Wingless sentence example

wingless
  • Rarely the male is the wingless sex.
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  • Hexapoda mostly with wings, the wingless forms clearly degraded.
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  • Fleas are wingless insects, with a laterally compressed body, small and indistinctly separated head, and short thick antennae situated in cavities somewhat behind and above the simple eyes, which are always minute and sometimes absent.
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  • Starting with the kiwi and cassowary, people have got into the habit of confounding flightless with wingless conditions.
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  • Such " workers " are essential to the formation of a social community of Hymenoptera, and their wingless condition among the ants shows that their specialization has been carried further in this family than among the wasps and bees.
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  • It is interesting and suggestive that in a few families of digging Hymenoptera (such as the Mutillidae), allied to the ants, the females are wingless.
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  • The winter moth (Cheimatobia brumata) must be kept in check by putting greasy bands round the trunks from October till December or January, to catch the wingless females that crawl up and deposit their eggs in the cracks and crevices in the bark.
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  • The females in this moth and in others allied to it are wingless.
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  • A, Winged female; B, winged D, viviparous wingless female from in patches from old apple trees, where the insects live in the rough bark and form cankered growths both above and below ground.
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  • Large pits are dug across the line of advance of these great insect armies to stop them when in the larval or wingless stage, and even huge bonfires are lighted to check their flight when adult.
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  • The wings of insects are, in all cases, developed after hatching, the younger stages being wingless, and often unlike the parent in other respects.
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  • These two endoderm-rudiments embryonic membrane formed by delamination from the blastoderm, ultimately grow together and give rise to the epithelium of the midwhile in a few insects, including the wingless spring-tails, the emgut.
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  • Wingless insects, such as spring-tails and lice, make their appearance in the form of miniature adults.
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  • His order of wingless insects (Aptera) included Crustacea, spiders, centipedes and other creatures that now form classes of the Arthropoda distinct from the Hexapoda; it also included Hexapoda of parasitic and evidently degraded structure, that are now regarded as allied more or less closely to various winged insects.
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  • Consequently the modern order Aptera comprises only a very small proportion of Linnaeus's " Aptera " - the spring-tails and bristle-tails, wingless Hexapoda that stand evidently at a lower grade of development than the bulk of the class.
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  • Sharp's proposed association of the parasitic wingless insects in a group Anapterygota cannot, however, be defended as natural; and recent researches into the structure of these forms enables us to associate them confidently with related winged orders.
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  • In most species the majority of individuals are wingless.
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  • Hexapoda mostly with wings; the wingless forms clearly degraded or modified.
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  • Many students of the group, following Brauer, have regarded the Apterygota as representing the original wingless progenitors of the Pterygota, and the many primitive characters shown by the former group lend support to this view.
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  • It is most unlikely that wings have been acquired independently by various orders of Hexapoda, and if we regard the Thysanura as the slightly modified representatives of a primitively wingless stock, we must postulate the acquisition of wings by some early offshoot of that stock, an offshoot whence the whole group of the Pterygota took its rise.
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  • This phenomenon occurs among species found at high elevations, among others found in arid or desert regions, and in some cases in the female sex only, the male being winged and the female wingless.
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  • The wingless forms in question are always allied to winged forms, and there is every reason to believe that they have been really derived from winged forms. There are also insects (fleas, &c.) in which metamorphosis of a " complete " character exists, though the insects never develop wings.
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  • These cases render it highly probable that insects may in some circumstances become wingless, though their ancestors were winged.
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  • There are, in fact, existing forms of Exopterygota that are usually wingless, and that nevertheless appear in certain seasons or localities with wings.
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  • The kagu (Rhinochetus jubatus), a peculiar "wingless" bird, is found here only.
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  • The larvae are perfectly white at first and wingless, although in other respects not unlike their parents, but they are not mature insects until after the sixth casting of the skin.
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  • Wingless females of many tropical species present a close superficial resemblance to woodlice; and one interesting apterous form known as Pseudoglomeris, from the East Indies, is able to roll up like a millipede.
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  • It is only necessary here to mention one anomalous form, Enoicyla pusilla, in which the mature female is wingless and the larva is terrestrial, living in moss or decayed leaves.
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  • Latreille to the primitive wingless insects known as springtails and bristletails.
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  • A large number of Hymenoptera are, however, entirely wingless - at least as regards one sex or form of the species.
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  • Not a few of these insects, however, are entirely wingless.
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  • All the other members of the group may be regarded as forming a single family - the Proctotrypidae, including an immense number of small parasitic Hymenoptera, not a few of which are wingless.
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  • The ants which form this group are readily distinguished by the differentiation of the females into winged " queens" and wingless " workers."
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  • In two of the families - the Mutillidae and Thynnidae - the females are wingless and the larvae live as parasites in the larvae of other insects; the female Mutilla enters humble-bees' nests and lays her eggs in the bee-grubs.
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  • In many of these insects, while most individuals of the species are wingless, winged specimens are now and then met with.
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  • Root-infesting forms, Root-infesting forms, znd generation, 2 Winged forms, 1 Root-infesting forms, 3 rd generation, Wingless female.
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  • Winged Female which lives on leaves and buds of vine, and lays parthogenetically eggs of two kinds, one developing into a wingless female, the other into a male.
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  • Outside the forest country the weka, an almost wingless bird, is numerous, and in the Alps a hawk-like green parrot, the kea, has learned to kill sheep and holds its ground.
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  • Some Embiidae are entirely wingless in the adult state, and it has been suggested that this is always the condition in the female sex.
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  • The vast majority of individuals in a community consist of wingless forms - " workers " and " soldiers," which are undeveloped members of either sex.
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  • A large proportion of the Corrodentia are wingless.
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  • The book-lice are familiar wingless insects, often found in houses running about among old papers and neglected biological collections.
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  • A bird called moho, but actually of a different family, was the Pennula ecaudata or millsi, which had hardly any tail, and had wings so degenerate that it was commonly thought wingless.
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  • Very many members of the order are entirely wingless.
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  • The Hemimeridae include the single genus Hemimerus, which contains only two species of curious wingless insects with long, jointed cerci, found among the hair of certain West African rodents.
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  • Wingless forms are fairly frequent in the order, but their relationship to the allied winged species is evident.
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  • Those of the highest zone are remarkable for the great predominance of predaceous species and of wingless forms. In this last respect they present a striking analogy with the endemic coleopterous fauna of oceanic islands.
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  • Many wingless insects - such as lice, fleas and certain earwigs and cockroaches - are placed in various orders together with winged insects to which they show evident relationships.
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  • But the bristle-tails and springtails, which form the modern order Aptera, are all without any trace of wings, and, on account of several remarkable archaic characters which they exhibit, there is reason for believing that they are primitively wingless - that they represent an early offshoot which sprang from the ancestral stock of the Hexapoda before organs of flight had been acquired by the class.
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  • All the known forms of plant-life are either fungi or allied to them, and many are only microscopic. The most interesting inhabitants of Mammoth Cave are the blind, wingless grasshoppers, with extremely long antennae; blind, colourless crayfish (Cambarus pellucidus, Telk.); and the blind fish, Amblyopsis spelaeus, colourless and viviparous, from 1 in.
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  • It has roundish cones, with numerous scales and wingless seeds.
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  • The females are always wingless, but are provided with antennae, legs and well-developed mouth-parts.
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  • Many species are wingless at all ages.
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  • Many Hexapoda have lost either one pair or both pairs of wings; cases are common of wingless genera allied to ordinary Pterygote genera.
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  • One species of these great wingless birds laid an egg which is the largest known, being 122 in.
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  • The Greek sphinx had wings and female bust, and the male sphinx of Egypt (wingless) is distinguished as "androsphinx" by Herodotus.
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  • An ancient female sphinx, but wingless, stands on the sacred road near Miletus.
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  • Though Greek sphinxes are in general winged, there have been found in Boeotia terra-cotta figures of wingless sphinxes.
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  • Both winged and wingless forms of both sexes occur, and the wings when present are normal in number, that is to say two pairs.
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  • Eggs produced in the autumn by fertilized females remain on the plant through the winter and hatching in the spring give rise to female individuals which may be winged or wingless.
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  • Not the least interesting features connected with this strange life-history are the facts that the young may be born by the oviparous or viviparous methods and either gamogenetically or agamogenetically, and may develop into winged forms or remain wingless, and that the males only appear in any number at the close of the season.
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  • In the course of the summer, from some of these eggs are hatched females which acquire wings and lay eggs from which wingless males and females are born.
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  • The design is wingless, with aerodynamic tail control giving a fast, highly agile missile.
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  • The female is wingless and never leaves the cocoon where it lays all its eggs and dies.
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  • They are small wingless insects which live in the hair and suck blood from the scalp.
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  • Further, although the wing-rudiments appear externally in an early instar of an exopterygotous insect, the earliest instars are wingless and wing-rudiments have been previously developing beneath the cuticle, growing however outwards, not inwards as in the larva of an endopterygote.
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  • The males, on the contrary, although sometimes wingless, are, as a rule, provided with a pair of large forewings and greatly reduced hindwings; their antennae and legs are longer than in the other sex, but the mouth-parts are reduced and functionless (see Economic Entomology).
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  • These pesky insects are tiny, wingless, nesting creatures that feed on warm blooded organisms such as humans, and leave red wounds where they bite.
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  • Lice are tiny, wingless insects with sucking mouthparts that feed on human blood and lay eggs on body hair or in clothing.
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  • In some lexicons, elves are human-sized and wingless, while fairies are wee and winged.
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  • In the East, the model is wingless, with four legs and scales.
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  • In the first film, audiences are introduced to Elina, a wingless flower fairy who must save all of Fairytopia.
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  • They are remarkable in having wingless males and winged females.
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