay, which is made from selected hemp fibres and is worn by both men and women; jusi, which is made from a mixture of hemp and pineapple-plant fibres with or without the addition of some cotton and silk and is used for making women's dresses and men's shirts; pina, which is made from the fibres in the leaf of the pineapple-plant and is used for making women's garments, handkerchiefs and scarfs.

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  • Nipa, made from the fibre of the agave or maguey plant and worn by women, is less common.

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  • For administrative convenience the "stars" - whose name comes from the scrap of crimson cloth worn on cap and jacket sleeve - have been generally concentrated at Portland, and employed in labours specially allotted to them, for the most part demanding a higher rate of intelligence than the general average shown by convicts.

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  • Either this king or an immediate successor introduced the present national costume, the dress worn by the Chinese before the Manchu conquest.

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  • He is said to have worn an iron belt as penance for his share in his father's death; and by his frequent visits to shrines, and his benefactions to religious foundations, he won a reputation for piety.

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  • It is situated at the junction of the sandstone and slate, where the water, having worn away the former, has accumulated on the latter.

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  • Failure to catch or induce plague from clothing that has been worn by plague patients proves nothing.

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  • Occasional hard rock ridges rise to a moderate elevation above the general level, while areas of unusually weak Triassic sandstones have been worn down to form lowlands.

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