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wisely

wisely Sentence Examples

  • I wisely followed with my careful research of recent births in this community until I found mother LeBlanc, lately arrived from a city near Lynn, Massachusetts!

  • "You'll lose it if you don't," he said wisely, accustomed to helping Jonny help her search the house for keys, purses, and anything else she lost.

  • "Well, if you tried to kill her, you probably didn't help things," Darian said wisely.

  • Someone brought you in, Linda said wisely.

  • Use it wisely, love.

  • "I will try, and I'll use it wisely," she said.

  • "Keep that in mind," he said wisely.

  • "You're not ready," he said wisely.

  • Dean's marriage to Cynthia hadn't helped break the tie as she wisely refused to divulge to either of them how she voted.

  • You do what you have to in that situation, even work with people you didn't think you ever would, Mrs. Watson said wisely.

  • She wisely chose not to meet the challenging gaze of a restlessly shifting man among the king's company but focused on Taran's leg.

  • Clara tipped her head to the side and smiled wisely.

  • Mr. O'Hara glanced at his wife, who smiled wisely.

  • "Betrayal's a bitch," Xander said wisely.

  • Even the manuscripts left at his death were so incomplete that Todhunter, into whose hands they were put, found it impossible to use them in the publication of a second edition of the original treatise, and wisely printed them, in 1865, in a supplementary volume.

  • The Catholic Church has more wisely left physicians in possession, and elevated the anointing of the sick into a sacrament to be used only in cases of mortal sickness, and even then not to the exclusion of the healing art.

  • Cromwell wisely inclined towards France, for Spain was then a greater menace than France alike to the Protestant cause and to the growth of British trade in the western hemisphere; but as no concessions could be gained from either France or Spain, the year 1654 closed without a treaty being made with either.

  • At the same time he wisely followed his fathers policy with regard to education and the church.

  • The resignation of the Gladstone-Granville cabinet further precluded the projected Italian occupation of Suakin, and the Italians, wisely refraining from an independent attempt to succour Kassala, then besieged by the Mahdists, bent their efforts to the increase of their zone of occupation around Massawa.

  • In June 1835 Airy was appointed Astronomer Royal in succession to John Pond, and thus commenced that long career of wisely directed and vigorously sustained industry at the national observatory which, even more perhaps than his investigations in abstract science or theoretical astronomy, constitutes his chief title to fame.

  • As many of the democratic principles frightened her more moderate and experienced advisers, she wisely refrained from immediately putting them into execution.

  • The government had done wisely in obscuring the passion for democratic ideals by an appeal to Russian chauvinism, an appeal soon to bear fruit in disuniting the revolutionary parties.

  • On his first return to Oxford the work was " wisely relinquished," and never afterwards resumed.

  • That there was fraud, and complicated fraud, in the guardians of the dauphin may be taken as proved by a succession of writers from 1850 onwards, and more recently by Frederic Barbey, who wisely attempts no ultimate solution.

  • But the latter used this privilege wisely and well-not, after the manner of De Blainville and others subsequent to him, relying solely or even chiefly on the character afforded by the posterior portion of the sternum, but taking also into consideration those of the anterior, as well as of the in some cases still more important characters presented by the pre-sternal bones, such as the furcula, coracoids and scapulae.

  • During his brief administration Vitellius showed indications of a desire to govern wisely, but he was completely under the control of Valens and Caecina, who for their own ends encouraged him in a course of vicious excesses which threw his better qualities into the background.

  • The provinces were unsettled, the barbarians on the borders restless and menacing, and Hadrian wisely judged that the old limits of Augustus afforded the most defensible frontier.

  • Learning by his own experience and errors, he wisely developed a sovereign prudence which nicely adjusted means to the end in view.

  • By the union of great moral qualities with high, though not the highest, intellectual faculties, he carried the Indian empire safely through the stress of the storm, and, what was perhaps a harder task still, he dealt wisely with the enormous difficulties arising at the close of such a war, established a more liberal policy and a sounder financial system, and left the people more contented than they were before.

  • The Spanish rulers made efforts to govern wisely and liberally, showing great complaisance, particularly in heeding the profit of the colony, even at the expense of Spanish colonial commercial regulations.

  • The concessionnaire companies have, however, wisely taken the view that it is better to depend upon their own revenues than upon any government guarantee, and have done their best to develop the working value of the lines in their charge.

  • The Ottoman government protested to the powers, but it wisely limited its demands to a claim for compensation.

  • Knowing the emperor's methods, he wisely restrained the ardour of his subordinates and asked for instructions whether to attack or wait.

  • Home wisely resigned his charge in 1757, after a visit to London, where Douglas was brought out at Covent Garden on the 14th of March.

  • This triumphant issue was mainly due to the diplomatic ability of the new vice chancellor, Alexius BestuzhevRyumin, whom Elizabeth, much as she disliked him personally, had wisely placed at the head of foreign affairs immediately after her accession.

  • He arranged the collective guarantee of the neutrality of Luxemburg in 1867, negotiated a convention about the " Alabama," which, however, was not ratified, and most wisely refused to take any part in the Cretan troubles.

  • We have said that this advance is often quoted, not very wisely, to signify that in modern progress "medicine" has fallen behind surgery - as if the art of the physician were not one and indivisible.

  • But he distributed the increased taxation so equally, and chose its subjects so wisely, that the ordinary administrative expenditure and the interest on the national debt were fully provided for, while the extraordinary expenditure for military purposes was met from the Chinese indemnity.

  • The failure of the bureau system and its discontinuance in the midst of reconstruction without harm to the blacks, and the intense hostility of the Southern whites to the institution caused by the irritating conduct of bureau officials, are indications that the institution was not well conceived nor wisely administered.

  • At the same time the viceroy wisely came to an agreement with Sayri Tupac, the son and successor of the Inca Manco, and granted him a pension.

  • The peoples of the thirteen states which had secured emancipation from British sovereignty were wisely intent on framing their own Federal Union, and in taking effective possession of the vast territories in the Ohio region and beyond the Mississippi.

  • But he wisely refrained from taking the immediate offensive.

  • But Zieten declined, and very wisely, to fight on the right bank, and he made the most of the screen afforded by the little river.

  • Instead of drawing his corps together and retreating en masse up the Fleurus road, Zieten wisely withdrew on two roads, using those to Quatre Bras and Fleurus.

  • Blucher wisely shifted his own headquarters to Sombreffe on the afternoon of the r 5th.

  • The day was now drawing to a close, and Ney decided wisely not to push his advance any farther.

  • For instance, he was never misled by the successes of the false Demetrius in Muscovy, and wisely insisted on recovering the great eastern fortress of Smolensk rather than attempting the conquest of Moscow.

  • Despite the approval of Cardinal Contarini and the goodwill of the pope (who is said to have exclaimed on perusing the scheme of Ignatius, "The finger of God is here"), there was a strong and general feeling that the regular system had broken down and could not be wisely developed farther.

  • The ocean-carrying trade was almost wholly in the hands of foreigners, the government wisely refraining from an attempt to develop an occupation for which its citizens had no natural aptitude.

  • The Church of England, which had put forth the version of 1611, fitly initiated the work, but for its performance most wisely invited the help of the sister churches.

  • His personal appearance was remarkable, and not imposing, for he was very short, with plain features, ungainly gestures and manners, very near-sighted, and of disagreeable voice; yet he became (after wisely giving up an attempt at the ornate style of oratory) a very effective speaker in a kind of conversational manner, and in the epigram of debate he had no superior among the statesmen of his time except Lord Beaconsfield.

  • Washington, who was wisely anxious to concentrate attack on one or other of the centres of British power in Virginia or New York, had to wait till the arrival of Grasse before he could see his ideas applied.

  • His power was immense, and it was well and wisely used.

  • In the constitutional movement in Persia (1907) the Babis, though their sympathies are undoubtedly with the reformers, wisely refrained from outwardly identifying themselves with that party, to whom their open support, by alienating the orthodox mujtahids and mullds, would have proved fatal.

  • There can be no doubt that he looked with apprehension on the growing power of the British; but he wisely avoided any serious collision with them.

  • During these early years Bedford ruled France wisely and at first with success, but he could not prevent the mischief which Humphrey of Gloucester caused both at home and abroad.

  • was to go on following wisely and firmly the way that had already been opened.

  • His letter, preserved by the imperial biographer, Eusebius of Caesarea, is a state document inspired by a wisely conciliatory policy; it made out both parties to be equally in the right and in the wrong, at the same time giving them both to understand that such questions, the meaning of which would be grasped only by the few, had better not be brought into public discussion; it was advisable to come to an agreement where the difference of opinion was not fundamental.

  • Modern engineers favour the practice of having the stones of various sizes instead of being uniform, because if these sizes are wisely proportioned the whole mixture can be made more solid, and the rough "pockets" avoided.

  • The medical work won the favour of the government, and so wisely did the missionaries act, that during all the turbulent changes since 1884 they escaped entanglement in the political disturbances and yet held the confidence of the people.

  • But when difficulties and differences arose between North and South, as they were sure to arise, they were not dealt with wisely.

  • " We cannot live pleasantly without living wisely and nobly and righteously."

  • He administered his estates wisely; promoted commerce and industry, particularly in Flanders; and left his son a welllined treasury.

  • Leopold had wisely decided to initiate a conciliatory policy in Hungary.

  • The best are in English; where we have the extremely paraphrastic, but for its time admirable translation of George Sale (repeatedly printed), that of Rodwell (1861), which seeks to give the pieces in chronological order, and that of Palmer (1880), who wisely follows the traditional arrangements.

  • Buller most wisely decided to withdraw the Desert Column from a position of extreme danger, it was determined at Korti that the River Column should proceed to attack Berber, and Lord Wolseley accepted the proposal of the government to make a railway from Suakin, telegraphing to Lord Hartington: By all means make railway by contract to Berber, or as far as you can, during summer.

  • Racial, administrative, and economic problems of an intricate kind pressed upon him and were not always wisely decided; and it says much for his personal charm that he carried away with him on his retirement the warm affection of the Rhodesians.

  • At the same time he was in favour of making the creed of the Church as wide as possible - " not narrower than that which is even now the test of its membership, the Apostles' Creed " - and of throwing down all barriers which could be wisely dispensed with to admission to its ministry.

  • But he felt himself lacking in the academic spirit, and wisely declined.

  • If his campaigns were not always so wisely and prudently planned as those of some of his predecessors, they were in the main eminently fortunate, and resulted in adding to his dominions Belgrade, Budapest, Temesvar, Rhodes, Tabriz, Bagdad, Nakshivan and Rivan, Aden and Algiers, and in his days Turkey attained the culminating point of her glory.

  • The education of the young prince was wisely entrusted to the vice-chancellor Osterman.

  • They were applied to other P Y PP uses less justifiable or defensible; they served to execute the will of the despotic master upon all who set themselves in opposition to his authority, or were decreed, more or less wisely but still arbitrarily, by a government in the best interests of society, organized for the general good.

  • This period of almost unbroken solitude is of a painful character, and its duration has therefore been wisely limited.

  • " Governments learned to oppress them wisely, depriving them of church and school, of pastor and schoolmaster; and by those nameless arts with which the rich used to coerce the poor in the good old days.

  • In physics you wisely note, and therein I agree with you, that after the notions of the first class and the axioms concerning them have been by induction well made out and defined, syllogism may be applied safely; only it must be restrained from leaping at once to the most general notions, and progress must be made through a fit succession of steps."

  • The interests of internal commerce were, however, wisely consulted.

  • He entered wisely on his work of reformation, for which he was well prepared.

  • The Buyids, and especially Adod addaula (Azud-ed-Dowleh, and similar forms), ruled Bagdad wisely and improved the city by great public works such as the great dike, still known as the Bend Amir on the Kur (Cyrus) near Persepolis.

  • He read widely and wisely, in poetry, philosophy and divinity.

  • Only by the creation of a central government could South Africa be wisely and successfully governed.

  • But they, professing somehow to know my mind, attempt to expound the words they heard from me more wisely than I who spoke them, telling those who are instructed by them that this is my meaning, which I never thought of.

  • Though the two great princes of Central India, Sindhia and Holkar, wisely and fortunately remained true to the British, troops belonging to both of them joined the mutineers.

  • The argument ex analogia hominis has often been carried too far; but if a "chief end of man" be discoverable - av9p6miruvov ayaOov, as Aristotle wisely insisted that the ethical end must be determined - then it may be assumed that this end cannot be irrelevant to that ultimate "meaning" of the universe which, according to Lotze, is the quest of philosophy.

  • Albert died in 1404, having ruled the land well and wisely for 46 years, first as Ruward, then as count.

  • At the same time he wisely strove to gain the goodwill of the powerful priesthoods of the great sanctuaries of Delphi and Olympia.

  • Up to this point the prince had ruled wisely; he had founded the universities of Bucharest and Jassy; his reforms had swept away the last vestiges of feudalism and created a class of peasant freeholders.

  • We do not always know the least resistance which it is safe to give to a retaining wall subject to the pressure of earth, or conversely, the maximum resistance to side-thrust which natural or embanked earth will afford, because we wisely neglect the important but very variable element of adhesion between the particles.

  • granted the harbour to the magistrates of Edinburgh, who did not always use their power wisely.

  • Disarmed, however, by the dukes frank submission they wisely resolved not to push him to extremes, and the first council which was appointed to act for the new monarch was a sort of coalition ministry in which Lancasters followers as well as his foes were represented.

  • Henry very wisely proceeded to get out of the war on the best terms possible, and, to the disgust of Maximilian, sold peace to the French king for 600,000 crowns, as well as an additional sum representing arrears of the pension which Louis XI.

  • He clearly saw, what Stanhope had failed to see, that the mass of the nation was not fitted as yet to interest itself wisely in affairs of government, and that therefore the rule must be kept in the hands of the upper classes.

  • Sir Robert Peel wisely endeavoured to stifle agitation by making considerable concessions to Irish sentiment.

  • Accordingly the government wisely determined on their repeal; and one of the last and greatest battles between Free Trade and Protection was fought over the question.

  • Burke felt now, as he did thirty years later, that civil institutions cannot wisely or safely be measured by the tests of pure reason.

  • Neither now nor ever had Burke any other real conception of a polity for England than government by the territorial aristocracy in the interests of the nation at large, and especially in the interests of commerce, to the vital importance of which in our economy he was always keenly and wisely alive.

  • Weary of revolution, men sought no more than to be wisely and firmly governed.

  • Wisdom will necessarily maintain orderly activity, and this latter consists in regulation by wisdom, while the two more special virtues of Courage (avbpeia) and Temperance (6cwcpotruvf) are only different sides or aspects of this wisely regulated action of the complex soul.

  • Ewald was of opinion that the Greek was an actual translation of the lost Hebrew; but Ball more wisely takes it as a free rendering of a lost Haggadic narrative founded on the older document from which the chronicler drew his information.

  • Burnet wisely refused to accept a benefice in the disturbed state of church affairs, but he wrote an audacious letter to Archbishop Sharp asking him to take measures to restore peace.

  • The lad was just over fifteen and the co-habitation of the couple was wisely delayed; but he died on the 2nd of April following.

  • The affairs of the colony were now in a critical condition; a man of experience and decision was needed to cope with the difficulties, and Louis XIV., who was not wanting in sagacity, wisely made choice of the choleric count to represent and uphold the power of France.

  • i should if possible be avoided; therefore quietness and the exer cise of care when manipulating are always recommended by teachers, and practised by those who wisely take their lessons to heart.

  • was trusting in a dishonest and insatiable prince; he would have acted more wisely in remaining the ally of the weak but loyal Louis of Anjou.

  • When Sigismondo was absent she governed Rimini wisely and well, and proved herself a match for the statesmen with whom she had to deal.

  • I wisely followed with my careful research of recent births in this community until I found mother LeBlanc, lately arrived from a city near Lynn, Massachusetts!

  • "You'll lose it if you don't," he said wisely, accustomed to helping Jonny help her search the house for keys, purses, and anything else she lost.

  • "Well, if you tried to kill her, you probably didn't help things," Darian said wisely.

  • Someone brought you in, Linda said wisely.

  • Use it wisely, love.

  • "I will try, and I'll use it wisely," she said.

  • "Keep that in mind," he said wisely.

  • "You're not ready," he said wisely.

  • Dean's marriage to Cynthia hadn't helped break the tie as she wisely refused to divulge to either of them how she voted.

  • You do what you have to in that situation, even work with people you didn't think you ever would, Mrs. Watson said wisely.

  • She wisely chose not to meet the challenging gaze of a restlessly shifting man among the king's company but focused on Taran's leg.

  • Clara tipped her head to the side and smiled wisely.

  • Mr. O'Hara glanced at his wife, who smiled wisely.

  • "Betrayal's a bitch," Xander said wisely.

  • He wisely refrained from putting his arm round me, just kept me plied with coffee.

  • He wisely refrained from putting his arm round me.

  • Shop wisely, making sure your purchase is strong enough to resist abrasions.

  • Benedict wisely plays his part in a stolid, straightforward manner; Titmuss goes for sweet sadness but produces only girlish affectation.

  • used wisely argumentation supports geographers in thinking deeply about the complexity of places.

  • Choose wisely and there is no reason say ciao to Italian eating OR your diet.

  • The public will also all act wisely, as they are also fully cognizant of the subtle nature of net society.

  • The movements Alston devises are almost always delectable, wisely inventive without shouting their unusualness.

  • Use color wisely You may have noticed that the Orwellian dystopia being filmed in Minority Report has a cold, blue feel.

  • evacuees in the village, wisely well separated.

  • The mood of Britain is wisely and rightly averse from every form of shallow or premature exultation.

  • investing wisely, in the key areas is so important to our clients.

  • isotonic solutions might be more wisely delivered over 30 minutes, an hour or two hours.

  • mightypen is still mightier than the sword - use it wisely FEATURE ARTICLES Here's your chance to make the news!

  • mightypen is still mightier than the sword - use it wisely FEATURE ARTICLES Here's your chance to make the news!

  • opted wisely for a secured personal loan.

  • Consequently, severe restrictions were wisely placed upon any new building.

  • The Admiralty handled it wisely by making slight improvements in the conditions, paying the sailors and only hanging the ringleaders.

  • The new headteacher thought wisely to wipe the slate clean.

  • And the lord commended the unjust steward, because he had done wisely.

  • Protests against the war and President Johnson himself had grown so strident by 1968 that he wisely chose not to run for reelection.

  • A brilliant scholar, a mediating theologian, and personally of lovable temperament, his influence was great and wisely exercised.

  • Even the manuscripts left at his death were so incomplete that Todhunter, into whose hands they were put, found it impossible to use them in the publication of a second edition of the original treatise, and wisely printed them, in 1865, in a supplementary volume.

  • The Catholic Church has more wisely left physicians in possession, and elevated the anointing of the sick into a sacrament to be used only in cases of mortal sickness, and even then not to the exclusion of the healing art.

  • Cromwell wisely inclined towards France, for Spain was then a greater menace than France alike to the Protestant cause and to the growth of British trade in the western hemisphere; but as no concessions could be gained from either France or Spain, the year 1654 closed without a treaty being made with either.

  • At the same time he wisely followed his fathers policy with regard to education and the church.

  • ViscontiVenosta and Minghetti, moreover, wisely resisted the chancellors pressure to override the Law of Guarantees and to engage in an Italian Kulturkampf.

  • Visconti-Ven.osta and Minghetti, partly from aversion to a Jacobin policy, and partly from a conviction that Bismarck sooner or later would undertake his Gang nach Canossa, regardless of any tacit engagement he might have assumed towards Italy, had wisely declined to be drawn into any infraction of the Law of Guarantees.

  • The resignation of the Gladstone-Granville cabinet further precluded the projected Italian occupation of Suakin, and the Italians, wisely refraining from an independent attempt to succour Kassala, then besieged by the Mahdists, bent their efforts to the increase of their zone of occupation around Massawa.

  • In June 1835 Airy was appointed Astronomer Royal in succession to John Pond, and thus commenced that long career of wisely directed and vigorously sustained industry at the national observatory which, even more perhaps than his investigations in abstract science or theoretical astronomy, constitutes his chief title to fame.

  • As many of the democratic principles frightened her more moderate and experienced advisers, she wisely refrained from immediately putting them into execution.

  • The government had done wisely in obscuring the passion for democratic ideals by an appeal to Russian chauvinism, an appeal soon to bear fruit in disuniting the revolutionary parties.

  • On his first return to Oxford the work was " wisely relinquished," and never afterwards resumed.

  • That there was fraud, and complicated fraud, in the guardians of the dauphin may be taken as proved by a succession of writers from 1850 onwards, and more recently by Frederic Barbey, who wisely attempts no ultimate solution.

  • But the latter used this privilege wisely and well-not, after the manner of De Blainville and others subsequent to him, relying solely or even chiefly on the character afforded by the posterior portion of the sternum, but taking also into consideration those of the anterior, as well as of the in some cases still more important characters presented by the pre-sternal bones, such as the furcula, coracoids and scapulae.

  • During his brief administration Vitellius showed indications of a desire to govern wisely, but he was completely under the control of Valens and Caecina, who for their own ends encouraged him in a course of vicious excesses which threw his better qualities into the background.

  • The provinces were unsettled, the barbarians on the borders restless and menacing, and Hadrian wisely judged that the old limits of Augustus afforded the most defensible frontier.

  • Learning by his own experience and errors, he wisely developed a sovereign prudence which nicely adjusted means to the end in view.

  • The love that is disguised in the deadly feud between Isolde and Tristan, before the drinking of the fatal potion, rises even above the music; the love-duet in the second act depends for its greatness on its introduction, before the lovers have met, and its wonderful slow movement (shortly before the catastrophe) where they are almost silent and leave everything to the music: the intervening twenty minutes is an exhausting storm in which the words are the sophisticated rhetoric of a 19th-century novel of passion, translated into terribly turgid verse and set to music that is more interesting as an intellectual ferment than effective as a representation of emotions which previous dramatists have wisely left to the imagination.

  • By the union of great moral qualities with high, though not the highest, intellectual faculties, he carried the Indian empire safely through the stress of the storm, and, what was perhaps a harder task still, he dealt wisely with the enormous difficulties arising at the close of such a war, established a more liberal policy and a sounder financial system, and left the people more contented than they were before.

  • The Spanish rulers made efforts to govern wisely and liberally, showing great complaisance, particularly in heeding the profit of the colony, even at the expense of Spanish colonial commercial regulations.

  • The concessionnaire companies have, however, wisely taken the view that it is better to depend upon their own revenues than upon any government guarantee, and have done their best to develop the working value of the lines in their charge.

  • The Ottoman government protested to the powers, but it wisely limited its demands to a claim for compensation.

  • Knowing the emperor's methods, he wisely restrained the ardour of his subordinates and asked for instructions whether to attack or wait.

  • Home wisely resigned his charge in 1757, after a visit to London, where Douglas was brought out at Covent Garden on the 14th of March.

  • This triumphant issue was mainly due to the diplomatic ability of the new vice chancellor, Alexius BestuzhevRyumin, whom Elizabeth, much as she disliked him personally, had wisely placed at the head of foreign affairs immediately after her accession.

  • He arranged the collective guarantee of the neutrality of Luxemburg in 1867, negotiated a convention about the " Alabama," which, however, was not ratified, and most wisely refused to take any part in the Cretan troubles.

  • We have said that this advance is often quoted, not very wisely, to signify that in modern progress "medicine" has fallen behind surgery - as if the art of the physician were not one and indivisible.

  • But he distributed the increased taxation so equally, and chose its subjects so wisely, that the ordinary administrative expenditure and the interest on the national debt were fully provided for, while the extraordinary expenditure for military purposes was met from the Chinese indemnity.

  • The failure of the bureau system and its discontinuance in the midst of reconstruction without harm to the blacks, and the intense hostility of the Southern whites to the institution caused by the irritating conduct of bureau officials, are indications that the institution was not well conceived nor wisely administered.

  • At the same time the viceroy wisely came to an agreement with Sayri Tupac, the son and successor of the Inca Manco, and granted him a pension.

  • The peoples of the thirteen states which had secured emancipation from British sovereignty were wisely intent on framing their own Federal Union, and in taking effective possession of the vast territories in the Ohio region and beyond the Mississippi.

  • But he wisely refrained from taking the immediate offensive.

  • But Zieten declined, and very wisely, to fight on the right bank, and he made the most of the screen afforded by the little river.

  • Instead of drawing his corps together and retreating en masse up the Fleurus road, Zieten wisely withdrew on two roads, using those to Quatre Bras and Fleurus.

  • Blucher wisely shifted his own headquarters to Sombreffe on the afternoon of the r 5th.

  • The day was now drawing to a close, and Ney decided wisely not to push his advance any farther.

  • For instance, he was never misled by the successes of the false Demetrius in Muscovy, and wisely insisted on recovering the great eastern fortress of Smolensk rather than attempting the conquest of Moscow.

  • Despite the approval of Cardinal Contarini and the goodwill of the pope (who is said to have exclaimed on perusing the scheme of Ignatius, "The finger of God is here"), there was a strong and general feeling that the regular system had broken down and could not be wisely developed farther.

  • The ocean-carrying trade was almost wholly in the hands of foreigners, the government wisely refraining from an attempt to develop an occupation for which its citizens had no natural aptitude.

  • The Church of England, which had put forth the version of 1611, fitly initiated the work, but for its performance most wisely invited the help of the sister churches.

  • His personal appearance was remarkable, and not imposing, for he was very short, with plain features, ungainly gestures and manners, very near-sighted, and of disagreeable voice; yet he became (after wisely giving up an attempt at the ornate style of oratory) a very effective speaker in a kind of conversational manner, and in the epigram of debate he had no superior among the statesmen of his time except Lord Beaconsfield.

  • Washington, who was wisely anxious to concentrate attack on one or other of the centres of British power in Virginia or New York, had to wait till the arrival of Grasse before he could see his ideas applied.

  • His power was immense, and it was well and wisely used.

  • In the constitutional movement in Persia (1907) the Babis, though their sympathies are undoubtedly with the reformers, wisely refrained from outwardly identifying themselves with that party, to whom their open support, by alienating the orthodox mujtahids and mullds, would have proved fatal.

  • There can be no doubt that he looked with apprehension on the growing power of the British; but he wisely avoided any serious collision with them.

  • During these early years Bedford ruled France wisely and at first with success, but he could not prevent the mischief which Humphrey of Gloucester caused both at home and abroad.

  • was to go on following wisely and firmly the way that had already been opened.

  • His letter, preserved by the imperial biographer, Eusebius of Caesarea, is a state document inspired by a wisely conciliatory policy; it made out both parties to be equally in the right and in the wrong, at the same time giving them both to understand that such questions, the meaning of which would be grasped only by the few, had better not be brought into public discussion; it was advisable to come to an agreement where the difference of opinion was not fundamental.

  • Modern engineers favour the practice of having the stones of various sizes instead of being uniform, because if these sizes are wisely proportioned the whole mixture can be made more solid, and the rough "pockets" avoided.

  • The medical work won the favour of the government, and so wisely did the missionaries act, that during all the turbulent changes since 1884 they escaped entanglement in the political disturbances and yet held the confidence of the people.

  • But when difficulties and differences arose between North and South, as they were sure to arise, they were not dealt with wisely.

  • " We cannot live pleasantly without living wisely and nobly and righteously."

  • He administered his estates wisely; promoted commerce and industry, particularly in Flanders; and left his son a welllined treasury.

  • Leopold had wisely decided to initiate a conciliatory policy in Hungary.

  • The best are in English; where we have the extremely paraphrastic, but for its time admirable translation of George Sale (repeatedly printed), that of Rodwell (1861), which seeks to give the pieces in chronological order, and that of Palmer (1880), who wisely follows the traditional arrangements.

  • Buller most wisely decided to withdraw the Desert Column from a position of extreme danger, it was determined at Korti that the River Column should proceed to attack Berber, and Lord Wolseley accepted the proposal of the government to make a railway from Suakin, telegraphing to Lord Hartington: By all means make railway by contract to Berber, or as far as you can, during summer.

  • Before entering on this, however, he wisely took the preliminary step of settling the more important of the legal questions as to which the older jurists had been divided in opinion, and which had therefore remained sources of difficulty, a difficulty aggra 1 See, for an account of the instructions given to the commission, the constitution Haec quae, prefixed to the revised Codex in the Corpus juris civilis.

  • Racial, administrative, and economic problems of an intricate kind pressed upon him and were not always wisely decided; and it says much for his personal charm that he carried away with him on his retirement the warm affection of the Rhodesians.

  • At the same time he was in favour of making the creed of the Church as wide as possible - " not narrower than that which is even now the test of its membership, the Apostles' Creed " - and of throwing down all barriers which could be wisely dispensed with to admission to its ministry.

  • But he felt himself lacking in the academic spirit, and wisely declined.

  • If his campaigns were not always so wisely and prudently planned as those of some of his predecessors, they were in the main eminently fortunate, and resulted in adding to his dominions Belgrade, Budapest, Temesvar, Rhodes, Tabriz, Bagdad, Nakshivan and Rivan, Aden and Algiers, and in his days Turkey attained the culminating point of her glory.

  • The education of the young prince was wisely entrusted to the vice-chancellor Osterman.

  • He wisely turned to the more feasible course of extending his dominions at the expense of the decadent Mahommedan princes of Valencia.

  • They were applied to other P Y PP uses less justifiable or defensible; they served to execute the will of the despotic master upon all who set themselves in opposition to his authority, or were decreed, more or less wisely but still arbitrarily, by a government in the best interests of society, organized for the general good.

  • This period of almost unbroken solitude is of a painful character, and its duration has therefore been wisely limited.

  • " Governments learned to oppress them wisely, depriving them of church and school, of pastor and schoolmaster; and by those nameless arts with which the rich used to coerce the poor in the good old days.

  • In physics you wisely note, and therein I agree with you, that after the notions of the first class and the axioms concerning them have been by induction well made out and defined, syllogism may be applied safely; only it must be restrained from leaping at once to the most general notions, and progress must be made through a fit succession of steps."

  • The interests of internal commerce were, however, wisely consulted.

  • He entered wisely on his work of reformation, for which he was well prepared.

  • The Buyids, and especially Adod addaula (Azud-ed-Dowleh, and similar forms), ruled Bagdad wisely and improved the city by great public works such as the great dike, still known as the Bend Amir on the Kur (Cyrus) near Persepolis.

  • He read widely and wisely, in poetry, philosophy and divinity.

  • Only by the creation of a central government could South Africa be wisely and successfully governed.

  • The two volumes of his speeches, as edited by James Redpath, were fortunately made from verbatim reports, and they wisely enclose in parentheses those indications of favour or dissent from the audience which transformed so many of his speeches into exhibitions of gladiatorial skill.

  • But they, professing somehow to know my mind, attempt to expound the words they heard from me more wisely than I who spoke them, telling those who are instructed by them that this is my meaning, which I never thought of.

  • Though the two great princes of Central India, Sindhia and Holkar, wisely and fortunately remained true to the British, troops belonging to both of them joined the mutineers.

  • The argument ex analogia hominis has often been carried too far; but if a "chief end of man" be discoverable - av9p6miruvov ayaOov, as Aristotle wisely insisted that the ethical end must be determined - then it may be assumed that this end cannot be irrelevant to that ultimate "meaning" of the universe which, according to Lotze, is the quest of philosophy.

  • Albert died in 1404, having ruled the land well and wisely for 46 years, first as Ruward, then as count.

  • At the same time he wisely strove to gain the goodwill of the powerful priesthoods of the great sanctuaries of Delphi and Olympia.

  • Up to this point the prince had ruled wisely; he had founded the universities of Bucharest and Jassy; his reforms had swept away the last vestiges of feudalism and created a class of peasant freeholders.

  • We do not always know the least resistance which it is safe to give to a retaining wall subject to the pressure of earth, or conversely, the maximum resistance to side-thrust which natural or embanked earth will afford, because we wisely neglect the important but very variable element of adhesion between the particles.

  • granted the harbour to the magistrates of Edinburgh, who did not always use their power wisely.

  • Disarmed, however, by the dukes frank submission they wisely resolved not to push him to extremes, and the first council which was appointed to act for the new monarch was a sort of coalition ministry in which Lancasters followers as well as his foes were represented.

  • Henry very wisely proceeded to get out of the war on the best terms possible, and, to the disgust of Maximilian, sold peace to the French king for 600,000 crowns, as well as an additional sum representing arrears of the pension which Louis XI.

  • He clearly saw, what Stanhope had failed to see, that the mass of the nation was not fitted as yet to interest itself wisely in affairs of government, and that therefore the rule must be kept in the hands of the upper classes.

  • Sir Robert Peel wisely endeavoured to stifle agitation by making considerable concessions to Irish sentiment.

  • Accordingly the government wisely determined on their repeal; and one of the last and greatest battles between Free Trade and Protection was fought over the question.

  • Burke felt now, as he did thirty years later, that civil institutions cannot wisely or safely be measured by the tests of pure reason.

  • Neither now nor ever had Burke any other real conception of a polity for England than government by the territorial aristocracy in the interests of the nation at large, and especially in the interests of commerce, to the vital importance of which in our economy he was always keenly and wisely alive.

  • Weary of revolution, men sought no more than to be wisely and firmly governed.

  • Wisdom will necessarily maintain orderly activity, and this latter consists in regulation by wisdom, while the two more special virtues of Courage (avbpeia) and Temperance (6cwcpotruvf) are only different sides or aspects of this wisely regulated action of the complex soul.

  • Ewald was of opinion that the Greek was an actual translation of the lost Hebrew; but Ball more wisely takes it as a free rendering of a lost Haggadic narrative founded on the older document from which the chronicler drew his information.

  • Burnet wisely refused to accept a benefice in the disturbed state of church affairs, but he wrote an audacious letter to Archbishop Sharp asking him to take measures to restore peace.

  • The lad was just over fifteen and the co-habitation of the couple was wisely delayed; but he died on the 2nd of April following.

  • The affairs of the colony were now in a critical condition; a man of experience and decision was needed to cope with the difficulties, and Louis XIV., who was not wanting in sagacity, wisely made choice of the choleric count to represent and uphold the power of France.

  • i should if possible be avoided; therefore quietness and the exer cise of care when manipulating are always recommended by teachers, and practised by those who wisely take their lessons to heart.

  • was trusting in a dishonest and insatiable prince; he would have acted more wisely in remaining the ally of the weak but loyal Louis of Anjou.

  • When Sigismondo was absent she governed Rimini wisely and well, and proved herself a match for the statesmen with whom she had to deal.

  • "But you ruled it wisely and well for many years," said she, "and made the people proud of your magical art.

  • To the sick the doctors wisely recommend a change of air and scenery.

  • If they pay the tax from a mistaken interest in the individual taxed, to save his property, or prevent his going to jail, it is because they have not considered wisely how far they let their private feelings interfere with the public good.

  • In the end, wisely and carefully we shall readjust the balance of animal and vegetable me to suit our human needs.

  • He wisely refrained from putting his arm round me, just kept me plied with coffee.

  • Consequently, severe restrictions were wisely placed upon any new building.

  • The Admiralty handled it wisely by making slight improvements in the conditions, paying the sailors and only hanging the ringleaders.

  • The new headteacher thought wisely to wipe the slate clean.

  • And the lord commended the unjust steward, because he had done wisely.

  • Protests against the war and President Johnson himself had grown so strident by 1968 that he wisely chose not to run for reelection.

  • Finally, whether you are planning to use an adoption agency, lawyer, or adoption facilitator, choose wisely.

  • It is up to parents and other caregivers to use these and any other videos or television shows wisely, choosing content that enriches a child's learning experiences and encourages developmental growth.

  • These steps will help you shop wisely for boys' clothes that fit, look good and last.

  • Choosing an electric heater wisely will help ensure that it operates to its optimum performance, offering warmth and heat where required in an energy efficient manner.

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