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workhouse

workhouse

workhouse Sentence Examples

  • We want to see whether we cannot make for the agricultural labourer some better hope than the workhouse in his old age.

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  • When the economy entered recession, the workhouse conditions had to be worsened more.

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  • By around 1700, the workhouse movement was under way.

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  • There he met Nicolai and Moses Mendelssohn, with whom he formed a close friendship. In 1768 he became preacher or chaplain to the workhouse at Berlin and the neighbouring fishing village of Stralow.

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  • A husband who wilfully abandons his wife, leaving her destitute, or who refuses to support her when he is able to do so, may be punished by imprisonment in the state prison not exceeding one year or in the county jail or workhouse not more than six months nor less than fifteen days, and for ten days, in the discretion of the judge, he may be kept on a bread and water diet.

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  • There are five state penal and correctional institutions: the Indiana Boys' School (1868-1883, the House of Refuge; 1883-1903, the Reform School for Boys), at Plainfield; the Indiana Girls' School, established at Indianapolis (1873), and removed to Clermont in 1907; a woman's prison (the first in the United States, authorized in 1869 and opened in 1873 at Indianapolis), which is entirely under the control of women (as is also the Indiana Girls' School) and has a correctional department (1908), in reality a state workhouse for women, formed with a view to removing as far as possible sentenced women from the county jails; a reformatory (1897), at Jeffersonville, conducted upon a modification of the " Elmira plan," formerly the State Prison (1822), later (1860) the State Prison South, so called to distinguish it from the State Prison North (1860) at Michigan City; and the prison at Michigan City, which became the Indiana State Prison in 1897.

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  • Emboldened by success, a large band of rioters marched into the town of Carmarthen on the 10th of June and attacked the workhouse, but on this occasion they were dispersed by a troop of cavalry which had hurried from Cardiff.

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  • Emboldened by success, a large band of rioters marched into the town of Carmarthen on the 10th of June and attacked the workhouse, but on this occasion they were dispersed by a troop of cavalry which had hurried from Cardiff.

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  • Such too, to a greater or less extent, is the condition of the operatives of every denomination in England, which is the great workhouse of the world.

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  • In 1773 the mine was leased by the General Court and was fitted up as a public gaol and workhouse (called Newgate Prison), the prisoners being employed in mining.

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  • Kneller Hall, the house built by Kneller (1711), was converted into a training college for masters of workhouse schools in 1847, and in 1856 became the Royal Military School of Music.

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  • In 1635 the king granted the inhabitants of Halifax licence to found a workhouse in a large house given to them for that purpose by Nathaniel Waterhouse, and incorporated them under the name of the master and governors.

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  • An accident brought on deafness, and in November 1819 he was sent to the workhouse, where he was employed in making list shoes.

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  • However, if one designs to construct a dwelling-house, it behooves him to exercise a little Yankee shrewdness, lest after all he find himself in a workhouse, a labyrinth without a clue, a museum, an almshouse, a prison, or a splendid mausoleum instead.

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  • In 1842 he took a "double-first" and was elected fellow of B alliol, and lecturer in mathematics and logic. Four years later he took orders, and with the aim of helping forward the education of the very poor, he accepted the headship of Kneller Hall, a college which the government formed for the training of masters of workhouse and penal schools.

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  • In the Church of England the word is applied to a private place of worship, attached either to the palaces of the sovereign, "chapels royal," or to the residence of a private person, to a college, school, prison, workhouse, &c. Further, the word has particular legal applications, though in each case the building might be and often is styled a church.

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  • The theory was that life in the workhouse had to be worse than life outside the workhouse, otherwise it would be overrun with the poor.

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  • In the same year the first district nurse began work in Liverpool; and in 1865 the reform of the much-neglected workhouse nursing was inaugurated by Miss Agnes Jones and twelve nurses from St Thomas's, who took up the work in Liverpool.

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  • The house was subsequently used as a workhouse, and is now almshouses, the grounds having been converted into public gardens by Mr Evelyn in 1886.

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  • The city maintains a workhouse (1882), also two market houses, and owns and manages an electric-lighting plant.

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  • Sacheverell was among its rectors (1713-1724), and Thomas Chatterton (1770) was interred in the adjacent burial ground, no longer extant, of Shoe Lane Workhouse; the register recording his Christian name as William.

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  • In 1899 a county workhouse was established in New Castle county, in which persons under sentence must labour eight hours a day, pay being allowed for extra hours, and a diminution of sentence for good behaviour.

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  • Further scruples as'to the oath required on the receipt of his half-pay reduced him to serious pecuniary straits (1791), and he divided his time between the open air and the workhouse, where he developed the idea that he had a special divine commission, and wrote to the king and the parliament to that effect.

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  • side of the Anacostia river, the District of Columbia Industrial Home School (1872), a Municipal Lodging House (1892), a Soldiers' and Sailors' Temporary Home (1888), Workhouse, Reform School for Boys, Reform School for Girls and Industrial Home School (1872).

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  • A "non-support law," which went into effect in 1906, enacts that a man who refuses to provide for his family when able to do so shall be committed to the workhouse for hard labour, and that fifty cents a day shall be paid to his family.

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  • from Providence, including the Workhouse and House of Correction, the Hospital for the Insane (1869), the Almshouse, the State Prison and Providence County Jail, the Sockanosset School for Boys, and the Oaklawn School for Girls, are supported entirely or in part by the state.

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  • To the west there are the Broadstone station, Dominion Street, and beyond this the large workhouse, prison, asylum and other district buildings, while the Royal barracks front the river behind Albert Quay.

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  • Workhouse chaplains are appointed by overseers and guardians on the direction of the Local Government Board, to which alone such chaplains are responsible.

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  • Since 1880 the increasing demands of medical knowledge have well-nigh revolutionized the craft in the home, the hospital and the workhouse.

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  • is said, the object of getting better wages in domestic service, or better dietary in the workhouse!

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  • A district council may also provide and maintain a proper place (otherwise than at a workhouse or at a mortuary) for the reception of dead bodies during the time required to conduct any post mortem examination ordered by a coroner.

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  • The poor law of 1838 had made no provision for the relief of the poor outside the workhouse, and outdoor relief was sanctioned by an act of 1847.

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  • The principal buildings are the castle, erected in the middle of the 16th century and now used as a workhouse; the cathedral, dating from the 13th century and restored in 1868, containing many fine monuments and possessing a square tower loo ft.

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  • In 1goo there was neither pauper nor workhouse in the country.

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  • The schools under the commissioners include national schools proper, model and workhouse schools and a number of monastic and convent schools.

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  • Other expenses included an apothecary to attend the sick poor and some education for the workhouse children.

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  • In the years before Hampshire's county lunatic asylum existed, the Winchester workhouse provided care for " lunatic and mentally handicapped paupers " .

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  • A separate vagrants ' block was situated at the south of the workhouse.

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  • Admission into the workhouse first required an interview to establish the applicant's circumstances.

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  • At 10.45 a.m. the workhouse clock stopped, a local clockmaker Mr. Andrew climbed the tower to repair it.

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  • Some of the stuff we did in the workhouse at about 10 at night was freezing cold, too.

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  • Workhouse diet The diet fed to workhouse inmates was often laid down in meticulous detail.

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  • The workhouse was substantially enlarged in 1908 and could then accommodate 440 inmates.

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  • In its day, the workhouse was considered the epitome of workhouse design.

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  • In 1838, the Poor Law Commissioners approved an expenditure of £ 2,649 on a workhouse for 100 inmates.

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  • feedrkhouse Diet The diet fed to workhouse inmates was often laid down in meticulous detail.

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  • The workhouse was greatly overcrowded, food was short, sanitation was poor, and diseases such as typhus fever and dysentery were widespread.

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  • While in the infirmary, patients wore workhouse garb and their own clothing was stored away after being fumigated if necessary.

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  • infirmary complex at the south of the workhouse was built in several phases.

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  • The original workhouse infirmary lay directly to the south of the main building.

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  • Holborn's Gray's Inn workhouse was designated for able-bodied inmates.

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  • Inmates workhouses, List of those visited in 1867 With Name of the Workhouse and numbers of insane, idiotic, and imbecile inmates workhouses, List of those visited in 1867 With Name of the Workhouse and numbers of insane, idiotic, and imbecile inmates.

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  • The workhouse inmates ' day was governed by the workhouse bell.

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  • inmates in the workhouse was 98 in 1841, & 163 in 1851.

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  • inmate of the workhouse.

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  • layout of the workhouse can be seen on the 1913 map below.

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  • lunacy wards were erected at the east of the workhouse at a cost of £ 16,000.

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  • Is there any dangerous lunatic or idiot in the Workhouse?

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  • In the years before Hampshire's county lunatic asylum existed, the Winchester workhouse provided care for " lunatic and mentally handicapped paupers " .

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  • matron of the workhouse, & the Rev William B Bransby is the chaplain.

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  • north of the workhouse with separate blocks for men and women.

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  • overseers paid for the poor in other ways than through the workhouse.

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  • parish workhouse, 2004. © Peter Higginbotham.

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  • On December 4th 1859, the aged paupers were transported " by omnibus " from the old premises to the new workhouse.

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  • There is in the workhouse no male but 10 female paupers who are classed as of unsound mind.

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  • This workhouse is set apart for male adult paupers.

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  • paupers in the workhouse.

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  • The problem in 1834 was the reduction of able-bodied pauperism, to effect which the workhouse test was applied.

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  • The workhouse had extensive vegetable gardens and its own piggery which produced food for the inmates.

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  • In Cerne Abbas, for example, the new workhouse's first Christmas dinner in 1837 included plum pudding and strong beer.

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  • Initially, the new Leyburn Union workhouse adopted the existing town poorhouse.

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  • redbrick workhouse buildings survive, turned into houses, along with the spike.

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  • Stanley finally left the workhouse in 1856 after a violent showdown with Francis.

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  • south of the workhouse.

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  • To assist the Master and Matron respectively in maintaining due subordination in the Workhouse.

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  • Of particular interest is the discovery of the 17th century workhouse, the Oracle, and a 16th century tannery.

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  • township workhouse also operated at Over Darwen, at the western end of what is now Police Street.

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  • west of the workhouse and women at the east.

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  • In 1837, the East Ashford Union erected a workhouse on the west side of Kennington Road in Ashford.

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  • A new purpose-built workhouse was erected on Grove Road in Richmond in 1786-7.

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  • In 1948, the former workhouse became a general hospital.

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  • It was everyone's idea of what a Victorian workhouse should look like.

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  • workhouse infirmary lay directly to the south of the main building.

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  • The workhouse inmates ' day was governed by the workhouse inmates ' day was governed by the workhouse bell.

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  • workhouse chapel has during the last few decades been converted into an Anglican church.

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  • workhouse master decided what food children under 9 received.

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  • workhouse building.

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  • workhouse uniform to wear.

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  • Up to 1834 The first Leeds parish workhouse was opened in 1638 on North Street at the top of Lady Lane.

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  • A township workhouse also operated at Over Darwen, at the western end of what is now Police Street.

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  • inmates workhouses, List of those visited in 1867 With Name of the Workhouse and numbers of insane, idiotic, and imbecile inmates.

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  • On Tuesday, January 9, at the union workhouse, Malton, Wm.

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  • workhouse in operation in St Pancras for up to 120 inmates.

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  • workhouse from the southwest, 2000. © Peter Higginbotham.

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  • workhouse from the southeast, 2000. © Peter Higginbotham.

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  • workhouse from the northwest, 2000. © Peter Higginbotham.

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  • workhouse for 20 inmates.

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  • No Presbyterian orphan child now needs to seek workhouse relief.

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  • Sacheverell was among its rectors (1713-1724), and Thomas Chatterton (1770) was interred in the adjacent burial ground, no longer extant, of Shoe Lane Workhouse; the register recording his Christian name as William.

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  • In 1635 the king granted the inhabitants of Halifax licence to found a workhouse in a large house given to them for that purpose by Nathaniel Waterhouse, and incorporated them under the name of the master and governors.

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  • The city maintains a workhouse (1882), also two market houses, and owns and manages an electric-lighting plant.

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  • Workhouse chaplains are appointed by overseers and guardians on the direction of the Local Government Board, to which alone such chaplains are responsible.

    0
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  • from Providence, including the Workhouse and House of Correction, the Hospital for the Insane (1869), the Almshouse, the State Prison and Providence County Jail, the Sockanosset School for Boys, and the Oaklawn School for Girls, are supported entirely or in part by the state.

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  • In 1842 he took a "double-first" and was elected fellow of B alliol, and lecturer in mathematics and logic. Four years later he took orders, and with the aim of helping forward the education of the very poor, he accepted the headship of Kneller Hall, a college which the government formed for the training of masters of workhouse and penal schools.

    0
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  • In 1899 a county workhouse was established in New Castle county, in which persons under sentence must labour eight hours a day, pay being allowed for extra hours, and a diminution of sentence for good behaviour.

    0
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  • In the same year the first district nurse began work in Liverpool; and in 1865 the reform of the much-neglected workhouse nursing was inaugurated by Miss Agnes Jones and twelve nurses from St Thomas's, who took up the work in Liverpool.

    0
    0
  • Since 1880 the increasing demands of medical knowledge have well-nigh revolutionized the craft in the home, the hospital and the workhouse.

    0
    0
  • The house was subsequently used as a workhouse, and is now almshouses, the grounds having been converted into public gardens by Mr Evelyn in 1886.

    0
    0
  • In 1773 the mine was leased by the General Court and was fitted up as a public gaol and workhouse (called Newgate Prison), the prisoners being employed in mining.

    0
    0
  • In the Church of England the word is applied to a private place of worship, attached either to the palaces of the sovereign, "chapels royal," or to the residence of a private person, to a college, school, prison, workhouse, &c. Further, the word has particular legal applications, though in each case the building might be and often is styled a church.

    0
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  • There he met Nicolai and Moses Mendelssohn, with whom he formed a close friendship. In 1768 he became preacher or chaplain to the workhouse at Berlin and the neighbouring fishing village of Stralow.

    0
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  • To the west there are the Broadstone station, Dominion Street, and beyond this the large workhouse, prison, asylum and other district buildings, while the Royal barracks front the river behind Albert Quay.

    0
    0
  • Further scruples as'to the oath required on the receipt of his half-pay reduced him to serious pecuniary straits (1791), and he divided his time between the open air and the workhouse, where he developed the idea that he had a special divine commission, and wrote to the king and the parliament to that effect.

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  • An accident brought on deafness, and in November 1819 he was sent to the workhouse, where he was employed in making list shoes.

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  • And yet he, who was generally the haughtiest and most irritable of mankind, who was but too prompt to resent anything which looked like a slight on the part of a purse-proud bookseller, or of a noble and powerful patron, bore patiently from mendicants, who, but for his bounty, must have gone to the workhouse, insults more provoking than those for which he had knocked down Osborne and bidden defiance to Chesterfield.

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  • side of the Anacostia river, the District of Columbia Industrial Home School (1872), a Municipal Lodging House (1892), a Soldiers' and Sailors' Temporary Home (1888), Workhouse, Reform School for Boys, Reform School for Girls and Industrial Home School (1872).

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  • A "non-support law," which went into effect in 1906, enacts that a man who refuses to provide for his family when able to do so shall be committed to the workhouse for hard labour, and that fifty cents a day shall be paid to his family.

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  • is said, the object of getting better wages in domestic service, or better dietary in the workhouse!

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  • Kneller Hall, the house built by Kneller (1711), was converted into a training college for masters of workhouse schools in 1847, and in 1856 became the Royal Military School of Music.

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  • A district council may also provide and maintain a proper place (otherwise than at a workhouse or at a mortuary) for the reception of dead bodies during the time required to conduct any post mortem examination ordered by a coroner.

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  • We want to see whether we cannot make for the agricultural labourer some better hope than the workhouse in his old age.

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  • There are five state penal and correctional institutions: the Indiana Boys' School (1868-1883, the House of Refuge; 1883-1903, the Reform School for Boys), at Plainfield; the Indiana Girls' School, established at Indianapolis (1873), and removed to Clermont in 1907; a woman's prison (the first in the United States, authorized in 1869 and opened in 1873 at Indianapolis), which is entirely under the control of women (as is also the Indiana Girls' School) and has a correctional department (1908), in reality a state workhouse for women, formed with a view to removing as far as possible sentenced women from the county jails; a reformatory (1897), at Jeffersonville, conducted upon a modification of the " Elmira plan," formerly the State Prison (1822), later (1860) the State Prison South, so called to distinguish it from the State Prison North (1860) at Michigan City; and the prison at Michigan City, which became the Indiana State Prison in 1897.

    0
    0
  • The poor law of 1838 had made no provision for the relief of the poor outside the workhouse, and outdoor relief was sanctioned by an act of 1847.

    0
    0
  • A husband who wilfully abandons his wife, leaving her destitute, or who refuses to support her when he is able to do so, may be punished by imprisonment in the state prison not exceeding one year or in the county jail or workhouse not more than six months nor less than fifteen days, and for ten days, in the discretion of the judge, he may be kept on a bread and water diet.

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  • The principal buildings are the castle, erected in the middle of the 16th century and now used as a workhouse; the cathedral, dating from the 13th century and restored in 1868, containing many fine monuments and possessing a square tower loo ft.

    0
    0
  • In 1goo there was neither pauper nor workhouse in the country.

    0
    0
  • The schools under the commissioners include national schools proper, model and workhouse schools and a number of monastic and convent schools.

    0
    0
  • The workhouse was declared fit for the reception of paupers on 26th May, 1841, and received its first admissions on 9th June.

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  • Some of the redbrick workhouse buildings survive, turned into houses, along with the spike.

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  • The workhouse inmates were segregated from the rest of the congregation.

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  • Stanley finally left the workhouse in 1856 after a violent showdown with Francis.

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  • A chapel lay at the south of the workhouse.

    0
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  • To assist the Master and Matron respectively in maintaining due subordination in the Workhouse.

    0
    0
  • Of particular interest is the discovery of the 17th century workhouse, the Oracle, and a 16th century tannery.

    0
    0
  • A township workhouse also operated at Over Darwen, at the western end of what is now Police Street.

    0
    0
  • Men were accommodated at the west of the workhouse and women at the east.

    0
    0
  • In 1837, the East Ashford Union erected a workhouse on the west side of Kennington Road in Ashford.

    0
    0
  • A new purpose-built workhouse was erected on Grove Road in Richmond in 1786-7.

    0
    0
  • In 1948, the former workhouse became a general hospital.

    0
    0
  • It was everyone 's idea of what a Victorian workhouse should look like.

    0
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  • Across Suffolk, Exning workhouse chapel has during the last few decades been converted into an Anglican church.

    0
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  • The workhouse master decided what food children under 9 received.

    0
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  • A separate asylum building was later erected at the rear workhouse building.

    0
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  • All their belongings were taken away and they were given a workhouse uniform to wear.

    0
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  • Up to 1834 The first Leeds parish workhouse was opened in 1638 on North Street at the top of Lady Lane.

    0
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  • On Tuesday, January 9, at the union workhouse, Malton, Wm.

    0
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  • Up to 1834 A parliamentary report of 1777 recorded a parish workhouse in operation in St Pancras for up to 120 inmates.

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  • Oundle parish workhouse from the southwest, 2000. © Peter Higginbotham.

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  • Clonmel new workhouse from the southeast, 2000. © Peter Higginbotham.

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  • Clonmel new workhouse from the northwest, 2000. © Peter Higginbotham.

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  • In 1777, Napton also had a parish workhouse for 20 inmates.

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  • The payments which the county council have to make in substitution for the local grants formerly made out of Imperial funds include payments for or towards the remuneration of the teachers in poorlaw schools and public vaccinators; school fees paid for children sent from a workhouse to a public elementary school; half of the salaries of the medical officer of health and the inspector of nuisances of district councils; the remuneration of registrars for births and deaths; the maintenance of pauper lunatics; half of the cost of the pay and clothing of the police of the county, and of each borough maintaining a separate police force.

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  • The payments which the county council have to make in substitution for the local grants formerly made out of Imperial funds include payments for or towards the remuneration of the teachers in poorlaw schools and public vaccinators; school fees paid for children sent from a workhouse to a public elementary school; half of the salaries of the medical officer of health and the inspector of nuisances of district councils; the remuneration of registrars for births and deaths; the maintenance of pauper lunatics; half of the cost of the pay and clothing of the police of the county, and of each borough maintaining a separate police force.

    0
    1
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