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woburn

woburn

woburn Sentence Examples

  • It has been noticed at Woburn Abbey that the antlers are shed and replaced twice a year.

  • The true home of this deer has never been ascertained, and probably never will be; all the few known specimens now living being kept in confinement - the great majority in the duke of Bedford's park at Woburn, Bedfordshire.

  • At Woburn, Leighton, Ampthill, Sandy, Upware, Wicken and Potton, near the base of Upper Neocomian ironsands, there is a band between 6 in.

  • Additional significance to the value of the above experiments on wheat and barley is afforded by the fact that the same series, with but slight modifications, has also been carried out since 1876 at the Woburn (Bedfordshire) experimental farm of the Royal Agricultural Society of England, the soil here being of light sandy character, and thus very different from the heavy soil of Rothamsted.

  • SIR JOSEPH PAXTON (1801-1865), English architect and ornamental gardener, was born of humble parents at Milton Bryant, near Woburn, Bedfordshire, on the 3rd of August 1801, and was educated at the grammar school of that town.

  • BENJAMIN THOMPSON RUMFORD, Count (1753-1814), British-American man of science, philanthropist and administrator, was born at Woburn, in Massachusetts, on the 26th of March 1753.

  • He was at Paris in 1658, but had returned to Woburn in December 1659.

  • Some very old cedars exist also at Syon House, Woburn Abbey, Warwick Castle and elsewhere, which presumably date from the 17th century.

  • In England small herds are kept by the duke of Bedford at Woburn Abbey, Bedfordshire, and by Mr C. J.

  • Winchester is served by the southern division of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected with Boston, Arlington, Medford, Stoneham and Woburn by electric lines.

  • In 1638 allotments of land between the Mystic Pond and the present Woburn were made to various Charlestown settlers, including John Harvard and Increase Nowell (1590-1655), secretary of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1644-1649, and the new settlement was called Waterfield.

  • Most of this territory in 1642 was incorporated in Woburn and was called South Woburn.

  • WOBURN, a market town in the northern parliamentary division of Bedfordshire, England, with a station (Woburn Sands), on a branch of the London & North-Western railway, 2 m.

  • To the west of the town lies Woburn Park, the demesne of Woburn Abbey,.

  • Woburn, Massachusetts >>

  • Few other rodents have been designedly naturalized, but the North American grey squirrel (Sciurus cinereus) appears to be established as a wild animal in Woburn Park, Bedfordshire, England, and may probably spread thence.

  • From Woburn through Ampthill to Potton a more elevated tract is formed by the Lower Greensand.

  • Beds of fuller's earth occur in this formation at Woburn.

  • Potton (2033), Shefford (874), and Woburn (1129) are lesser towns, and local centres of the agricultural trade.

  • Woburn Abbey, belonging to the Russells since 1547, is the seat of the duke of Bedford, the greatest landowner in the county.

  • The mansion of Woburn Abbey dates from the middle of the 18th century.

  • WOBURN, a city of Middlesex county, Massachusetts, U.S.A.,.

  • Woburn is served by the southern division of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected with Burlington, Lexington, Reading, Stoneham, Wilmington, Winchester, Arlington, Boston and Lowell by electric railways.

  • Woburn proper, known as "the Centre," North Woburn, Woburn Highlands, Cummingsville (in the western part), Mishawum (in the north-east), Montvale (in the east) and Walnut Hill (also in the east).

  • Forest Park (53 acres) is a fine stretch of natural woods, and there are several small parks and squares; on Woburn Common is the Public Library, by H.

  • Among colonial houses still standing are the birthplace of Count Rumford (in North Woburn), built about 1714, and now preserved by the Rumford Historical Association as a depository for the Rumford Library and historical memorials, and the Baldwin mansion (built partly in 1661 and later enlarged), the home of Loammi Baldwin (1780-1838), known as "the father of civil engineering in America."

  • Woburn's manufactories are concentrated within a small area.

  • Woburn, first settled about 1638-1640, was incorporated as a township under its present name in 1642, and was the first township set off from Charlestown.

  • It was named after Woburn in Bedfordshire by its chief founder, Edward Johnson (1599-1672), whose work, The Wonder-Working Providence of Zion's Saviour (1654; latest ed.

  • Woburn's industrial growth dates from the construction through the township of the old Middlesex Canal.

  • Converse, Legends of Woburn, 1642-1892 (2 vols., Woburn, 1892-1896); Samuel Sewall, History of Woburn, 1640 to 1860 (Boston, 1868); F.

  • Wetherell, Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of Woburn (Woburn, 1892); and G.

  • leaven left at roundabout at Woburn Rd Ind Est.

  • located at the bottom of Woburn Place, just off Russell Square.

  • Two species have been brought to Britain: The larger Indian muntjac was brought to Woburn Park in about 1900.

  • muntjac deer was introduced into England in the 19th century by the Duke of Bedford to Woburn Park.

  • palatial mansion Woburn Abbey.

  • I took the spare three seater squab in correct moquette to Block & Son in Woburn Sands so he can find a suitable match.

  • It has been noticed at Woburn Abbey that the antlers are shed and replaced twice a year.

  • The true home of this deer has never been ascertained, and probably never will be; all the few known specimens now living being kept in confinement - the great majority in the duke of Bedford's park at Woburn, Bedfordshire.

  • At Woburn, Leighton, Ampthill, Sandy, Upware, Wicken and Potton, near the base of Upper Neocomian ironsands, there is a band between 6 in.

  • Additional significance to the value of the above experiments on wheat and barley is afforded by the fact that the same series, with but slight modifications, has also been carried out since 1876 at the Woburn (Bedfordshire) experimental farm of the Royal Agricultural Society of England, the soil here being of light sandy character, and thus very different from the heavy soil of Rothamsted.

  • SIR JOSEPH PAXTON (1801-1865), English architect and ornamental gardener, was born of humble parents at Milton Bryant, near Woburn, Bedfordshire, on the 3rd of August 1801, and was educated at the grammar school of that town.

  • BENJAMIN THOMPSON RUMFORD, Count (1753-1814), British-American man of science, philanthropist and administrator, was born at Woburn, in Massachusetts, on the 26th of March 1753.

  • He was at Paris in 1658, but had returned to Woburn in December 1659.

  • Some very old cedars exist also at Syon House, Woburn Abbey, Warwick Castle and elsewhere, which presumably date from the 17th century.

  • In England small herds are kept by the duke of Bedford at Woburn Abbey, Bedfordshire, and by Mr C. J.

  • Winchester is served by the southern division of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected with Boston, Arlington, Medford, Stoneham and Woburn by electric lines.

  • In 1638 allotments of land between the Mystic Pond and the present Woburn were made to various Charlestown settlers, including John Harvard and Increase Nowell (1590-1655), secretary of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1644-1649, and the new settlement was called Waterfield.

  • Most of this territory in 1642 was incorporated in Woburn and was called South Woburn.

  • WOBURN, a market town in the northern parliamentary division of Bedfordshire, England, with a station (Woburn Sands), on a branch of the London & North-Western railway, 2 m.

  • To the west of the town lies Woburn Park, the demesne of Woburn Abbey,.

  • Woburn, Massachusetts >>

  • Few other rodents have been designedly naturalized, but the North American grey squirrel (Sciurus cinereus) appears to be established as a wild animal in Woburn Park, Bedfordshire, England, and may probably spread thence.

  • From Woburn through Ampthill to Potton a more elevated tract is formed by the Lower Greensand.

  • Beds of fuller's earth occur in this formation at Woburn.

  • Potton (2033), Shefford (874), and Woburn (1129) are lesser towns, and local centres of the agricultural trade.

  • Woburn Abbey, belonging to the Russells since 1547, is the seat of the duke of Bedford, the greatest landowner in the county.

  • The mansion of Woburn Abbey dates from the middle of the 18th century.

  • WOBURN, a city of Middlesex county, Massachusetts, U.S.A.,.

  • Woburn is served by the southern division of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected with Burlington, Lexington, Reading, Stoneham, Wilmington, Winchester, Arlington, Boston and Lowell by electric railways.

  • Woburn proper, known as "the Centre," North Woburn, Woburn Highlands, Cummingsville (in the western part), Mishawum (in the north-east), Montvale (in the east) and Walnut Hill (also in the east).

  • Forest Park (53 acres) is a fine stretch of natural woods, and there are several small parks and squares; on Woburn Common is the Public Library, by H.

  • Among colonial houses still standing are the birthplace of Count Rumford (in North Woburn), built about 1714, and now preserved by the Rumford Historical Association as a depository for the Rumford Library and historical memorials, and the Baldwin mansion (built partly in 1661 and later enlarged), the home of Loammi Baldwin (1780-1838), known as "the father of civil engineering in America."

  • Woburn's manufactories are concentrated within a small area.

  • Woburn, first settled about 1638-1640, was incorporated as a township under its present name in 1642, and was the first township set off from Charlestown.

  • It was named after Woburn in Bedfordshire by its chief founder, Edward Johnson (1599-1672), whose work, The Wonder-Working Providence of Zion's Saviour (1654; latest ed.

  • Woburn's industrial growth dates from the construction through the township of the old Middlesex Canal.

  • Converse, Legends of Woburn, 1642-1892 (2 vols., Woburn, 1892-1896); Samuel Sewall, History of Woburn, 1640 to 1860 (Boston, 1868); F.

  • Wetherell, Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of Woburn (Woburn, 1892); and G.

  • Like Woburn these monkeys were found to be carrying simian herpes virus.

  • I took the spare three seater squab in correct moquette to Block & Son in Woburn Sands so he can find a suitable match.

  • Bradley, Walter G., et al. Neurology in Clinical Practice,4th ed. Woburn, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann, 2003.

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