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wordsworth

wordsworth

wordsworth Sentence Examples

  • As a painter of nature she has much in common with Wordsworth.

  • She keeps her eye on the object, but adds, like Wordsworth, the visionary gleam, and receives from nature but what she herself gives.

  • Like Wordsworth she lays us on the lap of earth and sheds the freshness of the early world.

  • She, too, had found love in huts where poor men dwell, and her miller, her bagpipers, her workers in mosaic are as faithful renderings in prose of peasant life and sentiment as Wordsworth's leechgatherer and wagoners and gleaners are in verse.

  • Wordsworth, Fragments and Specimens of Early Latin (1874); Mommsen, Hist.

  • to the east, commemorated in Wordsworth's poem of the "Highland Girl."

  • The history of the whole controversy, which has been several times renewed, was dealt with in Christopher Wordsworth's tracts in a most exhaustive way.

  • Biog.; Christopher Wordsworth, Who wrote Eikon Basilike?

  • The most noteworthy waterfalls are - Scale Force (Dano-Norwegian fors, foss), besidesCrummock, Lodore near Derwentwater, Dungeon Gill Force, beside Langdale, Dalegarth Force in Eskdale, Aira near Ullswater, sung by Wordsworth, Stock Gill Force and Rydal Falls near Ambleside.

  • But it was Wordsworth, a native of Cumberland, born on the outskirts of the Lake District itself, who really made it a.Mecca for lovers of English poetry.

  • Southey, the friend of Wordsworth, was a resident of Keswick for forty years (1803-1843), and was buried in Crosthwaite churchyard.

  • De Quincey spent the greater part of the years 1809 to 1828 at Grasmere, in the first cottage which Wordsworth had inhabited.

  • Of this school the acknowledged head and founder was Wordsworth, and the tenets it professed are those laid down by the poet himself in the famous preface to the edition of The Lyrical Ballads which he published in 1800.

  • Wordsworth's theories of poetry - the objects best suited for poetic treatment, the characteristics of such treatment and the choice of diction suitable for the purpose - may be said to have grown out of the soil and substance of the lakes and mountains, and out of the homely lives of the people, of Cumberland and Westmoreland.

  • Knight, Through the Wordsworth Country (London, 1890); H.

  • Rawnsley, Literary Associations of the English Lakes (2 vols., Glasgow, 1894) and Life and Nature of the English Lakes (Glasgow, 1899); Stopford Brooke, Dove Cottage, Wordsworth's Home from 1800 to 1808; A.

  • The original church of St Mary's, at the mouth of the river, was swept away by a tidal wave in 1607: Wordsworth took this as a subject for a sonnet.

  • Wordsworth in Smith's Dictionary of Christian Biography.

  • There is more than one meaning of Christopher Wordsworth discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

  • 314 the thirteenth canon of Ancyra (for the true reading see Bishop Wordsworth's Ministry of Grace, p. 140) assumes that city presbyters may with the bishop's leave ordain other presbyters.

  • Wordsworth's Ministry of Grace (1902).

  • Wordsworth, 1899), are indispensable for serious study of the subject.

  • C. Trench (1845), Christopher Wordsworth (1847), Charles Merivale (1861), James Moorhouse (1865), F.

  • In 1868 he became prebendary of Lincoln and examining chaplain to Bishop Christopher Wordsworth, an office which he also held for a short time in 1870 for Dr Temple, just appointed to the see of Exeter.

  • The present Westminster Bridge, of iron on granite piers, was opened in 1862, but another preceded it, dating from 1750; the view from which was appreciated by Wordsworth in his sonnet beginning " Earth has not anything to show more fair."

  • In 1835 he visited the Lakes, and saw much of Hartley Coleridge, but would not "obtrude on the great man at Rydal," although "Wordsworth was hospitably disposed."

  • Wordsworth died, and on the 19th of November 1850 Queen Victoria appointed Tennyson poet laureate.

  • The distance between the generation of Wordsworth and Coleridge and that of Byron and Shelley is not less - it is even probably greater - than that which divides Keats from Tennyson, and he is more the last of that great school than the first of any new one.

  • Bishop Charles Wordsworth said that his experience of Gladstone at this time " made me (and I doubt not others also) feel no less sure than of my own existence that Gladstone, our then Christ Church undergraduate, would one day rise to be prime minister of England."

  • Manning's boyhood was mainly spent at Coombe Bank, Sundridge, Kent, where he had for companions Charles and Christopher Wordsworth, afterwards bishops of St Andrews and of Lincoln.

  • Wordsworth, Fragments and Specimens of Early Latin (1874).

  • From the side of literature the way was prepared for it by the genius of Coleridge, Wordsworth and Carlyle; from the side of morals and politics by the profound discontent of the constructive spirit of the century with the disintegrating conceptions inherited from utilitarianism.

  • In 1841 a travelling tutorship took him to the continent; and on his return a book appeared called Sights and Thoughts in Foreign Churches and among Foreign Peoples (London, 1842), with a dedication to his friend the poet Wordsworth.

  • In a house still standing William Wordsworth lived from 1799 to 1808, and it was subsequently occupied by Thomas de Quincey and by Hartley Coleridge.

  • Wordsworth's tomb, and also that of Coleridge, are in the churchyard of the ancient church of St Oswald, which contains a memorial to Wordsworth with an inscription by John Keble.

  • In its vicinity is Rydal Mount, for many years the residence of the poet Wordsworth.

  • These volumes revealed the author as the most gifted of the immediate disciples of Wordsworth, with a warmer colouring and more pronounced ecclesiastical sympathies than the master, and strong affinities to Tennyson, Keble and Monckton Milnes.

  • Here he lived in intimacy with many friends, especially P. C. Claughton and Charles Wordsworth.

  • In 1874 and again in 1875, he presided over the Reunion Conferences held at Bonn and attended by leading ecclesiastics from the British Isles and from the Oriental Church, among whom were Bishop Christopher Wordsworth of Lincoln; Bishop Harold Browne of Ely; Lord Plunket, archbishop of Dublin; Lycurgus, archbishop of Syros and Tenos; Canon Liddon; and Professor Ossinine of St Petersburg.

  • 3), as well as in all books dealing with Textual Criticism generally; other important books are R6nsch's Itala and Vulgata (1875); Corssen's Der cyprianische Text der Acta Apostolorum (Berlin, 1892); Wordsworth and Sanday on the " Corbey S.

  • Wordsworth (bishop of Salisbury) and H.

  • Among these the works of Sanday, Corssen, Wordsworth, White, Burkitt and Harris on the history of the Old Latin and Vulgate, and especially the work of Burkitt on the Old Syriac, have given most light on the subject.

  • (For his treatment of the lake poets see Wordsworth, William.) A criticism in the fifteenth number of the Review on the morality of Moore's poems led in 1806 to a duel between the two authors at Chalk Farm.

  • CHARLES WORDSWORTH (1806-1892), Scottish bishop, son of Christopher Wordsworth, Master of Trinity, was born in London on the 22nd of August 1806, and educated at Harrow and Christ Church, Oxford.

  • Earl Hodgson (1893); also The Episcopate of Charles Wordsworth, by his nephew John, bishop of Salisbury (1899).

  • Christopher Wordsworth (Divine) >>

  • Harold Browne (1811-1891), bishop of Ely; Christopher Wordsworth, bishop of Lincoln; and Lord Arthur Hervey (1808 1 A reprint of this edition has been published by the Clarendon Press (Oxford, 1833).

  • Scrivener (1813-1891), rector of St Gerrans, Cornwall; Charles Wordsworth, bishop of St Andrews; Dr W.

  • (4) It has indeed been contended (by Bishop Wordsworth of Salisbury) that reservation was not actually, though tacitly, continued under the second Prayer-Book of Edward VI., since that book orders that the curate shall " minister," and not " celebrate," the communion in the sick person's house.

  • Wordsworth, Further Considerations on Public Worship (Salisbury, 1901).

  • Another anonymous Life, written in 1599, printed in Wordsworth's Ecclesiastical Biography, ii.

  • Wordsworth in Smith and Wace's Dictionary of Christian Biography; H.

  • There is also a life in C. Wordsworth's Ecclesiastical Biography (1810), W.

  • He also became known to Wordsworth and Lamb.

  • Christian Winther (q.v.; 1796-1876) made the island of Zealand his loving study, and that province of Denmark belongs to him -no less thoroughly than the Cumberland lakes belong to Wordsworth.

  • The gift of a seal to Goethe on his birthday in 1831 " from fifteen English friends," including Scott and Wordsworth, was suggested and carried out by Carlyle.

  • Todhunter, Conflict of Studies (1873) William Whewell, Of a Liberal Education (London, 1845); Christopher Wordsworth, Scholae academicae (Cambridge, 1877); Etienne Zi (or Siu or Seu), Pratique des examens litteraires en Chine (Shanghai, 1894).

  • Both his collegiate and editorial duties stimulated his critical powers, and the publication in the two magazines, followed by republication in book form, of a series of studies of great authors, gave him an important place as a critic. Shakespeare, Dryden, Lessing, Rousseau, Dante, Spenser, Wordsworth, Milton, Keats, Carlyle, Thoreau, Swinburne, Chaucer, Emerson, Pope, Gray - these are the principal subjects of his prose, and the range of topics indicates the catholicity of his taste.

  • of Wordsworth's Ecclesiastical Biography.

  • The ruins, consisting of a theatre, the walls of a town, and some other buildings, had been conjectured to be those of Dodona by Wordsworth in 1832, but the conjecture was changed into ascertained fact by the excavations of Constantin Carapanos.

  • See C. Wordsworth, Greece (1839), p. 2 47; Constantin Carapanos, Dodone et ses mines (Paris, 1878).

  • The contemporary poets whom Keble most admired were Scott, Wordsworth and Southey; and of their influence traces are visible in his diction.

  • There are few things in literary history more remarkable than this friendship. The gifted Dorothy Wordsworth described Coleridge as "thin and pale, the lower part of the face not good, wide mouth, thick lips, not very good teeth, longish, loose, half-curling, rough, black hair," - but all was forgotten in the magic charm of his utterance.

  • Wordsworth, who declared, "The only wonderful man I ever knew was Coleridge," seems at once to have desired to see more of his new friend.

  • Coleridge was anxious to embody a dream of a friend, and the suggestion of the shooting of the albatross came from Wordsworth, who gained the idea from Shelvocke's Voyage (1726).

  • Wordsworth was to show the real poetry that lies hidden in commonplace subjects, while Coleridge was to treat supernatural subjects to illustrate the common emotions of humanity.

  • For many years he had desired to see the continent, and in September 1798, in company with Wordsworth and his sister, he left England for Hamburg.

  • Eventually Mackintosh obtained a grant of ioo a year for him in 1824 during the lifetime of George IV., as one of the royal associates of the Society of Literature, and at different times he received help principally from Stuart, the publisher, Poole, Sotheby, Sir George Beaumont, Byron and Wordsworth, while his children shared Southey's home at Keswick.

  • Four volumes of Literary Remains were published after his death, and these, along with the chapters on the poetry of Wordsworth in the Biographia Literaria, may be said to exhibit the full range of Coleridge's power as a critic of poetry.

  • With regard to the preface, which contains Wordsworth's theory, Coleridge has honestly expressed his dissent: - "With many parts of this preface, in the sense attributed to them, and which the words undoubtedly seem to authorize, I never concurred; but, on the contrary, objected to them as erroneous in principle, and contradictory (in appearance at least) both to other parts of the same preface, and to the author's own practice in the greater number of the poems themselves."

  • When, again, he met Wordsworth in 1797, the two poets freely and sympathetically discussed Spinoza, for whom Coleridge always retained a deep admiration; and when in 1798 he gave up his Unitarian preaching, he named his second child Berkeley, signifying a new allegiance, but still without accepting Christian rites otherwise than passively.

  • His last published volume contains a series of sonnets of singular beauty, addressed to the river, resembling Wordsworth's "Sonnets to the Duddon," but more perfect in form; and a blank verse idyll, "Ii Pettirosso" ("The Redbreast"), bearing an equally strong, though equally accidental, resemblance to the similar compositions of Coleridge.

  • The strongest influences in his development about this time were the liberating philosophy of Coleridge, the mystical visions of Swedenborg, the intimate poetry of Wordsworth, and the stimulating essays of Carlyle.

  • He travelled through Italy, visited Paris, spent two months in Scotland and England, and saw the four men whom he most desired to seeLandor, Coleridge, Carlyle and Wordsworth.

  • It forms one of the lives in Christopher Wordsworth's Ecclesiastical Biography (vol.

  • He has indeed praised "the self-sufficing power of solitude" in almost the same phrase as Wordsworth, and from time to time would even in youth seclude himself for a season in complete intellectual absorption, as when he toiled among his.

  • Wordsworth in Church Quarterly Review (London, April 1900); and Revue Internationale de theologie (Bern, July 1900); R.

  • Wordsworth, The Ministry of Grace, pp. 18 ff; J.

  • He was second wrangler in 1816, became fellow and tutor of his college, and, in 1841, succeeded Dr Wordsworth as master.

  • Forbes, liturgiologist; and Bishop Charles Wordsworth.

  • With him began the " enthusiasm of humanity " that was afterwards to become so marked in the poetry of Burns and Shelley, Wordsworth and Byron.

  • His chief friends were Charles Wordsworth, afterwards bishop of St Andrews, and Richard Chenevix Trench, afterwards archbishop of Dublin.

  • birthplace of the poet William Wordsworth.

  • inspirations for the poets Thomas Gray, William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

  • intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood by William Wordsworth is an example of an irregular ode.

  • The Complete Poetical Works of William Wordsworth, Poet Laureate, etc. (Philadelphia: Troutman and Hayes, 1851 ), p. IV.

  • nestled snugly on the banks of the Wye, below the wooded hills made famous by poet William Wordsworth.

  • Wordsworth even obfuscates the origin of the ' joy ' that the Vicar has taken with him to Heaven.

  • Wordsworth described poetry as the ' spontaneous overflow of powerful emotions.

  • This is known as the Spenserian stanza, and was quite widely used by Wordsworth, Byron and Keats.

  • As a painter of nature she has much in common with Wordsworth.

  • She keeps her eye on the object, but adds, like Wordsworth, the visionary gleam, and receives from nature but what she herself gives.

  • Like Wordsworth she lays us on the lap of earth and sheds the freshness of the early world.

  • She, too, had found love in huts where poor men dwell, and her miller, her bagpipers, her workers in mosaic are as faithful renderings in prose of peasant life and sentiment as Wordsworth's leechgatherer and wagoners and gleaners are in verse.

  • Wordsworth, Fragments and Specimens of Early Latin (1874); Mommsen, Hist.

  • to the east, commemorated in Wordsworth's poem of the "Highland Girl."

  • The history of the whole controversy, which has been several times renewed, was dealt with in Christopher Wordsworth's tracts in a most exhaustive way.

  • Biog.; Christopher Wordsworth, Who wrote Eikon Basilike?

  • The most noteworthy waterfalls are - Scale Force (Dano-Norwegian fors, foss), besidesCrummock, Lodore near Derwentwater, Dungeon Gill Force, beside Langdale, Dalegarth Force in Eskdale, Aira near Ullswater, sung by Wordsworth, Stock Gill Force and Rydal Falls near Ambleside.

  • But it was Wordsworth, a native of Cumberland, born on the outskirts of the Lake District itself, who really made it a.Mecca for lovers of English poetry.

  • Southey, the friend of Wordsworth, was a resident of Keswick for forty years (1803-1843), and was buried in Crosthwaite churchyard.

  • De Quincey spent the greater part of the years 1809 to 1828 at Grasmere, in the first cottage which Wordsworth had inhabited.

  • Of this school the acknowledged head and founder was Wordsworth, and the tenets it professed are those laid down by the poet himself in the famous preface to the edition of The Lyrical Ballads which he published in 1800.

  • Wordsworth's theories of poetry - the objects best suited for poetic treatment, the characteristics of such treatment and the choice of diction suitable for the purpose - may be said to have grown out of the soil and substance of the lakes and mountains, and out of the homely lives of the people, of Cumberland and Westmoreland.

  • Knight, Through the Wordsworth Country (London, 1890); H.

  • Rawnsley, Literary Associations of the English Lakes (2 vols., Glasgow, 1894) and Life and Nature of the English Lakes (Glasgow, 1899); Stopford Brooke, Dove Cottage, Wordsworth's Home from 1800 to 1808; A.

  • The original church of St Mary's, at the mouth of the river, was swept away by a tidal wave in 1607: Wordsworth took this as a subject for a sonnet.

  • Wordsworth in Smith's Dictionary of Christian Biography.

  • There is more than one meaning of Christopher Wordsworth discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

  • 314 the thirteenth canon of Ancyra (for the true reading see Bishop Wordsworth's Ministry of Grace, p. 140) assumes that city presbyters may with the bishop's leave ordain other presbyters.

  • Wordsworth's Ministry of Grace (1902).

  • Wordsworth, 1899), are indispensable for serious study of the subject.

  • C. Trench (1845), Christopher Wordsworth (1847), Charles Merivale (1861), James Moorhouse (1865), F.

  • In 1868 he became prebendary of Lincoln and examining chaplain to Bishop Christopher Wordsworth, an office which he also held for a short time in 1870 for Dr Temple, just appointed to the see of Exeter.

  • The present Westminster Bridge, of iron on granite piers, was opened in 1862, but another preceded it, dating from 1750; the view from which was appreciated by Wordsworth in his sonnet beginning " Earth has not anything to show more fair."

  • In 1835 he visited the Lakes, and saw much of Hartley Coleridge, but would not "obtrude on the great man at Rydal," although "Wordsworth was hospitably disposed."

  • Wordsworth died, and on the 19th of November 1850 Queen Victoria appointed Tennyson poet laureate.

  • The distance between the generation of Wordsworth and Coleridge and that of Byron and Shelley is not less - it is even probably greater - than that which divides Keats from Tennyson, and he is more the last of that great school than the first of any new one.

  • We still look to the earlier masters for supreme excellence in particular directions: to Wordsworth for sublime philosophy, to Coleridge for ethereal magic, to Byron for passion, to Shelley for lyric intensity, to Keats for richness.

  • Bishop Charles Wordsworth said that his experience of Gladstone at this time " made me (and I doubt not others also) feel no less sure than of my own existence that Gladstone, our then Christ Church undergraduate, would one day rise to be prime minister of England."

  • Manning's boyhood was mainly spent at Coombe Bank, Sundridge, Kent, where he had for companions Charles and Christopher Wordsworth, afterwards bishops of St Andrews and of Lincoln.

  • Wordsworth, Fragments and Specimens of Early Latin (1874).

  • From the side of literature the way was prepared for it by the genius of Coleridge, Wordsworth and Carlyle; from the side of morals and politics by the profound discontent of the constructive spirit of the century with the disintegrating conceptions inherited from utilitarianism.

  • In 1841 a travelling tutorship took him to the continent; and on his return a book appeared called Sights and Thoughts in Foreign Churches and among Foreign Peoples (London, 1842), with a dedication to his friend the poet Wordsworth.

  • In a house still standing William Wordsworth lived from 1799 to 1808, and it was subsequently occupied by Thomas de Quincey and by Hartley Coleridge.

  • Wordsworth's tomb, and also that of Coleridge, are in the churchyard of the ancient church of St Oswald, which contains a memorial to Wordsworth with an inscription by John Keble.

  • In its vicinity is Rydal Mount, for many years the residence of the poet Wordsworth.

  • These volumes revealed the author as the most gifted of the immediate disciples of Wordsworth, with a warmer colouring and more pronounced ecclesiastical sympathies than the master, and strong affinities to Tennyson, Keble and Monckton Milnes.

  • Here he lived in intimacy with many friends, especially P. C. Claughton and Charles Wordsworth.

  • In 1874 and again in 1875, he presided over the Reunion Conferences held at Bonn and attended by leading ecclesiastics from the British Isles and from the Oriental Church, among whom were Bishop Christopher Wordsworth of Lincoln; Bishop Harold Browne of Ely; Lord Plunket, archbishop of Dublin; Lycurgus, archbishop of Syros and Tenos; Canon Liddon; and Professor Ossinine of St Petersburg.

  • 3), as well as in all books dealing with Textual Criticism generally; other important books are R6nsch's Itala and Vulgata (1875); Corssen's Der cyprianische Text der Acta Apostolorum (Berlin, 1892); Wordsworth and Sanday on the " Corbey S.

  • Wordsworth (bishop of Salisbury) and H.

  • [The text of the Vulgate may be studied in Wordsworth and White, Novum Testamentum Latine; Corssen, Epistula ad Galatas.

  • Among these the works of Sanday, Corssen, Wordsworth, White, Burkitt and Harris on the history of the Old Latin and Vulgate, and especially the work of Burkitt on the Old Syriac, have given most light on the subject.

  • (For his treatment of the lake poets see Wordsworth, William.) A criticism in the fifteenth number of the Review on the morality of Moore's poems led in 1806 to a duel between the two authors at Chalk Farm.

  • CHARLES WORDSWORTH (1806-1892), Scottish bishop, son of Christopher Wordsworth, Master of Trinity, was born in London on the 22nd of August 1806, and educated at Harrow and Christ Church, Oxford.

  • Earl Hodgson (1893); also The Episcopate of Charles Wordsworth, by his nephew John, bishop of Salisbury (1899).

  • Christopher Wordsworth (Divine) >>

  • Harold Browne (1811-1891), bishop of Ely; Christopher Wordsworth, bishop of Lincoln; and Lord Arthur Hervey (1808 1 A reprint of this edition has been published by the Clarendon Press (Oxford, 1833).

  • Scrivener (1813-1891), rector of St Gerrans, Cornwall; Charles Wordsworth, bishop of St Andrews; Dr W.

  • (4) It has indeed been contended (by Bishop Wordsworth of Salisbury) that reservation was not actually, though tacitly, continued under the second Prayer-Book of Edward VI., since that book orders that the curate shall " minister," and not " celebrate," the communion in the sick person's house.

  • Wordsworth, Further Considerations on Public Worship (Salisbury, 1901).

  • Another anonymous Life, written in 1599, printed in Wordsworth's Ecclesiastical Biography, ii.

  • Wordsworth in Smith and Wace's Dictionary of Christian Biography; H.

  • There is also a life in C. Wordsworth's Ecclesiastical Biography (1810), W.

  • He also became known to Wordsworth and Lamb.

  • Christian Winther (q.v.; 1796-1876) made the island of Zealand his loving study, and that province of Denmark belongs to him -no less thoroughly than the Cumberland lakes belong to Wordsworth.

  • The gift of a seal to Goethe on his birthday in 1831 " from fifteen English friends," including Scott and Wordsworth, was suggested and carried out by Carlyle.

  • Todhunter, Conflict of Studies (1873) William Whewell, Of a Liberal Education (London, 1845); Christopher Wordsworth, Scholae academicae (Cambridge, 1877); Etienne Zi (or Siu or Seu), Pratique des examens litteraires en Chine (Shanghai, 1894).

  • Both his collegiate and editorial duties stimulated his critical powers, and the publication in the two magazines, followed by republication in book form, of a series of studies of great authors, gave him an important place as a critic. Shakespeare, Dryden, Lessing, Rousseau, Dante, Spenser, Wordsworth, Milton, Keats, Carlyle, Thoreau, Swinburne, Chaucer, Emerson, Pope, Gray - these are the principal subjects of his prose, and the range of topics indicates the catholicity of his taste.

  • of Wordsworth's Ecclesiastical Biography.

  • The ruins, consisting of a theatre, the walls of a town, and some other buildings, had been conjectured to be those of Dodona by Wordsworth in 1832, but the conjecture was changed into ascertained fact by the excavations of Constantin Carapanos.

  • See C. Wordsworth, Greece (1839), p. 2 47; Constantin Carapanos, Dodone et ses mines (Paris, 1878).

  • The contemporary poets whom Keble most admired were Scott, Wordsworth and Southey; and of their influence traces are visible in his diction.

  • There are few things in literary history more remarkable than this friendship. The gifted Dorothy Wordsworth described Coleridge as "thin and pale, the lower part of the face not good, wide mouth, thick lips, not very good teeth, longish, loose, half-curling, rough, black hair," - but all was forgotten in the magic charm of his utterance.

  • Wordsworth, who declared, "The only wonderful man I ever knew was Coleridge," seems at once to have desired to see more of his new friend.

  • Coleridge was anxious to embody a dream of a friend, and the suggestion of the shooting of the albatross came from Wordsworth, who gained the idea from Shelvocke's Voyage (1726).

  • Wordsworth was to show the real poetry that lies hidden in commonplace subjects, while Coleridge was to treat supernatural subjects to illustrate the common emotions of humanity.

  • For many years he had desired to see the continent, and in September 1798, in company with Wordsworth and his sister, he left England for Hamburg.

  • Eventually Mackintosh obtained a grant of ioo a year for him in 1824 during the lifetime of George IV., as one of the royal associates of the Society of Literature, and at different times he received help principally from Stuart, the publisher, Poole, Sotheby, Sir George Beaumont, Byron and Wordsworth, while his children shared Southey's home at Keswick.

  • Four volumes of Literary Remains were published after his death, and these, along with the chapters on the poetry of Wordsworth in the Biographia Literaria, may be said to exhibit the full range of Coleridge's power as a critic of poetry.

  • With regard to the preface, which contains Wordsworth's theory, Coleridge has honestly expressed his dissent: - "With many parts of this preface, in the sense attributed to them, and which the words undoubtedly seem to authorize, I never concurred; but, on the contrary, objected to them as erroneous in principle, and contradictory (in appearance at least) both to other parts of the same preface, and to the author's own practice in the greater number of the poems themselves."

  • When, again, he met Wordsworth in 1797, the two poets freely and sympathetically discussed Spinoza, for whom Coleridge always retained a deep admiration; and when in 1798 he gave up his Unitarian preaching, he named his second child Berkeley, signifying a new allegiance, but still without accepting Christian rites otherwise than passively.

  • His last published volume contains a series of sonnets of singular beauty, addressed to the river, resembling Wordsworth's "Sonnets to the Duddon," but more perfect in form; and a blank verse idyll, "Ii Pettirosso" ("The Redbreast"), bearing an equally strong, though equally accidental, resemblance to the similar compositions of Coleridge.

  • The strongest influences in his development about this time were the liberating philosophy of Coleridge, the mystical visions of Swedenborg, the intimate poetry of Wordsworth, and the stimulating essays of Carlyle.

  • He travelled through Italy, visited Paris, spent two months in Scotland and England, and saw the four men whom he most desired to seeLandor, Coleridge, Carlyle and Wordsworth.

  • It forms one of the lives in Christopher Wordsworth's Ecclesiastical Biography (vol.

  • He has indeed praised "the self-sufficing power of solitude" in almost the same phrase as Wordsworth, and from time to time would even in youth seclude himself for a season in complete intellectual absorption, as when he toiled among his.

  • Wordsworth in Church Quarterly Review (London, April 1900); and Revue Internationale de theologie (Bern, July 1900); R.

  • Wordsworth, The Ministry of Grace, pp. 18 ff; J.

  • He was second wrangler in 1816, became fellow and tutor of his college, and, in 1841, succeeded Dr Wordsworth as master.

  • Wordsworth, Athens and Attica (4th ed., London, 1869); C. Bursian, Geographie von Griechenland, vol.

  • Forbes, liturgiologist; and Bishop Charles Wordsworth.

  • Besides the works mentioned above may be noticed: Some Passages of the Life and Death of John, Earl of Rochester (Lond., 1680; facsimile reprint, with introduction by Lord Ronald Gower, 18 75); The Life and Death of Sir Matthew Hale, Kt., sometime Lord ChiefJustice of his Majesties Court of Kings Bench (Lond., 1682), which is included in C. Wordsworth's Ecclesiastical Biography (vol.

  • With him began the " enthusiasm of humanity " that was afterwards to become so marked in the poetry of Burns and Shelley, Wordsworth and Byron.

  • His chief friends were Charles Wordsworth, afterwards bishop of St Andrews, and Richard Chenevix Trench, afterwards archbishop of Dublin.

  • William Wordsworth described it as " emotions recollected in tranquility ".

  • This is known as the Spenserian stanza, and was quite widely used by Wordsworth, Byron and Keats.

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