Wood Sentence Examples

wood
  • We've got plenty of wood, though, from the forest.

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  • It was still warm and smelled of wood smoke.

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  • The table and chairs were made of a dark rich wood, and the tiles on the floor looked like polished bricks.

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  • As she descended the long stairway again, her palm caressed the smooth dark wood of the banisters.

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  • Coatings that keep wood buildings from burning.

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  • Taking a few steps back she gripped the ax half way down on the handle and slammed it down against the block of wood with a dull whack.

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  • You couldn't add wood to the fire?

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  • Concrete walls surrounded us and the door, the only opening was a massive solid wood hulk.

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  • The wood was split and stacked beside the house, waiting for winter.

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  • The French had attacked the men collecting wood in the copse.

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  • In the wood, wagons and horses were standing.

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  • The interior was marble and polished wood, dating back to a time when first generation craftsmen took pride in their workmanship.

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  • Wood was stacked beside it, and she turned the book sitting on the coffee table into newspaper to burn.

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  • Rusty hinges were still visible in the wood but no door barred the entrance nor could anything be seen beyond but utter blackness.

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  • All he knew now was his bare feet were cold, standing on the hard wood floor at the perimeter of the carpet in the death room.

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  • She dropped the wood and screamed before she realized it was only a young cat.

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  • He glared at the ocean and strode up the beach littered with wood, boats, and cars, to the highway.

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  • She sat in the living room as masculine as he, surrounded by wood, wool, and leather in dark colors.

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  • Beside the tank was a pile of split wood about three feet high and six feet long.

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  • He turned to pick up the scattered pieces of wood and caught her watching him.

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  • I lifted the heavy wood beam that crossed their door, securing it.

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  • The room was warm and cozy, its walls done up in dark lacquered wood, the warm glow of chandeliers non- imposing.

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  • She started to saw at them with the knife.  The wood was thick and wet.  She shifted closer, gasping when the root healed the cuts she'd just made.  Furious at the latest trick from the Immortal underworld, Katie sawed furiously at the root, until her arm ached.  She'd barely made a dent when she switched arms.

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  • Carmen looked at Alex, who suddenly found the wood grain on the table interesting.

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  • This time the ax sank about four inches into the wood - in another spot.

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  • The wood appeared to be cherry, and although it could use a coat of wax, it still had a deep luster.

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  • The dairy was warm, a fire burning brightly in the home made wood stove.

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  • It was old and heavy, its covers made of wood smoothed by years of wear.

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  • The only difference was the electricity powering lights in the heavy iron and wood chandeliers overhead and the intercom system installed into the walls beside each entrance.

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  • They glided past snow-covered fields and occasional farmhouses, drifting smoke from their chimneys skyward and adding a hint of wood smoke to the crisp winter air.

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  • Carmen grabbed a chunk of wood from the box and jerked the stove door open.

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  • Somehow, he'd moved back to the wood line.

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  • The wood is of a yellowish tint.

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  • Most of these are perforated for mounting on threads or wires, and had been, no doubt, originally connected together to form one or more of the elaborate girdles, necklaces and breast ornaments then worn by the women.3 On the bottom of the stone box there was similar dust, pieces of bone and jewelry, and also remains of what had been vessels of wood.

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  • The wood is fine grained and satiny.

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  • During the cannonade Prince Poniatowski is to advance through the wood on the village and turn the enemy's position.

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  • He took the wood from her arms and dropped it into the wood box.

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  • The door exploded open in flames, wood, and black fur.

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  • Her knee hit the solid chunk of wood with a nauseating thump.

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  • The air was tinged with the scent of burning wood and melted metals, sulfur, and the facility's damp mustiness.

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  • Drawing water from a well and cooking on a wood stove would be inconvenient, but how complicated could it be?

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  • He nailed the wood over the window while she cleaned the rest of the glass from the counter.

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  • Fine. You chop the wood and I'll make us some iced tea.

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  • She tugged at one of the chunks of wood until she had it sitting straight on the stump, as he had done.

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  • The wood of the tree is hard and durable.

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  • They live and feed in the wood of trees.

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  • Wood is the material most widely used, but steel is employed in some countries where timber is scarce or liable to destruction by white ants, though it is still regarded as too expensive in comparison with wood for general adoption.

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  • The keys which hold the rail in the chairs are usually of oak and are placed outside the rails; the inside position has also been employed, but has the disadvantage of detracting from the elasticity of the road since the weight of a passing train presses the rails up against a rigid mass of metal instead of against a slightly yielding block of wood.

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  • The majority of the wagons referred to above are comparatively short, are carried on four wheels, and are often made of wood.

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  • In 1255 and 1264 it was rebuilt, still in wood.

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  • Pre-Cape Rocks principally the yellow wood (Podocarpus)., sneezewood (Pteroxylon utile), stinkwood (Oreodaphne bullata), black ironwood (Olea laurifolia), white ironwood (Vepris lanceolata), and umtomboti (Exoecaria africana); all are very useful woods, and the yellow wood, sneezewood, stinkwood and ironwood when polished have grain and colour equal to maple, walnut and ebony.

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  • As a verb, the word means to stifle or check; hence damped vibrations or oscillations are those which have been reduced or stopped, instead of being allowed to die out naturally; the "dampers" of the piano are small pieces of feltcovered wood which fall upon the strings and stop their vibrations as the keys are allowed to rise; and the "damper" of a chimney or flue, by restricting the draught, lessens the rate of combustion.

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  • It exists in the wood to the extent of about 1 1 6%.

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  • C. atlantica, the Atlas cedar, has shorter and denser leaves than C. Libani; the leaves are glaucous, sometimes of a silvery whiteness, and the cones smaller than in the other two forms; its wood also is hard, and more rapid in growth than is that of the ordinary cedar.

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  • The great Nara school of sculpture in wood was founded in the early part of the 11th century by a sculptor of Imperial descent named JOchO, who is said to have modelled his style upon that of the Chinese wood-carvers of the Tang dynasty; his traditions were maintained by descendants and followers down to the beginning of the 13th century.

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  • There is a trade in wine, beer, wood and minerals.

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  • Damghan was an important city in the middle ages, but only a ruined mosque with a number of massive columns and some fine wood carvings and two minarets of the 11th century remain of that period.

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  • A tubular piece of wood shaped as in fig.

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  • Everything visible was made of wood, and the scene seemed stiff and extremely unnatural.

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  • The furnishings were of a dark wood, possibly cherry, with hand carved designs.

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  • Katie trailed her into the stately Georgian mansion and glanced down as the polished wood beneath her feet creaked.

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  • Wood dwellings sagged, and refuse was stacked high between them.

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  • Wood thus altered is known as heart-wood, or duramen, as distinguished from the young sap-wood, or alburnum, which, forming a cylinder next the cambium, remains alive and carries on the active functions of the xylem, particularly the conduction of water.

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  • This pressure leads to the filling of the vessels of the wood of both root and stem in the early part of the year, before the leaves have expanded, and gives rise to the exudation of fluid known as bleeding when young stems are cut in early spring.

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  • Thus, many Hymenomycetes (Agarics, Pulyporei, &c.) live on the wood of trees.

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  • Ambones were made of wood or else of costly marbles, and were decorated with mosaics, reliefs, gilding, &c.; sometimes also covered with canopies supported on columns.

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  • Some climb trees and feed on leaves, while others tunnel between bark and wood.

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  • Chapman, who finds that the eggs are laid in old wood, and that the triungulin seeks to attach itself to a social wasp, who carries it to her nest.

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  • They feed in wood or spend an underground life devouring roots or animal excrement.

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  • The larvae of Lucanidae live within the wood of trees, and may take three or four years to attain their full growth.

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  • The houses are generally built of wood and wear a poverty-stricken aspect.

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  • The Ural industry is the older, and is still conducted on primitive methods, wood being largely used for fuel, and the ore and metals being transported by water down the Kama and other rivers.

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  • Coal takes, however, an altogether secondary place as a fuel in Russia; wood is much more extensively used, not only for domestic, but also for industrial purposes.

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  • The planks were of wood, often beech, a few inches wide, and were fastened down, end to end, on logs of wood, or " sleepers," placed crosswise at intervals of two or three feet.

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  • In that most largely used, known as " creosoting," dead oil of tar, to the amount of some 3 gallons per sleeper, is forced into the wood under pressure, or is sucked in by vacuum, both the timber and the oil being heated.

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  • Cars built almost entirely of steel, in which the proportion of wood is reduced to a minimum, are used on some electric railways, in order to diminish danger from fire, and the same mode of construction is also being adopted for the rolling stock of steam railways.

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  • A missionary visiting the Samoan valley found there a tradition of a party who put to sea never to return, and he also found the wood of which the staff was made growing plentifully in the district.

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  • The houses, mostly white with coloured roofs, are generally built of wood and iron, and have glazed porches, gay with fuchsias and pelargoniums. Government House, grey, stone-built and slated, calls to mind a manse in Shetland or Orkney.

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  • The wood of the hornbeam is white and close-grained, and polishes ill, is of considerable tenacity and little flexibility, and is extremely tough and hard to work - whence, according to Gerard, the name of the tree.

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  • The wood, which in Indian temples is burnt as incense, is yellowish-red, close-grained, tough, hard, readily worked, durable, and equal in quality to that of the deodar.

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  • The wood is light, soft, straight-grained and easily worked; it is very durable in contact with the soil, and is used for.

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  • Byron's description, "[The] immemorial wood Rooted where once the Adrian wave flowed o'er," is probably true; but there is no evidence that it was in historic time that this change took place.

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  • The houses, with very few exceptions, are built of wood, but the streets are paved with blocks of granite and marble.

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  • Biography, with authorities there collected; lives in Wood's Athenae Oxonienses (Bliss), iv.

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  • Sergiyevo has long been renowned for its manufacture of holy pictures (painted and carved), spoons, and other articles carved in wood, especially toys, which are sold to pilgrims who resort to the place to the number of ioo,000 annually.

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  • It is said that Eleazar, the priest who guarded the treasure, offered Crassus the golden beam as ransom for the whole, knowing, what no one else knew, that it was mainly composed of wood.

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  • Thus it is used of the purchase used in raising the flukes of an anchor to the bill-board; of a piece of wood or metal used to strengthen a sprung mast or yard; and of a plate of metal used, as in railway construction, for the strengthening of the meeting-place of two rails.

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  • Trees and curiously shaped stones were also worshipped, and artificial pillars of wood or stone.

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  • Several other pines are found, and among the less important timber trees are black spruce, Carolina balsam, beeches, ashes, sycamore or button wood, sweet gum and lindens.

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  • Other genera of South American ants - A pterostigma and Cyphomyrmex - make similar fungal cultivations, but they use wood, grain or dung as the substratum instead of leaf fragments.

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  • The river furnishes good water-power, and the city has various manufactures, including lumber, paper, wood pulp, match blocks and boxes.

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  • Where the lowlands are highly cultivated they are adorned with planted wood, and where they are cut off from rain they are nearly completely desert.

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  • The trees of India producing economically useful timber are comparatively few, owing to the want of durability of the wood, in the extremely hot and moist climate.

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  • The sal, Shorea robusta, a very durable wood, is most abundant along the skirts of the Himalaya from Assam to the Punjab, and is found in central India, to which the teak also extends.

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  • He attended Phillips Exeter Academy about nine months in 1794, was further prepared for college by Dr Samuel Wood, the minister at Boscawen, and graduated at Dartmouth College in 1801.

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  • It is built principally of wood, stands on a low cape, and has the aspect of an important commercial city.

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  • The industries mainly consist in shipbuilding, fish-curing, and the manufacture of machinery (particularly for agriculture), and the commerce in the export of corn, wood and fish.

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  • The plough consists of several parts made of seasoned wood.

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  • In the most prevalent variety of the Norway spruce the wood is white, apt to be very knotty when the tree has grown in an open place, but, as produced in the close northern forests, often of fine and even grain.

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  • Where not exposed to the weather the wood is probably as lasting as that of the pine, but, not being so resinous, appears less adapted for out-door uses.

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  • The wood of the spruce is also employed in the manufacture of wood-pulp for paper.

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  • Eventually the tree is destroyed, and the wood rendered worthless for timber, and of little value even for fuel.

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  • The wood is burned for fuel, its heat-giving power being reckoned in Germany about one-fourth less than that of beech.

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  • The wood is strong, light and very elastic, forming an excellent material for small masts and spars, for which purpose the trunks are used in America, and exported largely to England.

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  • The wood is inferior to that of Picea excelsa, but, being soft and easily worked, is largely employed in the countries to which it is indigenous for all the purposes of carpentry.

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  • In the first months of his tenure of office he had to deal with the furious opposition to Wood's halfpence, and to counteract the effect of Swift's Draper's Letters.

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  • Wood's patent was however withdrawn, and Ireland settled down.

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  • The larva may be aquatic, or subterranean, or a burrower in wood, while the imago is aerial.

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  • Brick and more rarely stone took the place of wood and wattle.

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  • Wheat, coal, cotton, petroleum, wood, lime and cement are brought into Venice for shipment to the Levant or for distribution over Italy and Europe.

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  • With the exception of the church and the town-house, the buildings are mostly of wood.

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  • The architecture was carefully studied by Wood and Dawkins in 1751, whose splendid folio (The Ruins of Palmyra, London, 1753) also gave copies of inscriptions.

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  • When concealment is no longer possible terrestrial species, like the Lycosidae, dart swiftly to the nearest shelter afforded by crevices in the soil, stones, fallen leaves or logs of wood, while those that live in bushes, like the Argyopidae, drop straight to the ground and lie hidden in the earth or in the fallen vegetation beneath.

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  • It consists essentially of two rollers either both of wood, or one of wood and one of iron, geared to revolve in contact in opposite directions; the seed cotton is fed to the rollers, the lint is drawn through, and the seed being unable to pass between the rollers is rejected.

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  • For a long time these shells or hulls, as they are called, were burned at oil mills for fuel, 22 tons being held equal to a cord of wood, and 43 tons to a ton of coal.

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  • The system usually adopted is a modification of the Canadian system already described, the boring rods being, however, of iron instead of wood, but the cable system has also to some extent been used.

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  • Tanks of various types are employed in storing the oil, those at the wells being circular and usually made of wood, with a content of 250 barrels and upwards.

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  • The Malays also work jungle produce, of which the most important are gutta, rattans, agila wood, camphor wood, and the beautiful kamuning wood which is used by the natives for the hilts of their weapons.

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  • Hood is a very usual dialectal form of wood; and in his play Edward the First, George Peele actually alludes to the bandit as "Robin of the Wood."

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  • P. Grant, an Atlanta railroad builder, in 1882, and subsequently enlarged by the city (in its south-east corner is Fort Walker); the Lake wood, 6 m.

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  • The buildings, mostly of wood, include the town-hall and a museum, which contains a good zoological collection.

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  • The manufacture of glass, also practised in Egypt, demanded a knowledge of sodium or potassium carbonates; the former occurs as an efflorescence on the shores of certain lakes; the latter was obtained from wood ashes.

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  • It derives its name from Hazel-bosch (hazel wood).

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  • Fir trees and branches from the neighbouring forest are collected and planted in front of the houses, so that for a few hours Hasselt has the appearance of being restored to its primitive condition as a wood.

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  • Wood Mowing and Reaping Machine Co., which dates from 1866, the business having been started in 1852 by Walter Abbott Wood (1815-1892), who was a Republican representative in Congress in 1879-1883.

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  • In 922, when they were converted to Islam, Ibn Foslan found them not quite nomadic, and already having some permanent settlements and houses in wood.

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  • A matrix of wood or iron is covered with successive layers of papers, pasted together so as to form pasteboard.

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  • Of the head nothing could be made but garlands for the shrines of the gods; but the wood of the root was employed in the manufacture of different utensils as well as for fuel.

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  • When a number of specimens have to be submitted to pressure, ventilation is secured by means of frames corresponding in size to the drying paper, and composed of strips of wood or wires.

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  • The hospitium, of which the upper part is of wood, contains a collection of Roman antiquities; the building is of the 14th and 15th centuries.

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  • Of the rarer woods particular mention may be made of curly pine, yielding a wood of beautiful figure and polish; magnolia, hard, close-grained, of fine polish and of great lasting qualities; and cypress, light, strong, easily worked and never-rotting.

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  • The corojo palm (Cocos crispa) rivals the royal palm in beauty and utility; oil, sugar, drink and wood are derived from it.

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  • Then, too, there are various dyewoods; rosewood, logwood (or campeachy wood), indigo, manaju (Garcinia Morella), Brazil-wood and saffron.

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  • The leading articles of export are sugar, tobacco and fruit products; of import, textiles, foodstuffs, lumber and wood products, and machinery.

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  • Their houses are built of timber and thatch, or clay tiles, except in the Karst region, where stone is more plentiful than wood.

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  • To prevent the gradual destruction of the forests by unskilful management and depredations, schools of forestry have been founded, and means have been taken for regulating the cutting of wood and for replanting districts that have been partially denuded.

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  • About 21 millions of acres are under wood, of which over 3 millions are in European Turkey.

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  • Equally ancient are the rafts called kellek, constructed of inflated goat-skins, covered with a framework of wood, often supporting a small house for passengers, which descend the Tigris from above Diarbekr.

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  • The wood of these rafts is sold in Bagdad, and constitutes, in fact, the chief supply of wood in that city.

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  • It is some five feet long, ending at the top in a crook (volute) bent inwards, and made of metal, ivory or wood.

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  • If of metal, it is hollow; if of wood, it is usually covered with metal.

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  • It is of wood inlaid with ivory and mother-of-pearl.

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  • There are generally in a coloni three or four Danish houses, built of wood and pitched over, in addition to storehouses and a blubber-boiling establishment.

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  • Lately their houses in the colonis have also to some extent been built of imported wood.

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  • The best-placed healthy young shoot produced from the wood buds at the base of the bearing branch is to be carefully preserved and in due time nailed to the wall.

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  • After gathering the fruit all the wood not needed for extending the tree or for fruit bearing next season should be cut out so as to give the shoots left full exposure to air and light.

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  • When a shoot promises blossom, it is generally at some distance from the point of insertion into the old wood, and the intermediate space is covered with wood buds.

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  • They may be produced, by taking care, during the summer pruning or disbudding, to preserve a number of the little shoots emitted by the yearly wood, only pinching off the minute succulent points.

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  • Care must be taken in using this fungicide not to wet the painted wood, as it is sure to become discoloured.

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  • Sibley decisively defeated Little Crow, the principal leader of the Kaposia band, at Wood Lake.

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  • He cut the wood blocks for the books which he printed in Tirgovishtea, Ramnicu, Snagov and Bucharest.

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  • It was made of "gopher" wood, which has been variously identified with cypress, pine and cedar.

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  • From the girdle hung the single-edged missile axe or francisca, the scramasax or short knife, a poniard and such articles of toilet as scissors, a comb (of wood or bone), &c. The Franks also used a weapon called the framea (an iron lance set firmly in a wooden shaft), and bows and arrows.

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  • Partly for this reason and partly because pieces of wood and dirt are apt to be included with the scrap, the market value of Ceara rubber is usually less than that of Para.

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  • In order to prevent decomposition of any proteid impurity which may remain incorporated with the rubber, the freshly coagulated rubber is sometimes cured in the smoke of burning wood or a small quantity of an antiseptic such as creosote is added during coagulation.

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  • Vigorous measures are now taken in many plantations to remove all old wood and to extract stumps of old trees, which in the first instance it was considered unnecessary to remove.

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  • That derived from Brazil, however, is generally inferior, being mixed with wood and dirt.

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  • The chief industry of the town is wool-spinning, and there is trade in wood.

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  • In commercial importance Iloilo ranks next to Manila among Philippine cities; it has manufactures of pina, jusi, coconut oil, lime, vinegar and various articles made from palm wood.

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  • Industrial surveys, having for their object the granting of land to the peasants to the extent of 40 acres per each male head, with 8 additional acres of wood and 8 acres as a reserve, were started many years ago, and after being stopped in 1887 were commenced again in 1898.

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  • The fibre of the piassava (Leopoldinia piassava, or Attalea funifera) is widely used for cordage, brushes and brooms. There are many other palms whose fruit, fibre and wood enter largely into the domestic economy of the natives, but the list given shows how important a service these trees rendered to the aboriginal inhabitants of tropical America, and likewise how useful they still are to the people of tropical Brazil.

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  • The interior contains some good pictures by Umbrian artists, a fine episcopal throne in carved wood, and a fine Flemish cope given by Pope Marcellus II.

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  • More important is the cultivation of the black wattle (Acacia mollissima), which began in 1886, the bark being exported for tanning purposes, the wood also commanding a ready sale.

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  • The name means "warm place of the wood," according to Llyn's definition of bettors.

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  • The Wood worsted mill here is said to be the largest single mill in the world.

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  • It is mainly a rich residential quarter; the most fashionable part is found in the south, in the vicinity of Cavendish and Portman Squares, but there are numerous fine houses surrounding Regent's Park and in the north-western district of St John's Wood.

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  • Poor and squalid streets are found, in close proximity to the wealthiest localities, between Marylebone Road and St John's Wood Road, and about High Street in the south, the .site of the original village.

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  • StMarylebone contains a great number of hospitals, among which are the Middlesex, Mortimer Street; Throat Hospital and Dental Hospital and School, Great Portland Street; Lying-in and Ophthalmic Hospitals, Marylebone Road; Samaritan Hospital for women, Seymour Street; Consumption Hospital, Margaret Street; and the Home for incurable children, St John's Wood Road.

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  • These architectural decorations are derived from a style of building found by the recent German expedition extant in an ancient church; courses of stone here alternate in the walls (both inside and out) with beams of wood held by circular clamps.

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  • Adjoining it on the west was the central chamber, on a lower level; this chamber was separated by a partition, originally of wood and later of marble, from the western compartment of the temple, which was of peculiar construction.

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  • They wear small pieces of wood in their ears and lips, but are not tattooed.

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  • Among the timber trees of this region is the bolkenhout of terblanz (Faurea Saligna) which yields a fine wood resembling mahogany.

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  • Few of the low veld bushes are large or straight enough to furnish any useful wood, and timber trees are wholly absent from the level country.

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  • These patches, called " woodbushes," contain many hardwood trees of great size, their flora and fauna being altogether different from that immediately outside the wood.

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  • Common species in the woodbush are three varieties of yellow wood (Podocarpus), often growing to an enormous size, the Cape beech (myrsine), several varieties of the wild pear (Olivia) and of stinkwood (Oreodaphne) ironwood and ebony.

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  • Ten days previous to the disaster at Majuba Sir Evelyn Wood had arrived at Newcastle with reinforcements.

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  • On the 6th of March a truce was concluded and on the 21st terms of peace were arranged between the Boer triumvirate and Sir Evelyn Wood.

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  • The Thonraki equally denied the name of church to buildings of wood or stone, and called themselves the Catholic Church.

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  • The latter is known as the llanos of the Orinoco, a region described by Humboldt as a vast " sea of grass," with islands of wood scattered here and there.

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  • The fruit is edible and its juice is made into beer; the sap of the tree is made into wine, and its pith into bread; the leaves furnish an excellent thatch, and the fibre extracted from their midribs is used f or fish lines, cordage, hammocks, nets, &c.; and the wood is hard and makes good building' material.

    1
    0
  • The "incense tree" of America is the Icica guianensis, and the "incense wood" of the same continent I.

    1
    0
  • In cold weather the Egyptians warm their rooms by placing in them a brazier, "chafing-dish," or "standing-dish," filled with charcoal, whereon incense is burnt; and in hot weather they refresh them by occasionally swinging a hand censer by a chain through them - frankincense, benzoin and aloe wood being.

    1
    0
  • The grateful perfumed powder abir or rand y is composed either of rice, flour, mango bark or deodar wood, camphor and aniseed, or of sandalwood or wood aloes, and zerumbet, zedoary, rose flowers, camphor and civet.

    1
    0
  • The incense sticks and pastils known all over India under the names of ud-buti (" benzoin-light") or aggar-ki-buti (" wood aloes light") are composed of benzoin, wood aloes, sandalwood, rock lichen, patchouli, rose-malloes, talispat (the leaf of Flacourtia Cataphracta of Roxburgh), mastic and sugar-candy or gum.

    1
    0
  • The postal area excludes part of Woolwich within the county; but includes considerable areas outside the county in other directions, as West Ham, Leyton, &c., on the east; Woodford, Chingford, &c., on the north-east; Wood Green, Southgate and Finchley on the north; Hendon and Willesden on the north-west; Acton and Ealing, Barnes and Wimbledon on the west; and Penge and Beckenham on the south, wholly or in part.

    1
    0
  • The system covers the county of London, West Ham, Penge, Tottenham, Wood Green, and parts of Beckenham, Hornsey, Croydon, Willesden, East Ham and Acton.

    1
    0
  • Large gatherings of spectators are attracted to the first-class cricket matches played at Lord's ground, St John's Wood, by the Marylebone Club and the Middlesex County teams, Eton College against Harrow School, and Oxford against Cambridge University; to the Kennington Oval for the matches of the Surrey club, and the Leyton ground for those of the Essex club.

    1
    0
  • In spite of Fitzstephen's glowing description we must remember that the houses of London were wholly built of wood and thatched with straw or reeds.

    1
    0
  • What makes this fact still more certain is the circumstance that a haberdasher in Cheapside living "'twixt Wood Street and Milk Street," two streets on the north side opposite Bread and Friday Streets, described himself as " over against the Mermaid tavern in Cheapside."

    1
    0
  • He afterwards served in the Zulu war with Wood's column.

    1
    0
  • The left column under Colonel (afterwards Sir) Evelyn Wood, which had done excellent work, found itself obliged to act on the defensive after the disaster to the centre column.2 For a time an invasion of Natal was feared.

    1
    0
  • Wood, who had been given leave to make a diversion in northern Zululand, on the 28th of March occupied Hlobane (Inhlobane) mountain.

    1
    0
  • At mid-day next day the Zulu army made a desperate attack, lasting over four hours, on Wood's camp at Kambula; the enemy - over 20,000 strong - was driven off, losing fully 1000 men, while the British casualties were 18 killed and 65 wounded.

    1
    0
  • The 1st division, under major-general Crealock, advanced along the coast belt and was destined to act as a support to the 2nd division, under major-general Newdigate, which with Wood's flying column, an independent unit, was to march on Ulundi from Rorke's Drift and Kambula.

    1
    0
  • The 2nd division (with which was Lord Chelmsford) and Wood's column crossed the White Umfolosi on the 4th of July - the force numbering 4200 Europeans and 1000 natives.

    1
    0
  • In the meantime, however, blood feuds had been engendered between the chiefs Usibepu 1 For his action on this occasion Colonel (afterwards General Sir) Redvers Buller, who was Wood's principal assistant, received the V.C. Piet Uys was among the slain.

    1
    0
  • The embattled castle contains the two-handed sword of Sir Almeric Tristram, the Anglo-Norman conqueror of the hill of Howth, and a portrait of Dean Swift holding one of the Drapier letters, with Wood, the coiner against whom he directed these attacks, prostrate before him.

    1
    0
  • A frame of wood or steel, erected at the shaft mouth, and rarely employed except for deep shafts of small cross-section or when the mine cars (tubs) are small, as in many parts of Europe.

    1
    0
  • Steel frames are more durable than those of wood, and have become common in nearly all mining countries, especially where timber is scarce.

    1
    0
  • Anthony a Wood prophesied that he would one day break his neck while running downstairs after a retreating guest, in the hope of extracting a story from him.

    1
    0
  • In 1667 he had made the acquaintance of Anthony a Wood at Oxford, and when Wood began to gather materials for his invaluable Athenae Oxonienses, Aubrey offered to collect information for him.

    1
    0
  • He left the task of verification largely to Wood.

    1
    0
  • In 1592 he complained bitterly that Wood had destroyed forty pages of his MS., probably because of the dangerous freedom of Aubrey's pen.

    1
    0
  • This perhaps explains the estrangement between the two antiquaries and the ungrateful account that Wood gives of the elder man's character.

    1
    0
  • The battle was fought in the defile formed by the wood of Agincourt and that of Tramecourt, at the northern exit of which the army under d'Albret, constable of France, had placed itself so as to bar the way to Calais against the English forces which had been campaigning on the Somme.

    1
    0
  • The Pliocene, on the other hand, is of freshwater origin, and contains silicified wood and numerous remains of Mammalia.

    1
    0
  • The chief dyeproduct of Burma is cutch, a brown dye obtained from the wood of the sha tree.

    1
    0
  • The design is traced on the wood with charcoal, gouged out in the rough, and finished with sharp fine tools, using the mallet for every stroke.

    1
    0
  • The Venetian furnaces in the island of Murano are small low structures heated with wood.

    1
    0
  • The blowing iron is constantly trundled, and the small lump of glass is squeezed and flattened into the shape of a foot, either between two slabs of wood hinged together, or by pressure against an upright board.

    1
    0
  • The scene of the discovery of glass is placed by Pliny on the banks of the little river Belus, under the heights of Mount Carmel, where sand suitable for glass-making exists and wood for fuel is abundant.

    1
    0
  • When the window openings were large, as was the case in basilicas and other public buildings, and even in houses, the pieces of glass were, doubtless, fixed in pierced slabs of marble or in frames of wood or bronze.

    1
    0
  • The positions of the factories were determined by the supply of wood for fuel, and subsequently, when the craft of glass-cutting was introduced, by the accessibility of water-power.

    1
    0
  • In 1567 James Carre of Antwerp stated that he had erected two glass-houses at " Fernefol " (Fernfold Wood in Sussex) for Normandy and Lorraine glass for windows, and had brought over workmen.

    1
    0
  • Beginning in Sussex, Surrey and Kent, where wood for fuel was plentiful, the foreign glass-workers and their descendants migrated from place to place, always driven by the fuel-hunger of their furnaces.

    1
    0
  • Simultaneously with the issue of this patent the use of wood for melting glass was prohibited, and it was made illegal to import glass from abroad.

    1
    0
  • He was for some time tutor of his college; but the most characteristic reminiscence of his university life is the mention made by Anthony Wood that in the musical gatherings of the time "Thomas Ken of New College, a junior, would be sometimes among them, and sing his part."

    1
    0
  • Gudea was also a great builder, and the materials for his buildings and statues were brought from all parts of western Asia, cedar wood from the Amanus mountains, quarried stones from Lebanon, copper from northern Arabia, gold and precious stones from the desert between Palestine and Egypt, dolerite from Magan (the Sinaitic peninsula) and timber from Dilmun in the Persian Gulf.

    1
    0
  • In 1819 he was apprenticed to Nicholas Wood, a coal-viewer at Killingworth, after which he was sent in 1822 to attend the science classes at the university of Edinburgh.

    1
    0
  • It is situated in a narrow valley between two hills called West Mountain and Skene's Mountain, and Wood Creek flows through the village and empties into the lake with a fall, from which valuable water-power is derived; there are various manufactures, and the village owns and operates the water works.

    1
    0
  • In 1809 it was replaced by the bitter wood or bitter ash of Jamaica, Picraena excelsa, which was found to possess similar properties and could be obtained in pieces of much larger size.

    1
    0
  • Since that date this wood has continued in use in Britain under the name of quassia to the exclusion of the Surinam quassia, which, however, is still employed in France and Germany.

    1
    0
  • The wood is nearly white, or of a yellowish tint, but sometimes exhibits blackish markings due to the mycelium of a fungus.

    1
    0
  • The wood has a pure bitter taste, and is without odour or aroma.

    1
    0
  • It is usually to be met with in the form of turnings or raspings, the former being obtained in the maufacture of the "bitter cups" which are made of this wood.

    1
    0
  • The wood contains no tannin, and for this reason quassia, like chiretta and calumba, may be preserved with iron.

    1
    0
  • They had a taste for ornaments, necklaces of wood, bone and shells, worked in different designs.

    1
    0
  • With the latter system practically as much sugar is obtained from the canes as by diffusion, and the resulting megass furnishes, in a well-appointed factory, sufficient fuel for the crop. With diffusion, however, in addition to the strict scientific control necessary to secure the benefits of the process, fuel - that is, coal or wood - has to be provided for the working off of the crop, since the spent chips or slices from the diffusers are useless for this purpose; although it is true that in some plantations the spent chips have to a certain extent been utilized as fuel by mixing them with a portion of the molasses, which otherwise would have been sold or converted into rum.

    1
    0
  • He died on the 3rd of May 1888, at Abbey Wood, near London.

    1
    0
  • In the broad sandy wadi beds the tamarisk (athl) is everywhere found; its wood is used for making domestic implements of all sorts.

    1
    0
  • The staple productions are machinery, railway engines and carriages, steel, tin and bronze wares, pottery, bent and carved wood furniture, textiles and chemicals.

    1
    0
  • Drawers of cedar or chips of the wood are now employed to protect furs and woollen stuffs from injury by moths.

    1
    0
  • Cedar-wood, however, is said to be injurious to natural history objects, and to instruments placed in cabinets made of it, as the resinous matter of the wood becomes deposited upon them.

    1
    0
  • The Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) is a kind of cypress, the wood of which is very durable.

    1
    0
  • It has small leaves and fibrous bark, the wood is light, soft and easily-worked, and very durable in contact with the soil, and is much used for boat-building and for making fences and coopers' staves.

    1
    0
  • When the substance operated upon is of uncertain composition, as, for example, coal, wood, coal-tar, &c., the term destructive distillation is employed.

    1
    0
  • The entrance from Chesapeake Bay is defended by Fortress Monroe on Old Point Comfort and by Fort Wood on a small island called the Rip Raps near the middle of the channel; and at Portsmouth, a few miles up the Elizabeth river, is, an important United States navy-yard.

    1
    0
  • Its most distinctive manufactures are paper and wood pulp; more valuable are foundry and machine shop products; other manufactures are safes, malt liquors, flour, woollens, Corliss engines, carriages and wagons and agricultural implements.

    2
    1
  • The gilded wood carvings of Santa Clara are noteworthy; and in the courtyard of the federal palace there are other specimens of the same work.

    1
    0
  • The parish church of Santa Maria has some good pictures and wood carvings.

    1
    0
  • A large trade is carried on in grain, flour, alcohol, cattle and wood.

    1
    0
  • The place of honor may perhaps be conferred upon sculptures in wood, representing the Indian Buddhists, Asangha and Vasabandhu, preserved in the Golden Hall of Kofuku-ji, Nara.

    1
    0
  • The pillars, architraves, ceilings, panels, and almost every available part of the structure, are covered with arabesques and sculptured figures of dragons, lions, tigers, birds, flowers, and even pictorial compositions with landscapes and figures, deeply carved in solid or open workthe wood sometimes plain, sometimes overlaid with pigment and gilding, as in the panelled ceiling of the chapel of Iyeyasu in Tokyo.

    1
    0
  • The metallic bowl and mouthpiece of the pipe offered a tempting surface for embellishment, as well as the clasp of the pouch; and the netsuke, being made of wood, ivory or other material susceptible of carving, also gave occasion for art and ingenuity.

    1
    0
  • Millions of commercial articles in metal-work, wood and ivory flood the European markets, and may be bought in any street in Europe at a small price, but they offer a variety of design and an excellence of workmanship which place them almost beyond Western competition.

    1
    0
  • Evidently the idea of the great Yokoya experts, the originators of the style, was to break away from the somewhat formal monotony of ordinary engraving, where each line performs exactly the same function, and to convert the chisel into an artists i It is first boiled in a lye obtained by lixiviating wood ashes; it is next polished with charcoal powder; then immersed in plum vinegar and salt; then washed with weak lye and placed in a, tub of water to remove all traces of alkali, the final step being to digest in a boiling solution of copper sulphate, verdigris and water.

    1
    0
  • Among the artists of early times it is often difficult to distinguish between the carver of wood and the caster of bronze.

    1
    0
  • The latter sometimes made his own models in wax, carving In sometimes chiselled them in wood, and sometimes had Wood and recourse to a specialist in wood-carving.

    1
    0
  • When Japanese sculpture in wood or ivory is spoken of, the first idea that presents itself is connected with the netsuke, which, of all the art objects found in Japan, is perhaps the most Netsuke essentially Japanese.

    1
    0
  • They have not even the attraction of being cleanly sculptured in wood, but are covered with thinly lacquered muslin, which, though doubtless a good preservative, accentuates their puppet-like character.

    1
    0
  • Nevertheless, Matsumotos figures marked an epoch in Japanese wood sculpture.

    1
    0
  • The roof was thatched, and perhaps had a gable at each end with a hole to allow the smoke of the wood fire to escape.

    1
    0
  • Its only notable production of a ceramic character was the work of Miura Kenya (1830-1843), who followed the methods of the celebrated Haritsu (I 6881704) of KiOto in decorating plain or lacquered wood with mosaics of raku faience having colored glazes.

    1
    0
  • The wood is heavy, strong; and very close-grained and used in turnery.

    1
    0
  • The portage at this place between the Mohawk river and Wood Creek, which are about 1 m.

    1
    0
  • About 1725 there were built, to protect the carrying-place here, Fort Bull, on Wood Creek, which was surprised and taken by French and Indians in March 1756, and Fort Williams, on the Mohawk, which, like Fort Craven, also on the Mohawk, was destroyed by Colonel Daniel Webb after the reduction of Oswego by the French in August 1756.

    1
    0
  • In 1796 a canal was built across the old portage between Wood Creek and the Mohawk river.

    1
    0
  • Amboyna wood, of great value for ornamental work, is obtained from the hard knots which occur on certain trees in the forests of Ceram.

    1
    0
  • The larvae known as caddis-worms are aquatic. The mature females lay their eggs in the water, and the newly-hatched larvae provide themselves with cases made of various particles such as grains of sand, pieces of wood or leaves stuck together with silk secreted from the salivary glands of the insect.

    1
    0
  • The "general" mixture consists of Too litres of spirit, and 5 litres of wood spirit or 2 litre of pyridine.

    1
    0
  • The British force, consisting of the second division and Wood's column, numbered in all 4200 Europeans and some 1000 natives.

    1
    0
  • It is ordinarily caught in wooden traps of simple construction, being little enclosures of stakes or brush in which the bait is placed upon a trigger, with a short upright stick supporting a log of wood, which falls upon its victim on the slightest disturbance.

    1
    0
  • The floor of the sluice is laid with riffles made of strips of wood 2 in.

    1
    0
  • The action is not properly understood; it may be due to the reducing gases (hydrogen, hydrocarbons, &c.) which are invariably present in wood charcoal.

    1
    0
  • The ores, having been broken and ground, generally in tube mills, until they pass a 150 to 200-mesh sieve, are transferred to the leaching vats, which are constructed of wood, iron or masonry; steel vats, coated inside and out with pitch, of circular section and holding up to woo tons, have come into use.

    1
    0
  • The precipitating boxes, generally made of wood but sometimes of steel, and set on an incline, are divided by partitions into alternately wide and narrow compartments, so that the liquor travels upwards in its passage through the wide divisions and downwards through the narrow divisions.

    1
    0
  • They are provided with lids, made either of lead or of wood lined with lead, which have openings to serve for the introduction of the alloy and acid, and a vent tube to lead off the vapours evolved during the operation.

    1
    0
  • As timber trees many of the species are valuable from their rapidity of growth and for the production of light durable wood, serviceable for many purposes.

    1
    0
  • The ordinary houses are of wood; but the more important buildings are of more solid materials.

    1
    0
  • Dioscorides refers to it as agallochon, a wood brought from Arabia or India, which was odoriferous but with an astringent and bitter taste.

    2
    1
  • Its houses are generally built of wood, with high roofs and wide verandahs shaded by cocoanut or cabbage palms. The principal buildings are the court house, in the centre of the town, government house, at the southern end, Fort George, towards the north, the British bank of Honduras, the hospital, the Roman Catholic convent, and the Wesleyan church, which is the largest and handsomest of all.

    1
    0
  • For example, when Moray, after Mary was in Elizabeth's power (May 16, 1568), wished Elizabeth to have the matter tried, he in May-June 1568 sent John Wood to England with Scots translations of the letters.

    1
    0
  • Wood was to ask, "if the French originals are found to tally with the Scots translations, will that be reckoned good evidence ?"

    1
    0
  • Now, on the 11th of June 1568, Lennox was in the company of John Wood, a creature of Moray's, and Wood, as we saw, brought copies of the Scots renderings of the Letters into England in May - June 1568.

    1
    0
  • It was argued by Andrew Lang that Wood was likely to show these letters to Lennox; and that as Lennox follows Moray's version of Mary's long and murderous letter, and does not follow Letter II., the murderous letter (a forgery) was then part of the dossier of Mary's accusers.

    1
    0
  • Thus the question remains, why, if Wood about the 11th of June showed to Lennox Letter II.

    1
    0
  • The reply may be that the Scots versions were regarded as a great secret; that Lennox was a married man; and that though Lennox in June knew about Mary's letters, doubtless from Wood, or from common report (Bishop Jewell in a letter of August 1567 mentions that he had heard of them), yet Wood did not show to him the Scots copies.

    1
    0
  • But, on the other hand, as Lennox after meeting Wood wrote to Crawford for his reminiscences of his own interview with Mary (January 21, 1567), and as these reminiscences were only useful as corroborative of Mary's account in Letter II., it seems that Wood had either shown Lennox the letters or had spoken of their contents.

    1
    0
  • After being nursed by friends at Leipzig and Carlsbad, he rejoined his corps and fell in an engagement outside a wood near Gadebusch in Mecklenburg on the 26th of August 1813.

    1
    0
  • No group of terrestrial insects escapes their attacks - even larvae boring in wood are detected by ichneumon flies with excessively long ovipositors.

    1
    0
  • The ovipositor is long and prominent, enabling the female insect to lay her eggs in the wood of trees, where the white larvae, whose legs are excessively short, tunnel and feed.

    1
    0
  • This may be accomplished by using a vessel with a somewhat wide bottom, and inserting the substance so that it may be volatilized very rapidly, as, for example, in tubes of Wood's alloy, D and by filling the tube with hydrogen.

    1
    0
  • The manufacture of paper and wood pulp showed an increased product in 1905 19.1% greater than in 190o; and flour and grist mill products were valued in 1905 43.6% higher than in 1900.

    1
    0
  • An adapter h is fixed on a telescope-tube, made of wood, in Fraunhofer's usual fashion.

    1
    0
  • But the two substances were generally confounded as "fixed alkali" (carbonate of ammonia being "volatile alkali"), till Duhamel du Monceau in 1736 established the fact that common salt and the ashes of seaplants contain the same base as is found in natural deposits of soda salts ("mineral alkali"), and that this body is different from the "vegetable alkali" obtained by incinerating land plants or wood (pot-ashes).

    1
    0
  • The manufacture of biscuits and gingerbread, and of leather and farm implements is carried on, and there is considerable traffic in wood, wine, and the live-stock and agricultural produce of the surrounding country.

    1
    0
  • Of these methods one of the chief is the plan of tubbing, or lining the excavation with an impermeable casing of wood or iron, generally the latter, built up in segments forming rings, which are piled upon each other throughout the whole depth of the water-bearing strata.

    1
    0
  • In Yorkshire hollow square pillars, formed by piling up short blocks of wood or chocks, are often used instead of props formed of a single stem.

    1
    0
  • For shaft linings steel rings of H or channel section supported by intermediate struts are also used, and cross-bearers or buntons of steel joists and rail guides are now generally substituted for wood.

    1
    0
  • In many cases a light but air-proof cloth, specially made for the purpose, is used instead of wood for brattices, as being more handy and more easily removed.

    1
    0
  • The guides or conductors in the pit may be constructed of wood, in which case rectangular fir beams, about 3 by 4 in., are used, attached at intervals of a few feet to buntons or cross-beams built into the lining of the pit.

    1
    0
  • The drum, when round ropes are used, is a plain broad cylinder, with flanged rims, and cased with soft wood packing, upon which the rope is coiled; the breadth is made sufficient to take the whole length of the rope at two laps.

    1
    0
  • A flexible steel band, lined with wood blocks, is gripped on the motor fly-wheel or pulley by a screw A, which, together with W, is adjusted to hold the brake steady.

    1
    0
  • In or near the city of San Antonio are the ruins of five missions built of stone; and missions were more numerous in east Texas, but they were built of wood and nothing remains to mark their location.

    1
    0
  • The industries of Arnstadt include iron and other metal founding, the manufacture of leather, cloth, tobacco, weighing-machines, paper, playing-cards, chairs, gloves, shoes, iron safes, and beer, and market-gardening and trade in grain and wood are carried on.

    1
    0
  • The commerce consists principally in wine, hides, horses, coal, wood and cereals.

    1
    0
  • Red cedar (Cedrilla) abounds in the riverine flats, but the quality is poor and commercially valueless; and oaks are plentiful, but the wood is coarse.

    1
    0
  • A considerable native export trade in wood, charcoal, bamboo, medicines, paper umbrellas, oranges, otter skins and tobacco leaf is carried on.

    1
    0
  • The stick with which Elisha made the iron to swim in that passage, and the wood which Isaac carried up the mountain for his own pyre " were sacraments reserved for fulfilment in the time of Christ."

    1
    0
  • That they retained the laying on of hands in their spiritual baptism was an inconsistency which their orthodox opponents did not fail to note; the human hand, argued the latter, is, like the rest of the body, no less the work of the evil creator than water, oil, bread and wine, or than the wood, metal and stone out of which altars, images and churches are made.

    1
    0
  • Wood's Hole is a station of the United States.

    1
    0
  • There are many insectivorous birds; among the song birds are the hermit thrush, the wood thrush, the Wilson's thrush, the brown thrasher, the bobolink, the catbird, the oven bird, the house wren, the song sparrow, the fox sparrow, the vesper sparrow, the white-throated sparrow (Peabody bird), the goldfinch and the robin.

    1
    0
  • When the ice breaks up in spring they always leave their embankments, and rove about until a little before the fall of the leaf, when they return to their old habitations, and lay in their winter stock of wood.

    1
    0
  • When they erect a new habitation they fell the wood early in summer, but seldom begin building till towards the end of August.

    1
    0
  • These experiments resulted in the legislation of 1855, when the use of duty-free alcohol mixed with 10% by volume of wood naphtha, known as methylated spirits, was authorized for manufacturing purposes only.

    1
    0
  • In Sweden, where wood pulp is made in enormous quantities, the manufacture of alcohol from the waste sulphite lyes is carried on, and it was estimated that in 1920 the probable capacity was in the neighbourhood of 8,000,000 gal.; the actual production, however, amounted to about 2,750,000 gal.

    1
    0
  • Mineral, vegetable and animal substances, by means of tools and apparatus of stone, wood and bone - tools for cutting, or edged tools; tools for abrading and smoothing the surfaces of substances, like planes, rasps and sandpaper; tools for striking, that is, pounding for the sake of pounding, or for crushing and fracturing violently; perforating tools; devices for grasping and holding firmly.

    1
    0
  • The hammock was universal in the tropics, and chairs of wood or stone.

    1
    0
  • The tribes quarried by means of crowbars and picks of wood and bone.

    1
    0
  • Edible plants, and those for dyes and medicines, were on their lists, as well as wood for tools, utensils and weapons, and fibres for textiles.

    1
    0
  • It is manufactured by distilling wood in iron retorts at about 50o C., when an aqueous distillate, containing methyl alcohol, acetone, acetic acid and methyl acetic ester, is obtained.

    1
    0
  • The amount of methyl alcohol present in wood spirit is determined by converting it into methyl iodide by acting with phosphorus iodide; and the acetone by converting it into iodoform by boiling with an alkaline solution of iodine in potassium iodide; ethyl alcohol is detected by giving acetylene on heating with concentrated sulphuric acid, methyl alcohol, !under the same circumstances, giving methyl ether.

    1
    0
  • The houses are mainly built of wood, and on the 31st of July 1909 some 12,000 houses and other buildings were destroyed by fire.

    1
    0
  • This was of wood; the third sight, also of wood, was for guns without a dispart patch, which consequently could not be layed at elevations below the dispart.

    1
    0
  • The image of the Lar, made of wood, stone or metal, sometimes even of silver, stood in its special shrine (lararium), which in early times was in the atrium, but was afterwards transferred to other parts.

    1
    0
  • Coloured and white paper, ready-made clothing, cellulose, tobacco, lime and liqueurs are the chief manufactures, while a considerable export trade is done down the Main in wood, cattle and wine.

    1
    0
  • They carried coal, wood and grain, also iron-ore, Stinnes having begun to manufacture iron and steel.

    1
    0
  • These cultivate gambier and pepper successfully in Bintang, and there is a considerable trade in wood.

    1
    0
  • But by boldly scattering his force and by making use of the Bossu wood and the farms, he covered the cross-roads and showed a firm front to the very superior force which Ney commanded.

    1
    0
  • Picton at once stopped the victorious French advance to the east of the road, but the remaining division (Jerome) of Reille's corps now reached the front and Ney flung it into the Bossu wood to clear that place and keep his left flank free.

    1
    0
  • A fierce fight now broke out all along the line, in which J erome steadily made ground in the Bossu wood, while Picton showing a dauntless front maintained his position.

    1
    0
  • Together, these troops drove Billow out of Plancenoit, and forced him back towards the Paris wood.

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  • Gardens and promenades have taken the place of the old ramparts, and on the south the city is bounded by the Frederiks and the Flora parks, between which runs the fine avenue called the Dreef, leading to the Haarlemmer Hout or wood.

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  • Allowance must of course be made for the thickness of the wood.

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  • In striking, the lower die was fixed into a block of wood, and the blank piece of metal laid upon it by hand.

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  • Wood's copper money for Ireland and America was coined at Wolverhampton (1700-1722), and the tradesmen's tokens were struck at various towns.

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  • Kosen, which became a town in 1869, has large mill-works; it has a trade in wood and wine.

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  • He was by occupation a worker in wood, but took to writing for Social Democratic newspapers, and was from 1897 to 1902 on the staff of the Konigsberger Volkszeitung and afterwards on that of the Volksstimme at Chemnitz.

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  • In the last instance, if the forks are fixed on one solid piece of wood which can be grasped with the hand, the beat will be actually felt by the hand.

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  • Timber trees are almost confined to the river valleys, where willows, yellow wood, iron wood, red wood, mimosas and, in deep gorges, the wild fig are found.

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  • On the promotion of Colonel Wood to the command of the brigade, Mr Roosevelt became colonel of the regiment, which took an especially prominent part in the storming of San Juan Hill.

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  • The character of the relics shows that in some cases the settlements have been the dwellings of a people using no materials but stone, bone and wood for their implements, ornaments and weapons; in others, of a people using bronze as well as stone and bone; and in others again the occasional use of iron is disclosed.

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  • The implements found in the relic bed under it were axe-heads of stone, with their haftings of stag's horn and wood; a flint saw, set in a handle of fir wood and fastened with asphalt; flint flakes and arrow-heads; harpoons of stag's horn with barbs; awls, needles, chisels, fish-hooks and other implements of bone; a comb of yew wood 5 in.