Wit Sentence Examples

wit
  • He had an ironic wit.

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  • His face was pale and clammy, his wit sharp but his eyes glazed.

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  • Darian had a quick wit that was as unpredictable as his actions.

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  • His poems, novels and comedies are full of wit and exuberant vitality.

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  • His wit was often used as a weapon of defence, for he did not suffer fools gladly.

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  • She is especially known for her wit and humor.

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  • But, since those universals, so far as they are called genera and species, cannot be perceived by any one in their purity without the admixture of imagination, Plato maintained that they existed and could be beheld beyond the things of sense, to wit, in the divine mind.

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  • Half-witted men from the almshouse and elsewhere came to see me; but I endeavored to make them exercise all the wit they had, and make their confessions to me; in such cases making wit the theme of our conversation; and so was compensated.

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  • Even so, there's no denying Gemini's alert gaze and sharp wit.

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  • Their sudden bouts of wit can make them seem rather capricious, but this only adds dimension to their personalities.

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  • It needs your wit, your charm, and most of all, unique information about you.

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  • Wit continued decrease of altitude south-eastward, the crystalline belt dips under the coastal plain, near a line marked by the Delaware river from Trenton to Philadelphia in Pennsylvania, and thence south-south-westward through Maryland and Virginia past the cities of Baltimore, Washington and Richmond.

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  • It was one of his most trenchant utterances, full of fancy, wit, eloquence and elevated thought.

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  • It was a desultory exposition of the Ruskinian ideal of life, manners and society, full of wit, play, invective and sermons on things in general.

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  • More was not only a lawyer, a wit, a scholar, and a man of wide general reading; he was also a man of cultivated taste, who delighted in music and painting.

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  • Bridgett (Wisdom and Wit of Blessed Thomas More, London, 1891).

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  • She arrived nevertheless in safety at Leith, escorted by three of her uncles of the house of Lorraine, and bringing in her train her future biographer, Brantome, and Chastelard, the first of all her voluntary victims. On the 21st of August she first met the only man able to withstand her; and their first passage of arms left, as he has recorded, upon the mind of John Knox an ineffaceable impression of her "proud mind, crafty wit and indurate heart against God and His truth."

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  • Early in 1751 he became literary critic to the Vossische Zeitung, and in this position laid the foundation for his reputation as a reviewer of learning, judgment and wit.

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  • Here he manifested those great gifts which ultimately raised him to high office; a powerful grasp of mental, moral and political problems, combined with eloquence of a high order, and illuminated with brilliant flashes of wit.

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  • Kingsley's life was written by his widow in 1877, entitled Charles Kingsley, his Letters and Memories of his Life, and presents a very touching and beautiful picture of her husband, but perhaps hardly does justice to his humour, his wit, his overflowing vitality and boyish fun.

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  • He thought only of Ireland; lived for no other object; dedicated to her his beautiful fancy, his elegant wit, his manly courage, and all the splendour of his astonishing eloquence."

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  • Finally he would consider, in a crowning treatise De cive, how men, being naturally rivals or foes, were moved to enter into the better relation of Society, and demonstrate how this grand product of human wit must be regulated if men were not to fall back into brutishness and misery.

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  • He had, besides, a relish for Hobbes's wit (as he used to say, " Here comes the bear to be baited "), and did not like the old man the less because his presence at court scandalized the bishops or the prim virtue of Chancellor Hyde.

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  • Chesterfield had long been celebrated for the politeness of his manners, the brilliancy of his wit, and the delicacy of his taste.

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  • He had strong sense, quick discernment, wit, humour, immense knowledge of literature and of life, and an infinite store of curious anecdotes.

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  • They have a remarkable quickness of apprehension, a ready wit, a retentive memory, combined, however, with religious pride and hypocrisy, and a disregard for the truth.

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  • His original verse tends chiefly to show that with all his sarcastic and cynical wit his genius had also its tender, serious and sentimental side.

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  • Nor in any series of comedies in existence is decency so rarely sacrificed to a desire for popularity or a false sense of wit.

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  • Her knowledge of life, her sparkling wit and her almost faultless style, make these short stories masterpieces of their kind.

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  • His wit, however, was often cruel, and any one who responded with too much spirit was soon made to feel that the licence of talk was to be complete only on one side.

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  • By eloquence, readiness of wit, and adroit flattery of the jury he contrived to secure his acquittal in the face of the open hostility of the judge - a unique achievement at a time when the condemnation of prisoners whom the authorities wished to convict was a mere matter of course.

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  • After her father's death in 1819 she lived with her mother, and her wit and beauty attracted many admirers.

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  • These elements are, briefly stated, (1) a strong partiality for subjects dealing with humble life, in country and town, with the fun of taverns and village greens, with that domestic life in the rough which goes to the making of the earlier farces in English and French; (2) a whimsical, elfin kind of wit, delighting in extravagance and topsy-turviness; (3) a frank interest in the pleasures of good company and good drink.

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  • He professed to rest all upon Scripture, yet accepted from the Babylon of Rome a baptism neither scriptural nor primitive, nor fulfilling the chief conditions of admission into a visible brotherhood of saints, to wit, repentance, faith, spiritual illumination and free surrender of self to Christ.

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  • After attending the grammar schools of Melton and Oakham, he entered St John's College, Cambridge, and while still an undergraduate he addressed in February 1712, under the pseudonym of Peter de Quir, a letter to the Spectator displaying no small wit and humour.

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  • This was due to the king's relations with the Spanish dancer Lola Montez, who appeared in Munich in October 1846, and soon succeeded by her beauty and wit in fascinating the king, who was always susceptible to feminine charms. The political importance of this lay in the fact that the royal mistress began to use her great influence against the clerical policy of the Abel ministry.

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  • Though it is a biographical tradition that he lacked wit, Moliere and Don Quixote seem to have been his favourites; and though the utilitarian wholly crowds romanticism out of his writings, he had enough of that quality in youth to prepare to learn Gaelic in order to translate Ossian, and sent to Macpherson for the originals !

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  • Howe's eloquence, and still more his unfailing wit and high spirits, made him for many years the idol of his province.

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  • Lowell was already looked upon by his companions as a man marked by wit and poetic sentiment; Miss White was admired for her beauty, her character and her intellectual gifts, and the two became thus the hero and heroine among a group of ardent young men and women.

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  • Even his index was spiced with wit.

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  • His morals were as loose as those of his great rival Mirabeau, but he was famed in Paris for his wit and gaiety.

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  • His life was often in danger, but his ready wit always saved it, and it was said that one bon mot would preserve him for a month.

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  • It must be remembered, however, that he was the great wit of the period.

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  • The book did not attract the attention of the critics and the reading public till a letter from Emerson to the poet, in which the volume was characterized as "the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed," was published in the New York Tribune.

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  • But sometimes there is a contest between the new tests wit fsh cult and the old.

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  • He never learned to read or write, though late in life he mastered colloquial Arabic; yet those Europeans who were brought into contact with him praised alike the dignity and charm of his address, his ready wit, and the astonishing perspicacity which enabled him to read the motives of men and of governments and to deal effectively with each situation as it arose.

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  • On Arcona in Wit tow are the remains of an ancient fortress, enclosing a temple which was destroyed in 1168 by the Danish king Waldemar I., when he made himself master of the island.

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  • This is in agreement wit the known results for n=a, n= i.

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  • He himself delivered in the House of Commons many speeches unrivalled in parliamentary history for wit and recklessness; and one of them still lives in history as the "champagne speech."

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  • The universal tribute of Townshend's colleagues allows him the possession of boundless wit and ready eloquence, set off by perfect melody of intonation, but marred by an unexampled lack of judgment and discretion.

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  • Prose mingles with poetry, wit with wisdom, the good with the bad, and as one thing goes on to suggest another, it makes the Talmud a somewhat rambling compilation.

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  • The heretic, having developed powers of rational choice, perceives his heresy, to wit, his want of adaptation to the moral environment, and turning round embraces the new faith that is the passport to survival.

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  • The army reserve, formed of men who have served wit h the colours, consists of four classes.

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  • Knox had already by letter formally broken with the earl of Moray, "committing you to your own wit, and to the conducting of those who better please you"; and now, in one of his greatest sermons before the assembled lords, he drove at the heart of the situation - the risk of a Catholic marriage.

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  • The chevalier de Mere, a man of some literary distinction, who had made her acquaintance at Mme de Neuillant's, discovered her penniless condition, and introduced his "young Indian," as he called her, to Scarron, the famous wit and comic writer, at whose house all the literary society of the day assembled.

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  • Two popes anathematized each other from Avignon and from Rome, and zealous churchmen were at their wit's end to concoct ways and means, by general councils of Constance and Basel and otherwise, to restore peace to a distracted church, and to discipline the clergy into decent living.

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  • There were to be found the most contradictory qualities in perfect agreement with each other - gravity and courtliness, earnestness and gaiety, the man of learning, the noble and the bishop. But all centred in an air of high-bred dignity, of graceful, polished seemliness and wit - it cost an effort to turn away one's eyes.

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  • Nor were his intimate associates men of refinement and taste; they were rather good fellows who quietly enjoyed a good bottle and a joke; he uniformly avoided encounters of wit with his equals.

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  • And he instances the "darkling springs and lonely rivers which are said to snatch, to wit by force of a harmful spirit."

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  • The king was feeble and vicious, but had wit enough to leave the Melhor conduct of affairs to stronger hands.

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  • Canon Ainger's gentle wit and humour, his generosity and lovable disposition, endeared him to a wide circle.

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  • He impressed every one as a man of extraordinary acuteness and originality; and these solid gifts were set off to the highest advantage by quickness of thought and speech, a lucid style, wit and poetic fancy, and a social warmth which made him delightful as a friend and companion.

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  • Bennet," entitled The Treasury of Wit, and by his first important historical work, the Dissertation on the Origin and Progress of the Scythians or Goths, to which Gibbon acknowledged himself indebted.

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  • In some of them he attacks superstition and philosophical error with the sharpness of his wit; in others he merely paints scenes of modern life.

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  • The architectural and ornamental sculpture of the interior is mostly by the same artist, and there are a few interesting pictures, as well as some realistic wall paintings by the 18thcentury artist Jacob de Wit similar to those in the Huis ten Bosch near the Hague.

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  • Donne excels in brief flashes of wit and beauty, and in sudden daring phrases that have the full perfume of poetry in them.

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  • During these years of subordinate activity Canning had established his position as an orator and a wit.

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  • His wit was, and remains, above all question.

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  • All share in the administration of even Irish affairs was denied him; every politician shunned him; and his society hardly included a single author or wit.

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  • It is a just remark of Thackeray's that he everywhere half-consciously recognizes her as his better angel, and dwells on her wit and her tenderness with a fondness he never exhibits for any other topic. On the 28th of January 1728, she died, and her wretched lover sat down the same night to record her virtues in language of unsurpassed simplicity, but to us who know the story more significantly for what it conceals than for what it tells.

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  • The stress which Swift thus laid upon his character as an assertor of liberty has hardly been ratified by posterity, which has apparently neglected the patriot for the genius and the wit.

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  • He is best known, however, as a warm opponent of Arianism, whose eagerness to emphasize the deity of Christ and the unity of His person led him so far as a denial of the existence of a rational human soul (Pas) in Christ's human nature, this being replaced in Him by a prevailing principle of holiness, to wit the Logos, so that His body was a glorified and spiritualized form of humanity.

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  • In general he spoke as a man of the people, the predominating quality of his style being an overflowing and often coarse wit.

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  • Bunyan's works were coarse, indeed, but they showed a keen mother wit, a great command of the homely mother tongue, an intimate knowledge of the English Bible, and a vast and dearly bought spiritual experience.

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  • Soon his quick wit discovered innumerable points of similarity which had escaped his predecessors.

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  • Producing, as he certainly has produced, work which classes him with the greatest names in literature, he has also signed an extraordinary quantity of verse which has not merely the defects of genius, irregularity, extravagance, bizarrete, but the faults which we are apt to regard as exclusively belonging to those who lack genius, to wit, the dulness, and tediousness of mediocrity.

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  • The absolute or infinite - the unconditioned ground and source of all reality - is yet apprehended by us as an immediate datum or reality; and it is apprehended in consciousness - under its condition, that, to wit, of distinguishing subject and object, knower and known.

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  • Being a master of its methods, but very cautious in accepting assertions about its results, he secured attention early in the Free Church for scientific criticism, and yet threw the whole weight of his learning and his caustic wit into the argument against critical extravagance.

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  • The collections in the Chinese and Japanese rooms, and the grisailles in the dining-room painted by Jacobus de Wit (1695-1754), are also noteworthy.

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  • His banter is nearly always ungainly, his wit blunt, as Johnson said, and often unseasonable.

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  • Gregory Orlov was no statesman, but he had a quick wit, a fairly accurate appreciation of current events, and was a useful and sympathetic counsellor during the earlier portion of Catherine's reign.

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  • But the mind, in becoming gradually stored with its " simple ideas " is able to elaborate them in numberless modes and relations; although it is not in the power of the most exalted wit or enlarged understanding to invent or frame any new simple idea, not taken in in one or the other of these two ways.

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  • Then comes gentleness - the virtue regulative of anger; and the list is concluded by the excellences of social intercourse, friendliness (as a mean between obsequiousness and surliness), truthfulness and decorous wit.

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  • His biting wit involved him in many controversies with well-known contemporaries, such as Lavater, whose science of physiognomy he ridiculed, and Voss, whose views on Greek pronunciation called forth a powerful satire, Ober die Pronunciation der Schopse des alten Griechenlandes (1782).

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  • As a result of the rebellion of 1173-1174 it was provided that an oath of fealty should be taken by all, to wit, barons, knights, freeholders and even villeins (rustici)", and that any one who refused should be arrested as the king's enemy, and the justices were to see that the castles whose demolition had been ordered were completely razed.

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  • They found a brilliant interpreter in Aeschines, who, after having been a tragic actor and a clerk to the assembly, had entered political life with the advantages of a splendid gift for eloquence, a fine presence, a happy address, a ready wit and a facile conscience.

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  • On the 8th of April 1886 he had told the House of Commons that it " passed the wit of man " to draw a practical distinction between imperial and non-imperial affairs.

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  • She was the queen of fashion in a society where corruption blossomed luxuriantly and exquisitely, and in a century of wit hers was second to none.

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  • Just as this latter method of divination rested on a well-defined theory, to wit, that the liver was the seat of the soul of the animal and that the deity in accepting the sacrifice identified himself with the animal, whose "soul" was thus placed in complete accord with that of the god and therefore reflected the mind and will of the god, so astrology is based on a theory of divine government of the world, which in contrast to "liver" divination assumes at the start a more scientific or pseudo-scientific aspect.

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  • Few have written French with greater purity than Feuillet, and his style, reserved in form and never excessive in ornament, but full of wit and delicate animation, is in admirable uniformity with his subjects and his treatment.

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  • But his nature was cold, unsympathetic and calculating, combined with a talent for intrigue, to which was added an excellent memory and a ready wit.

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  • He was remarkable from the first, handsome in face and tall in figure, with a finely trained singing voice, and brilliant in wit and conversation.

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  • He certainly had wit, but it is hard to believe he could have had any touch of fancy.

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  • If any one of us had retained a wit of common sense, we'd never have pursued the course we undertook.

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  • Ken's dry wit and good heart make him popular with the regulars, especially the pretty barmaid.

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  • Evans does write plainly and clearly, and avoids metaphors, wit or stylistic flourishes with fair assiduity.

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  • Do not sup o ' nights; ' twill beget you an admirable wit.

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  • Imagine Jarvis Cocker writing lyrics for Paul McCartney or putting dry observational wit in to Franz Ferdinand's hip-swinging swagger to make punk-funk fun.

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  • He was neither a wit nor a croquet champion, a hypnotic force nor a begetter of amateur theatricals.

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  • With his endearing yet cynical wit, Malcolm navigates his way through the sometimes treacherous, always entertaining waters of childhood.

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  • We moan with merriment, with purpose, with self-deprecating wit.

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  • A literary debut which combines wit with barbed insight f. .

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  • And it will work for more mature readers because you can appreciate the wit, as well as the visual jokes.

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  • The property has a spacious double living room wit...

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  • Roddy Renfrew started the ball rolling with a set of gentle, tho occasionally more acerbic, wit.

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  • Wilder's caustic wit was famous, but he wasn't above bullying.

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  • Added pleasures are a biting wit, a sly subtlety and a merciless eye for social satire.

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  • He is an erudite writer, with the wry wit of the man of the world rather than the university wit more common nowadays.

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  • Often extreme, even mischievous in language with a sardonic wit, his actions were gentler than his words as his letters show.

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  • This was, once again, treated like rapier wit.

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  • This is an easy read full of Pratchett's trademark wit.

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  • Dropping John O'Shea and playing Gary Neville at center half wit Wes Brown, Ferguson seems to have missed the point.

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  • But it was as a literary critic of unusually clever style and an original vein of wit, that he first became known to the public, with his volume of essays entitled Obiter Dicta (1884).

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  • Wit, called von Darring (1800-1863), was long, though erroneously, considered the author.

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  • There was much true poetry in the verse, and much sound sense and keen observation in the prose of these works; but the poetical feeling and lyrical facility of the one, and the more solid qualities of the other, seemed best employed when they were subservient to his rapid wit, and to the ingenious coruscations of his fancy.

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  • Already antiquated, it could not resist the wit and raillery with which Voltaire, in his Lettres sur les Anglais (1728), brought against it the principles and results of Locke and Newton.

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  • He was a terse, able and lucid speaker, master of wit and sarcasm, and a fearless critic. He gave liberally to Cooper Union, of which he was trustee and secretary, and which owes much of its success to him; was a trustee of Columbia University from 1901 until his death, chairman of the board of trustees of Barnard College, and was one of the original trustees, first chairman of the board of trustees, and a member of the executive committee of the Carnegie Institution.

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  • His cheerful conversation, his smart and lively sallies, a singular mixture of malice of speech with goodness of heart, and of delicacy of wit with simplicity of manners, rendered him a pleasing and interesting companion; and if his manner was sometimes plain almost to the extent of rudeness, it probably set all the better an example of a much-needed reform to the class to which he belonged.

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  • He was the author of a collection of epigrams called Cicuta (" hemlock") 1 from their bitter sarcasm, and of a beautiful epitaph on the death of Tibullus; of elegiac poems, probably of an erotic character; of an epic poem Amazonis; and of a prose work on wit (De urbanitate).

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  • Thus Candide attacks religious and philosophical optimism, L'Homme aux quarante ecus certain social and political ways of the time, Zadig and others the received forms of moral and metaphysical orthodoxy, while some are mere lampoons on the Bible, the unfailing source of Voltaire's wit.

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  • Later, the motive of the Toba pictures, as such caricatures were called, tended to degenerate, and the elegant figures of Kakuyu were replaced by scrawls that often substituted indecency and ugliness for art and wit.

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  • Though he treated his subject in relation to himself with more levity and irony than real feeling, yet by his sparkling wit and fancy he created a literature of sentiment and adventure adapted to amuse the idle and luxurious society of which the elder Julia was the centre.

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  • Valerius Martialis or Martial (c. 41-104) that we have a true image of the average sensual frivolous life of Rome at the end of the 1st century, seen through a medium of wit and humour, but undistorted by the exaggeration which moral indignation and the love of effect add to the representation of Juvenal.

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  • Martin's tracts are characterized by violent and personal invective against the Anglican dignitaries, by the assumption that the writer had numerous and powerful adherents and was able to enforce his demands for reform, and by a plain and homely style combined with pungent wit.

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  • He was an able, terse, forcible speaker, master of bitter sarcasm, irony, stinging ridicule, and, less often used, good-humoured wit.

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  • The needy scholar was generally to be seen under the gate of Pembroke, a gate now adorned with his effigy, haranguing a circle of lads, over whom, in spite of his tattered gown and dirty linen, his wit and audacity gave him an undisputed ascendancy.

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  • Among the most constant attendants were two high-born and high-bred gentlemen, closely bound together by friendship, but of widely different characters and habits - Bennet Langton, distinguished by his skill in Greek literature, by the orthodoxy of his opinions, and by the sanctity of his life, and Topham Beauclerk, renowned for his amours, his knowledge of the gay world, his fastidious taste and his sarcastic wit.

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  • He had naturally a most cheerful and sunny temper, was highly social and sympathetic, loved pleasant conversation, wit, anecdote and laughter.

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  • He possessed some oratorical ability and adopted a very theatrical style of elocution, "tuning his voice and balancing his hands"; and his addresses were a strange medley of solemnity and buffoonery, of clever wit and the wildest absurdity, of able and original disquisition and the worst artifices of the oratorical charlatan.

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  • Within a week of the opening of Parliament he bounded into fame by a sparkling maiden speech in a Tariff Reform debate - a speech conceived in a confident fighting spirit, calculated to cheer dejected partisans, and full of wit and epigram.

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  • York was scandalized at its clergyman's indecency, and indignant at his caricature as "Slop" of a local physician (Dr John Burton); London was charmed with his audacity, wit and graphic unconventional power.

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  • Though race may count for something in the matter of mental endowment - and at least it would seem to involve differences in weight of brain - it clearly counts for much less than does milieu, to wit, that social environment of ideas and institutions which depends so largely for its effectiveness on mechanical means of tradition, such as the art of writing.

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  • Thomas de Noronha and Antonio Serrao de Castro, the first a natural and facile writer, the second the author of Os Ratos da Inquisicao, a facetious poem composed during his incarceration in the dungeons of the Inquisition, while Diogo de Sousa Camacho showed abundant wit at the expense of the slaves of Gongorism and Marinism.

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  • Her contemporaries, scorning her low birth rather than her vices, attributed to her a malicious political role of which she was at heart incapable, and have done scant justice to her quick wit, her frank but gracious manners, and her seductive beauty.

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  • He had a thorough knowledge of the private and indirect motives which influence politicians, and his genial attractive manner, easy temper and vivacious, if occasionally coarse, wit helped to confer on him a social distinction which led many to take for granted his eminence as a statesman.

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  • In class (2) he includes, besides the Benevolence of Shaftesbury and Hutcheson, the useful virtues, Justice, Veracity and Fidelity to compacts; as well as such immediately agreeable qualities as politeness, wit, modesty and even cleanliness.

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  • At the same time he cultivated literature, entertaining poets and writers both at the Luxembourg and at his château of Brunoy (see Dubois-Corneau, Le Comte de Provence a Brunoy, 2909), and gaining a reputation for wit by his verses and mots in the salon of the charming and witty comtesse de Balbi, one of Madame's ladies, who had become his mistress, 4 and till 1793 exerted considerable influence over him.

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  • Sometimes we are inclined to class those who are once-and-a-half-witted with the half-witted, because we appreciate only a third part of their wit.

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  • Lewis Schaffer Arrive early to catch the London-based quick-fire wit of US stand-up Lewis Schaffer.

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  • She had a cool, logical mind, and a quick, ready wit.

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  • Sallies of wit, jests, good stories and enjoyment, were the soul of the banquet.

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  • He aproaches life at the fort with a dry sarcastic wit worthy of David Hyde Pierce on his best day.

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  • Their songs were laced with a dry, sardonic wit, backed up with some catchy hooklines.

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  • They contemplate the world with nostalgia, with anger, with sharp satirical wit.

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  • A cool, suave, sophisticated man with a lively satirical wit.

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  • Imagine Jarvis Cocker writing lyrics for Paul McCartney or putting dry observational wit in to Franz Ferdinand 's hip-swinging swagger to make punk-funk fun.

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  • A trickster spirit with a devilish wit, solid objects that pass through walls and a house with an untold secret.

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  • Twain 's singular wit is on full display engaging the reader to such an extent that pages swiftly fly by.

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  • Under her design, however, Wire consolidates its growing aura of urbane wit, sophistication and cosmopolitan hybridity.

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  • Trinny Woodall and Susannah Constantine have perfected the art of constructive criticism and waspish wit in the addictive What Not To Wear.

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  • A literary debut which combines wit with barbed insight f..

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  • America line 's luxurious a place to wit as experts planned by the.

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  • Wilder 's caustic wit was famous, but he was n't above bullying.

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  • Discus wanted Baby discus wanted will collect any where wit...

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  • This is an easy read full of Pratchett 's trademark wit.

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  • Despite her beauty, intelligence and wit, Emma was not at all conceited.

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  • Seen as an answer to every teacher's dilemma of reluctant male readers, the deadpan wit and cartoonish character illustrations have what it takes to engage students and keep them reading.

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  • With its fun design and signature Benefit wit, it makes an excellent addition to any gift basket of beauty fun.

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  • Richly told, this gothic tale of a young boy raised by philosophers and a regal mother of renowned beauty and wit is a mesmerizing read.

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  • In the 80s and 90s, Emmy award winning actress Kirstie Alley was known just as much for her sexy body as for her sassy wit.

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  • With its wry tone and dry wit, the site does more than just report the news and show off the latest photographs.

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  • To say it all started here may not be exactly truthful, but it was at Pop Idol that Cowell's wit and special brand of honesty became the stuff of legend.

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  • Her dry wit, clever writing, and strong stage presence will ensure that she will be a popular celebrity for many years to come.

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  • With his quick wit and easy enthusiasm, Harris is also a popular event host and has hosted both the Tony and Primetime Emmy Awards ceremonies.

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  • The first, probably coined by someone who had a bad experience in Oklahoma, describes the type as someone "who thinks he has charm, romance, and wit to score with attractive females.But doesn't!"

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  • Jay Leno and Johnny Carson took careers to the bank with their fast wit and great quotes.

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  • His sarcastic wit also comes to play throughout the tale.

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  • Sometimes wit and cunning is necessary to figure out how to complete these levels.

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  • Despite her oddities, she drew him with her large eyes and quick wit.

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  • Well, I also see where Elisabeth gets her scathing wit.

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  • If, for example, the processus pyramidalis was abnormally small and the processus papillaris abnormally large, it pointed to a reversion of the natural order, to wit, that the servant should control the master or that the son would be above the father.

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  • After the explosion he hurried back to Holyrood and feigned surprise at the receipt of the news half an hour later, ascribing the catastrophe to "the strangest accident that ever chancit, to wit, the fouder (lightning) came out of the luft (sky) and had burnt the king's house."

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  • He was called to the bar four years later, and practised as a barrister for a short time; but in 18-61, after two comparatively false starts in poetry and fiction, he made his first noteworthy appearance as a writer with a satire called The Season, which contained incisive lines, and was marked by some promise both in wit and observation.

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  • Of a genuine poetic temperament, fervid and mobile in feeling, and of a prolific fancy, he had also the sense and wit that come of varied contact with men.

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  • He was "gay and sprightly, with a turn for wit and humour."

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  • Throughout all the vicissitudes of the Revolution the relations between the two states had wit remained unimpaired, and Turkey had been one with France.

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  • As far as purity of diction, fine wit, crushing satire against a debased and ignorant clergy, and a general sympathy with suffering humanity are concerned, Omar certainly reminds us of the great Frenchman; but there the comparison ceases.

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  • But Hugh Latimer (1485?-1555) is the first great English preacher, and the wit and power of his sermons (1549) give them prominence in our literature.

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  • Slight as these sketches are, they show considerable dramatic talent and an Aristophanic wit.

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  • Elected deputy in 1860 he became celebrated by the biting wit of his speeches, while, as journalist, the acrimony of his polemical writings made him a redoubtable adversary.

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  • The Letters are brilliantly written - full of elegant wisdom, of keen wit, of admirable portrait-painting, of exquisite observation and deduction.

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  • On the 30th of May the priests were once more sent for - to wit, his nephew, the abbe Mignot, the abbe Gaultier, who had officiated on the former occasion, and the parish priest, the cure of St Sulpice.

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  • But there is immense wit, a wonderful command of such metre and language as the taste of the time allowed to the poet, occasionally a singular if somewhat artificial grace, and a curious felicity of diction and manner.

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  • The Burmese are fond of stage-plays in which great licence of language is permitted, and great liberty to " gag " is left to the wit or intelligence of the actors.

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  • The queen, Marie Antoinette, was especially attracted by the grace and wit of le beau Fersen, who had inherited his full share of the striking handsomeness which was hereditary in the family.

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  • Thenceforth he violently attacked whatever was considered modern and enlightened, and while he delighted society with his numerous sensational pamphlets, he aroused the fear and hatred of his opponents by his stinging wit.

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  • Even Shakespeare has been played by these amateurs, and the abundant wit of the Japanese is on the way to enrich the stage with modern farces of unquestionable merit.

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  • It became slate-colored or bluish-brown faience, wit!

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  • He had a sprightly wit, some delicacy of feeling, and some generous impulses which made him amiable.

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  • His wit generally inclines towards sarcasm, and it was probably the knowledge of his quarrelsome temperament that prevented his promotion to a bishopric. He was noted for the extent of his charities.

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  • Bolingbroke's conversation, described by Lord Chesterfield as "such a flowing happiness of expression that even his most familiar conversations if taken down in writing would have borne the press without the least correction," his delightful companionship, his wit, good looks, and social qualities which charmed during his lifetime and made firm friendships with men of the most opposite character, can now only be faintly imagined.

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  • Cicero, who speaks of 150 of these speeches as extant in his day, praises them for their acuteness, their wit, their conciseness.

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  • They let us into the secret of his most serious thoughts and cares, and they give a natural outlet to his vivacity of observation, his wit and humour, his kindliness of nature.

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  • He began life as a scullion in the imperial kitchen, became cook, then pursebearer to Khosrev Pasha, and so, by wit and favour, rose to be master of the horse, "pasha of two tails," and governor of a series of important cities and sanjaks.

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  • But literary criticism is merged in admiration of the wit, the humour, the vivacity, the satire of a piece which brings before us the old life of Florence in a succession of brilliant scenes.

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  • A story is told that Cromwell spared the town from bombardment owing to the wit of a woman who drank his health at the town-gate.

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  • Seldom has any man united so many and such various gifts in his own person and carried them so easily - a playful wit, a vivid imagination, oratorical and literary eloquence and, above all, a profound knowledge of human nature both male and female, of every class and rank, from the king to the meanest citizen.

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  • It now appeared to some of the ecclesiastical authorities that the only way to silence Martin was to have him attacked in his own railing style, and accordingly certain writers of ready wit, among them John Lyly, Thomas Nashe and Robert Greene, were secretly commissioned to answer the pamphlets.

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  • His son, Gaston Jean Baptiste de Roquelaure (1617-1683), a celebrated wit, was created duke and peer of France in 1652, and was appointed governor of Guienne in 1679.

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  • He had employed all his resources of wit and satire against the priests and monks, and the superstitions in which they traded, long before Luther's name was heard of.

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  • The cathedral of St Christopher is also of note; on the top of the tower (246 ft.) is a copper statue of the saint, and the interior is adorned with paintings by Rubens, Jacob de Wit (1695-1754) and others.

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  • It is a rhyming description of the province of Nordland, its natural features, its trades, its advantages and its drawbacks, given in dancing verse of the most breathless kind, and full of humour, fancy, wit and quaint learning.

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  • There is also a spiritual chewing of the body of Christ, not such that by it we understand the very food to be changed into spirit, but such that, the body and blood of the Lord abiding in their essence and peculiarity, they are spiritually communicated to us, not in any corporeal way, but in a spiritual, through the Holy Spirit which applies and bestows on us those things which were prepared through the flesh and blood of the Lord betrayed for our sake to death, to wit, remission of sins, liberation and life eternal, so that Christ lives in us and we in him...

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  • Tradition has dramatized their first meeting into the story given by Cresacre More' - that the two happened to sit opposite each other at the lord mayor's table, that they got into an argument during dinner, and that, in mutual astonishment at each other's wit and readiness, Erasmus exclaimed, " Aut tu es Morus, aut nullus," and the other replied, " Aut tu es Erasmus, aut diabolus !

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  • As a last resource More tried the expedient of silence, dissembling his wit and affecting to be dull.

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  • Latimer, however, besides possessing sagacity, quick insight into character, and a ready and formidable wit which thoroughly disconcerted and confused his opponents, had naturally a distaste for mere theological discussion, and the truths he was in the habit of inculcating could scarcely be controverted, although, as he stated them, they were diametrically contradictory of prevailing errors both in The only reasons for assigning an earlier date are that he was commonly known as " old Hugh Latimer," and that Bernher, his Swiss servant, states incidentally that he was " above threescore and seven years " in the reign of Edward VI.

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  • His legends are not without wit and poetical merit.

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  • When in difficulty he ran to her and flattered her with the name of Madame La Ressource - Madame Quick Wit - which did not prevent him from insulting and even kicking her when the immediate need of her help was over.

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  • Her letters are full of vivacity, of colour, and at times of insight and wit, but she never learnt to write either French or German correctly.

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  • Primitive religions are like so many similar beads on a string; and the concern of the student of comparative religion is at this stage mainly with the nature of the string, to wit, the common conditions of soul and society that make, say, totemism, or taboo, very much the same thing all the savage world over, when we seek to penetrate to its essence.

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  • He himself was not only a Huguenot, but a freethinker, and had made unsparing use of his sharp wit in epigrams on the Church and on the government.

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  • But he writes with keenness and wit, and knows well how to use the materials already often taken advantage of by earlier deists.

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  • Here we see at their sharpest the social prejudices that Disraeli had to fight against, provocation of them carried to its utmost in every way open to him, and complete conquest in a company of young men less likely to admit superiority in a wit of their own years, probably, than any other that could have been brought together at that time.

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  • Carmen had a quick wit and a gentle temperament – most of the time.

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  • The Washington Post went on to say that "what's remarkable here isn't Moore's political animosity, or ticklish wit."

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  • It was more a curiosity of wit, than of any calling of grace.

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  • It has wit, economy and intellectual control, in a richly expressive harmonic idiom.

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  • The story is told with wry wit and humor, employing sharp irony and masterful dialog.

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  • Gorsky's airy choreography is sheer joy, and abounds in wit and technical bravura.

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  • He is a most likeable chap, yet displays cutting and sometimes acidic wit.

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  • Barrister and wit F.E. Smith was the master of the snappy comeback.

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  • Chicken fried band... Ya want gravy er grits wit dat?

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  • His acidic quick wit is also amply demonstrated on BBC radio shows such as Just A Minute.

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  • Halliwell's Film Guide - Familiar fare of police corruption, drugs and inner-city deprivation, enlivened by its direction and dry wit.

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  • The script was utterly devoid of wit, subtlety, or humor.

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  • I bet da scum dat did dis to my dad get away wit it.

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  • The exhibits and labels show wit, creativity and scholarship, and include folklore and myths about plants, as well as scientific facts.

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  • Brian Lever Very sorry to hear of Dave's death; he was indeed a very sporting gentleman, with a quiet wit.

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  • The Guardian obituary describes his roles as juggling " mischievousness, a sardonic wit, and a malicious glee " .

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  • However it is also during the monsoon that Goa is probably at its most beautiful, wit h greenery sprouting all around.

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  • You will have regular meetings with them to discuss your progress and help you wit h any issues connected with your studies.

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  • Irish wedding toasts are well known for their wit and wry humor, their sense of history and tradition.

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  • Top Gear With Jeremy Clarkson the driving seat, Top Gear is complete with his customary irreverence, wit and unbiased honesty.

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  • My wit, being folly, is not by your wise man understood; there- fore, I'll to the purpose.

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  • He is a modern minstrel with gentle wit, sensitive vocals, and wicked guitar skills.

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  • Laced with audacious wit and pithy humor, Bunny Girl is romantic, funny and full of Joan Conway's brilliant one-liners.

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  • He abhorred a vain ostentation of wit in handling sacred truths, so venerable and grave, and of eternal consequence.

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  • The show is lacking wit, originality or any sparkle and has, too fast, became a pastiche of itself with effortless ease.

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  • His agile mind, quick wit and ready repartee made him something of a favorite of the media.

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  • I'll miss your cheery smile and quiet wit.

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  • Up comes the cotton, down goes the woven cloth; up comes the silk, down goes the woollen; up come the books, but down goes the wit that writes them.

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  • With respect to wit, I learned that there was not much difference between the half and the whole.

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  • Men of almost every degree of wit called on me in the migrating season.

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  • If we were left solely to the wordy wit of legislators in Congress for our guidance, uncorrected by the seasonable experience and the effectual complaints of the people, America would not long retain her rank among the nations.

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  • He does however have a likeable roguish charm and a very quick wit.

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  • There are many levels of humorous cards you can send, from light wit to bawdy jokes.

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  • It was during his time at Shoebox Greetings that he created the character of an old lady with wild, curly hair, large tinted glasses, and a surprisingly piercing wit that struck a chord with consumers around the world.

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  • Maternity shirts with sayings offer ways to show personality and wit during a special time in your life.

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  • To wit, there is a difference between how much of a food you ingest, and how much of that food is available for cellular uptake and physiological use.

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  • If you love board games that really make you think then Wit's End belongs on your game shelf.

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  • You do not want to include any off-color jokes or wit that makes fun of the religious holiday.

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  • To wit, turn your attention to the Mini Ciao Bella, a look that reminds one of a delicately stitched seashell, or Mini Frolic in the Woods, a style that is rich in its deep brown color, yet sophisticated with its petal-like jewels.

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  • Kate Spade designs accessories with panache, charm and wit and her straw handbags are a testimony to her irreverent style.

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  • If you're a Monkey, you probably also enjoy a keen sense of wit that entertains your companions.

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  • Gemini tends to be the life of any party with lively mannerisms, a quick wit, and the ability to embellish a story about the most mundane experience and make it seem magical.

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  • In fact, when one reads her books, what really comes across is her sense of wit and charm (sun conjunct Venus).

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  • You can also attract a Sagittarius male by displaying good wit and having a well-developed funny bone.

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  • Nothing stimulates and excites a Gemini more than a love interest with a quick wit and agile mind.

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  • Breakups can be ugly at this stage for a Gemini whose quick tongue and sardonic wit can effectively nip a lover's passion and destroy it for all time.

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  • The Leo's love of flattery and the Gemini's quick wit and good nature also make for a good conversation.

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  • Nonetheless, the meeting of Scorpio and Virgo is a typical game of cat and mouse, a delicate tango of sharp wit and sexual attraction.

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  • Both signs respect a high level of intelligence and are delighted to see that each has a substantial grasp of language and wit.

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  • Pocahontas, star of Disney's Pocahontas, is an adventurous girl who uses her sharp wit to help bring peace to her tribe and the Jamestown settlers.

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  • Some are famous for being a part of romantic movie history while other classic lines have earned their place due their wit.

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  • At the beach, at the mall, at your best friend's house…It's Happy Bunny can outfit your feet and amuse you with its sarcastic wit.

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  • Brooke (B&B) - Brooke's drag you up by the boot straps method of social climbing relied as much on her wit and looks as it did on her natural talent with chemistry.

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  • Adam's youngest daughter Colby has often left the man at his wit's end.

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  • A few phrases may come in handy, but having a quick wit also helps.

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  • You may remember T-Pain from 2005, when his impossible to ignore (for many reasons) song I'm N Luv (Wit a Stripper) was burning up the airwaves on MTV.

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  • Jarvis Cocker has been spending his post-Pulp days lending his wry wit and song writing genius to other lucky artists, but lucky for us, Mr. Cocker has finally decided to return to the game.

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  • Those who have looked at the lyrics, however, have been quick to point out that Gaga's quick tongue is a compliment to the wit in her words.

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  • Since then he has been known as a character actor with a dry wit and good comedic ability.

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  • To wit, what happens when you've been through a life-altering experience facing terrible exterminating machines from the future?

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  • The real wit and rigour of Oldham's satirical poetry are undeniable, while its faults - its frenzied extravagance and lack of metrical polish - might, as Dryden suggests, have been cured with time, for Oldham was only thirty when he died.

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  • In character he was modest, kind and sympathetic, ever ready to help and encourage serious students, generous in his judgment of the works of others, a most cheery companion, full of wit and humour.

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  • With a little more wit we might use these materials so as to become richer than the richest now are, and make our civilization a blessing.

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  • He brings his custom brand of astonishing creativity and abundant wit to Psychonauts, a Platform/Adventure game for Xbox and PS2.

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  • ReconTostind ciliation seemed wit,hin sight when suddenly Tostis tion.

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  • These numbers are valuable as an exhibition not so much of events as of the feelings of the Parisian people; they are adorned, moreover, by the erudition, the wit and the genius of the author, but they are disfigured, not only by the most biting personalities and the defence and even advocacy of the excesses of the mob, but by the entire absence of the forgiveness and pity for which the writer was afterwards so eloquently to plead.

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  • The great names at this period were those of Isaac Barrow (1630-1677); Robert South (1634-1716), celebrated for his wit in the pulpit; John Tillotson (1630-1694), the copyright of whose sermons fetched the enormous sum of 2500 guineas after his death, and of whom it was said that he was "not only the best preacher of the age, but seemed to have brought preaching to perfection"; and Edward Stillingfleet (1635-1699), styled, for his appearance in the pulpit, "the beauty of holiness."

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  • Gaston's son, Antoine Gaston Jean Baptiste de Roquelaure (1656-1738), carried on the family reputation for wit, and, in spite of his military incapacity, received the marshal's baton in 1724.

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  • Even his wit and knowledge of the world were spoiled, and his affected gaiety was touched with sadness, by the odour of falsehood which escaped through every pore of his body."

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  • Horace Twiss had a pretty wit, and as a young man wrote light articles for the papers; and, FIG.

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  • Fuad was renowned for his boldness and promptness of decision, as well as for his ready wit and his many bons mots.

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  • But her frank recklessness, her generosity, her invariable good temper, her ready wit, her infectious high spirits and amazing indiscretions appealed irresistibly to a generation which welcomed in her the living antithesis of Puritanism.

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  • While his scientific work procured him an extraordinary reputation among his contemporaries, his private character and virtues, the charm of his social manners, his wit and powers of conversation, endeared him to a large circle of personal friends.

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