Wind sentence example

wind
  • After sunset the wind had dropped.
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  • A gust of wind flung snow into her face.
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  • All the while the wind was rising.
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  • In the forest it was almost hot, no wind could be felt.
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  • Wind tossed her hair, and she tied it up in a bun.
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  • The wind in the upper atmosphere has extraordinary amounts of energy.
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  • There was thunder and lightning; the wind blew hard; the rain poured.
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  • The snow started shortly after they left and the wind blew it horizontal.
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  • He withdrew, and the cold wind swept over her.
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  • The night was cold and the wind nonexistent.
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  • Carmen was so tired that the icy wind failed to keep her awake.
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  • Suddenly, the cold roar of the wind gave way to warmth and quiet.
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  • The morning wind forever blows, the poem of creation is uninterrupted; but few are the ears that hear it.
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  • The snow fell straight from the sky without the wind and was soft and fluffy beneath her feet.
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  • The sky had grown darker again and the wind made queer sobbing sounds as it swept over the valley.
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  • When only the winter wind greeted him, he continued.
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  • A cold wind comforted her as she sat alone.
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  • A third asserts that the cause of its movement lies in the smoke which the wind carries away.
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  • She helped me wind some worsted one day, first rapidly and afterward slowly.
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  • Of course, a little make-up and the right clothes could do wonders - which was a good way to wind up straying off the path she had mapped before she left home.
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  • At length the wind rose, the mist increased, and the waves began to run, and the perch leaped much higher than before, half out of water, a hundred black points, three inches long, at once above the surface.
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  • The hot rays of the sun beat down vertically and a fresh soft wind played with the hair of the bared heads and with the ribbons decorating the icon.
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  • They Transported to the mountainside again, and the cold wind swept past him.
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  • Mother, what makes the wind blow?
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  • (2) Wind resistance.
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  • I then said to her with the finger alphabet, "wind fast," or "wind slow," holding her hands and showing her how to do as I wished.
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  • Grass tickled her hands, a chilled wind nipped her neck, and the scents from her vision intensified until she was near gagging.
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  • Gabriel was at his place in the underworld, a small cottage tucked into Death.s realm, in the Everdark forest of Immortal trees whose hissing, fanlike leaves and snake-like branches moved to catch the quiet wind.
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  • I've been on climbs in all kinds of weather, some all day, rappelling down at dusk, nearly in the dark, with wind and snow trying to blow me off the wall.
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  • The wind howled as she settled against the far wall to wait out the storm.
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  • A gust of wind delivered the smell of raindrops on parched soil.
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  • At most stations a+ and a_ both increase markedly as wind velocity rises.
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  • Its principal streams are those that cross the West Shore of the Coastal Plain and here wind their way from Parr's Ridge rapidly toward the south-east in narrow steep-sided gorges through broad limestone valleys.
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  • The night was overcast, with a light wind from the N.E., and a thick column of smoke soon began to roll down the coast, hiding everything.
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  • The sea was smooth, the night dark with wind from N.W., but hardly had the ships left Dunkirk when the "Sappho" blew out a manhole joint in her boiler and had to put back.
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  • There was not a breath of wind to stir the young leaves on the trees.
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  • As soon as the sun appeared in a clear strip of sky beneath the clouds, the wind fell, as if it dared not spoil the beauty of the summer morning after the storm; drops still continued to fall, but vertically now, and all was still.
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  • The wind still whistled at the mouth of the cave.
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  • She wondered what would be worth the investment, but didn't want to wind up in the middle of a feud.
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  • Rain and wind battered him.
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  • Fog coated the ocean, and a cold, moist wind made her eyes water.
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  • Chilled by the cold ocean wind, Deidre pressed herself against his warm body.
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  • There they slowed down and let the horses get their wind again.
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  • Wind whipped up the building and tossed her hair.
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  • A wind of exceptional violence blows sometimes from the N.N.W.
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  • The flowers are yellow, and the seeds enclosed in a pod are long and thin with numerous long silky fibres attached to them, which enable the seeds to be readily carried by the wind.
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  • In the west the climate is generally delightful, it being there greatly affected by the warm, dry " Chinook " wind which blows from the Pacific Ocean; to some extent the wind modifies the temperature nearly to the eastern border.
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  • Partly on account of its great extent, and partly because there is no wide opening to the Arctic regions, the normal wind circulation is on the whole less modified in the North Pacific than in the Atlantic, except in the west, where the south-west logy.
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  • On stones too large for facing-plates a diagonal draft was run, so as to avoid any wind in the plane (P.T.
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  • These were used to wind round glass vases, to form lips, handles, &c.; and to twist together for spiral patterns.
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  • In April the east wind, which is particularly searching, is predominant, while westerly winds prevail from May to August.
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  • wind called skai prevails in May and June, and is exceedingly destructive to vegetation; while along the west coast of the peninsula similar effects are produced by a salt mist, which carries its influence from 15 t& 30 m.
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  • Destructive hailstorms, again, though rare, are not unknown in Egypt, while the locusts are definitely stated to have been brought by a strong east wind.
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  • It is then dropped or carried by some external agent, wind, water or some member of the animal kingdom, on to the receptive surface of lateral type, that is to sa the elements of the wood or ?P y?
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  • The Gramineae offer a prominent example of a dominant self-pollinated or wind :pollinated family, and this may find explanation in a multiplicity of factors.
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  • Sun and wind are freely admitted, and the whole effect is one of the most airy lightness and grace.
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  • His father, the god Ares-Hippius, gave him winged horses swift as the wind, and Oenomaiis promised his daughter to the man who could outstrip him in the chariot race, hoping thus to prevent her marriage altogether.
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  • There is nearly twice as much wind from the south-west as from the north-east, but the proportions vary greatly in different months.
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  • 15 he had suffered so many injuries and insults, he sowed the wind and his son reaped the whirlwind.
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  • The prevailing wind is that of the north-east and south-east trade winds, broken and modified on the plateau and western lowlands by mountain barriers.
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  • The temperature of the pass in summer is very high, whereas in winter, near its head, the cold is extreme, and the ice-cold wind rushing down the narrow outlet becomes destructive to life.
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  • "Let us make," said Gaiseric, "for the dwellings of the men with whom God is angry," and he left the conduct of his marauding ships to wind and wave.
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  • The former wind, rising often to a gale in a few hours and falling as suddenly, is foretold b y no change in the barometer.
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  • This wind is much dreaded by native mariners as it strikes nearly all the sheltered anchorages.
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  • The factors that enable us to solve for and eliminate disease are getting better all the time, like wind at our back, pushing us forward.
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  • I like to contend with wind and wave.
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  • Then she said, "Helen wind slow," again suiting the action to the words.
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  • So many autumn, ay, and winter days, spent outside the town, trying to hear what was in the wind, to hear and carry it express!
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  • It was worth the while to see the sun shine on these things, and hear the free wind blow on them; so much more interesting most familiar objects look out of doors than in the house.
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  • The bullfrogs trump to usher in the night, and the note of the whip-poor-will is borne on the rippling wind from over the water.
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  • Though it is now dark, the wind still blows and roars in the wood, the waves still dash, and some creatures lull the rest with their notes.
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  • But the wind slides eastward over its opaque surface in vain, till it reaches the living surface beyond.
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  • Several battalions of soldiers, in their shirt sleeves despite the cold wind, swarmed in these earthworks like a host of white ants; spadefuls of red clay were continually being thrown up from behind the bank by unseen hands.
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  • And now, from the hints contained in his letter and given by the little princess, he saw which way the wind was blowing, and his low opinion changed into a feeling of contemptuous ill will.
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  • I always wind up with my foot in my mouth.
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  • He cupped his hand to her ear so she could hear over the howl of the rising wind.
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  • Wind and rain slashed at her as she reached the kitchen doorway and she hurried into the house.
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  • It was as if I hadn't had time to come to grips with that tragedy with the world wind swirling around me.
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  • The car, the traffic, the wind, all went motionless.
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  • He beat the air mercilessly with his wings, rising high above the city and coasting on cold wind currents until he reached the ocean.
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  • A burst of wind sent water from the closest column raining over them.
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  • The winter wind has come a-calling and moans through cracks and crevices like so many ghosts visiting from hell, wailing and beckoning for me to join them.
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  • The wind blew the entire night, creaking and groaning about the old building in a mournful dirge.
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  • Thursday's storm had roared into town with uncommon severity, bringing with it not only more than two feet of fresh snow, but a wind that set the white stuff a-dancing and swirling about the town, like a wild rhumba or some native fertility rite.
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  • The house groaned as a gust of wind bombarded it.
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  • A gust of wind tore the hood from her head and snatched at her hair.
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  • At least it wasn't a cold wind, and the snow was melting.
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  • No doubt Tessa was in labor and searching for a private place to give birth - some place high in the rocks, away from the water, but sheltered from the wind.
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  • Josh's words crept through her mind like an icy wind.
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  • A light wind whispered across the grass and a cloud drifted over, blocking the sun from her face.
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  • A gust of pine and jet fuel scented wind whipped by her.
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  • Her hair whipped in the wind chilling his body.
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  • Finally, he broke through the thatch of branches and leaves blocking most of the sun.  The day was darkening.  In the distance, he saw the massive fortress that was Death's, and he saw the Lake of Souls he'd seen in angel memories.  He saw birds but couldn't see through the jungle to where Katie might be.  The branch holding him swayed in a heavy wind that smelled of rain.
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  • Much later, sometime in the deep hours of the night, he awoke to the sound of thunder and the rush of wind.
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  • "Wind me up and take me anywhere," he'd say, much to her irritation.
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  • I still think it's whistling in the wind, but it'll keep you out of trouble.
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  • The weather remained ominous with dark clouds rolling in, pushed by an ever-increasing wind that churned the sky in threatening waves.
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  • The little plane danced and swayed in the turbulence, constantly buffeted by the increas­ing wind.
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  • He yelled her name but the call was smothered by the cry of the wind and the crash of the surf beyond.
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  • He groped his way down the path, the wind whipping his raincoat behind him, until he felt the mush of soft sand beneath his aching feet.
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  • They decided against it, cautious about frightening off Byrne if he should get wind of the search and realize someone was this close to finding him.
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  • Dean picked up the pace and closed the gap on the yellow­shirted rider, low on his bike to minimize the wind resistance as he raced downward at a dangerous speed.
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  • When we got wind of what he was doing, we picked him up.
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  • He's well formed, slender, not too tall, and strong - but bends with the wind.
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  • Somehow I think I'll wind up on the losing side no matter what happens.
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  • Wind instruments produce very special effects in chamber-music, and need an exceedingly adroit technique on the part of the composer.
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  • The resistance caused by the wind is very variable, and in extreme cases may double the resistance found from the formulae.
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  • A side wind causes excessive flange friction on the leeward side of the train, and increases the tractive resistances therefore very considerably, even though its velocity be relatively moderate.
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  • By the rain wash and wind action detritus from the mountains is carried to these valley floors, raising their level, and often burying low mountain spurs, so as to cause neighbouring valleys to coalesce.
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  • The mountains are composed in great part of Paleozoic strata, often modified by vulcanism and greatly denuded and sculptured by wind and water erosion.
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  • The climate is rather severe, and the southern part is exposed to the cold north-eastern wind, known as the Bora.
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  • The coarser kinds are sorted, cured (dried in the sun and wind) and stacked ready for market.
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  • SKAGWAY (a native name said to mean "home of the north wind"), a city in S.E.
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  • As the earth of light has five tokens (the mild zephyr, cooling wind, bright light, quickening fire, and clear water), so has the earth of darkness also five (mist, heat, the sirocco, darkness and vapour).
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  • This low range turns westward in a curve through the Rattlesnake Mountains towards the high Wind River Mountains (Gannett Peak, 3,775 ft.), an anticlinal range within the body of the mountain system, with flanking strata rising well on the slopes.
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  • If this be true, the southern district will furnish a good illustration of an advanced stage of the cycle of arid erosion, in which the exportation of waste from enclosed depressions by the wind has played an important part.
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  • Most of the bess is now generally believed to have been deposited by the wind.
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  • Some of the bess is thought to have been derived by the wind from the surface of the drift soon after the retreat of the ice, before vegetation got a foothold upon the new-made deposit; but a large part of the bess, especially that associated with the main valleys, appears to have been blown up on to the bluffs of the valleys from the flood plains below.
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  • Outside the region affected by glaciation, deposits by wind, rain, rivers, &c., have been building up the land, and sedimentation has N ~ been in progress in lakes and about coasts.
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  • It flourishes in light soils and is one of the few trees that will grow amongst heather; owing to the large number of "winged seeds" which are readily scattered by the wind, it spreads rapidly, springing up where the soil is dry and covering clearings or waste places.
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  • The people kiss the cross and bow down to it; and ever after Christ's spirit is enshrined in it; it cures disease, drives off demons, and wards off wind and hail.
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  • Since the Rev. William Ellis and a party of American missionaries first made the volcano known to the civilized ' Among the minqr phenomena of Hawaiian volcanoes are the delicate glassy fibres called Pele's hair by the Hawaiians, which are spun by the wind from the rising and falling drops of liquid lava, and blown over the edge or into the crevices of the crater.
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  • During January, February and a part of March the wind blows strongly from the S.
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  • or S.W.; and at this season an unpleasant hot, damp wind is sometimes felt.
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  • Blowing over land and in the direction of the longitudinal valleys, the south-east wind is comparatively dry, and thus favours the formation of steppes in the north such as the Toba plains.
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  • P. van der Stok, Regenwaarnemingen and Atlas of Wind and Weather (Batavia, 1897).
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  • Such gums are formed abundantly in pycnidia, and, absorbing water, swell and carry out the spores in long tendrils, which emerge for days and dry as they reach the air, the glued spores gradually being set free by rain, wind, &c. In oidial chains (Sclerotinia) a minute double wedge of wall-substance arises in the middle lamella between each pair of contiguous oidia, and by its enlargement splits the separating lamella.
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  • The natural steps first of making it intentionally by putting such stones into his fire, and next of improving his fire by putting it and these stones into a cavity on the weather side of some bank with an opening towards the prevalent wind, would give a simple forge, differing only in size, in lacking forced blast, and in details of construction, from the Catalan forges and bloomaries of to-day.
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  • per minute, or that of a " high wind."
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  • Like the Siemens furnace, described in § 99, they have two distinct phases: one, " on gas," during which part of the waste gas of the blast-furnace is burnt within the stove, highly heating the great surface of brickwork which for that purpose is provided within it; the other, " on wind," during which the blast is.
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  • Nelson could only have retreated before the south-easterly wind by going past the Trekroner fort, where the passage is narrow, and the navigation difficult.
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  • In the shita or cold weather (October to February inclusive) there is a cold wind from the north.
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  • The south wind is dry, cool and invigorating, and banishes mosquitoes for a time; the north wind is hot, moist and relaxing.
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  • Violent wind storms generally come from the south.
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  • The island is practically inaccessible for eight months of the year, but the inhabitants communicate with the outer world by means of "sea messages," which are despatched in boxes when a strong west wind is blowing, and generally make the western islands or mainland of Scotland in a week.
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  • The land forms of a desert are exceedingly characteristic. Surface erosion is chiefly due to rapid changes of temperature through a wide range, and to the action of wind transferring sand and dust, often in the form of "dunes" resembling the waves of the sea.
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  • From May until October the prevailing wind is southeast, from November to January it is north, and from February to April it is east.
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  • Thus it is possible to speak of a snow-drift, an accumlation driven by the wind; of a ship drifting out of its course; of the drift of a speech, i.e.
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  • The fall is directly caused by the formation of a layer of tissue across the base of the leaf-stalk; the cells of this layer separate from one another and the leaf remains attached only by the fibres of the veins until it becomes finally detached by the wind or frost.
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  • The climate of Aveyron varies from extreme rigour in the mountains to mildness in the sheltered valleys; the south wind is sometimes of great violence.
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  • Not in the strong wind that brake the rocks in pieces, not in the earthquake, not in the fire, but in the still small voice that followed the Lord made himself known.
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  • The two leading ships had not seen each other for 70 days and met off the Lizard, from which point they ran a neck-and-neck race before a strong westerly wind, with every rag of canvas set.
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  • On his way a west wind drove him to Friesland, where he evangelized the natives and prepared the way for Willibrord.
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  • On the one occasion when Captain Dawson says he heard it himself, " the sound was like the swishing of a whip or the noise produced by a sharp squall of wind in the upper rigging of a ship, and as the aurora brightened and faded so did the sound which accompanied it."
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  • The chief scourge is the sirocco, which is experienced in its most characteristic form on the north coast, as an oppressive, parching, hot, dry wind, blowing strongly and steadily from the south, the atmosphere remaining through the whole period of its duration leaden-coloured and hazy in consequence of the presence of immense quantities of reddish dust.
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  • The same name is sometimes applied to a moist and not very hot, but yet oppressive, south-east wind which blows from time to time on the east coast.
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  • In dry weather the valves open, and the small seeds are ejected through the pores when the capsule is shaken by the wind on its long stiff slender stalk.
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  • The direction of the prevailing wind is S.W.
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  • Then the " hamattan," or hot, dry wind from the Sahara, begins and brings with it clouds of impalpable dust.
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  • In 1889 he published The Wind among the Reeds, containing some of his best lyrics, and in 1900 another poetical drama, The Shadowy Waters.
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  • The prevalent north wind and the rise of the water tend to keep the air cool in summer.
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  • From this it will be seen that the desert in Egypt is mainly a rock desert, where the surface is formed of disintegrated rock, the finer particles of which have been carried away by the wind; and east of the Nile this is almost exclusively the case.
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  • They occur as lines of dunes formed of rounded grains of quartz, and lie in the direction of the prevalent wind, usually being of small breadth as compared with their length; but in certain areas, such as that lying S.W.
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  • The most striking meteorological factor in Egypt is the persistence of the north wind throughout the year, without which the climate would be very trying.
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  • It is this Etesian wind which enables sailing boats constantly to ascend the Nile, against its strong and rapid current.
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  • In December, January and February, at Cairo, the north wind slightly predominates, though those from the south and west often nearly equal it, but after this the north blows almost continuously for the rest of theyear.
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  • The same thing is repeated on the second and sometimes the third day, by which time the wind has worked round to the north again.
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  • During a khamsin the temperature is high and the air extremely dry, while the dust and sand carried by the wind form a thick yellow fog obscuring the sun.
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  • Until May the hot wind is little felt, while during the rains the weather is cool and agreeable.
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  • Out of doors the wind was blowing.
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  • But during the night the fury of the wind increased to such a degree that it thrilled us with a vague terror.
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  • It is said that a flood-tide, with a westerly wind, and ice in the Neva, would sweep St. Petersburg from the face of the earth.
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  • But now the kind October wind rises, rustling the leaves and rippling the surface of the water, so that no loon can be heard or seen, though his foes sweep the pond with spy-glasses, and make the woods resound with their discharges.
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  • With a startled gasp, she dashed into the cabin, struggling to shut the door against the rising wind.
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  • With the door closed, she ran to the window to gaze in horror as the trees tossed their limbs in protest of the wind.
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  • The room was filled with dust and the wind whistled through the screens, ruffling the pages of her book as it lay on the floor.
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  • The wind screamed around the eves and pounded on the windows.
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  • It roared on the tin roof and plunged off the eves, where the wind caught it and drove it across the yard in horizontal sheets.
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  • I think the wind blew that old maple over.
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  • She followed him out on the porch, gasping as a gust of cold wind met them.
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  • A sudden gust of wind ruffled the leaves of the trees, creating a sound much like the surf.
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  • Hold your horses before you wind up with a run away team.
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  • In Sicily and southern Italy the Sirocco occurs at all seasons; it is a dry, dusty wind from south-east or south-west.
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  • Elsewhere local surface currents are developed, either drifts due to the direct action of the winds, or streams produced by wind action heaping water up against the land; but these nowhere rise to the dignity of a distinct current system, although they are often sufficient to obliterate the feeble tidal action characteristic of the Mediterranean.
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  • The Elster and Geitel apparatus is furnished with a cover, serving to protect the dissipator from the direct action of rain, wind or sunlight.
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  • per hour in wind velocity.
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  • Simpson got similar results at Karasjok; the rise in a + and a_ with increased wind velocity seemed, however, larger in winter than in summer.
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  • The wind velocity did not exceed 20 km.
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  • When he considered all days irrespective of wind velocity, Mazelle found the influence of temperature obliterated.
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  • Dissipation was above the average when cyclonic conditions prevailed, but this seemed simply a consequence of the increased wind velocity.
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  • To Eliminate The Disturbing Influence Of Wind, Different Wind Strengths Are Treated Separately.
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  • The prevalent northeast wind cau s es at times a heavy swell on the lake.
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  • In the Andean region, a dry, hot wind from the north or north-west, called the Zonda, blows with great intensity, especially in September - October, and causes much discomfort and suffering.
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  • It is followed by a cold south wind which often lowers the temperature 25°.
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  • The prevailing winds, mild and humid, are west winds from the Atlantic; continental climatic influence makes itself felt in the east wind, which is frequent in winter and in the east of France, while the mistral, a violent wind from the north-west, is characteristic of the Mediterranean region.
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  • Broken Bay and other inlets, and several headlands, were also seen and named, but the vessel did not come to an anchor till Moreton Bay was reached, although the wind prevented Cook from entering this harbour.
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  • The number of rainy days throughout the peninsula varies from 160 to over 200 in each year, but violent gusts of wind, called " Sumatras," accompanied by a heavy downpour of short duration, are more common than persistent rain.
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  • The mistral of the Riviera is entirely absent from Algiers, but in summer the city occasionally suffers from the sirocco or desert wind.
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  • The wind circulation over the Atlantic is of a very definite character.
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  • On the polar side of the high-pressure area a west wind drift is under the control of the " roaring forties," and on reaching South Africa part of this is deflected and sent northwards along the west coast as the cold Benguella current which rejoins the equatorial.
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  • The dry wind from the Sahara called harmattan, which carries great quantities of fine red sand, causes a fall of temperature in the (European) summer.
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  • avgµos, wind, and p. rpov, a measure), an instrument for measuring either the velocity or the pressure of the wind.
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  • Anemometers may be divided into two classes, (1) those that measure the velocity, (2) those that measure the pressure of the wind, but inasmuch as there is a close connexion between the pressure and the velocity, a suitable anemometer of either class will give information about both these quantities.
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  • The cups are placed symmetrically on the end of the arms, and it is easy to see that the wind always has the hollow of one cup presented to it; the back of the cup on the opposite end of the cross also faces the wind, but the pressure on it is naturally less, and hence a continual rotation is produced; each cup in turn as it comes round providing the necessary force.
    0
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  • Unfortunately, when Dr Robinson first designed his anemometer, he stated that no matter what the size:of the cups or the length of the arms, the cups always moved with one-third of the velocity of the wind.
    0
    0
  • The result has been that wind velocities published in many official publications have of ten been in error by nearly 5 0%.
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  • The distortion of the spring determines the actual force which the wind is exerting on the plate, and this is either read off on a suitable gauge, or leaves a record in the ordinary way by means of a pen writing on a sheet of paper moved by clockwork.
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  • ft., but it is now fairly certain that these high values are erroneous, and due, not to the wind, but to faulty design of the anemometer.
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  • The fact is that the wind is continually varying in force, and while the ordinary pressure plate is admirably adapted for measuring the force of a steady and uniform wind, it is entirely unsuitable for following the rapid fluctuations of the natural wind.
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  • A violent gust strikes the plate, which is driven back and carried by its own momentum far past the position in which a steady wind of the same force would place it; by the time the motion has reached the pen it has been greatly exaggerated by the springiness of the connexion, and not only is the plate itself driven too far back, but also its position is wrongly recorded by the pen; the combined errors act the same way, and more than double the real maximum pressure may be indicated on the chart.
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  • In this arrangement a catch is provided so that the plate being once driven back by the wind cannot return until released by hand; but the catch does not prevent the plate being driven back farther by a gust stronger than the last one that moved it.
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  • of fine sewing cotton has been employed to measure the wind velocity passing over a kite, the tension of the cotton being recorded, and this plan has given satisfactory results.
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  • Lind's anemometer, which consists simply of a U tube containing liquid with one end bent into a horizontal direction to face the wind, is perhaps the original form from which the tube class of instrument has sprung.
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  • If the wind blows into the mouth of a tube it causes an increase of pressure inside and also of course an equal increase in all closed vessels with which the mouth is in airtight communication.
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  • 1) utilizes the increased pressure in the open mouth of a straight tube facing the wind, and the decrease of pressure caused inside when the wind blows over a ring of small holes drilled through the metal of a vertical tube which is closed at the upper end.
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  • Thus if the instrument depends on the pressure or suction effect alone, and this pressure or suction is measured against the air pressure in an ordinary room, in which the doors and windows are carefully closed and a newspaper is then burnt up the chimney, an effect may be produced equal to a wind of io m.
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  • It is probable that the wind pressure is not strictly proportional to the extent of the surface exposed.
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  • Similar principles apply in infinite detail to the treatment of wind instruments, and we must never lose sight of them in speculating as to the reasons why the genius of Beethoven was able to carry instrumentation into worlds of which Haydn and Mozart never dreamt, or why, having gone so far, it left anything unexplored.
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  • Larger combinations, being semi-orchestral, especially where the double-bass and wind instruments are used, lend themselves to a somewhat lighter style; thus Beethoven's septet and Schubert's octet are both in the nature of a very large serenade.
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  • south, protects Cartagena from the violence of wind and waves.
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  • All creatures he called his "brothers" or "sisters" - the chief example is the poem of the "Praises of the Creatures," wherein "brother Sun," "sister Moon," "brother Wind," and "sister Water" are called on to praise God.
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  • A rising was organized for February 1831; but Francis got wind of it, and, repenting of his dangerous dallying with revolution, arrested Menotti and fled to Austrian territory with his prisoner.
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  • Robinson published a number of papers in scientific journals, and the Armagh catalogue of stars (Places of 5345 Stars observed from 1828 to 1854 at the Armagh Observatory, Dublin, 1859), but he is best known as the inventor (1846) of the cup-anemometer for registering the velocity of the wind.
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  • The fertile leaves or sporophylls are generally aggregated on special shoots to form rioweN which may contain one or both kinds The microspores are set free from the sporangiurn and carried generally by wind or insect agency to the vicinity of the macrospore, which never leaves the ovule.
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  • and, as is well-known, wind and other nhvsieal agencies are very efficient in dissemination.
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  • This may be due to frost, especially in thin-barked trees, and often occurs in beeches, pears, &c.; or it may result from bruising by wind, hailstones, gun-shot wounds in coverts, &c., the latter of course very local.
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    0
  • The pollination, of flowers and the dispersal of seeds by various animals are biological factors; but pollination and dispersal by the wind cannot be so regarded.
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  • The first of these is wind: it cannot be doubted that small seeds can be swept up like dust and transported to considerable distances.
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  • Birds are even more effective than wind in transporting seeds to long distances.
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  • Thus the stream bed, from which at first the water might be blown away into a new channel by a gale of wind, ultimately grows to be the strongest line of the landscape.
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  • The building and handling of vessels also, and the utilization of such uncontrollable powers of nature as wind and tide, helped forward mechanical invention.
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  • While steam has been said to make a ship independent of wind and tide, it is still true that a long voyage even by steam must be planned so as to encounter the least resistance possible from prevailing winds and permanent currents, and this involves the application of oceanographical and meteorological knowledge.
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  • The older navigation by utilizing the power of the wind demands a very intimate knowledge of these conditions, and it is probable that a revival of sailing ships may in the present century vastly increase the importance of the study of maritime meteorology.
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  • The management of the company had meanwhile passed into the hands of others, whose sole object was to settle accounts with the government, and wind up the undertaking.
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  • A Log Book is a marine or sea journal, containing, in the British navy, the speed, course, leeway, direction and force of the wind, state of the weather, and barometric and thermometric observations.
    0
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  • The distance from Rarotonga to New Zealand is about 2000 m., and, with the aid of the trade wind, large canoes could traverse the distance within a month.
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  • The strength of the wind is greater, on the whole, than in the continental parts of W.
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  • The colouring of the steppe changes as if by magic, and only the silvery plumes of the steppe-grass (Stipa pennata) wave in the wind, tinting the steppe a bright yellow.
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  • Although the succession of the periodical winds follows the progress of the seasons as just described, the changes in the wind's direction everywhere take place under the operation of special local influences which often disguise the more general law, and make it difficult to trace.
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  • The south-west monsoon does not generally extend, in its character of a south-west wind, over the land.
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  • In these storms the wind invariably circulates from north by west through south to east.
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  • Such a reduction of temperature is brought about along the greater part of the coasts of India and of the BurmoSiamese peninsula by the interruption of the wind current by continuous ranges of mountains, which force the mass of air to rise over them, whereby the air being rarefied, its specific capacity for heat is increased and its temperature falls, with a corresponding condensation of the vapour originally held in suspension.
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  • "the highest purest light, the gentle wind, the harmony of sounds, the voice of all the aeons, and the beauty of their forms," all these being treated as abstractions and personified.
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  • The army was visited by a plague, and the fleet was prevented from sailing by the total absence of wind.
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  • The mean rise and fall of the tide is about 2 ft., but under certain conditions of wind the variation amounts to 5 ft.
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  • The prevailing winds in most parts are westerly, but sudden changes, as well as the extremes of temperature, are caused mainly by the frequent shifting of the wind from N.W.
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  • He was the child of a nymph by the god of the wind.
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  • Wind is another important factor, as cotton does not do well in localities subject to very high winds; and in exposed situations, otherwise favourable, wind belts have at times to be provided.
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  • Rain is brought by the west wind; the north-west wind, which blows often, moderates the heat.
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  • On the other hand, an ozoneless east wind (sirocco) is occasionally experienced - especially during the second half of May and before the beginning of the rainy season - which has a prejudicial influence on both animal and vegetable life.
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  • On the eastern side are numerous sand hills, formed by the wind into innumerable fantastic shapes, sometimes covered with stunted trees and scanty vegetation, but usually bare and rising to heights of from 150 to 250 ft.
    0
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  • These frolics suggest the wind.
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  • Robin Hood is Hod, the god of the wind, a form of Woden; Maid Marian is Morgen, the dawn-maiden; Friar Tuck is Toki, the spirit of frost and snow."
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  • The sea immediately south of Formosa is the birthplace of innumerable typhoons, but the high mountains of the island protect it partially against the extreme violence of the wind.
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  • The ordinary rise and fall of the river is comparatively slight, but when the west wind blows steadily for a long time, or when Lake Ladoga sends down its vast accumulations of block-ice, inundations of a dangerous kind occur, as in 1777, 1824, 1879 and 1903.
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  • 150) by name, Podarge, the mother of the coursers of Achilles by Zephyrus, the generative wind.
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  • (1892-1893), the Harpies are the hostile spirits of the scorching south wind; E.
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  • Here, too, the sand is raised into ever-changing hills by the force of the wind sweeping over it.
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  • In both alike the scirocco, bringing rain from the south-west, is a prevalent wind, as well as the bora, the fearful north-north-easter of Illyria, which, sweeping down the lateral valleys of the Dinaric Alps, overwhelms everything in its path.
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  • Helped by a strong south wind, the British war-ships passed up the straits and anchored off the Seven Towers.
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  • Aided by lucky changes of wind, he reached Cadiz, was joined by 1 French and 6 Spanish ships under Admiral Gravina, which, added to the 1 r he had with him, gave him a force of 18 sail.
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  • Sometimes, in the months of June, July and August, when the sherki or south wind is blowing, the thermometer at break of day is known to stand at 112° F., while at noon it rises to 1 19° and a little before two o'clock to 122°, standing at sunset at 114°, but this scale of temperature is exceptional.
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  • The climate of Thrace was regarded by the Greeks as very severe, and that country was spoken of as the home of the north wind, Boreas.
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  • Oligoneuria and allies) the legs are aborted, and the creatures are driven helplessly about by the wind.
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  • Bizerta occupies the site of the ancient Tyrian colony, Hippo Zarytus or Diarrhytus, the harbour of which, by means of a spacious pier, protecting it from the north-east wind, was rendered one of the safest and finest.
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  • The nature of the soil appears, however, to be of secondary importance, provided that it is able to hold moisture and that climatic conditions of high and even temperature with considerable rainfall and absence of wind are satisfied.
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  • In Cumberland, Northumberland, Durham and latterly the United States, the reverberatory furnace is used only for roasting the ore, and the oxidized ore is then reduced by fusion in a low, square blastfurnace (a "Scottish hearth furnace") lined with cast iron, as is also the inclined sole-plate which is made to project beyond the furnace, the outside portion (the "work-stone") being provided with grooves guiding any molten metal that may be placed on the "stone" into a cast iron pot; the "tuyere" for the introduction of the wind was, in the earlier types, about half way down the furnace.
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  • Chilled by the wind, the new-born god went to a fig-tree, partook of its fruit, and clothed himself in its leaves.
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  • Above these, the chapadas lie open to the sun and wind and have a cool, bracing atmosphere even where high sun temperatures prevail.
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  • The prevailing winds on the coast are north-east, warm and humid, and south-west, cool and bracing, though in summer the south-west wind brings rain.
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  • The north-east wind brings more moisture.
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  • The wind from the north-west, known as the cers, blows with great violence, and the sea-breeze is often laden with pestilential effluvia from the lagoons.
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  • Marine rainbow is the name given to the chromatic displays formed by the sun's rays falling on the spray drawn up by the wind playing on the surface of an agitated sea.
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  • HELM WIND, a wind that under certain conditions blows over the escarpment of the Pennines, near Cross Fell from the eastward, when a helm (helmet) cloud covers the summit.
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  • See "Report on the Helm Wind Inquiry," by W.
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  • It must be remembered that the Arabs, who inhabit an extremely hot country, are very fully clothed, while the Fuegians at the extremity, of Cape Horn, exposed to all the rigours of an antarctic climate, have, as sole protection, a skin attached to the body by cords, so that it can be shifted to either side according to the direction of the wind.
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  • The plan which he laid to attack it in the Golfe Jouan in June may possibly have served to some extent as an inspiration, if not as a model, to Nelson for the battle of the Nile, but the wind was unfavourable, and the attack could not be carried out.
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  • The Tower was injured, and a portion of the roof of the church of St Mary-leBow, Cheapside, was carried off and fell some distance away, being forced into the ground as much as 20 ft., a proof of the badness of the thoroughfares as well as of the force of the wind.
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  • A violent east wind fomented the flames which ra ed durin the whole of Monda and Fire.
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  • On Tuesday night the wind fell somewhat, and on Wednesday the fire slackened.
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  • As a result of its relatively great depth there are seldom any great fluctuations of level in this lake due to wind disturbance, but the lake follows the general rule of the Great Lakes (q.v.) of seasonal and annual variation.
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  • wind is fairly constant in the inland regions during the middle of the day.
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  • A hot wind from the N.W.
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  • The dust caused much annoyance whenever there was any wind.
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  • The artillery still remaining to be embarked was for the most part got afloat during the early hours of darkness, and the infantry followed; but the wind soon began to rise ominously, blowing home from W.
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  • (where rapids interrupt the currents) the valleys open out and the rivers wind in tortuous channels often choked by sandbanks.
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  • Adapa while fishing had broken the wings of the south wind, and was accordingly summoned before the tribunal of Anu in heaven.
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  • Moreover the rain penetrates into the small interstices between its particles and dissolves out some of the materials which bind the whole into a solid stone, the surface then becoming a loose powdery mass which falls to the ground below or is carried away by the wind.
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  • On the other hand it should not be too open in texture or the roots do not get a proper hold of the ground and are easily disturbed by wind: moreover such soils are liable to blow away, leaving the underground parts exposed to the air and drought.
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  • Wind and hail may break plants or damage leaves, especially if required for wrapper purposes.
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  • The provision of wind breaks is the only effective remedy.
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  • the direction of the prevailing wind, and the cusps to leeward.
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  • In the south of the Nafud, where Huber found the prevailing wind to be from the south, the falks are turned in that direction.
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  • a steady and often strong wind blows from the south-south-east, which dies away later.
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  • At Tunis the temperature rarely exceeds 90°, except with a wind from the Sahara.
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  • When the wind rises above the snow-capped Andes, the last particle of moisture is wrung from it that a very low temperature can extract.
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  • Passing the summit of that range, it rushes down as a cool and dry wind on the Pacific slopes beyond.
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  • Meeting with no evaporating surface, and with no temperature colder than that to which it is subjected on the mountain-tops, this wind reaches the ocean before it becomes charged with fresh moisture.
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  • The constantly prevailing wind on the Peruvian coast is from the south, which is a cold wind from the Humboldt current.
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  • The monument, after repeatedly resisting the violence of curiosity, was broken into in 1810 by the French soldiery; the statue was mutilated, and the yellow hair was cut from the broken skeleton, to be preserved in reliquaries and blown away by the wind.
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  • Opposite stands the new Pinakothek, built 1846-1853, the frescoes on which, designed by Kaulbach, show the effects of wind and weather.
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  • hawah, " sink, glide down " (through space); hawwa " blow " (wind).
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  • " He rides through the air, He blows " (Wellhausen), would be a fit name for a god of wind and storm.
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  • The cherub upon which he rides when he flies on the wings of the wind (Ps.
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  • The climate of the locality is better than that of the other districts of Berar; the hot wind which blows during the day in the summer months being succeeded at night by a cool breeze.
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  • For a moment the wind blew the flames aside, leaving the corpses untouched.
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  • The intervening sea being comparatively warm, this wind arrives at Japan having its temperature increased and carrying moisture which it deposits as snow on the western faces of the Japanese mountains.
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  • Crossing the mountains and descending their eastern slopes, the wind becomes less saturated and warmer, so that the formation of clouds ceases.
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  • They come from tile adjacent continent of Asia, and they de- Wind velop considerable strength owing to the fact that there is an average difference of some 22 mm.
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  • A comparison of the force habitually developed by the wind in various parts of the islands shows that at Suttsu in Yezo the average strength is 9 metres per second, while Izuhara in the island Tsu-shima, Kumamoto in KiOshi and Gifu in the east centre of the main island stand at the bottom of the list with an average wind velocity of only 2 metres.
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  • A calamitous atmospheric feature is the periodical arrival of storms called typhoons (Japanese tai-fu or great wind).
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  • About 1893 a satisfactory machine was ready, and a new series of troubles had to be faced, for it had to be launched at a certain initial speed, and in the face of any wind that might be blowing.
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  • The flowers appear generally before the leaves and are thus rendered more conspicuous, while passage of pollen by the wind is facilitated.
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  • Fertilization is effected by insects, especially by bees, which are directed in their search by the colour and fragrance of the flowers; but some pollen must also be transported by the wind to the female flowers, especially in arctic species which, in spite of the poverty of insect life, set abundant fruit.
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  • The regular tides are hardly perceptible, but, under the influence of barometric pressure and wind, the sea-level occasionally varies as much as ft.
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  • The direct passes across it from Herat (the Baba and the Ardewan) wind amongst masses of disintegrating sandstone for some miles on each side of the dividing watershed, but farther west the rounded knolls of the rain-washed downs may be crossed almost at any point without difficulty.
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  • Want of wind prevented the operation.
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  • Changes of wind made the battle somewhat confused.
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  • A shift of the wind having given him the weather-gage, he concentrated a vigorous attack on Lawson.
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  • But the wind changed again and transferred the weather-gage to the English.
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  • Between the 26th and the 30th of July Tromp, by a series of skilful manoeuvres, united the divided Dutch squadrons in the face of Monk's fleet, and on the 30th he stood out to sea with the wind in his favour, and gave battle.
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  • wind.
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  • The Dutch admiral, who had the advantage of the wind, fell on the English in the van and centre.
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  • Wind also gives rise to differences of level by driving the water before it, and the prevailing westerly wind of the southern Baltic is the chief cause of the sea-level at Kiel being 51 in.
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  • The influence of wind project for laying a telegraph cable between Ireland and on water-level is most remarkable in heavy storms on the flat Newfoundland.
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  • In the region of tropical hurricanes the navies, while in the Mediterranean and in the Indian Ocean converging wind system of a circular storm causes a heaping many soundings were made in connexion with submarine up of water capable of devastating the low coral islands of the cables to the East.
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  • Similar effects are produced in narrow waters by the action of tidal currents, and the influence of a steady wind blowing onor off-shore has a powerful effect in mixing the water.
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  • In small nearly land-locked basins shut off from one another by bars rising to within a short distance of the surface and affected both by strong tidal currents and by a considerable admixture of land water, the contrasts of vertical distribution of temperature with the seasons are strongly marked, and there are also great unperiodic changes effected mainly by wind, as is shown by the investigations of H.
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  • The influence of wind and tide breaks up the frozen surface of the sea, and sheets yielding to the pressures slide over or under one another and are worked together into a hummocky ice-pack, the irregularities on the surface of which, caused by repeated fractures and collisions, may be from 10 to 20 ft.
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  • The west-wind drifts on the poleward side carry back part of the water southward to reunite with the equatorial current, and thus there is set up an anticyclonic circulation of water between io and 40° in each hemisphere, the movement of the water corresponding very closely with that of the wind.
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  • The coincidence of wind and current direction is most marked in the region of alternating monsoons in the north of the Indian Ocean and in the Malay Sea.
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  • The accordance of wind and currents is so obvious that it was fully recognized by seafaring men in the time of the first circumnavigators.
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  • When the wind acts on the surface of the sea it drives before it the particles of the surface layer of water, and, as these cannot be parted from those immediately beneath, the internal friction of the fluid causes the propelling impulse to act through a considerable depth, and if the wind continued long enough it would ultimately set the whole mass of the ocean in motion 'right down to the bottom.
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  • The current set up by the grip of the wind sweeping over the surface is deflected by the earth's rotation about 45° to the right of the direction of the wind in the northern hemisphere and to the left in the southern.
    0
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  • per hour, the drift-current depth in latitude 5° would be approximately 104 fathoms, in latitude 15°, 55 fathoms, and in latitude 45° only from 33 to 38 fathoms. A strong wind of 38 m.
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  • Ekman shows further that in a pure drift current the mean direction of the whole mass of the current is perpendicular to the direction of the wind which sets it in motion.
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  • On the flat coasts of Europe the influence of on-shore wind in driving in warm water, and of off-shore wind in producing an updraught of cold water, has long been familiar to bathers.
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  • The difference in density which occurs between one part of the ocean and another, shares with the wind in the production of currents.
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  • Wind and tide greatly alter the strength of these currents due to difference of density, and the surface outflow may either be stopped or, in the case of the belts, actually reversed by a strong and steady wind.
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  • Modern oceanography has found means to calculate quantitatively the circulatory movements produced by wind and the distribution of temperature and salinity not only at the surface but in deep water.
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  • The climate is one of great extremes of heat and cold, with a dry winter and a usually wet summer, the prevailing wind of winter being N.W.
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    0
  • During the cold season the thermometer at night falls below the freezing point; little or no hot wind is felt before the end of April, and even then it ceases after sunset.
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  • In 1743, from the circumstance that an eclipse not visible in Philadelphia because of a storm had been observed in Boston, where the storm although north-easterly did not occur until an hour after the eclipse, he surmised that storms move against the wind along the Atlantic coast.
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  • From its bracing qualities this wind, which blows in the summer, is known as the "Cape Doctor."
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  • Throughout the dry or cool season the wind blows steadily and almost uninterruptedly (except for an hour or so forenoon and afternoon) from the south-east.
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  • on the right bank of the Aar and on the level floor of the valley, but is much exposed to the south wind (or Fohn), and has several times been in great part destroyed by fire (1632, 1879 and 1891).
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  • It is said that while the archbishop was blessing the fleet the silver cross of his archiepiscopal staff fell off, but that the omen was disregarded by .the irreverence of the Pisans, who declared that if they had the wind they could do without divine help. They advanced in line abreast to meet the first line of the Genoese, fighting according to the medieval custom to ram and board.
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  • are composed chiefly of comminuted shells drifted and deposited by the wind, and they are very irregularly stratified, as is usually the case with wind-blown deposits.
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  • ZEPHYRUS, in Greek mythology, the west wind (whence the English "zephyr," a light breeze), brother of Boreas, the north wind, and son of the Titan Astraeus and Eos, the dawn.
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    0
  • In the Puget Sound Basin an occasional cold east wind during a dry period in winter causes the temperature to fall below zero.
    0
    0
  • The velocity thus obtained will be affected by the wind.
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    0
  • He found that the time varied between 551seconds when the wind was blowing most strongly with the sound, to 63 seconds when it was most strongly against the sound.
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    0
  • But when the wind is steady its effect may be eliminated by " reciprocal " observations, that is, by observations of the time of passage of sound in each direction over the measured distance..
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  • Let D be the distance, U the velocity of sound in still air, and Tr) the velocity of the wind, supposed for simplicity to blow directly from one station to the other.
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    0
  • To eliminate wind as far as possible reciprocal firing was adopted, the interval between the two firings being only a few seconds.
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    0
  • It is well known that sound travels far better with the wind than against it.
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    0
  • 1857, P by wind.
    0
    0
  • It is, of course, a matter of common observation that the wind increases in velocity from the surface upwards.
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    0
  • direction in which the wind is going.
    0
    0
  • The same kind of thing happens with sound-wave fronts when travelling with the wind.
    0
    0
  • The velocity of any part of a wave front relative to the ground will be the normal velocity of sound + the velocity of the wind at that point.
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    0
  • 14, where we must suppose the wind to be blowing from left to right.
    0
    0
  • But if the wind is against the sound the velocity of a point of the wave front is the normal velocity-the wind velocity at the point, and so decreases as we rise.
    0
    0
  • 14, where the wind is travelling from right to left.
    0
    0
  • But through the wind velocity the first wave is carried to a distance U + w from S, while through the motion of the source the last wave is a distance u from S.
    0
    0
  • If the velocities of source and receiver are equal then the frequency is not affected by their motion or by the wind.
    0
    0
  • But if their velocities are different, the frequency of the waves received is affected both by these velocities and by that of the wind.
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  • - The longitudinal vibration of air in cylindrical pipes is made use of in various wind instruments.
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  • It is the prevailing wind of winter in the mountains and in consequence the periods of cold, though often severe, are short.
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  • Storms endangering life and property occur only in the east, caused by a high north wind with snow or rain and a low temperature.
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  • Provision is made for longitudinal expansion due to change of temperature, for distortion due to the sun acting on one side of the structure, and for the wind acting on one side of the bridge.
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  • This is due to the half weight of centre girder, the weight of the cantilever itself, the rolling load on half the bridge, and the wind pressure.
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  • road to pass between the springings and ensured the transmission of the wind stresses to the abutments without interrupting the crossbracing.
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  • (3) The dead load comprises the weight of the main girders, flooring and wind bracing, or the total weight of the superstructure exclusive of any part directly carried by the piers.
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  • (4) The horizontal pressure due to a wind blowing transversely to the span, which becomes of importance in long and high bridges.
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  • Wind Pressure.-Much attention has been given to wind action since the disaster to the Tay bridge in 1879.
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  • As to the maximum wind pressure on small plates normal to the wind, there is not much doubt.
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  • For a plate girder bridge of less height than the train, the wind is to be taken to act on a surface equal to the projected area of one girder and the exposed part of a train covering the bridge.
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  • In the case of braced girder bridges, the wind pressure is taken as acting on a continuous surface extending from the rails to the top of the carriages, plus the vertical projected area of so much of one girder as is exposed above the train or below the rails.
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  • in compression boom, 7 o tons in tension boom, 5 o tons in vertical struts, 6.5 tons in diagonal ties, 8 o tons in wind bracing, and 6.5 tons in cross and rail girders.
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  • His strongest arguments are that the wind would easily develop into the messenger of the gods (Len oU pos), and that it was often thought to promote fertility in crops and cattle.
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  • The Homeric epithet 'ApyEtybO rqs, which the Greeks interpreted as "the slayer of Argus," inventing a myth to account for Argus, is explained as originally an epithet of the wind (apyEO-Tris), which clears away the mists (apyos, q5aivco).
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  • The uncertainty of the wind might well suggest the trickery of a thief, and its whistling might contain the germ from which a god of music should be developed.
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  • If he was evolved from the wind, his character had become so anthropomorphic that the Greeks had practically lost the knowledge of his primitive significance; nor did Greek cult ever associate him with the wind.
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  • Cathedral Park in the southern portion, Spearfish Canon in the north, and the extensive fossil forest at the foot of Mattie's Peak are noteworthy; while the Crystal Cave, near Piedmont, and the Wind Cave, near Hot Springs, are almost unrivalled.
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  • The picturesque effect of this sculpturing by water, wind and fire is greatly enhanced by the brilliant colours along the faces of the hills and ravines - grey, yellow, black and every shade of red and brown.
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  • only on Turtle Mountains, in the vicinity of streams, and in a few other places sheltered from wind and sun.
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  • High winds are frequent, and prairie houses are often protected by rows of trees called " wind breaks."
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  • In these instances most of the flowers were abortive, but a few were fertile, which he attributes to the dust of the apices having been wafted by the wind from other plants.
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  • This gives rise to the great morphological difference, that in the former regions, the Astin-tagh and the Kuruk-tagh, the products of disintegration are almost always carried away by the wind, and so disappear; no matter how powerful or how active the disintegration may be, none of the loosened material ever succeeds either in gathering amongst the mountains or in accumulating at their foot.
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  • In reviving that theory at the beginning of the 19th century, Thomas Young stated his conviction that material media offered an open structure to the substance called aether, which passed through them without hindrance " like the wind through a grove of trees."
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  • A strong north-west wind, at such times, is of incalculable value to the farmer."8 Other gall-making dipterous flies are members of the family Trypetidae, which disfigure the seed-heads of plants, and of the family Mycetophilidae, such as the species Sciara tilicola, 9 Low, the cause of the oblong or rounded green and red galls of the young shoots and leaves of the lime.
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  • 1) he entertains Odysseus, gives him a favourable wind to help him on his journey, and a bag in which the unfavourable winds have been confined.
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  • F.) Slates are widely used for roofing houses and buildings of every description, and for such purposes they are unequalled, the better sorts possessing all the qualities necessary for protection against wind, rain and storm.
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  • The branches as well as the upper parts of the main streams flow through broad and shallow valleys; the middle courses of the main streams wind their way through reed-covered marshes, the water ebbing and flowing with the tide; in their lower courses they become estuarine and the water flows between low banks.
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  • Nevertheless along the whole line some kind of surveillance was established long before the close of 1861, and, in proportion as the number of vessels available increased, the blockade became more and more stringent, until at last it was practically unbreakable at any point save by the fastest steamers working under unusually favourable conditions of wind and weather.
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  • In summer the east wind brings dense and sudden fogs; while in winter the northerly gales blow straight into the mouths of the harbours.
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  • Between May and September the sirocco, or hot wind of the desert, sweeps at intervals over the country, impregnating the air with fine sand; but in general, with the exception of the vicinity of the marshes, the climate is healthy.
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  • 10) we find "upon a cherub" parallel to "upon the wings of the wind" (cp. Isa.
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  • Within the southern monsoon region there is a gradual transition to the northwest monsoon of New Guinea in low latitudes, and in higher latitudes to the north-east wind of the Queensland coast.
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  • These conditions are satisfied in English Miles o 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 £30 Peaks Passes Glaciers Land above 1500 feet left white Emery Walker sG As very little snow can rest on rocks that lie at an angle exceeding 60°, and this is soon removed by the wind, some steep masses of rock remain bare even near the summits of the highest peaks, but as almost every spot offering the least hold for vegetation is covered with snow, few flowering plants are seen above ii,000 ft.
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  • The north-east wind is the most prevalent, and sometimes blows for months together.
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  • The site is low, but the town is surrounded by hills, which afford protection from the north wind.
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  • " Who then is this," they whispered with awe, " that even the wind and the sea obey Him?
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  • From April to October a north or north-east wind blows upon the islands, beginning about lo A.M.
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  • In summer this wind produces a dense stratum of sea-cloud (cumuloni), 500 ft.
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  • In winter they are occasionally visited by a hot south-east wind from Africa, which is called the Levante, and produces various disagreeable consequences on the exposed parts of the person, besides injuring the vegetation, especially on the higher grounds.
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  • Locusts have sometimes been brought by this wind.
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  • The ornithology is more interesting, on account at once of the birds native to the islands, and the stragglers from the African coast, which are chiefly brought over in winter, when the wind has blown for some time from the east.
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  • Ocean steamers are able to enter it at all states of wind and tide.
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  • The semiconventional open scroll-work of branches and fruit which wind around and frame each figure or group is devised with the most perfect taste and richness of fancy, while each minute part of this great piece of metal-work is finished with all the care that could have been bestowed on the smallest article of gold jewellery.
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  • It put to sea, and by hugging the wind gained the weather gage of the French adventurer.
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  • As they approached they threw unslaked lime in the air and the wind blew it in the faces of the French.
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  • This form of attack, and the flights of arrows discharged by the English (which flew with the wind), produced confusion in the crowded benches of the French vessels, which in most cases must have been little more than open boats.
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  • From May to September the wind blows from the N.W.
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  • The cold is then intense and the force of the wind cyclonic. Speaking generally, the Afghanistan climate is a dry one.
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  • There is no reason to believe that any transfer of air takes place across the Himalayas in a southerly direction, unless indeed in those most elevated regions of the atmosphere which lie beyond the range of observation; but a nocturnal flow of cooled air, from the southern slopes, is felt as a strong wind where the rivers debouch on the plains, more especially in the early morning hours; and this probably contributes in some degree to lower the mean temperature of that belt of the plains which fringes the mountain zone.
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  • This range exerts an important influence on the direction of the wind, and also on the rainfall.
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  • At Ajmer, an old meteorological station at the eastern foot of the range, the wind is predominantly south-west, and there and at Mount Abu the south-west monsoon rains are a regularly recurrent phenomenon, - which can hardly be said of the region of scanty and uncertain rainfall that extends from the western foot of the range and merges in the Bikaner desert.
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  • The rains, however, are prolonged some three or four weeks later than in tracts to the north of the Satpuras, since they are also brought by the easterly winds which blow from the Bay of Bengal in October and the early part of November, when the recurved southerly wind ceases to blow up the Gangetic valley, and sets towards the south-east coast.
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  • The country to the east of the gap receives the rainfall of the south-west monsoon; and during the north-east monsoon ships passing Beypur meet with a stronger wind from the land than is felt elsewhere on the Malabar coast.
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  • The Bombay monsoon, after surmounting the Ghats, blows across the peninsula as a west and sometimes in places a north-west wind; but it leaves with very little rain a strip 100 to 200 m.
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  • In its rear springs up a gentle steady north-east wind, which gradually extends over the Bay of Bengal, and is known as the north-east monsoon.
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  • A wind similar in character, but rather more easterly in direction, simultaneously takes possession of the Arabian Sea.
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  • They are swept north by the wind till they strike upon the outer ranges of the Himalayas.
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  • Hindus wind the pagri in various ways as described for Mussulmans, but the angles are formed over the ears and not from front to back.
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  • At the main base in Adelie Land autumn sledging proved impossible, and throughout the winter there was a continuous succession of terrific blizzards, wind with an average velocity of 50 m.p.h.
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  • respectively from the hut towards the high inland plateau and were stored with provisions for summer sledging; the use of surface depots like those on the Ross Barrier was impossible owing to the wind.
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  • The movements of the atmosphere, however, are upon a scale large enough to make this observation easy, and the simplest evidence is obtained from a study of the direction of the air movements in the great wind systems of the globe.
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  • Within four months (1842) he surveyed the Pass and ascended to the summit of the highest of the Wind River Mountains, since known as Fremont's Peak, and the interest aroused by his descriptions was such that in the next year he was sent on a second expedition to complete the survey across the continent along the line of travel from Missouri to the mouth of the Columbia river.
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  • In the upper air a dry off-shore wind from the Rocky Mountain plateau prevails throughout the summer; and in winter an onshore rain wind.
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  • The last is the counter-trade, the all-year wind of Alaska and Oregon; it prevails in winter even off Southern California.
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  • In the Wind River Range, farther S.E., areGannett Peak (13,775 ft.), the highest point in the state, and Fremont: Peak (13,720 ft.).
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  • Limestone occurs in thick formations near Lava Creek, and in the valley of the East Fork of the Yellowstone river; also near the summit of the Owl Creek range, and in the Wind River range.
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  • The Wind River Reservation, under the Shoshoni School, is in the central part of the state.
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  • Ashley with a considerable party explored and trapped in the Sweetwater and Green river valleys, and in 1826 wagons were driven from St Louis to Wind river for the Rocky Mountain Fur Company.
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  • The United States exploring expedition, commanded by John Charles Fremont, explored the Wind River Mountains and the South Pass in 1842, under the guidance of Kit Carson.
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  • Once more God "appoints" something; it is the east wind, which, together with the fierce heat, brings Jonah again to desperation.
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  • and N.W.) prevail at all the meteorological stations, not the comparatively dry south-east wind.
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  • Even at Banjermasin, near the south coast, the north-west wind brings annually a rainfall of 60 in., as against 33 in.
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  • of rain carried by the south-east wind.
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  • Most rain falls between November and May, and at this season the torrents are tremendous while they last, and squalls of wind are frequent and violent, almost invariably preceding a downpour.
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  • A great feature of summer is the inbat or north wind, which blows almost daily, often with the force of a gale, off the sea from noon till near sunset.
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  • We seem here to have a remnant of the very ancient and widely diffused tree-worship. Sometimes, however, auguries were taken in other manners, being drawn from the moaning of doves in the branches, the murmur of a fountain which rose close by, or the resounding of the wind in the brazen caldrons which formed a circle all round the temple.
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  • The wind had risen, the rain was blown in sheets, and the snow was whirling thickly on the mountains.
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  • It is protected from the north wind by the Binn (632 ft.), and in consequence of its excellent situation, its links and sandy beach, it enjoys considerable repute as a summer resort.
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  • From June to August the north west wind blows over the entire area; in September it retreats again as far as 16° N., south of which the winds are for a time variable.
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  • In the Gulf of Suez the westerly, or "Egyptian," wind occurs frequently during winter, sometimes blowing with violence, and generally accompanied by fog and clouds of dust.
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  • The weeders, faces to the wind, move slowly on hands and knees, and should remove every vestige of weed in order that the flax plants may receive the full benefit of the land.
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  • The springs and rivers, the wind, the sun, fire, the Earth-Mother, the Sky-Father, are all active powers.
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  • Associated with the Sky are tablets to the sun and moon, the seven stars of the Great Bear, the five planets, the twenty-eight constellations, and all the stars of heaven; tablets to clouds, rain, wind and thunder being placed next to that of the moon.
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  • They direct the changing seasons, the wind and the rain; and the good and bad fortunes of individuals,.
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  • To meet this obstacle P. Manhes proposed elevated side tuyeres, which could be kept clear by punching through gates in a wind box.
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  • Knox returned in time to guide the Assembly which sat on the 25th of June 1567 in dealing with this unparalleled crisis, and to wind up the revolution by preaching at Stirling on the 9th of July 1567, after Mary's abdication, at the coronation of the infant king.
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  • In England the pine is largely employed as a " nurse " for oak trees, its conical growth when young admirably adapting it for this purpose; its dense foliage renders it valuable as a shelter tree for protecting land from the wind; it stands the sea gales better than most conifers, but will not flourish on the shore like some other species.
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  • A dry and warm wind comes down from the snowy Elburz to Gilan in December and January, and much resembles the fhn of the Alps (Dr Tholozan, Sur les vents du Nord de la Perse et sur le foehn du Guilan, Corn pies rendus, Acad.
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  • Trade, the prevailing wind throughout the West Indies.
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  • A brazen Triton on the summit, with a rod in his hand, turned round by the wind, pointed to the quarter from which it blew.
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  • After fully three months' imprisonment they were released on the demand of the dey of Algiers, and again set sail for Marseilles on the 28th of November, but when within sight of their port they were driven back by a northerly wind to Bougie on the coast of Africa.
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  • During the dry season, when the climate is very much like that of the West Indies, there occur terrible tornadoes and long periods of the harmattan - a north-east wind, dry and desiccating, and carrying with it from the Sahara clouds of fine dust, which sailors designate "smokes."
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  • A cold north-west wind, with frosty nights and sunny days in alternation, tends to incite the flow, which is more abundant during the day than the night.
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  • A thawing night is said to promote the flow, and it ceases during a south-west wind and at the approach of a storm; and so sensitive are the trees to aspect and climatic variations that the flow of sap on the south and east side has been noticed to be earlier than on the north and west side of the same tree.
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  • When the threads reach the air they branch in a tree-like manner, and each branch (sporangiophore) carries one or more ovate sporangia, as shown at E, E, E, which fall off and are carried by the wind.
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  • It is therefore obvious that, if the tubers are exposed to the air where they are liable to become slightly cracked by the sun, wind, hail and rain, and injured by small animals and insects, the spores from the leaves will drop on to the tubers, quickly germinate upon the slightly injured places, and cause the potatoes to become diseased.
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  • Diurnal currents of wind, which are established from the plains to the mountains during the day, and from the hills to the plains during the night, are impqrtant agents in distributing the rainfall.
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  • Electrical wind storms are frequent in these high altitudes.
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  • He also calculated the effect of surface-tension on the propagation of waves on the surface of a liquid, and determined the minimum velocity of a wave, and the velocity of the wind when it is just sufficient to disturb the surface of still water.
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  • In certain states of wind and sea it is turned almost into an island, and a sea-wall protects the road to Saffi.
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  • The harbour is well sheltered from all winds except the southwest, but escape is difficult with the wind from that quarter, as the channel between the town and Mogador Island is narrow and hazardous.
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  • Everywhere are evidences of water and wind erosion, of desiccation and differential weathering.
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  • The evidence to hand shows that on heights and in open country, especially in the north, there may be few or even no Schizomycetes detected in the air, and even in towns their distribution varies greatly; sometimes they appear to exist in minute clouds, as it were, with interspaces devoid of any, but in laboratories and closed spaces where their cultivation has been promoted Lhe air may be considerably laden with them Of course the distribution of bodies so light and small is easily influenced by movements, rain, wind, changes of temperature, &c. As parasites, certain Schizomycetes inhabit and prey upon the organs of man and animals in varying degrees, and the conditions for their growth and distribution are then very complex.
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  • The staminate contain 8 to 20 stamens which produce an enormous amount of dusty yellow pollen, some of which gets carried by wind to the protruding stigmas of the pistillate flowers.
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  • The original number and position of the stones have suffered in the course of time from wind and weather, in days when archaeological interest was not alive to the importance of preserving so ancient a monument.
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  • Only half the outer circle (sarsens) now remained upright, three on the west, thirteen on the east; and this indicated the effect of the prevalent west wind.
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  • The fall of trilithon 22 and its lintel opened a larger path to the wind, and added to the danger of further destruction.
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  • excellent holding ground, protected from all winds except the southeast, the prevailing wind being westerly.
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  • The whole of the operation must, of course, be completed in the few days - five to ten - during which the capsules are capable of yielding the drug: A cold wind or a chilly atmosphere at the time of collection lessens the yield, and rain washes the opium off the capsules.
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  • 27) that the wind exerts a very marked influence in refracting sound-beams. From 1868 Henry continued to be annually chosen as president of the National Academy of Sciences; and he was also president of the Philosophical Society of Washington from the date of its organization in 1871.
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  • Between December and March a north wind blows, unfavourable to weak constitutions.
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  • More personal than Ouranos and Helios - with whom he has only slight associations - he was worshipped and invoked as the deity of the bright day ('Apapcos, 'Aevea70s, AvKa70s), who sends the rain, the wind and dew ("Op(3pcos, Naios, `Tetcos, Oupcos, EMIÆpos, 'IK,uaZos), and such a primitive adjective as Sc17rET7)3, applied to things " that fall from heaven," attests the primeval significance of the name of Zeus.
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  • During the summer months the general course of the wind along the sea-coast is interrupted about midday by an incoming current of air, the " sea breeze," which gradually increases until about three o'clock in the afternoon, and then gradually lessens until the offshore wind takes its place.
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  • The wind was at north-east and gave him the weathergage.
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  • One might as well attempt to steer a boat carried along by currents of water in the absence of oars, sails and wind, as to steer a balloon carried along by currents of air.
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  • The balloon, because of its vast size and from its being lighter than the air, is completely at the mercy of the wind.
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  • It forms an integral part, so to speak, of the wind for the time being, and the direction of the wind in every instance determines the horizontal motion of the balloon.
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  • The balloon is controlled by the wind; the flying creature controls the wind.
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  • The balloon in the absence of wind can only rise and fall in a vertical line; the flying creature can fly in a horizontal plane in any given direction.
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  • As, moreover, the wings travel at a much higher speed than any wind that blows, they are superior to and control the wind; they enable the insect to dart through the wind in whatever direction it pleases.
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  • It in fact ensures that the wing, and the curtain or fringe of the wing which the primary and secondary feathers form, shall be screwed into and down upon the wind in extension, and unscrewed or withdrawn from the wind during flexion.
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  • It must tread with its wings and rise upon the air as a swimmer upon the water, or as a kite upon the wind.
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  • Wind up the string by turning the flyers different ways, so that the spring of the bow may unwind them with their anterior edges ascending; then place the cork with the bow attached to it upon a table, and with a finger on the upper cork press strong enough to prevent the string from unwinding, and, taking it away suddenly, the instrument will rise to the ceiling."
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  • The machine advanced with its front edge a little raised, the effect of which was to present its under surface to the air over which it passed, the resistance of which, acting upon it like a strong wind on the sails of a windmill, prevented the descent of the machine and its burden.
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  • when caught by a gust of c, c, Thin bands of iron with truss planks a, a, and wind, actually lifted the d, d, Vertical rods.
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  • They threw themselves from natural or artificial elevations, or, facing the wind, they ran or were dragged forwards against it until they got under way and the wind caught hold of their aeroplanes.
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  • It was with a machine of the latter type that he was upset by a sudden gust of wind and killed in 1896.
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  • He too made several hundred glides in safety; but finally was thrown over by a gust of wind and killed in 1899.
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  • In the hottest month (July) the mean temperature of England and Wales is about 61.5°, and the westerly wind then exercises a cooling effect, the greatest heat being found in the Thames basin immediately around London, where the mean temperature of the month exceeds 64°: the mean temperature along the south coast is 62°, and that at the mouth of the Tweed a little under 59°.
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  • The natural effect of the heating of the air in summer and the cooling of the air in winter by contact with the land is largely masked in England on account of the strength of the prevailing south-westerly wind carrying oceanic influence into the heart of the country.
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  • This effect is well seen in the way in which the wind blowing directly up the Severn estuary is directed along the edges of the Oolitic escarpment north-eastward, thus displacing the centre of cold in winter to the east coast, and the centre of heat in summer to the lower Thames, from the position which both centres would occupy, if calms prevailed, in a beit running from Birmingham to Buckingham.
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  • The Mersey estuary, being partly sheltered by Ireland and North Wales, does not serve as an inlet for modifying influences to the same extent as the Bristol Channel: and as the wind entering by it blows squarely against the slope of the Pennine Chain, it does not much affect the climate of the midland plain.
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  • The direction of the mean annual isobars shows that the normal wind in all parts of England and Wales must be from the south-west on the west coast, curving gradually until in the centre of the country, and on the east coast it is westerly, without a southerly component.
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  • In April the gradient is so slight that any temporary fall of pressure to the south of England or any temporary rise of pressure to the north, which would suffice in other months merely to reduce the velocity of the south-westerly wind, is sufficient in that month to reverse the gradient and produce an east wind over the whole country.
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  • The liability to east wind in spring is one of the most marked features of the English climate, the effect being naturally most felt on the east coast.
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  • The southerly component in the wind is as a rule most marked in the winter months, the westerly component predominating in summer.
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  • The west end of a town receives the wind as it blows in fresh from the country at all seasons, and consequently the west end of an English town is with few exceptions the residential quarter, while smoke-producing industries are usually relegated to the east end.
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  • On account of the great frequency of cyclonic disturbances passing in from the Atlantic, the average conditions of wind over the British Islands give no idea of the frequency of change in direction and force.
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  • On the second day the issue was doubtful till, if we may trust the concurrent testimony of all the contemporary church historians, a sudden gust of wind blew back the enemy's arrows on themselves.
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  • Helm Wind >>
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  • It is sheltered from the north-east and east winds, but is exposed to the cold north-west wind or mistral.
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  • The wind, however, rarely attains any exceptional velocity.
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