This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

wool

wool

wool Sentence Examples

  • Wool grows on sheep.

    75
    25
  • The most important internal industries are in wool and frozen meat.

    51
    22
  • X's woman just pulled the wool over his eyes.

    33
    17
  • Sheep have likewise been raised in Piauhy, but there is no market for mutton and their wool is not utilized.

    33
    24
  • Andre was dressed in cashmere and wool, his hair kept short and neat, his loafers more expensive than Kris's conference room had cost to build.

    31
    15
  • She brushed one of the frozen women trapped in time on the sidewalk, surprised to feel her warm skin and the brush of the wool suit.

    27
    14
  • Its wool was as soft as freshly washed hair and it bleated when she scooped it into her arms.

    24
    13
  • Its wool was as soft as freshly washed hair and it bleated when she scooped it into her arms.

    24
    13
  • During the same period, owing to the efforts of pastoralists to improve their flocks, there was a gradual increase in the weight of wool produced per sheep from 341b to an average of over 71b.

    23
    13
  • Its material may be linen, wool, cotton or silk; but silk only is the rule for deacons.

    20
    9
  • She sat in the living room as masculine as he, surrounded by wood, wool, and leather in dark colors.

    19
    12
  • Angora is connected with Constantinople by railway, and exports wool, mohair, grain and yellow berries.

    17
    1
  • She emerged from the bathroom in flashy purple ski pants, a matching wool sweater.

    17
    5
  • Megan helped and stacked socks and underwear in her pile and then brought her a light wool jacket, leather gloves, hat, and scarf.

    16
    7
  • A permanent memorial of it remains in the famous Order of the Golden Fleece, which was instituted by the duke at Bruges in 1430 on the occasion of his marriage with Isabel of Portugal, a descendant of John of Gaunt, and was so named from the English wool, the raw material used in the Flemish looms, for which Bruges was the chief mart.

    15
    3
  • Other manufactures of Kendal are machine-made boots and shoes, cards for wool and cotton, agricultural and other machinery, paper, and, in the neighbourhood, gunpowder.

    14
    3
  • After dressing in double sweaters, wool knickers and stockings, they racked their skis atop their jeep and drove south from town into the mountains.

    13
    8
  • Wiping her eyes, she pored through the rest of the paperwork, growing cold despite her wool coat in the middle of her warm apartment.

    13
    14
  • But all I can learn of their conclusions amounts to just this, that "Cato and Brister pulled wool"; which is about as edifying as the history of more famous schools of philosophy.

    13
    16
  • The opportunity of utilizing the wool for textile industries has not yet been taken, though Sardinian women are accustomed to weave strong and durable cloth.

    10
    1
  • It has post and telegraph offices and a lively trade in wool, cotton and dry fruits (almonds, pistachios).

    10
    2
  • She drew her wool down through the canvas and, scarcely able to refrain from laughing, stooped as if trying to make out the pattern.

    10
    12
  • Towards the en._ cf October 20,000 shearers were called out, and many other trades, principally concerned with the handling or shipping of wool, joined the ranks of the strikers, with the result that the maritime and pastoral industries throughout the whole of Australia were most injuriously disturbed.

    8
    3
  • It's wool and is a bit scratchy.

    7
    7
  • Men and women do make wool cloth in mills.

    7
    7
  • Katie gathered her clothes into a wool satchel and slung it over her shoulder.

    6
    8
  • The name "flock" is given to a material formed of wool or cotton refuse, or of shreds of old woollen or cotton rags, torn by a machine known as a "devil."

    5
    2
  • The name "flock" is given to a material formed of wool or cotton refuse, or of shreds of old woollen or cotton rags, torn by a machine known as a "devil."

    5
    2
  • She shivered despite her lamb's wool coat, her hands plunged deep into pockets that contained weapons.

    5
    5
  • It was hard indeed for a carter drawing coal to a gasworks to recognize the necessity which compelled a reduction in his wages because wool had fallen 20 7 0.

    5
    5
  • Numerically the flocks of Australia represent one-sixth of the world's sheep, and in just over half a century (1851-1905) the exports of Australian wool alone reached the value of £650,000,000.

    4
    3
  • She tugged off her wool coat with some effort.

    4
    4
  • The skirts are usually of the native wool (called orbacia).

    4
    4
  • After a quick stop at a clothier to pick up a long wool skirt and sweater, she changed in her car and drove home.

    4
    5
  • Men do cut sheep's wool off with large shears, and send it to the mill.

    4
    5
  • Wool, manufactures of 11,998 10,190 8,459

    3
    2
  • She shivered in her wool coat, folded the paperwork, and called her sister.

    3
    3
  • Soon they were snuggled beneath a heavy wool robe, gliding contentedly down the snow covered back roads of the Uncompahgre valley.

    3
    3
  • Taran looked down at his own richly spun wool and linen clothing, pitying the men on the beach.

    3
    3
  • In the Black Sea they exploited the shores of Pontus and Scythia, whose products they exchanged for textiles spun from the wool of their own country.

    3
    3
  • The rapid development of the foreign trade of the republic since 1881 is due to settled internal conditions and to the prime necessity to the commercial world of many Argentine products, such as beef, mutton, hides, wool, wheat and Indian corn.

    3
    3
  • The principal items of export are wool, skins, tallow, frozen mutton, chilled beef, preserved meats, butter and other articles of pastoral produce, timber, wheat, flour and fruits, gold, silver, lead, copper, tin and other metals.

    3
    3
  • In 1905 the value of the wool export regained the £20,000,000 level, and with the rapid recovery of the numerical II.

    3
    3
  • Victoria produced already more wool than New South Wales,the aggregate produce of Australia in 1852 being 45,000,000 lb; and South Australia, between 1842 and this date, had opened most valuable mines of copper.

    3
    3
  • The time chosen for the strike was the height of the wool season, when a cessation of work would be attended with the maximum of inconvenience.

    3
    3
  • Taran looked down at his own richly spun wool and linen clothing, pitying the men on the beach.

    3
    3
  • In 1905 the value of the wool export regained the £20,000,000 level, and with the rapid recovery of the numerical II.

    3
    3
  • Practically the whole of the territory between the 145° meridian and the Great Dividing Range, as well as extensive tracts in the south and west, are a natural sheep pasture with climatic conditions and indigenous vegetation pre - eminently adapted for the growth of wool of the highest quality.

    3
    4
  • Amongst imports raw materials (wool, cotton and silk, coal, oilseeds, timber, &c.) hold the first place, articles of food (cereals, wine, coffee, &c.) and manufactured goods (especially machinery) ranking next.

    3
    5
  • They have a kind of short kilt, stiff, made of black wool, with a band from back to front between the legs; under this they wear short linen trousers, which come a little below the knee, and black woollen leggings with boots.

    2
    2
  • floccus, but many Teutonic languages have the same word in various forms), a tuft of wool, cotton or similar substance.

    2
    2
  • Thomas, and a monolithic shaft to the memory of General John Ellis Wool (1784-1869), who served with distinction in the War of 1812 and in the Mexican War, and in the Civil War commanded for a time the Department of Virginia.

    2
    2
  • In the north the staple products for export are salt, grain, wool and cotton, in the south opium and cotton; while the imports consist of sugar, hardware and piece goods.

    2
    2
  • In the north the staple products for export are salt, grain, wool and cotton, in the south opium and cotton; while the imports consist of sugar, hardware and piece goods.

    2
    2
  • His overcoat was slung over one arm, and he wore a wool suit over a dark turtleneck.

    2
    3
  • Donald Ryland tipped his wool cap to her as he entered, still dripping snow on the kitchen floor.

    2
    3
  • Wool, raw 13,372 16,750 16,395

    2
    3
  • Rhayader has for some centuries been an important centre for Welsh mutton and wool, and its sheep fairs are largely attended by drovers and buyers from all parts.

    2
    4
  • In 1878, 65,000,000 sheep yielded 230,000,000 lb weight of wool, or an average per sheep of about 32 lb.

    1
    3
  • In the season of 1899-1900 the wool exports weighed 420,000,000 lb, and averaged more than 5 lb per sheep. The extra weight of fleece was owing to the large importation of better breeds.

    1
    3
  • Wool, raw 5,003 7,813 9,159

    1
    3
  • able trade of rearing fine wool sheep, first commenced by Captain John McArthur in 1803.

    1
    3
  • Wool, raw 5,003 7,813 9,159

    1
    3
  • in depth, and well protected by forts Monroe and Wool.

    0
    0
  • WoolIn 1901, 161,000 persons were engaged in the spinning and other preparatory processes and in the weaving of wool.

    0
    0
  • The exports of Aube consist of timber, cereals, agricultural products, hosiery, wine, dressed pork, &c.; its imports include wool and raw cotton, coal and machinery, especially looms. The department is served by the Eastern railway, of which the main line to Belfort crosses it.

    0
    0
  • A piece of cotton wool soaked in strong carbolic acid will relieve the pain of dental caries, but is useless in other forms of toothache.

    0
    0
  • Those who were reconciled were deprived of all honourable employment, and were forbidden to use gold, silver, jewelry, silk or fine wool.

    0
    0
  • In the 13th and 14th centuries Abingdon was a flourishing agricultural centre with an extensive trade in wool, and a famous weaving and clothing manufacture.

    0
    0
  • Uruguayan wool is favourably regarded in foreign markets, on account of the clean state in which it is shipped, this being largely due to the natural conditions of the land and climate.

    0
    0
  • The element also occurs in the animal and vegetable kingdoms. It is present in hair and wool, and in albuminous bodies; and is also a constituent of certain vegetable oils, such as the oils of garlic and mustard.

    0
    0
  • The external trade of the Russian empire (bullion and the external trade of Finland not included) since the year 1886 is shown in the following table: The exports rank in the following order :- cereals (wheat, barley, rye, oats, maize, buckwheat) and flour, 49.2%; timber and wooden wares, 7.2; petroleum, 5.8; eggs, 5.4; flax, 5; butter, 3; sugar, 2-4; cottons and oilcake, 2 each; oleaginous seeds, &c., 1.5; with hemp, spirits, poultry, game, bristles, hair, furs, leather, manganese ore, wool, caviare, live-stock, gutta-percha, vegetables and fruit, and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • The commodities which the United Kingdom principally takes are wheat, wool, barley, eggs, oats and flax.

    0
    0
  • With regard to the imports into Russia-they consist mainly of raw materials and machinery for the manufactures, and of provisions, the principal items being raw cotton, 17% of the aggregate; machinery and metal goods, 13%; tea, 5%; mineral ores, 5%; gums and resins, 4%; wool and woollen yarns, 32%; textiles, 3%; fish, 3%; with leather and hides, chemicals, silks, wine and spirits, colours, fruits, coffee, tobacco and rice.

    0
    0
  • The long hauls in the United States make it specially important that the cars should carry a load in both directions, and so bcx cars which have carried grain or merchandise one way are filled with wool, coal, coke, ore, timber and other coarse articles for the return journey.

    0
    0
  • Important features of Greek sacrifice, though not necessarily found in every rite, were the putting of wreaths and pieces of wool on the victim, the gilding of its horns, the lustration of the officiant and the sprinkling of those present with holy water.

    0
    0
  • Wool forms by far the largest export, and tallow, hides, bones and frozen mutton are also exported.

    0
    0
  • There are flour-mills and a trade in cereals, wool, tallow and hides.

    0
    0
  • Harwich has always had a considerable trade; in the 14th century merchants came even from Spain, and there was much trade in wheat and wool with Flanders.

    0
    0
  • The wool manufacture flourished at Honiton in the reign of Henry VII., and it is said to have been the first town at which serges were made, but the industry entirely declined during the 19th century.

    0
    0
  • The only industry of importance is grazing, cattle being raised for export to Chile, and a few sheep for their wool.

    0
    0
  • Feudal in origin, Dunster's later importance was commercial, and the port had a considerable wool, corn and cattle trade with Ireland.

    0
    0
  • Large flocks of sheep are kept, both for their flesh and their wool, and there are in the province large numbers of horned cattle and of pigs, Geese and goose feathers form lucrative articles of export.

    0
    0
  • Linseed and other oil-bearing grains are also important articles of commerce, as well as wool and butter.

    0
    0
  • The principal imports are butter, woollens, timber, cereals, eggs, glass, cottons, preserved meat, wool, sugar and bacon.

    0
    0
  • The export that comes next in value is silk, and after it may be named wheat, barley, manganese ore, maize, wool, oilcake, carpets, rye, oats, liquorice and timber.

    0
    0
  • The annual average value maybe put at not quite £2,000,000, machinery and tin-plate being a long way the most important items. There is further a small transit trade through Transcaucasia from Persia to the value of less than half a million sterling annually, and chiefly in carpets, cocoons and silk, wool, rice and boxwood; and further a sea-borne trade between Persia and Caucasian.

    0
    0
  • Sheep were small and their fleeces light, nevertheless, owing to the meagreness of the yields of cereals' and the demand for wool for export, sheep-farming was looked to, as early as the 12th century, as the chief source of profit.

    0
    0
  • In the latter course they were encouraged by the high prices of wool during the, 4th century, and by Edward III.'s policy of fostering both the export of wool and the home manufacture of woollen goods.

    0
    0
  • " Some have 24,000 sheep, some 20,000 sheep, some io,000, some 6000, some 4000, and some more and some less "; and yet it is alleged the price of wool had nearly doubled, " sheep being come to a few persons' hands."

    0
    0
  • The following passage indicates the contemporary theory of manuring: - " In thy tillage are these special opportunities to improve it, either by liming, marling, sanding, earthing, mudding, snayl-codding, mucking, chalking, pidgeons-dung, hens-dung, hogs-dung or by any other means as some by rags, some by coarse wool, by pitch marks, and tarry stuff, any oyly stuff, salt and many things more, yea indeed any thing almost that bath any liquidness, foulness, saltness or good moysture in it, is very naturall inrichment to almost any sort of land."

    0
    0
  • Its unfitness for the production of mutton, and increasing supplies of fine clothing wool from other countries, soon led to its total rejection.

    0
    0
  • Another aphis of importance is the woolly aphis (Schizoneura lanigera) of the apple and pear: it secretes tufts of white flocculent wool often to be seen hanging B D E humuli).

    0
    0
  • The chief industries are the manufacture of railway plant, cloth, wool, soap, shoddy, furniture, bricks and cement.

    0
    0
  • Between Fort Monroe and Sewell's Point is Fort Wool, almost covering a small island called Rip Raps.

    0
    0
  • Almuces were occasionally made of silk or wool, but from the 13th century onward usually of fur, the hem being sometimes fringed with tails.

    0
    0
  • Among the curious customs of Halifax was the Gibbet Law, which was probably established by a prescriptive right to protect the wool trade, and gave the inhabitants the power of executing any one taken within their liberty, who, when tried by a jury of sixteen of the frith-burgesses, was found guilty of the theft of any goods of the value of more than 13d.

    0
    0
  • An active trade is carried on with Austria, especially through the Isakovets and Gusyatin custom-houses, corn, cattle, horses, skins, wool, linseed and hemp seed being exported, in exchange for wooden wares, linen, woollen stuffs, cotton, glass and agricultural implements.

    0
    0
  • Fibres and vegetable grasses, wool, hides and skins, cotton, sugar, iron and steel and their manufactures, chemicals, coal, and leather and its manufactures are the leading imports; provisions, leather and its manufactures, cotton and its manufactures, breadstuffs, iron and steel and.

    0
    0
  • It is the largest wool and the largest fish market of the United States, being in each second in the world to London only.

    0
    0
  • Steamers ascend this river as far as Bilyutai, near the Mongolian frontier, and bring back tea, imported via Kiakhta, while grain, cedar nuts, salt, soda, wool and timber are shipped on rafts down the Khilok, Chikoi and Uda (tributaries of the Selenga), and manufactured goods are taken up the river for export to China.

    0
    0
  • These special qualities are its fineness, strength, elasticity and great natural twist, which combined enable it to make very fine, strong yarns, suited to the manufacture of the better qualities of hosiery, for mixing with silk and wool, for making lace, &c. It also mercerizes very well.

    0
    0
  • The fibre is generally white, somewhat harsh and wiry, and especially adapted for mixing with wool.

    0
    0
  • " Rough Peruvian," the produce of one of the tree cottons, has a special use, as being rather harsh and wiry it is well adapted for mixing with wool.

    0
    0
  • Corn, wine, oil, wool, silk, fruits and liquorice (a speciality of the district) are exported.

    0
    0
  • Other articles of export are silk cocoons, wool, hides, sponges, eggs and fruits (oranges, almonds, raisins and the like); the amounts of cotton, tobacco and wine sent out of the country are small.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are wheat, mealies, Kaffir corn, wool, mohair, horses and cattle.

    0
    0
  • There are manufactures of wool and silk, and of straw hats and pottery.

    0
    0
  • This property is usually obtained by mixing soft and hard soaps, or, more rarely, by adding gum tragacanth to a hard soap. In the textile trades the wool scourer employs a neutral olive-oil soap, or, on account of its cheapness, a neutral curd or curd mottled brand; the cotton cleanser, on the other hand, uses an alkaline soap, but for cleaning printed cottons a neutral olive-oil curd soap is used, for, in this case, free alkali and resin are objectionable; olive-oil soap, free from caustic alkali, but often with sodium carbonate, is also used in cleansing silk fibres, although hard soaps free from resin are frequently employed for their cheapness.

    0
    0
  • The Annals abound with references to the prices and comparative abundance or scarcity of the two staple products, wool and corn.

    0
    0
  • The oxidation, which is effected by chromic acid and sulphuric acid, is conducted in a flask provided with a funnel and escape tube, and the carbon dioxide formed is swept by a current of dry air, previously freed from carbon dioxide, through a drying tube to a set of potash bulbs and a tube containing soda-lime; if halogens are present, a small wash bottle containing potassium iodide, and a U tube containing glass wool moistened with silver nitrate on one side and strong sulphuric acid on the other, must be inserted between the flask and the drying tube.

    0
    0
  • As a river-port it has a brisk trade in the produce of the surrounding district as well as in the raw materials of its manufactures, especially in wool from La Plata, Australia and Germany.

    0
    0
  • Trade with Persia and India, as also with the Khazars and the Russians, and undoubtedly with Biarmia (Urals), was, however, their chief occupation, their main riches being furs, leather, wool, nuts, wax and so on.

    0
    0
  • It is nearly always a neat structure composed of fine twigs, roots or bents, and lined with wool or hair.

    0
    0
  • On either side of the canal are the warehouses of wholesale dealers in cotton, wool, sugar, grain and other commodities.

    0
    0
  • Wool and cotton spinning and weaving, dyeing, distilling, paper-making and tanning are carried on here with considerable activity.

    0
    0
  • Ewes as well as rams generally have short horns, and the wool is long and very fine.

    0
    0
  • It is customary to pluck the wool by hand rather than shear it, as this is believed to ensure a finer second crop. Black-faced and Cheviots are also found in some places.

    0
    0
  • It is the centre of a thriving agricultural district and has a considerahle trade in wool, grain, cattle and horses with Basutoland, Pondoland and the neighbouring regions of Natal.

    0
    0
  • To preserve the colour of flowers pledgets of cotton wool, which prevent bruising, should be introduced between them, as also, if the stamens are thick and succulent, as in Digitalis, between these and the corolla.

    0
    0
  • When, as with some plants like Verbascum, the thick hard stems are liable to cause the leaves to wrinkle in drying by removing the pressure from them, small pieces of bibulous paper or cotton wool may be placed upon the leaves near their point of attachment to the stem.

    0
    0
  • The trade of the city is principally in Bolivian products - mineral ores, alpaca wool, &c. - but it also receives and exports the products of the neighbouring Peruvian provinces, and the output of the borax deposits in the neighbourhood.

    0
    0
  • From the wool which their sheep yield they manufacture every article of native dress and good blankets.

    0
    0
  • The principal industries are wool and cotton spinning, and the manufacture of porcelain, earthenware, boots, soap, oil, sparkling wines and beer.

    0
    0
  • The staple articles of export are hides, wool and dates.

    0
    0
  • A large part of the foreign trade is in their hands, and at the season of the sheep-shearing their agents and representatives are found everywhere among the Bedouins and Madan Arabs of the interior, purchasing the wool and selling various commodities in return.

    0
    0
  • There are flour mills, breweries and saw-mills; and paper, chemicals, wooden shoes, wool and woollen goods are produced.

    0
    0
  • The modern town is connected with Smyrna by railway, and exports cotton, wool, opium, cocoons and cereals.

    0
    0
  • Callias And Hipponicus The exports from Callao are guano, sugar, cotton, wool, hides, silver, copper, gold and forest products, and the imports include timber and other building materials, cotton and other textiles, general merchandise for personal, household and industrial uses, railway material, coal, kerosene, wheat, flour and other food stuffs.

    0
    0
  • Its principal imports are coffee (of which it is the greatest continental market), tea, sugar, spices, rice, wine (especially from Bordeaux), lard (from Chicago), cereals, sago, dried fruits, herrings, wax (from Morocco and Mozambique), tobacco, hemp, cotton (which of late years shows a large increase), wool, skins, leather, oils, dyewoods, indigo, nitrates, phosphates and coal.

    0
    0
  • It exports citrons, wool, oak, bark and skins.

    0
    0
  • The tunica was originally of white wool, but in the 3rd century it began to be made of linen, and from the 4th century was always of linen.

    0
    0
  • Tea makes up nearly one-half of the imports, the other commodities being silks, cottons, hides and wool; while cottons and other manufactured wares constitute considerably over 50% of the exports.

    0
    0
  • Its wool was also renowned.

    0
    0
  • Agricultural products, fruit and wool from the surrounding country are shipped in considerable quantities.

    0
    0
  • They also make felts and a rough cloth of sheep's wool.

    0
    0
  • Corn, raw cotton, hides, wool, nuts and dried fruit are exported.

    0
    0
  • As early as 1293 trade was carried on with Bayonne, and six years later a receiver of customs on wool and wool-fells is mentioned at Weymouth, while wine was imported from Aquitaine.

    0
    0
  • Edward III., by the Statute Staple of 1353, declared Carmarthen the sole staple for Wales, ordering that every bale of Welsh wool should be sealed or "cocketed" here before it left the Principality.

    0
    0
  • It imports great quantities of wool from the Argentine and Australia, and is in regular communication with New York, London and the chief ports of the United Kingdom, Brazil and the far East.

    0
    0
  • Besides wool, leading imports are jute, cotton, flax, timber, petroleum, coal, pitch, wine, cereals, oil-seeds and oil-cake, nitrate of soda and other chemical products, and metals.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are sugar, coal, cereals, wool, forage, cement, chalk, phosphates, iron and steel, tools and metal-goods, thread and vegetables.

    0
    0
  • The products are chiefly cereals, fruits, opium, cotton, tobacco, wool, ordinary goat-hair and mohair, in which there is a large trade.

    0
    0
  • and Piauhy in colonial times, and small flocks are still to be seen in the latter state, but no use is made of their wool, and the market for mutton is extremely limited because of popular prejudices.

    0
    0
  • The exportation of wool amounted to 1,130,160 Ib in 1906.

    0
    0
  • Syria, and manufactures textiles in silk, cotton and wool, carpets and leather commodities, besides being the centre of a large district growing cereals, pistachios and fruit.

    0
    0
  • long and equipped with electric light, stationary and travelling hydraulic cranes, machinery for meat freezing, and large sheds for storing corn and wool.

    0
    0
  • These harbours on the eastern side of Sydney are mainly frequented by cargo boats trading in coal, corn, frozen meat, wool, hides and various ores.

    0
    0
  • Newcastle is also a mining town, but depends chiefly on its large trade in wool.

    0
    0
  • Greytown (2436), a wool and wattle trading centre, is in central Natal.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports, not all products of the province, are coal, wool, mohair, hides and skins, wattle bark, tea, sugar, fruits and jams. The import trade is of a most varied character, and a large proportion of the goods brought into the country are in transit to the Transvaal and Orange Free State, Natal affording, next to Delagoa Bay, the shortest route to the Rand.

    0
    0
  • The bulk of these exports are to the Transvaal and neighbouring countries, and previously figure as imports, other exports, largely wool and hides, are first imported from the Transvaal.

    0
    0
  • They are not exported, but there is a considerable export trade in wool.

    0
    0
  • It has important commerce in linen, flax, hemp, wool and seeds, and a considerable transit trade.

    0
    0
  • A promising home industry, started under English auspices after the war of 1899-1902, is the weaving by women of rugs, carpets, blankets, &c., from native wool.

    0
    0
  • Next in value came wool (£226,000), horses and mules (£110,000), skins, hides and horns (£106,000), tobacco (£89,000), tin, coal, copper and lead.

    0
    0
  • The system continued steadily down to 1899, by which time railways, dynamite, spirits, iron, sugar, wool, bricks, jam, paper and a number of other things were all of them articles of monopoly.

    0
    0
  • It is one of the chief centres in France for wool combing and spinning, and produces a great variety of cloths.

    0
    0
  • 81), a woollen mantle was worn over the fringed linen skirt, wool was forbidden to the priests in the temple.

    0
    0
  • Why the layman was forbidden a mixture of wool and linen (sha'atnez, Deut.

    0
    0
  • In addition to the mining, the district produces large quantities of wool.

    0
    0
  • Wool and hides are the principal exports.

    0
    0
  • Among these are the Corn Exchange in Mark Lane, where the privilege of a fair was originally granted by Edward I.; the Wool Exchange, Coleman Street; the Coal Exchange, Lower Thames Street; the Shipping Exchange, Billiter Street; and the auction mart for landed property in Tokenhouse Yard.

    0
    0
  • Chrysaniline (diamino-phenylacridinei) forms red-coloured salts, which dye silk and wool a fine yellow; and the solutions of the salts are characterized by their fine yellowish-green fluorescence.

    0
    0
  • The district is agricultural and pastoral, and wool and grain are exported, as well as meat and dairy produce, for which there are large refrigerating works.

    0
    0
  • The manufactures are considerable, the chief articles made being cloth, wool, leather, tobacco, pianos and machinery.

    0
    0
  • It was a free port and had a considerable trade in wool and wine.

    0
    0
  • It has a large trade in wool, flax and grain, its markets for these commodities being very numerously attended.

    0
    0
  • Among others we may mention the Palazzo Vecchio, formerly the seat of the government of the Republic and now the town hall, the Palazzo Riccardi, the residence of the Medici and now the prefecture, the palaces of the Strozzi, Antinori (one of the most perfect specimens of Florentine quattrocento architecture), Corsini, Davanzati, Pitti (the royal palace), 4c. The palace of the Arte della Lana or gild of wool merchants, tastefully and intelligently restored, is the headquarters of the Dante Society.

    0
    0
  • The people were still unsatisfied, the anti minori demanded further privileges, and the workmen insisted that their grievances against the anti maggiori, especially the wool trade by whom they were employed, be redressed.

    0
    0
  • A large body of ciompi (wool carders) gathered outside the city and conspired to subvert the signory and establish a popular government.

    0
    0
  • By the first of these (1290) the town was granted a fair on St Margaret's Day (July 20) and as the abbey had extensive sheep walks the trade in wool was considerable.

    0
    0
  • One of the earliest references to sugar in Great Britain is that of 100,000 lb of sugar being shipped to London in 1319 by Tomasso Loredano, merchant of Venice, to be exchanged for wool.

    0
    0
  • It is an important river port for the export of corn, wool, fruit, wine and cattle.

    0
    0
  • It is the chief centre in Germany of the cotton, wool, silk and velvet manufactures, and of upholstery, drapery and haberdashery of all descriptions, of printed calicoes, of Turkey-red and other dyes, and of fine chemicals.

    0
    0
  • If zinc be heated to near its boiling-point, it catches fire and burns with a brilliant light into its powdery white oxide, which forms a reek in the air (lana philosophica, " philosopher's wool").

    0
    0
  • A solution of the oxide in the chloride has the property of dissolving silk, and hence is employed for removing this fibre from wool.

    0
    0
  • Cattle and swine are reared, and dairy produce is largely exported; but the sheep of the province are small and their wool indifferent.

    0
    0
  • The wool is not of much value, and is spun by the women and woven into rugs, and made up into saddlebags or into the black Bedouin tents.

    0
    0
  • The Germans recognized the staple rights of Bruges for a number of commodities, such as wool, wax, furs, copper and grain, and in return for this material contribution to the growing commercial importance of the town, they received in 1309 freedom from the compulsory brokerage which Bruges imposed on foreign merchants.

    0
    0
  • From his committee he reported in April 1888 the "Mills Bill," which provided for a reduction of the duties on sugar, earthenware, glassware, plate glass, woollen goods and other articles, the substitution of ad valorem for specific duties in many cases, and the placing of lumber (of certain kinds), hemp, wool, flax, borax, tin plates, salt and other articles on the free list.

    0
    0
  • Among native industries may be mentioned the spinning and weaving of wool for clothing, carpet-weaving, the manufacture of pottery, slippers and matting, saddle-making and leather embroidery.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are olive oil, wheat, esparto grass, barley, sponges, dates, fish (especially tunny), hides, horses, wool, phosphates, copper, zinc and lead.

    0
    0
  • The exports consist of cotton, sugar, cocaine, hides and skins, rubber and other forest products, wool, guano and mineral products.

    0
    0
  • Four kinds are produced: rough cotton or " vegetable wool," sea island, brown or Mitafifi, and smooth or American.

    0
    0
  • Sheep are reared over a somewhat wider range, exclusively for their wool.

    0
    0
  • The " natives," or descendants of the early importations, are small, long-legged animals whose wool is scanty and poor.

    0
    0
  • The chief breeding industry is that of the llama, alpaca and vicuiiaanimals of the Auchenia family domesticated by the Indians and bred, the first as a pack animal, and the other two for their wool, hides and meat.

    0
    0
  • The export of wool in 1905 exceeded 3,300,000 lb.

    0
    0
  • The manufacturing industries of Peru are confined chiefly to the treatment of agricultural and mineral products - the manufacture of sugar and rum from sugar cane, textiles from cotton and wool, wine and spirits from grapes, cigars and cigarettes from tobacco, chocolate from cacao, kerosene and benzine from crude petroleum, cocaine from coca, and refined metals from their ores.

    0
    0
  • There is a flourishing trade in soap, which is here manufactured, and a considerable commerce in wool and cotton with the regions E.

    0
    0
  • The harbour is too shallow to admit vessels of large size, but the proximity of the town to Odessa secures for it a thriving business in wine, salt, fish, wool and tallow.

    0
    0
  • The principal articles imported are cotton and cotton goods, coffee, coal, cereals, hides, fruit and tobacco; the principal articles exported are wool and woollen goods,.

    0
    0
  • The value of trade probably exceeds 2,000,000, principal exports being rice, raw silk, dry fruit, fish, sheep and cattle, wool and cotton, and cocoons, the principal imports sugar, cotton goods, silkworm "seed" or eggs (70,160 worth in 1906-7), petroleum, glass and china., The trade in dried silkworm cocoons has increased remarkably since 1893, when only 76,150 lb valued at 6475 were exported; during the year 1906-7 ending 10th March, 2,717,540 lb valued at 238,000 were exported.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are salt, minerals, opium, cotton, cereals, wool and live stock; and the imports cloth-goods, coffee, rice and petroleum.

    0
    0
  • These machines were soon adapted to the spinning of wool, and in 1804 a woollen factory was built at Peacedale, South Kingston.

    0
    0
  • Its principal imports are cotton and woollen goods, yarn, metals, sugar, coffee, tea, spices, cashmere shawls, &c., and its principal exports opium, wool, carpets, horses, grain, dyes and gums, tobacco, rosewater, &c. The importance of Bushire has much increased since about 1862.

    0
    0
  • Its commercial importance was also great, being especially due to its trade in wool.

    0
    0
  • been held twice a year since 1862 under the patronage of the agricultural society; and the wool market was reinstituted in 1872 by the German Trade Society (Deutscher Handelsverein).

    0
    0
  • The dock is specially designed and equipped for dealing with the coal, timber, grain and wool trades.

    0
    0
  • There is an immense granary and a wool warehouse with capacity for 40,000 bales.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are wines, especially champagne, spirits, hay, straw, wool, potatoes, woven goods, fruit, glass-ware, lace and metal-ware.

    0
    0
  • Imports include cotton and silk goods, coal, iron and steel, petroleum, timber, raw wool, cotton yarn and cork.

    0
    0
  • Dijon has considerable trade in cereals and wool, and is the second market for the wines of Burgundy.

    0
    0
  • The industries include the spinning and weaving of cotton and wool, printing, dyeing and tanning, while there is a brisk trade in wine.

    0
    0
  • In 1672 John Ford was granted a Tuesday market for the sale of wool and woollen goods made from English yarn, and in 1705 Andrew Quicke obtained two annual fairs, on the first Thursdays in March and June, for the sale of cattle, corn and merchandise.

    0
    0
  • Lake Charles is the chief centre of lumber manufacture in the state, and has rice mills, car shops and an important trade in wool.

    0
    0
  • The prosperity of the town is largely due to the export trade in phosphates, esparto grass, oil, almonds, pistachio nuts, sponges, wool, &c. There is in the Gulf of Gabes a rise and fall of 5 ft.

    0
    0
  • Among the manufactures are beer, wagons, wool, and pearl buttons, and the city is a centre of the fresh-water pearl fisheries along the Mississippi.

    0
    0
  • Next in importance comes the spinning and weaving of wool, cotton, linen and carpet manufactures, and dyeing.

    0
    0
  • high, composed of reddish-brown, needle-like bristles, closely packed with cottony wool.

    0
    0
  • At the summit of this crown the small rosy-pink flowers are produced, half protruding from the mass of wool, and these are succeeded by small red berries.

    0
    0
  • Samsun exports cereals, tobacco and wool.

    0
    0
  • It imports general merchandise and manufactures, and exports phosphates, iron, zinc, barley, sheep, wool, cork, esparto, &c. There are manufactories of native garments, tapestry and leather.

    0
    0
  • His sons were trained for war and the chase, and his daughters instructed in the spinning of wool and other feminine arts.

    0
    0
  • The department contains a comparatively large extent of pasturage, which has given rise to a considerable trade in horses, cattle, sheep and wool for the northern markets.

    0
    0
  • Coal and wine are leading imports, while cereals, timber, wool, fruit and industrial products are exported.

    0
    0
  • The wool product of the state in 1900 was 9,638,002 lb, and in 1910 was 8,943,750 lb washed and unwashed and 3,040,875 lb scoured.

    0
    0
  • Iron mines, slate and stone quarries are worked at various points, and, with live stock, poultry, wool and timber form the chief exports.

    0
    0
  • Among the principal imports are cocoa, coffee, grain (including Indian corn), fruit, provisions (including butter, eggs and potatoes from France and the Channel Islands), wines and spirits, sugar, wool, and other foreign and colonial produce.

    0
    0
  • Wool was very largely exported, and the fact that it was brought to this port to be shipped probably led to the first establishment of the woollen trade in the W.

    0
    0
  • The rise of London as a port, the prohibition of the export of wool, the loss of the Winchester market after the suppression of the monastic institutions, and the withdrawal of the court led to the gradual decline of trade from the 16th century onwards until railway facilities and the opening of new dockyards gave Southampton the position it holds to-day.

    0
    0
  • Parallel to this shrinkage was the decrease in ranging sheep (82.0% from 1850-1900; 34.2% from 1890-1900), and cattle, once numerous in the hill counties of the west, and in the Connecticut Valley; Boston, then ranking after London as the second wool market of the world, and being at one time the chief packing centre of the country.

    0
    0
  • " Not a yard of fancy wool fabric had ever been woven by the power-loom in any country till done by William Crompton at the Middlesex Mills, Lowell, in 1840 " (Samuel Lawrence).

    0
    0
  • (Cambridge, 1870; Bulletin of National Association of Wool Manufacturers), and literature therein referred to.

    0
    0
  • The local industries, chiefly developed since 1880, include the manufacture of cotton, linen, wool, ribbons, cloth, chocolate, soap, brandies, leather, cards and nails.

    0
    0
  • The manufactures include agricultural implements, leather, vinegar and plaited sandals, and there is a trade in brandy, wine, cattle, poultry and wool; there are quarries of building-stone in the neighbourhood.

    0
    0
  • At that age he was apprenticed to a fuller and clothier, to card wool, and to dye and dress the cloth.

    0
    0
  • This composite art reached its climax in Peru, the llama wool affording the finest staple on the whole hemisphere.

    0
    0
  • Merino wool is one of the chief products.

    0
    0
  • Livonia carries on a large export trade, especially through Riga and Pernau, in petroleum, wool, oilcake, flax, linseed, hemp, grain, timber and wooden wares; the Dvina is the chief channel for this trade.

    0
    0
  • Although New York has lost in the competition with the Western States in the production of most of the grains, especially wheat and barley, and in the production of wool, mutton and pork, it has made steady progress in the dairy business and continues to produce great crops of hay.

    0
    0
  • Manufactures are insignificant, but there is a brisk export trade in grain, salt, fish, wool and tallow.

    0
    0
  • Its cloth and wool manufactories are among the most extensive in Prussia.

    0
    0
  • Wool (£4,250,000 to £7,657,000 according to prices) remains at the head of the list of exports.

    0
    0
  • The smaller size of the flocks and the breeding of sheep for meat rather than for wool, the cultivation of English grasses and of extensive crops of turnips and other roots on which to fatten sheep and lambs, all tend to change sheep-farming from the mere grazing of huge mobs on wide, unimproved runs held by pastoral licences.

    0
    0
  • Though not yet quite equal in importance to wool or frozen meat, dairy-farming is almost entirely carried on by small farmers and their families, who supply milk to factories.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile the industrial story of New Zealand may be summed up in the words wool and gold.

    0
    0
  • Coinciding as the carrying out of Vogel's policy did with a rising wool market, it for a time helped to bring great prosperity, an influx of people and much genuine settlement.

    0
    0
  • But prosperity brought on a feverish land speculation; prices of wool and wheat fell in 187 9 and went on falling.

    0
    0
  • Although the district is principally devoted to mining it is well adapted for sheep-farming, and some of the finest wool in the world is produced near Ballarat.

    0
    0
  • Its chief exports are diamonds, live stock (cattle, horses and mules, sheep and goats), wool, mohair, coal, wheat and eggs.

    0
    0
  • In 1765 the regent Prince Xaver imported 300 merino sheep from Spain, and so improved the native breed by this new strain that Saxon sheep were eagerly imported by foreign nations to improve their flocks, and " Saxon electoral wool " became one of the best brands in the market.

    0
    0
  • A considerable trade is carried on in hops, which are extensively cultivated in the neighbourhood, and in cattle, wool, leather and grain.

    0
    0
  • In this way there arose central boards for wool, cotton, oil and fat, hides and leather, and various metals - to name only the more important materials.

    0
    0
  • frequently refer to wool, and Flemish weavers settled in the Weald in the time of Edward III.

    0
    0
  • The statute of 1630 forbidding the exportation of wool, followed by the Plague of 1665, led to a serious trade depression, while the former enactment resulted in the vast smuggling trade which spread along the coast, 40,000 packs of wool being smuggled to Calais from Kent and Sussex in two years.

    0
    0
  • made it a staple port for wool in 1369.

    0
    0
  • The trade is very active and increasing, Kishinev being a centre for the Bessarabian trade in grain, wine, tobacco, tallow, wool and skins, exported to Austria and to Odessa.

    0
    0
  • The city is an important railway centre, has extensive railway repair shops and stock-yards, and exports large quantities of live-stock, hides and wool.

    0
    0
  • Small rudely shaped figures of wool, known as pilae, were also hung up in the same way as the oscilla.

    0
    0
  • Muller, p. 239) that pilae and effigies viriles et muliebres made of wool were hung at the crossroads to the Lares, the number of pilae equalling that of the slaves of the family, the effigies that of the children; the purpose being to induce the Lares to spare the living, and to be content with the pilae and images.

    0
    0
  • There is an active, trade, both by rail and river, in corn, cattle, wood, wool and potatoes.

    0
    0
  • Of the Ceylonese galls, " some are as symmetrical as a composite flower when in bud, others smooth and spherical like a berry; some protected by long spines, others clothed with yellow wool formed of long cellular hairs, others with regularly tufted hairs."

    0
    0
  • In that year, and again in 1825, great reductions were made in the duties on raw materials, especially on wool, raw silk, flax and iron, while considerable reductions were also made in the duties on manufactured goods.

    0
    0
  • Such was the case not only with some metals, such as lead, zinc, copper, but still more strikingly with textile materials such as wool, flax, and the like, and most of all with agricultural products such as grain, meat and meat products, timber.

    0
    0
  • In 1867 an important act on wool and woollens was passed, largely increasing the duties on both.

    0
    0
  • Certain duties were reduced (though in no case greatly reduced) such as those upon wool, some woollens, cheaper grades of cotton cloths, iron, steel rails, copper.

    0
    0
  • The duties on wool were raised, corresponding changes made on woollen goods, the duties on cottons, linens, some silks, and velvets considerably raised.

    0
    0
  • The duty on wool, typical among the duties on raw materials, was completely abolished, and with this change came a great reduction in the duties upon woollen goods.

    0
    0
  • This reimposed the Dingley duties upon wool, on most qualities at the precise rates tariff of 1897 .

    0
    0
  • Jiiterbog carries on weaving and spinning both of flax and wool, and trades in the produce of those manufactures and in cattle.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are sheep and oxen, most of which are raised in Morocco and Tunisia, and horses; animal products, such as wool and skins; wine, cereals (rye, barley, oats), vegetables, fruits (chiefly figs and grapes for the table) and seeds, esparto grass, oils and vegetable extracts (chiefly olive oil), iron ore, zinc, natural phosphates, timber, cork, crin vegetal and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • The import of wool exceeds the export.

    0
    0
  • To these may be added wool-weaving, centred at Sedan, and minor industries such as the manufacture of basket-work, wooden shoes, &c. Coal and raw wool are prominent imports, while iron goods, cloth, timber, live-stock, alcohol and the products of the soil are exported.

    0
    0
  • Whilst objecting to the prevention of the export of wool, he proposes a tax on that export as somewhat less injurious to the interest of growers than the prohibition, whilst it would "afford a sufficient advantage" to the domestic over the foreign manufacturer.

    0
    0
  • X.) 1 Professor Bastable calls attention to the interesting fact that the proposal of an export duty on wool and the justification of a temporary monopoly to joint-stock companies both appear for the first time in the edition of 1784.

    0
    0
  • The chief articles of export are cereals, flour, wool, hemp, skins and fish; and the imports include hardwares, fruits, oil and petroleum.

    0
    0
  • The chief export from the group is wool, grown upon runs farmed both by Europeans and Morioris.

    0
    0
  • She was celebrated as a spinner of wool, and was supposed to exercise influence over Roman brides.

    0
    0
  • This quarter was inhabited altogether by workers in wool, and as the city was small, the aristocracy lived close by in noble mansions which are now miserable memorials of past prosperity.

    0
    0
  • Sheep-raising, especially for wool, is an industry of considerable importance, and Dukes county is one of the three most important counties of the state in this industry.

    0
    0
  • Beverungen is the chief market for corn and Paderborn for wool.

    0
    0
  • Trade is in wool, iron, grain, sheep, lithographic stone and leather.

    0
    0
  • According to the decisions of the Congregation of Rites chasubles must not be of linen, cotton or woollen stuffs, but of silk; though a mixture of wool (or linen and cotton) and silk is allowed if the silk completely cover the other material on the outer side; spun glass thread, as a substitute for gold or silver thread, is also forbidden, owing to the possible danger to the priest's health through broken fragments falling into the chalice.

    0
    0
  • Bismarck is the headquarters for navigation of the upper Missouri river, is situated in a good agricultural region, and has a large wholesale trade, shipping grain, hides, furs, wool and coal.

    0
    0
  • In the former the hair is thick and close, with frequently an under-coat resembling wool.

    0
    0
  • The coat is composed of two kinds of hair, the one short and coarse and of the character of hair, which lies close to the skin, the other long and curly and of the nature of wool, forming the outer covering.

    0
    0
  • The process of shearing takes place in early spring, the average amount of wool yielded FIG.

    0
    0
  • The coat is composed, as in the Angora, of two materials; but in this breed it is the under-coat that partakes of the nature of wool and is valued as an article of commerce.

    0
    0
  • The animal undergoes during that time a process of combing by which all the wool and a portion of the hair, which of necessity comes with it, is removed.

    0
    0
  • Much of the wool is sold, like the native cotton, to Indian and Ladino women, who manufacture coarse cloth and linen in their homes.

    0
    0
  • The leading imports in 1909 were as follows, indicating in each case, when not evidently unnecessary, the value of finished manufactures and of unmanufactured materials: Silk (manufactured, $32,963,162; unmanufactured, $75,512,401); hides and skins, other than fur skins ($103,758,277); sugar and molasses ($91,535,466); fibres, vegetables and textile grasses (manufactured, $33,511,696; unmanufactured, $54,860,698); coffee ($86,524,006); chemicals ($86,401,432); cotton (manufactured, $68,380,780; raw and waste, $1 5,421,854); rubber (manufactured, $1,462,541, unmanufactured, $83,682,013); wool (manufactured, $22,058,712; unmantifactured, $55,530,366); and wood (manufactured, $43,620,591; unmanufactured, $13,584,172).

    0
    0
  • It is chiefly composed of moss and wool, lined internally with grass, wool, feathers, and whatever soft material the locality affords.

    0
    0
  • Wool is produced to some extent and is woven for the local market in the woollen factories of Pasto.

    0
    0
  • The trade in wool still flourished in 1751.

    0
    0
  • The medieval importance of these markets and fairs for the sale of wool and wine and later of cloth has gone.

    0
    0
  • Llanidloes has a trade in Plinlimmon slates and minerals besides flannel and wool manufactures.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in red octahedra and dyes silk and wool yellow.

    0
    0
  • Silk is readily distinguished from wool and other animal fibres by the action of an alkaline solution of oxide of lead, which darkens wool, &c., owing to the sulphur they contain, but does not affect silk, which is free from that body.

    0
    0
  • Again, silk dissolves freely in common nitric acid, which is not the case with wool.

    0
    0
  • This is the process equivalent to combing in the wool industry.

    0
    0
  • The resulting sliver is used by silk spinners who make a speciality of spinning short fibres, and the exhaust noils are bought by those who spin them up into " noil yarns " on the same principle as wool.

    0
    0
  • The noils are also in great demand for mixing with wool to make fancy effects in wool cloths for the dress goods trade.

    0
    0
  • of Aragon, who converted the pastures of the Apulian plain into a royal domain in 1445, and made Foggia the place at which the tax on the sheep was to be paid and the wool to be sold.

    0
    0
  • During the 18th century a considerable trade in sheep, wool, wine and pelts developed, chiefly with Chihuahua and with the Indians of the plains.

    0
    0
  • The pili grass (Heteropogon contortus) is also noxious, for its awns get badly entangled in the wool of sheep. The native manienie (Stenotaphrum americanum) and kukai (Panicum pruriens), however, are relished by stock and are found on all the inhabited islands; the Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon), a June grass (Poa annua), and Guinea grass (Panicum jumentorum) have also been successfully introduced.

    0
    0
  • From several species of Cibotium is obtained a glossy yellowish wool, used for making pillows and mattresses.

    0
    0
  • Some of his relations wished that he should be educated for the ministry; but his father apprenticed him to a shoemaker, who also dealt in wool and cattle.

    0
    0
  • Austin is the principal trade and jobbing centre for central and western Texas, is an important market for livestock, cotton, grain and wool, and has extensive manufactories of flour, cotton-seed oil, leather goods, lumber and wooden ware; the value of the factory product in 1905 was $1,569,353, being 105.2% more than in 1900.

    0
    0
  • Wheat and wool were exported in the 4th century, when, as we have said, Britain was especially prosperous.

    0
    0
  • - The chief material for clothing was at first no doubt wool, though linen must also have been used and later became fairly common.

    0
    0
  • It is a wool and grain port for central Morocco, chiefly for the provinces of Tadla and Shawia.

    0
    0
  • The exports include cattle, hides, skins, wool and ostrich feathers.

    0
    0
  • The taxes paid to the Lhasa government are mostly in kind, sheep, ponies, meal, butter, wool, native cloth, &c., and the coin paid is said to be about 130,000 ounces of silver a year.

    0
    0
  • The exports from Tibet are silver, gold, salt, wool, woollen cloth, rugs, furs, drugs, musk.

    0
    0
  • - Tunic Of Linen, Vove With Bands Of Purple Wool Embroidered With White Flax.

    0
    0
  • The exports, which include beans, almonds, maize, chick-peas, wool, hides, wax, eggs, &c., were valued at 360,000 in 1900, £364,000 in 1904, and £248,000 in 1906.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are wool, mohair and copper ore, and imports are cotton and woollen goods, indigo, coffee, sugar, petroleum, &c.

    0
    0
  • It is an important centre for trade in cereals and flour for export, and in sheep, cattle, wool, leather and timber.

    0
    0
  • The Bedouins bring wool and camel's hair to the market; and glass bracelets, lamps and leather waterskins are manufactured in the town.

    0
    0
  • Wool is also exported to France, and hides to Turkey.

    0
    0
  • Preveza exports dairy produce, valonia, hides and wool, olives and olive oil.

    0
    0
  • The spinning and weaving of wool, cotton and silk are the principal industries, but the enterprising spirit of the Catalans has compelled them to try almost every industry in which native capital could attempt to compete with foreign, especially since the institution of the protectionist tariffs of 1892.

    0
    0
  • Four different sources have been suggested; the classical myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts for the golden fleece, the scriptural story of Gideon, the staple trade of Flanders in wool, and the fleece of golden hair of Marie de Rambrugge, the duke's mistress.

    0
    0
  • The manufactures of the town include railway plant, glass, soap, tobacco and beer; and there is a trade in grain, cattle, fruit and wool.

    0
    0
  • An active trade is carried on in agricultural produce, wood, wool, cattle and spirits.

    0
    0
  • Its chief exports are oranges, millet, dra and other cereals, goat-hair and skins, sheepskins, wool and fullers' earth.

    0
    0
  • The wool goes chiefly to Marseilles.

    0
    0
  • According to modern Roman use, laid down by the decree of the Congregation of Rites in 1819, the amice must be of linen or of a hempen material, not wool; and, as directed by the new Roman Missal (1570), a small cross must be sewn or embroidered in the middle of it.

    0
    0
  • Linen, flax, jute and wool are also spun and woven.

    0
    0
  • Hence arose the powerful fraternity of the "Umiliati," who established their headquarters at the Brera, and began to develop the wool trade, and subsequently gave the first impetus to the production of silk.

    0
    0
  • Slight ties of soft cotton wool or worsted, or moist raffia, are then applied.

    0
    0
  • The seat of the hop-trade is Nuremberg; of wool, Augsburg.

    0
    0
  • The chief industries are flax-spinning, rope-making, sugar refining, book printing, wool combing and dyeing, and it also manufactures beer, tobacco and cigars, cotton and woollen stuffs, furniture, organs and pianos; besides which there are saw, oil and grain mills, machine works, and numerous goldsmiths and silversmiths.

    0
    0
  • The uses of chloroform which fall to be mentioned here are: - as a counter-irritant; as a local anaesthetic for toothache due to caries, it being applied on a cotton wool plug which is inserted into the carious cavity; as an antispasmodic in tetanus and hydrophobia; and as the best and most immediate and effective antidote in cases of strychnine poisoning.

    0
    0
  • Nitric acid converts it into nitro-compounds, which are occasionally used for dyeing silk and wool.

    0
    0
  • It forms orange-yellow plates and dyes wool a golden yellow (from an acid bath).

    0
    0
  • 7 - trisulphonic acid, is an orange-yellow powder which dyes wool and silk yellow (from an acid bath).

    0
    0
  • For one kind of meat we could substitute another; wool could be replaced by cotton, silk or fur; were our common silicate glass gone, we could probably perfect and cheapen some other of the transparent solids; but even if the earth could be made to yield any substitute for the forty or fifty million tons of iron which we use each year for rails, wire, machinery, and structural purposes of many kinds, we could not replace either the steel of our cutting tools or the iron of our magnets, the basis of all commercial electricity.

    0
    0
  • These properties of fur constitute its essential value for felting purposes, and mark its difference from wool and silk; the first, after some slight preparation by the aid of hot water, readily unites its fibres into a strong and compact mass; the others can best be managed by spinning and weaving.

    0
    0
  • Their use was not simply a barbarous expedient to defend man from the rigours of an arctic winter; woven wool alone cannot, in its most perfect form, accomplish this.

    0
    0
  • In this class of animal the underneath wool of the belly is thicker than that of the back, while the opposite is true of those found on the land.

    0
    0
  • The sea otter, one of the richest and rarest of furs, especially for men's wear, is an exception to this unhairing process, which it does not require, the hair being of the same length as the wool, silky and bright, quite the reverse of the case of other aquatic animals.

    0
    0
  • It is found that in densely wooded districts furs are darker in colour than in exposed regions, and that the quality of wool and hair is softer and more silky than those from bare tracts of country, where nature exacts from its creatures greater efforts to secure food, thereby developing stronger limbs and a consequently coarser body covering.

    0
    0
  • Otters and beavers that run dark in the hair or wool are more valuable than the paler ones, the wools of which are frequently touched with a chemical to produce a golden shade.

    0
    0
  • The European, Arabian and East Indian kinds are seldom used for rugs, the skins are chiefly dressed as leather for books and furniture, and the kids for boots and gloves, and the finer wool and hair are woven into various materials.

    0
    0
  • The Angora from the heights of central Asia Minor has curly, fleecy, silky, white wool, 4 to 7 in.

    0
    0
  • This species of goat was some years since introduced into Cape Colony, but its wool is not so good as the Asiatic breed.

    0
    0
  • The Tibet goat is similar to the Angora in the fineness of its wool, and many are used in the making of cashmere shawls.

    0
    0
  • They have a similar wool to the vicuna, but coarser and redder; both are largely used in South America.

    0
    0
  • Lustre, however, cannot be imparted unless the wool was originally of a silky nature.

    0
    0
  • Broadtails, size IoX5 in., are the very young of the Persian sheep, and are killed before the wool has time to develop beyond the flat wavy state which can be best compared to a piece of moire silk.

    0
    0
  • There is, notwithstanding, a great demand for these from the fashionable world, as not only are they very effective, but being so flat in the wool the figure of the wearer can be shown as perfectly as in a garment made of silk.

    0
    0
  • They have a particularly thin pelt with very close wool of minute curl.

    0
    0
  • These animals have a dense coat of fine, long brown wool, with very long dark brown hair on the head, flanks and tail, and, in the centre, a peculiar pale oval marking.

    0
    0
  • They do not wear as well, however, as the pelt and the wool are not of a strength comparable to those of sealskin.

    0
    0
  • It is of a very pretty silvery-blue shade of even wool with very little silky top hair, having silvery-white sides and altogether a very marked effect.

    0
    0
  • Although it has wool and top hair, the latter is so sparse and fine that the coat may be considered as one of close even wool.

    0
    0
  • Those from the neighbourhood of Sydney are light clear blue, while those from Victoria are dark iron grey and stronger in the wool.

    0
    0
  • Has a very short close and dark grey wool, some being almost black.

    0
    0
  • Is of a similar description, but darker and stronger in the wool and larger.

    0
    0
  • Skins from Germany and China are smaller, and shorter in the wool.

    0
    0
  • Both as a fur and as a pelt it is extremely strong, but owing to its short and close wool it is usually made up for the linings, collars and cuffs of men's coats.

    0
    0
  • Unlike other aquatic animals the skin undergoes no process of unhairing, the fur being of a rich dense silky wool with the softest and shortest of water hairs.

    0
    0
  • The blacker the wool and the more regular the silver points, the more valuable the skin.

    0
    0
  • Shee P. - Vary much in size and in quality of wool.

    0
    0
  • Skins with very short wool are dyed black and used for military saddlecloths.

    0
    0
  • The bulk, however, is used in the wool trade.

    0
    0
  • Has light grey or brown close thick wool half an inch deep without any top hair, with a rather thick spongy pelt.

    0
    0
  • The hat trade is largely interested in the fur piece trade, the best felt hats being made from beaver and musquash wool and the cheaper sorts from nutria, hare and rabbit wools.

    0
    0
  • Among the principal imitations of other furs is musquash, out of which the top hair has been pulled and the undergrowth of wool clipped and dyed exactly the same colour as is used for seal, which is then offered as seal or red river seal.

    0
    0
  • The wool is, however, poor compared to the otter and beaver, and the pelt thin and in no way comparable to them in strength.

    0
    0
  • The most important and imposing among the more modern architectural additions to the city are the handsome Gothic exchange, completed in 1867, the municipal theatre, the municipal library, the post office (1878), the law courts (1891-1895), the wool exchange, the German bank, the municipal museum for natural science, ethnology and commerce, and the fine railway station (1888).

    0
    0
  • In two articles, tobacco and rice, Bremen is the greatest market in the world; in cotton and indigo it takes the first place on the continent, and it is a serious rival of Hamburg and Antwerp in the import of wool and petroleum.

    0
    0
  • The principal imports are food supplies` and raw material such as cotton, wool, silk, flax, hemp and jute.

    0
    0
  • Thousands of rafts and boats of all descriptions descend the stream every year with cargoes of corn, wool, timber and wooden wares, giving occupation to a large number of men.

    0
    0
  • Still, large amounts of corn, wool and timber are floated down, especially after its confluence with the Black Hancza.

    0
    0
  • The principal fairs are held at Warsaw (wool, hemp, hops), Lcczyca in Kalisz, Skaryszew in Radom, Ciechanoviec in Lomza, and Lowicz in Warsaw.

    0
    0
  • Coarse tweeds and blanketing are manufactured for home use from the sheep's wool which is plucked from the animal, not shorn.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are grain and other agricultural produce, live stock, spirits, wood and wool; the chief imports are colonial produce, iron, coal, salt, wine, beer and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • The horse and wool markets of Mecklenburg are largely attended by buyers from various parts of Germany.

    0
    0
  • Trade is chiefly in agricultural produce, wool and cider, as the district is rich in orchards.

    0
    0
  • Leominster was famous for wool from the 13th to the 18th century.

    0
    0
  • In 1835 the wool trade was said to be dead; and that of glove-making,.

    0
    0
  • The exports are wool, cotton, madder, cummin seed, asafoetida, fruit, silk and horses.

    0
    0
  • The exports are chiefly coal, sheep, tallow, wool, frozen meat and hides.

    0
    0
  • Its date is disputed, but the town dependent on it seems to have grown up during the 13th century, being first mentioned in 1290, when an inquisition states that the mayor has pesage of wool and cheese.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports of the province are coarse wool, hides, dates and horses.

    0
    0
  • Metals and metal goods, rice, wool and woollen goods, and cotton and cotton goods are the chief imports; and silk, silk goods and tea are the chief exports.

    0
    0
  • The native demand for wool is not covered by the home production, and in this article the export from the United Kingdom to Germany is steadily rising, having amounted in 1905

    0
    0
  • Although Germany produces wool, flax and hemp, the home production of these materials is not sufficient to meet the demand of manufactures, and large quantities of them have to be imported.

    0
    0
  • Wool 33,260 31,195 27,114 24,918

    0
    0
  • Wares of spun wool 8,660 6,925 20,668 18,964

    0
    0
  • Wool 742,632 1,691,035

    0
    0
  • The principal articles of import are cotton and cotton goods, wool and woollen goods, silk and silk goods, coffee, tobacco and metals.

    0
    0
  • Yet the wool harvest is scarce, and the production of butter a negligible quantity, though there is abundance of the principal product of Sicilian pasture lands, cheese of various kinds, for which there is a lively local demand.

    0
    0
  • By far the most important export is grain, which goes almost entirely to British ports; but wool, flax and cattle are also shipped.

    0
    0
  • Rostock has an important fair at Whitsuntide, lasting for fourteen days, and also a frequented wool and cattle market.

    0
    0
  • The wool is coarse and short.

    0
    0
  • Of less importance are the exports of hides and skins, eggs, wheat and other grains, wool, quails, lentils, dates and Sudan produce in transit.

    0
    0
  • Exports of less value, but worthy of special notice, are vegetables and wool, bones and tallow, also dairy machinery, and finally cement, the production of which is a growing industry.

    0
    0
  • It lies in the heart of one of the busiest industrial districts in Germany, and carries on important manufactures of the finer kinds of cloth, wool, yarn and felt, and also of iron and steel goods.

    0
    0
  • It is the natural shipping-port for these territories and for the southern districts of the province of Buenos Aires, from which great quantities of wheat and wool are exported.

    0
    0
  • The mountains maintain large flocks of sheep, of which two kinds are distinguished - with a fine short-stapled and a coarse long-stapled wool respectively.

    0
    0
  • Chief exports are coal, stone, woollen goods and machinery; imports, butter, fruit, indigo, logwood, timber and wool.

    0
    0
  • These, together with pigs, wool, butter, and (in small quantities) cheese, form the staple of a considerable trade with the Midlands and the industrial districts to the south and southwest.

    0
    0
  • Exports are wool, preserved meat and timber.

    0
    0
  • Magdeburg is the central market in Germany for sugar and chicory, but trades extensively also in cereals, fruit, vegetables, groceries, cattle, horses, wool, cloth, yarn, leather, coal and books.

    0
    0
  • It has three Evangelical and two Roman Catholic churches, a classical school and a teachers' seminary; the manufactures include woollen and cotton goods, hats, morocco leather and gloves, and there is a considerable trade in corn, cattle and wool.

    0
    0
  • The exports consist chiefly of grain, timber, flax, hides, wool, a species of anchovy, and hemp, and the imports of manufactured goods and machinery.

    0
    0
  • 2.7.1 (a) Wool and Worsted 2.7.2 (b) Flax, Hemp and Jute 2.7.3 (c) Cotton 2.7.4 (d) Silk and other Textiles 2.7.5 (e) Whisky and Beer 2.7.6 (f) Miscellaneous

    0
    0
  • Erasmus Darwin, the grandfather of Charles Darwin, set forth ',in' Zoonomia a much more definite theory of the relation of variation to evolution, and the following passage, cited by Clodd, clearly expresses it: "When we revolve in our minds the metamorphoses of animals, as from the tadpole to the frog; secondly, the changes produced by artificial cultivation, as in the breeds of horses, dogs and sheep; thirdly, the changes produced by conditions of climate and season, as in the sheep of warm climates being covered with hair instead of wool, and the hares and partridges of northern climates becoming white in winter; when, further, we observe the changes of structure produced by habit, as shewn especially by men of different occupations; or the changes produced by artificial mutilation and prenatal influences, as in the crossing of species and production of monsters; fourth, when we observe the essential unity of plan in all warmblooded animals - we are led to conclude that they have been alike produced from a single living filament."

    0
    0
  • Comines carries on the spinning of flax, wool and cotton.

    0
    0
  • Wool in Chihuahua, and under General Winfield Scott in the southern campaign; he was breveted major-general for gallantry at Cerro Gordo, where he was severely wounded, and he was again wounded at Chapultepec. In1849-1855he was a United States senator from Illinois; and in1858-1859was a senator from Minnesota.

    0
    0
  • Its importance was maintained, however, by its trade in agricultural products and in Apulian wool (which was there dyed and cleaned), by its port (probably Cannae) at the mouth of the Aufidus, and by its position on the high-road.

    0
    0
  • The trade of Budapest is mainly in corn, flour, cattle, horses, pigs, wines, spirits, wool, wood, hides, and in the articles manufactured in the town.

    0
    0
  • Market gardens, known as hortillonnages, intersected by small canals derived from the Somme and Avre, cover a considerable area to the north-east of Amiens; and the city has trade in vegetables, as well as in grain, sugar, wool, oil-seeds and the duck-pasties and macaroons for which it is renowned.

    0
    0
  • Horses and mules are reared for export on a small scale, and sheep for their wool, which is used in home manufactures.

    0
    0
  • Forest Products.-The forest and other natural products include rubber, cinchona bark, ivory-nuts, mocora and toquilla fibre for the manufacture of hats, hammocks, &c., cabaya fibre for shoes and cordage, vegetable wool (Bombax ceiba), sarsaparilla, vanilla, cochineal, cabinet woods, fruit, resins, &c. The original source of the Peruvian bark of commerce, the Cinchona calisaya, is completely exhausted, and the " red bark " derived from C. succirubra, is now the principal source of supply from Ecuador.

    0
    0
  • It derived wealth from great salines and from a trade in oil and wool, to which the wide range of its admirable coinage bears witness from the 5th century B.C. onwards.

    0
    0
  • The bark possesses tanning properties, and in Scotland in past times yielded with ferrous sulphate a black dye for wool.

    0
    0
  • The light silk and wool fabric called barege takes its name from the place, where it was first made.

    0
    0
  • It possesses a tobacco factory, candle-works and brick-kilns, and is an important river port, vessels discharging here their cargoes of corn, wine, wool, cattle, flour and tallow, to be conveyed by land to Odessa and to Yassy in Rumania.

    0
    0
  • Commerce is mostly in the hands of the Jews and Armenians, and chiefly confined to raw products, such as agricultural produce, cattle, wool and wood.

    0
    0
  • This was important as the wool trade was established by 1249 and certainly continued until 1630, when the.

    0
    0
  • Much of the white wool is exported to Persia, and now largely to Europe by Bombay.

    0
    0
  • The nomadic Afghan tribes of the west are chiefly pastoral, and the wool of the southern Herat and Kandahar provinces is famous for its quality.

    0
    0
  • A large quantity of wool, together with silk, dried fruit, madder and asafetida, finds its way to India by the Kandahar route.

    0
    0
  • These imports include horses, cattle, fruits, grain, wool, silk, hides, tobacco, drugs and provisions (ghi, &c.).

    0
    0
  • Threefourths of the exports consist of cotton goods, and three-eighths of the imports were raw wool.

    0
    0
  • Australia and Argentina need it for wool and wheat, Chili and Brazil for nitrates and coffee, Asiatic countries for rice, and the world as a whole for its increased output of produce.

    0
    0
  • This consists of a loose coat and trousers of silk, wool or other material; the trousers are fastened by a cord round the waist.

    0
    0
  • In India farther south in cold weather an overcoat called dagla is worn; this is an anga padded with cotton wool.

    0
    0
  • Rough cotton, called "vegetable wool," and tobacco are the principal products, and are also produced in the valley of the Tumbes and in some of the elevated mountain districts.

    0
    0
  • Machinery, wool, cloth, chicory, slates, &c., are also produced.

    0
    0
  • This was a branch of olive or laurel, bound with purple or white wool, round which were hung various fruits of the season, pastries, and small jars of honey, oil and wine.

    0
    0
  • The name is generally derived from Eipos (wool) in reference to the woollen bands, but some connect it with E'ipaw (to speak), the eiresione being regarded as the "spokesman" of the suppliants.

    0
    0
  • Some 10o,000 burnouses are made annually, the finest partly of wool and partly of silk.

    0
    0
  • The exports consist chiefly of livestock, jerked beef, hides, wool, and other animal products, wheat, flour, corn, linseed, barley, hay, tobacco, sealskins, fruit, vegetables, and some minor products.

    0
    0
  • There is a considerable trade in French wines, for which Luneburg has for centuries been one of the chief emporia in north Germany, and also in grain and wool.

    0
    0
  • 7) Shows The Brake Lagged With Cotton Wool, And The 4 Ft.

    0
    0
  • Other industrial products are machinery, enamelled tinware, leather, alum, paper, earthenware, stoves and spirits, while a tolerably brisk trade is carried on in wool, feathers, cattle and horses.

    0
    0
  • The principal articles of import are shirtings, drills, jeans and twills, opium, woollens, steel, lead, needles, J apanese sea-weed and sugar; and of export, wool, skins, beans and pease, straw braid, coal, dates, tobacco and rhubarb.

    0
    0
  • Coal and limestone are found in the vicinity, and much live stock is raised, wool and hides being shipped from Chillicothe.

    0
    0
  • It is one of the principal seats of the glass industry in Indiana - plate glass, lamp chimneys, mirrors, &c., being manufactured here - and also has mineral wool factories and paper mills.

    0
    0
  • Instead of acting as a little world by itself for the raising of corn, the breeding of cattle, the gathering of wool, the weaving of linen and common cloths, the fabrication of necessary implements of all kinds, the local group began to buy some of these goods and to sell some others, renouncing isolation and making its destiny dependent on commercial intercourse.

    0
    0
  • There is a thriving trade in wine, oil, wool, timber, cattle, mules, horses and sheep, but agriculture is far less prosperous than in the maritime provinces of Catalonia.

    0
    0
  • There was a considerable trade in wool and wine, and the building of the dockyards by Henry VII.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, the trade interests of his subjects, who got their raw wool from England, drew him to an alliance with England.

    0
    0
  • This deputation led to the recall of Narses in 567, accompanied, according to a somewhat late tradition, by an insulting message from the empress Sophia, who sent him a golden distaff, and bade him, as he was not a man, go and spin wool in the apartments of the women.

    0
    0
  • Staple products have changed with increasing knowledge of climatic conditions, of life-zones and of the fitness of crops; first hides and tallow, then wool, wheat, grapes (which in the early eighteen-nineties were the leading fruit), deciduous orchard fruits, and semi-tropical citrus fruits successively.

    0
    0
  • At them the neophytes worked up wool, tanned hides, prepared tallow, cultivated hemp and wheat, raised a few oranges, made soap, some iron and leather articles, mission furniture, and a very little wine and olive oil.

    0
    0
  • Colmar is the centre of considerable textile industries, comprising wool, cotton and silk-weaving, and has important manufactures of sewing thread, starch, sugar and machinery.

    0
    0
  • Their influence in the foreign relations of the country was likewise great, it being in their interest to keep up friendly relations with England, on whose wool the flourishing state of the staple industry of Flanders depended.

    0
    0
  • In 1909 Wyoming ranked first among the states in the number of sheep and the production of wool.

    0
    0
  • The production of wool in 1909 was 38,400,000 lb of washed and unwashed wool and 12,288,000 lb of scoured wool.

    0
    0
  • Large numbers of sheep and Angora goats are reared on the plateau, and fair horses are bred on the Uzun Yaila; but no effort is made to improve the quality of the wool and mohair or the breed of horses.

    0
    0
  • The exports are: - Cereals, cotton, cotton seed, dried fruits, drugs, fruit, gall nuts, gum tragacanth, liquorice root, maize, nuts, olive oil, opium, rice, sesame, sponges, storax, timber, tobacco, valonia, walnut wood, wine, yellow berries, carpets, cotton yarn, cocoons, hides, leather, mohair, silk, silk stuffs, rugs, wax, wool, leeches, live stock, minerals, &c. The imports are: - Coffee, cotton cloths, cotton goods, crockery, drysalteries, fezzes, glass-ware, haberdashery, hardware, henna, ironware, jute, linen goods, manufactured goods, matches, petroleum, salt, sugar, woollen goods, yarns, &c.

    0
    0
  • The same holds good with regard to all other stuffs, the prices of wool (provisionally established at the earlier fairs of south-western Russia) being ultimately settled at Nizhniy, as well as those of raw silk.

    0
    0
  • The Lowell textile school, opened in 1897, offers courses in cotton manufacturing, wool manufacturing, designing, chemistry and dyeing, and textile engineering; evening drawing schools and manual training in the public schools have contributed to the high degree of technical perfection in the factories.

    0
    0
  • (Pop. about 15,000.) Although the principal wool and grain port of central Morocco, the anchorage is an open roadstead and communication with the shore is at times difficult.

    0
    0
  • The principal production is the wool of the merino sheep, which at one time yielded an immense revenue.

    0
    0
  • There is a fair local trade in wheat and agricultural produce, also sheep and cattle, wool, hides and furs for export.

    0
    0
  • The distinctive badge of a member of the three upper castes was the sacred triple cord or thread (sutra) - made of cotton, hemp or wool, according to the respective caste - with which he was invested at the upanayana ceremony, or initiation into the use of the sacred savitri, or prayer to the sun (also called gayatri), constituting his second birth.

    0
    0
  • Its high tower has four stages, each adorned with grotesques; and Greenway's chapel, built in 1517 by John Greenway, a wool merchant of Tiverton, is ornamented with figures minutely carved in stone.

    0
    0
  • The district is highly fertile, and the town deals largely in fruit, and milletstalks for brooms, as well as in wool, silk, honey and truffles.

    0
    0
  • Stock-raising is the most important industry, and the growing of sheep for wool takes a leading place.

    0
    0
  • In April 1907 (according to an estimate of the National Association of Wool Manufacturers) New Mexico contained 2,600,000 sheep, the largest XIX.

    0
    0
  • On their return trip the wagons often brought loads of wool, fur and blankets.

    0
    0
  • Wool at Chihuahua, some of the inhabitants revolted, and in January 1847 assassinated the governor, Charles Bent, and a number of Americans and Mexicans who had taken office under the new regime.

    0
    0
  • Stephen Gray (1696-1736) noticed in 1720 that electricity could be excited by the friction of hair, silk, wool, paper and other bodies.

    0
    0
  • It produces and exports wool, cotton, silk and much dried fruit, of the latter particularly raisins and Ala Bukhara, "Bokhara prunes."

    0
    0
  • The wool of the sheep is manufactured into flannel at numberless factories in the various country towns, and the supply meets an important local demand.

    0
    0
  • Coal, copper, timber, iron, and especially wool, were exported from the Principality, and by the Statute Staple of 1353 Carmarthen was declared the sole staple for the whole Welsh wool trade, every bale of wool having first to be sealed or " cocketed " at this important town, which during the 14th century may almost be accounted as the English capital of the Principality, so greatly was it favoured by the Plantagenet monarchs.

    0
    0
  • The exports of grain and timber, chiefly to Germany and Great Britain, and of wool and cattle, are considerable.

    0
    0
  • Babadag is a market for the wool and mutton of the Dobrudja.

    0
    0
  • They are not used as beasts of burden like llamas, but are valued only for their wool, of which the Indian blankets and ponchos are made.

    0
    0
  • It is primarily a term applied to the wool, or rather hair, obtained from the Peruvian alpaca.

    0
    0
  • It is, however, more broadly applied to a style of fabric originally made from the alpaca wool but now frequently made from an allied type of wool, viz.

    0
    0
  • mohair, Iceland, or even from lustrous English wool.

    0
    0
  • Of the four the alpaca and the vicu�re the most valuable wool-bearing animals: the alpaca on account of the quality and quantity, the vicu�n account of the softness, fineness and quality of its wool.

    0
    0
  • It is customary to mix these colours together, thus producing a curious ginger-coloured yarn, which upon being dyed black in the piece takes a fuller and deeper shade than can be obtained by piecedyeing a solid-coloured wool.

    0
    0
  • The history of the manufacture of this wool into cloth is one of the romances of commerce.

    0
    0
  • It does not appear to have made any headway, however, and alpaca wool was condemned as an unworkable material.

    0
    0
  • Alpaca, Vicuna, and Llama Wool imported into the United Kingdom.

    0
    0
  • - 1905 4,954 Owing to the success in the manufacture of the various styles of alpaca cloths attained by Sir Titus Salt and other Bradford manufacturers, a great demand for alpaca wool arose, and this demand could not be met by the native product, for there never seems to have been any appreciable increase in the number of alpacas available.

    0
    0
  • The preparing, combing, spinning, weaving and finishing of alpacas and mohairs are dealt with under WooL.

    0
    0
  • with worsted in the various kinds of carpets, with cotton in tapestries and household cloths, with line and tow yarns for the same fabrics and for paddings, &c., and with wool for horse clothing.

    0
    0
  • The extent of the woollen and worsted manufactures of the United Kingdom is indicated by the following table showing the imports and exports of wool and the quantity retained for use in various years (1890-19ò5):--- During the same period the minimum and maximum amount of wool (in lb) imported into the United Kingdom was as follows: Australia (1904), 220,483,961; (1895), 417,163,078; New Zealand (1890), 95, 6 3 2, 59 8; (1909), 1 7 6, 457, 1 5 0; British possessions in South Africa (1900), 32,219,369; (1909), 115,896,598; South America (1890), 11,173,692; (1908), 78,938,157; British possessions in the East Indies (1901), 24,069,571; (1909), 56,238,633; France (1890), 10, 8 73,7 88; (1902), 27,770,790; Turkish Empire (1908), 5,705,671; (1897), 25,727,462.

    0
    0
  • The decline in exports, regular and steady throughout the period, and with a tendency to become more pronounced every year, affected all the principal articles of British Wool.

    0
    0
  • The chief industries are the spinning of cotton and wool, and the weaving, dyeing and printing of fabrics of different kinds.

    0
    0
  • The principal imports with percentage to the whole are: coal and coke 15, grain 8, coffee 4.6, machinery 4, wool, yarn, thread, cotton and woollen goods 9'4; hides and skins 2.5.

    0
    0
  • Chief exports are wool, flour and frozen meat, and the industries are in connexion with these.

    0
    0
  • It imparts a yellow colour to wool and silk.

    0
    0
  • It is prepared by boiling the needles in a solution of soda to remove the resin, which process loosens the fibre and renders its separation easy; it has some resemblance to coarse wool, and is spun and woven into blankets and garments that are said to be warm and durable; it is also used for stuffing cushions; an essential oil, obtained by a previous distillation of the leaves, has medicinal virtues attributed to it by some German practitioners.

    0
    0
  • The principal imports into Persia in approximate order of value are cottons, sugar, tea, woollens, cotton yarn, petroleum, stuffs of wool and cotton mixed, wool, hardware, ironmongery, matches, iron and steel, dyes, rice, spices and glass-wdre.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are fruits (dried and fresh), carpets, cotton, fish, rice, gums, wool, opium, silk cocoons, skins, live animals, silks, cottons, wheat, barley, drugs and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • The city exports coal, wool, coke, horses, cattle, frozen meat, silver, lead, copper, tallow, hides and country produce.

    0
    0
  • The town is the terminus of the Murray River railway and the entrepot of the overland intercolonial trade; it has large wool stores, saw-mills, coach factories, breweries and soap-works.

    0
    0
  • his head and hairs white like wool, as white as snow; and his eyes as a flame of fire " (Rev. i.

    0
    0
  • Wool, mohair and ostrich feathers were the chief exports, the only mineral exported being copper (from the Namaqualand mines).

    0
    0
  • Of the exports raw gold was valued at £33,303,000, diamonds at £6,370,000, wool at £3,728,000 and ostrich feathers at £2,091,000.

    0
    0
  • Of the exports the United Kingdom took some 95%; a considerable quantity of South African produce, especially wool, shipped to England ultimately, however finds its way to other countries.

    0
    0
  • Large quantities of dairy produce, wool and live stock are exported; and there are a number of flourishing industries in the town, including brewing, flourmilling, tanning and boot and biscuit manufacturing.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are wool, agricultural produce and black marble, which is polished in local mills.

    0
    0
  • Wheat and wool are exported.

    0
    0
  • The following table shows the value for five years of the exports, and of all imports not reexported (exclusive of coin and bullion): - In 1910 the principal exports, in order of value, were wine (chiefly port, common wines and Madeira), raw and manufactured cork, preserved fish, fruits and vegetables, cottons and yarn, copper ore, timber, olive oil, skins, grain and flour, tobacco and wool.

    0
    0
  • The imports were raw and manufactured cotton, wool and silk, wheat and maize, coal, iron and machinery, dried codfish, sugar, rice, hides and skins, oils.

    0
    0
  • He sought to undo the worst consequences of the Methuen treaty by the creation of national industries, establishing a gunpowder factory and a sugar refinery in 1751, a silk industry in 1752, wool, paper and glass factories after 1759.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →