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witchcraft

witchcraft

witchcraft Sentence Examples

  • Andover was a prominent centre in the witchcraft trials of 1692.

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  • Native courts may not deal with murder, witchcraft, cannibalism or slavery.

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  • set forth the doctrine of lecherous demons as an indisputable fact; and in the history of the Inquisition and of trials for witchcraft may be found the confessions of many who bore witness to their reality.

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  • Autos-da fe were rare events; their victims were not as a rule serious thinkers, but persons accused of sorcery or Judaizing, nor were they more numerous than the victims of the English laws relating to witchcraft and heresy.

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  • He attended the trials, investigated many of the cases himself, and wrote sermons on witchcraft, the Memorable Providences and The Wonders of the Invisible World (1693), which increased the excitement of the people.

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  • 1 50o), the Dominican inquisitor of Cologne, who with Heinrich Kramer (institor) published M alleus maleficarum or Hexenhammer, the standard textbook on witchcraft, especially in Germany.

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  • Under the general law against heresy their books were burnt by the hangman, they were searched for signs of witchcraft, they were imprisoned for five weeks and then sent away.

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  • But these beliefs are far from being confined to the uncivilized; Greek philosophers like Porphyry, no less than the fathers of the Church, held that the world was pervaded with spirits; side by side with the belief in witchcraft, we can trace through the middle ages the survival of primitive animistic views; and in our own day even these beliefs subsist in unsuspected vigour among the peasantry of the more uneducated European countries.

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  • To the beginning of the 13th century the popular superstitions regarding sorcery, witchcraft and compacts with the devil were condemned by the ecclesiastical authorities as heathenish, sinful and heretical.

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  • All these trials were conducted in accordance with the English law of the time; there had been an execution for witchcraft at Charlestown in 1648; there was a case in Boston in 1655; in 1680 a woman of Newbury was condemned to death for witchcraft but was reprieved by Governor Simon Bradstreet; in England and Scotland there were many executions long after the Salem delusion died out.

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  • In native cases the chiefs have civil jurisdiction in disputes among their own tribesmen and criminal jurisdiction over natives except in capital cases, offences against the person or property of non-natives, pretended witchcraft, cases arising out of marriages by Christian rites, &c. An appeal lies to a magistrates' court from every judgment of a native chief, and from the magistrates' judgment on such appeal to a native high court.

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  • Having been thrown into prison by her father, who was afraid of being injured by her witchcraft, she escaped by means of her art and fled to the temple of Helios the Sun-god, her reputed grandfather.

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  • The great blot on his memory is his cruelty, which at times was frightful, and showed itself in its full fierceness in the punishment of persons accused of witchcraft, soothsaying or magical practices.

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  • Again imprisoned, this time on a charge of witchcraft, he escaped from captivity in 1 59 1, and was deprived by parliament of his lands and titles; as an outlaw his career was one of extraordinary lawlessness.

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  • While the Franciscans rejected the belief in witchcraft, the Dominicans were most zealous in persecuting witches.

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  • The familiar, who is sometimes replaced by the devil, commonly figured in witchcraft trials; and a statute of James I.

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  • Under the influence of the touchstone of strict inquiry set on foot by the Royal Society, the marvels of witchcraft, sympathetic powders and other relics of medieval superstition disappeared like a mist before the sun, whilst accurate observations and demonstrations of a host of new wonders accumulated, amongst which were numerous contributions to the anatomy of animals, and none perhaps more noteworthy than the observations, made by the aid of microscopes constructed by himself, of Leeuwenhoek, the Dutch naturalist (1683), some of whose instruments were presented by him to the society.

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  • On Witchcraft: See C. W.

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  • Witchcraft and the influence of fairies are still often believed in.

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  • A fantastic and elaborate doctrine of symbolism existed which comprised all nature; witchcraft, alchemy and medicine were its practical expressions.

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  • The Corwin or "Witch" house, so called from a tradition that Jonathan Corwin, one of the judges in the witchcraft trials, held preliminary examinations of witches here, is said to have been the property of Roger Williams. The Pickering house, built before 1660, was the homestead of Timothy Pickering and of other members of that family.

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  • On a bluff projecting into South river is the old "Burying Point," set apart in 1637, and the oldest cemetery in the city; its oldest stone is dated 1673; here are buried Governor Simon Bradstreet, Chief-Justice Benjamin Lynde (1666-1745) and Judge John Hathorne (1641-1717) of the witchcraft court.

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  • The witchcraft delusion of 1692 centred about Salem Village, now in the township of Danvers, but then a part of Salem.

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  • Sir Walter Scott mentions a belief in the banshee as existing in the highlands of Scotland (Demonology and Witchcraft, p. 351).

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  • Mar was arrested on a charge of magic, and died, whether murdered or from natural causes is uncertain, while his accomplices are said to have been the protomartyrs of witchcraft, scarcely heard of in Scotland till the reformers began to burn old women.

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  • The latinized form of the Greek word was corrupted into nigromantia, connecting the word with niger, black, and so was applied to the "black art," "black magic," in the sense of witchcraft, sorcery.

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  • It is also notorious for its many witchcraft trials.

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  • Poole, about a thousandth part of those executed for witchcraft in the British Isles in the 16th and 17th centuries).

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  • The mullahs or priests enjoy very great influence, but the people are very superstitious, believing in witchcraft, omens, spirits and the evil eye.

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  • For such offences as witchcraft, fraud, removing landmarks, and adultery the criminal had his heart cut out on the altar, or his head crushed between two stones, while even lesser punishments were harsh, such as that of slanderers, whose hair was singed with a pine-torch to the scalp.

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  • In May 1692 during the witchcraft delusion, on the accusation of some personal enemies in his former congregation who had sued him for debt, Burroughs was arrested and charged, among other offences, with "extraordinary Lifting and such feats of strength as could not be done without Diabolicall Assistance."

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  • After the adoption of Christianity, and possibly to a certain extent even before, such persons came to be regarded with disfavour - whence the persecutions for witchcraft - but it is clear from Tacitus's works and other sources that their influence in early times must have been very great.

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  • concerning witchcraft (Dec. 5, 1484) has brought upon him many attacks.

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  • The Bechuanas and all Kaffir tribes believe that death, even at an advanced age, if not from hunger or violence, is due to witchcraft, and blood is required to expiate or avenge it.

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  • Drake, Annals of Witchcraft (Boston, 1869) and The Witchcraft Delusion in New England (3 vols., Roxbury, 1866), this last a reprint of accounts of the time by Cotton Mather and R.

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  • (Cambridge, 1885); Barrett Wendell, Cotton Mather, the Puritan Priest (New York, 1891), a remarkably sympathetic study and particularly valuable for its insight into (and its defence of) Mather's attitude toward witchcraft; Abijah P. Marvin, The Life and Times of Cotton Mather (Boston, 1892); 1VI.

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  • She was a bride of only seventeen and was related to the royal house; yet, as his Catholic biographer put it, "by sorcery and witchcraft he did so allure that poor gentlewoman that she could not live without him."

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  • There is much faith in dreams, and in the utterances of certain "wise men," who practise an embryonic magic and witchcraft.

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  • against all "tonsured" persons, supra); (d) Offences in regard to holy places - " brawling " and such like; (e) Heresy, schism, apostasy, witchcraft.

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  • PHARMACY, a term which in the original Greek form signified the use of any kind of drug (46p,uaKov), potion or spell, and hence also poison and witchcraft.

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  • They are an intelligent and industrious people, growing their own crops, manufacturing their own cloth and mats, and building their own boats, while many read Arabic more or less fluently, although still believers in magic and witchcraft.

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  • Not till 1736 were the statutes against witchcraft repealed; an act which the Associate Presbytery at Edinburgh in 1743 declared to be" contrary to the express law of God, for which a holy God may be provoked in a way of righteous judgment."The recognition and condemnation of errors in religious belief is by no means confined to the Christian Church.

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  • Although punishment by whipping and by standing in the pillory was prohibited by an act of Congress in 1839, in so far as the Federal government had jurisdiction, both these forms of punishment were retained in Delaware, and standing in the pillory was prescribed by statute as a punishment for a number of offences, including various kinds of larceny and forgery, highway robbery, and even pretending " to exercise the art of witchcraft, fortune-telling or dealing with spirits," at least until 1893.

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  • A witchcraft scare (at its worst in 1691-1697, though the earliest Connecticut case was in1646-1647and the earliest in Boston in 1648) led to another tragedy of ignorance.

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  • Lowell are two on " New England two Centuries Ago " and " Witchcraft."

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  • He took refuge in St Andrews Castle, where " a wise woman," Alison Pearson, who was ultimately burned for witchcraft, cured him of a serious illness.

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  • The custom of suttee, or widow-burning, has long been abolished in the state, but the people retain all their superstitions regarding witches and sorcery; and as late as 1870, a Bhil woman, about eighty years old, was swung to death at Kushalgarh on an accusation of witchcraft.

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  • Island Magee had, besides antiquarian remains, a notoriety as a home of witchcraft, and was the scene of an act of reprisal for the muchdisputed massacre of Protestants about 1641, by the soldiery of Carrickfergus.

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  • Albert then declared she was his lawful wife; and subsequently, during his absence, she was seized by order of Duke Ernest and condemned to death for witchcraft.

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  • The church and church theology, to whose guidance the masses now surrendered themselves, took in along with them their superstition, their polytheism, their magic, their myths, and all the machinery of religious witchcraft.

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  • The suit was purposely protracted, and at length, in 1620, the unhappy woman, then in her seventy-fourth year, was arrested on a formal charge of witchcraft.

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  • The young king regarded him with an affection which the superstition of the time attributed to witchcraft.

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  • Moreover the bull contained no essentially new regulations as to witchcraft.

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  • These leaders skilfully seized upon every breach of tradition to inflame popular passion, attacking especially the medical work as a pretext for mutilation, the schools as hotbeds of vice, and the orphanages as furnishing material for witchcraft.

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  • the release from prison of all then held on the charge of witchcraft.

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  • URBAN GRANDIER (1590-1634), priest of the church of Sainte Croix at Loudun in the department of Vienne, France, was accused of witchcraft in 1632 by some hysterical novices of the Carmelite Convent, where the trial, protracted for two years, was held.

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  • But to these were quickly added subjects of allegory, of classical learning, of witchcraft and superstition and of daily life; scenes of the parlour and the cloister, of the shop, the field, the market and the camp; and lastly portraits of famous men, with scenes of court life and princely pageant and ceremony.

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  • But the martyrs were few, compared with the numbers of people whom the reformed kirk burned for witchcraft.

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  • It was said that after leaving the cloister he studied the black art in Toledo, which had a great reputation in the middle ages as a school of witchcraft.

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  • This corrupted form is common in English to the 17th century (see Magic and Witchcraft).

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  • When Erik Blood-axe, son of Harold Haarfager, visited Bjarmaland in 922, he found Gunhild, daughter of Asur Tote, living among the Lapps, to whom she had been sent by her father for the purpose of being trained in witchcraft; and Ivan the Terrible of Russia sent for magicians from Lapland to explain the cause of the appearance of a comet.

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  • It was the scene of the last execution for witchcraft in Scotland (1722).

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  • Together with this idolatry there is also a firm belief in the power of witchcraft and sorcery, in divination, in lucky and unlucky days and times, in ancestor worship, especially that of the sovereign's predecessors, and in several curious ordeals for the detection of crime.

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  • Its main features may be summed as follows: - a purely agricultural life, with the plantain, yam and manioc (the last two of American origin) as the staple food; cannibalism common; rectangular houses with ridged roofs; scar-tattooing; clothing of bark-cloth or palm-fibre; occasional chipping or extraction of upper incisors; bows with strings of cane, as the principal weapons, shields of wood or wickerwork; religion, a primitive form of fetishism with the belief that death is due to witchcraft; ordeals, secret societies, the use of masks and anthropomorphic figures, and wooden gongs.

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  • But if the progress of physical science has not prevented the rehabilitation of much of ancient alchemy by the later researches into chemical change, and if psychology now finds a place for explanations of spiritualism and witchcraft which involve the admission of the empirical facts under a new theory (as in the case of the diviningrod, &c.), it is at least conceivable that some new synthesis might once more justify part at all events of ancient and medieval astromancy, to the extent of admitting the empirical facts where provable, and substituting for the supposed influence of the stars as such, some deeper theory which would be consistent with an application to other forms of prophecy, and thus might reconcile the possibility of dipping into futurity with certain interrelations of the universe, different indeed from those assumed by astrological theory, but underlying and explaining it.

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  • accusations of witchcraft in Wales.

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  • In 1615 there were only ten instances of witchcraft accusations traced across the country, including Jonet and Katherine.

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  • LaVey's involvement gives the witchcraft elements the official seal of approval, as it were, guaranteeing their verisimilitude if not absolute authenticity.

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  • The diagnosis may produce a psychological catharsis which may benefit the afflicted in relation to the real fear of witchcraft.

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  • dabble had too many experiences now where even adults can be disturbed by dabbling in witchcraft.

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  • executed for witchcraft at Bury St. Edmunds during the late 1600s.

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  • An understanding the genesis of the Salem Witchcraft episode provides a way of understanding the genesis of these latter-day Satanic sexual abuse episodes.

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  • miscarrynne miscarried a second child Henry accused her of witchcraft and had her beheaded at the Tower of London for adultery and incest.

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  • The faculty of witchcraft is also said to be hereditary, and in some places families are pointed out as possessing this peculiarity.

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  • Aberdeen Town Council had its own shameful record of witchcraft persecutions.

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  • sin of witchcraft, and stubbornness is as iniquity and idolatry.

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  • Many illnesses are believed to be caused by witchcraft.

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  • Witch A person, normally a woman who practices witchcraft.

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  • About fifty people were hanged for practicing witchcraft during his reign.

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  • To chew a part of this tree was believed to protect the person against negative forces including witchcraft.

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  • Death was the penalty for murdering or hurting someone by using witchcraft.

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  • Long ago when men cursed and beat the ground with sticks, it was called witchcraft.

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  • If you do witchcraft, you would be burnt at the stake.

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  • Which is probably just as well for modern witchcraft.

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  • Three books have recently appeared on aspects of Scottish witchcraft.

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  • One of them had to do with black witchcraft.

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  • Conjuration, sleight of hand, magic, witchcraft, were the subjects of the evening.

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  • The book also brings to bear on this material current scholarship on the history of European witchcraft.

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  • In particular he argues that the unique role of the familiar in English witchcraft needs a much more detailed historical investigation.

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  • witchcraft accusations in Scotland in the early modern period.

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  • witchcraft persecutions.

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  • witchcraft prosecution.

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  • witchcraft trials began in Europe.

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  • witchcraft belief was not, of course, ' weird ' .

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  • witchcraft case, you have to analyze your material.

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  • Do you practice witchcraft, or do you just write about it?

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  • Holberg took no rest, and before the end of 1723 the comedies of Barselstuen (The Lying-in Room), The Eleventh of July, Jakob von Thyboe, Den Bundeslose (The Fidget), Erasmus Montanus, Don Ranudo, Ulysses of Ithaca, Without Head or Tail, Witchcraft and Melampe had all been written, and some of them acted.

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  • With all his breadth and liberality of mind Bodin was a credulous believer in witchcraft, the virtues of numbers and the power of the stars, and in 1580 he published the Demonomanie des sorciers, a work which shows that he was not exempt from the prejudices of the age.

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  • i535; 942 A.H.), author of the Sihr-i-Ltalal, or Lawful Witchcraft, which, like Ktibis (d.

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  • His pleading in defence of a wretched creature accused of witchcraft brought him many clients and some reputation.

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  • It was her wish that publication would bring to light the authentic beliefs of Witchcraft and reestablish the respectability of this ancient art.

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  • For rebellion is as the sin of witchcraft, and stubbornness is as iniquity and idolatry.

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  • In total the collection boasts some 4,000 records - the total known number of witchcraft accusations in Scotland in the early modern period.

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  • A small research grant from the British Academy allowed the researchers to improve the information about people involved in witchcraft prosecution.

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  • In the 13th century, witchcraft trials began in Europe.

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  • Early modern witchcraft belief was not, of course, ' weird '.

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  • To write a report on a witchcraft case, you have to analyze your material.

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  • After 12 rejections, her manuscript was purchased and the world soon became consumed with the Hogwart's School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

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  • A visit to the Gryffindor common room, the Great Hall, and other popular areas of Hogwarts School for Witchcraft and Wizardry.

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  • Anne was locked in the Tower of London and accused of witchcraft, incest, treason and adultery.

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  • Such creatures are also reported in connection to the practice of Native American witchcraft.

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  • The Torah advises against becoming "a sorcerer, soothsayer or engager of witchcraft".

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  • Depictions of fairies as fallen angels or being connected to witchcraft are not always common, but are not unheard of, either.

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  • On his eleventh birthday he finally learns that he is a wizard, a very famous one too, and that no matter his uncle says, he will be attending classes at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

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  • As another year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft of Wizardry commences, Harry Potter is again put in the position to save the school and prove that he will be one of the most powerful wizards in the world.

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  • He is also warned not to go looking for the dangerous wizard and as his third year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry progresses, Harry learns why.

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  • In his fourth year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, Harry learns that his school will be hosting the Triwizarding Tournament.

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  • Though he is ultimately allowed to return to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, he is strongly urged by the members of the Order of the Phoenix to keep his head down and to stay out of trouble.

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  • Two weeks after the end of his fifth term at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, Harry is overjoyed to learn that in only a few days he will be taken to his friend Ron's house for the remainder of the summer.

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  • In his sixth year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, Harry has taken on an army of responsibilities.

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  • Ah, another year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry and another year full of peril for Harry Potter and his friends Ron and Hermione.

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  • As Harry Potter begins his fourth year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry the scent of danger is already in the air, but nothing can match the excitement of the Tri-Wizarding Tournament.

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  • New to the world of wizards, Harry begins his magical education at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

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  • Animal forms attributed to the banshee woman are all associated with witchcraft in Ireland.

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  • When you look at the publication dates of the Harry Potter books, it's clear to see that Harry and his friends at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft were first introduced to the people of the UK, before they made the trek overseas to the U.S. J.

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  • Flight first penned about it in The True Legend of St. Dunstan and the Devil; Showing how the Horse-Shoe came to be a Charm against Witchcraft.

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  • de Nino's charming collection of Usi e costumi abruzzesi), their country being in Rome counted the home of witchcraft; see Hor.

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  • The chief features of this epoch -the Antinomian dissensions, the Quaker and Baptist persecutions, the witchcraft delusion (four witches were executed in Boston, in 1648, 165r, 1656, 1688) &c.-are referred to in the article Massachusetts.

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  • Upham, Witchcraft in Salem (2 vols., Boston, 1867); S.

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  • Poole, " Cotton Mather and Salem Witchcraft " (North American Review, April 1869); and controversy of A.

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  • xvii.); though apparently now confined solely to purposes of witchcraft, it perhaps contains survivals of a former extensive system superseded by the alphabetic writing introduced from India.

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  • The history of witchcraft in Europe and its attendant horrors, so vividly painted in Lecky's Rise of Rationalism, are but echoes of this universal refusal of savage man to accept death as the natural end of life.

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  • Upham, Salem Witchcraft (2 vols., Boston, 1867); H.

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  • He had much to do with the witchcraft persecution of his day; in 1692 when the magistrates appealed to the Boston clergy for advice in regard to the witchcraft cases in Salem he drafted their reply, upon which the prosecutions were based; in 1689 he had written Memorable Providences Relating to Witchcraft and Possessions, and even his earlier diaries have many entries showing his belief in diabolical possession and his fear and hatred of it.

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  • Like the most learned men of his time he was superstitious and a firm believer in "praesagious impressions"; his Essay for the Recording of Illustrious Providences: Wherein an Account is Given of many Remarkable and very Memorable Events which have Hapned in this Last Age, Especially in New England (1684) shows that he believed only less thoroughly than his son in witchcraft, though in his Cases of Conscience Concerning Evil Spirits (1693) he considered some current proofs of witchcraft inadequate.

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  • The revulsion of feeling after the witchcraft delusion undermined his authority greatly, and Robert's Calef's More Wonders of the Spiritual World (1700) was a personal blow to him as well as to his son.

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  • As in India, after the expulsion of Buddhism, the degrading worship of Siva and his dusky bride had been incorporated into Hinduism from the savage devil worship of Aryan and of non-Aryan tribes, so, as pure Buddhism died away in the north, the Tantra system, a mixture of magic and witchcraft and sorcery, was incorporated into the corrupted Buddhism.

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  • While hoping for a better fate in their next birth, the poor turned for succour and advice in this to the aid of astrology, witchcraft and animism - a belief in which seems to underlie all 1 Note on the Date of the Buddha.

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  • He is chargeable, however, with the condemnation and execution of two poor women tried before him for witchcraft in 1664, a kind of judicial murder then falling under disuse.

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  • He denounced the trial by ordeal of fire and water, the belief in witchcraft, and the ascription of tempests to magic,maintained the Carolingian opposition to image-worship, but carried his logic farther and opposed the adoration of the saints.

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  • The book gives (1) evidences of witchcraft; (2) rules for discovering it; (3) proceedings for punishment.

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