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wind

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wind

wind Sentence Examples

  • After sunset the wind had dropped.

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  • All the while the wind was rising.

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  • A gust of wind flung snow into her face.

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  • In the forest it was almost hot, no wind could be felt.

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  • Carmen was so tired that the icy wind failed to keep her awake.

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  • The snow started shortly after they left and the wind blew it horizontal.

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  • Wind tossed her hair, and she tied it up in a bun.

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  • He withdrew, and the cold wind swept over her.

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  • The morning wind forever blows, the poem of creation is uninterrupted; but few are the ears that hear it.

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  • The wind in the upper atmosphere has extraordinary amounts of energy.

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  • There was thunder and lightning; the wind blew hard; the rain poured.

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  • I always wind up with my foot in my mouth.

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  • Suddenly, the cold roar of the wind gave way to warmth and quiet.

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  • The night was cold and the wind nonexistent.

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  • Of course, a little make-up and the right clothes could do wonders - which was a good way to wind up straying off the path she had mapped before she left home.

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  • The sky had grown darker again and the wind made queer sobbing sounds as it swept over the valley.

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  • A cold wind comforted her as she sat alone.

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  • She helped me wind some worsted one day, first rapidly and afterward slowly.

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  • The snow fell straight from the sky without the wind and was soft and fluffy beneath her feet.

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  • A third asserts that the cause of its movement lies in the smoke which the wind carries away.

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  • When only the winter wind greeted him, he continued.

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  • There they slowed down and let the horses get their wind again.

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  • A burst of wind sent water from the closest column raining over them.

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  • Your tent has to protect against wind, water and snow to maintain a warm and dry climate inside.

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  • Mother, what makes the wind blow?

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  • Fear made the wind seem colder.

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  • Grass tickled her hands, a chilled wind nipped her neck, and the scents from her vision intensified until she was near gagging.

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  • The hot rays of the sun beat down vertically and a fresh soft wind played with the hair of the bared heads and with the ribbons decorating the icon.

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  • Rain and wind battered him.

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  • A shiver ran through the tree, and the wind sent forth a blast that would have knocked me off had I not clung to the branch with might and main.

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  • At length the wind rose, the mist increased, and the waves began to run, and the perch leaped much higher than before, half out of water, a hundred black points, three inches long, at once above the surface.

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  • I've been on climbs in all kinds of weather, some all day, rappelling down at dusk, nearly in the dark, with wind and snow trying to blow me off the wall.

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  • They Transported to the mountainside again, and the cold wind swept past him.

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  • I like to contend with wind and wave.

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  • Wind whipped up the building and tossed her hair.

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  • Katie clicked the phone off and looked at the five-year-old doing wind sprints across her apartment.

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  • The top of the buggy caught the air like a parachute or an umbrella filled with wind, and held them back so that they floated downward with a gentle motion that was not so very disagreeable to bear.

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  • Instead of sitting at his ease in a parlor car, he went jolting along through mud and mire, exposed to wind and weather.

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  • He had just constructed a boat that could be propelled by a kite with the wind in its favor, and one day he tried experiments to see if he could steer the kite against the wind.

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  • We're short handed so you wind up taking care of your own team and wagon.

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  • A sudden gust of wind circled them and whispered words in her mind.

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  • She screamed as she wind milled her arms in the hot air.

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  • Fog coated the ocean, and a cold, moist wind made her eyes water.

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  • I then said to her with the finger alphabet, "wind fast," or "wind slow," holding her hands and showing her how to do as I wished.

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  • It is splendid to feel the wind blowing in my face and the springy motion of my iron steed.

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  • As soon as the sun appeared in a clear strip of sky beneath the clouds, the wind fell, as if it dared not spoil the beauty of the summer morning after the storm; drops still continued to fall, but vertically now, and all was still.

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  • So many autumn, ay, and winter days, spent outside the town, trying to hear what was in the wind, to hear and carry it express!

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  • There was not a breath of wind to stir the young leaves on the trees.

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  • As long as she didn't wind up at that building, her safety was of no real concern.

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  • The wind still whistled at the mouth of the cave.

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  • The car, the traffic, the wind, all went motionless.

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  • Chilled by the cold ocean wind, Deidre pressed herself against his warm body.

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  • The factors that enable us to solve for and eliminate disease are getting better all the time, like wind at our back, pushing us forward.

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  • Aside from the scarring, a maroon tattoo seemed to wind all the way around her neck.

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  • Before he gave his Immortal soul to death, he.d never noticed how sweet the air was or how the grass sang as the wind whipped through it.

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  • The cold early winter wind dried the tears on his face and made his cheeks stiff.

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  • She wondered what would be worth the investment, but didn't want to wind up in the middle of a feud.

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  • Wind and rain slashed at her as she reached the kitchen doorway and she hurried into the house.

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  • It was as if I hadn't had time to come to grips with that tragedy with the world wind swirling around me.

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  • He beat the air mercilessly with his wings, rising high above the city and coasting on cold wind currents until he reached the ocean.

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  • In the evening a wind from the northeast sprang up, and the flakes rushed hither and thither in furious melee.

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  • It is said that a flood-tide, with a westerly wind, and ice in the Neva, would sweep St. Petersburg from the face of the earth.

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  • These small waves raised by the evening wind are as remote from storm as the smooth reflecting surface.

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  • Sofia shielded her eyes against the wind and sand.

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  • Then she said, "Helen wind slow," again suiting the action to the words.

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  • The bullfrogs trump to usher in the night, and the note of the whip-poor-will is borne on the rippling wind from over the water.

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  • Though it is now dark, the wind still blows and roars in the wood, the waves still dash, and some creatures lull the rest with their notes.

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  • It was worth the while to see the sun shine on these things, and hear the free wind blow on them; so much more interesting most familiar objects look out of doors than in the house.

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  • And now, from the hints contained in his letter and given by the little princess, he saw which way the wind was blowing, and his low opinion changed into a feeling of contemptuous ill will.

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  • But during the night the fury of the wind increased to such a degree that it thrilled us with a vague terror.

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  • It was worth the while, if only to feel the wind blow on your cheek freely, and see the waves run, and remember the life of mariners.

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  • The next day, while exercising, she spelled to me, "Helen wind fast," and began to walk rapidly.

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  • A gust of wind whipped at her full skirt and tossed her long blond curls into the air.

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  • "That woman could blow this entire enterprise higher than a kite in a wind storm," Quinn said.

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  • A cold wind tore at her hair as she stomped across the courtyard and out to the chicken coup.

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  • Sean's body collapsed beneath the blanket, and the ocean's wind whipped the cloth into the air.

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  • Out of doors the wind was blowing.

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  • My thoughts would often rise and beat up like birds against the wind, and I persisted in using my lips and voice.

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  • There was no wind, and the men choked in that motionless atmosphere.

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  • But now the kind October wind rises, rustling the leaves and rippling the surface of the water, so that no loon can be heard or seen, though his foes sweep the pond with spy-glasses, and make the woods resound with their discharges.

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  • At any time a gust of wind could send the car over the cliff.

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  • Several battalions of soldiers, in their shirt sleeves despite the cold wind, swarmed in these earthworks like a host of white ants; spadefuls of red clay were continually being thrown up from behind the bank by unseen hands.

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  • Virgil is serene and lovely like a marble Apollo in the moonlight; Homer is a beautiful, animated youth in the full sunlight with the wind in his hair.

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  • Sometimes, on Sundays, I heard the bells, the Lincoln, Acton, Bedford, or Concord bell, when the wind was favorable, a faint, sweet, and, as it were, natural melody, worth importing into the wilderness.

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  • The peasants say that a cold wind blows in late spring because the oaks are budding, and really every spring cold winds do blow when the oak is budding.

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  • With the living shadow staring at her, the winter wind sucking the air from her lungs, and the prescriptions clenched in her hand, she'd never felt less a part of her world.

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  • The old house groaned with each gust of wind, but it felt like a happy house.

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  • But the wind slides eastward over its opaque surface in vain, till it reaches the living surface beyond.

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  • One morning, between seven and eight, returning after a sleepless night, he sent for embers, changed his rain-soaked underclothes, said his prayers, drank tea, got warm, then tidied up the things on the table and in his own corner, and, his face glowing from exposure to the wind and with nothing on but his shirt, lay down on his back, putting his arms under his head.

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  • Peasants having no clear idea of the cause of rain, say, according to whether they want rain or fine weather: "The wind has blown the clouds away," or, "The wind has brought up the clouds."

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  • Their fears were well founded, for their long absence had alarmed the King, and he mounted North Wind and went out in search of his tardy couriers.

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  • They got wind there might be someone out there in the nether world with incredible abilities they could commandeer.

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  • This is an eco-friendly venue, which reduces its carbon footprint by composting waste, conserving water and using wind power.

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  • As I walked in the woods to see the birds and squirrels, so I walked in the village to see the men and boys; instead of the wind among the pines I heard the carts rattle.

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  • The virtues of a superior man are like the wind; the virtues of a common man are like the grass--the grass, when the wind passes over it, bends.

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  • Perhaps on that spring morning when Adam and Eve were driven out of Eden Walden Pond was already in existence, and even then breaking up in a gentle spring rain accompanied with mist and a southerly wind, and covered with myriads of ducks and geese, which had not heard of the fall, when still such pure lakes sufficed them.

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  • I have sometimes disturbed a fish hawk sitting on a white pine over the water; but I doubt if it is ever profaned by the wind of a gull, like Fair Haven.

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  • The wind had fallen and black clouds, merging with the powder smoke, hung low over the field of battle on the horizon.

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  • And at that moment, though the day was still, a light gust of wind blowing over the army slightly stirred the streamers on the lances and the unfolded standards fluttered against their staffs.

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  • The cold wind flapped the ends of her kerchief and her loose locks of gray hair.

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  • The French were putting out the fire which the wind was spreading, and thus gave us time to retreat.

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  • The wind snapped free of its bonds, nearly tearing her from his grip with its first gust.

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  • His long, sleek hair was tied in a tight braid, and despite the cold and wind he wore only a long-sleeved sweater that hugged the muscles of his arms and shoulders beneath a down vest.

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  • The wind was harsher, colder than it was just a few minutes ago.

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  • The wind chime above the door tinkled.

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  • The Indians had advanced so far as to regulate the effect of the wind by a mat suspended over the hole in the roof and moved by a string.

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  • That curly grass which always grows by country roadsides became clearly visible, still wet with the night's rain; the drooping branches of the birches, also wet, swayed in the wind and flung down bright drops of water to one side.

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  • Debbie Woolrich, age nine, remains in the wind but there's little hope she's alive.

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  • Frozen in mid-air were fat raindrops, arcing in a wind she didn't feel.

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  • Gabriel was at his place in the underworld, a small cottage tucked into Death.s realm, in the Everdark forest of Immortal trees whose hissing, fanlike leaves and snake-like branches moved to catch the quiet wind.

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  • The wind howled as she settled against the far wall to wait out the storm.

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  • A gust of wind delivered the smell of raindrops on parched soil.

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  • Its principal streams are those that cross the West Shore of the Coastal Plain and here wind their way from Parr's Ridge rapidly toward the south-east in narrow steep-sided gorges through broad limestone valleys.

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  • The sea was smooth, the night dark with wind from N.W., but hardly had the ships left Dunkirk when the "Sappho" blew out a manhole joint in her boiler and had to put back.

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  • The north wind had already begun to cool the pond, though it took many weeks of steady blowing to accomplish it, it is so deep.

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  • The opening of large tracts by the ice-cutters commonly causes a pond to break up earlier; for the water, agitated by the wind, even in cold weather, wears away the surrounding ice.

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  • It was only by the keener wind that met them and the jerks given by the side horses who pulled harder--ever increasing their gallop--that one noticed how fast the troyka was flying.

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  • Like wind over leaves ran an excited whisper: They're coming!

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  • His power moved through her like a wind in a forest.

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  • Cold wind whipped snow against her face.

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  • His trench was long and unfastened, the chilled winter wind whipping back one side to reveal a sword tucked against his leg.

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  • The cold wind felt good against her face and roused her dark thoughts.

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  • His hands were hot on her hips and his body blocked the cold wind whipping up the cliff.

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  • In the deepest part there are several acres more level than almost any field which is exposed to the sun, wind, and plow.

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  • While I was surveying, the ice, which was sixteen inches thick, undulated under a slight wind like water.

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  • While he was speaking, the curtain of smoke that had concealed the hollow, driven by a rising wind, began to move from right to left as if drawn by an invisible hand, and the hill opposite, with the French moving about on it, opened out before them.

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  • But though I do not know what causes the cold winds to blow when the oak buds unfold, I cannot agree with the peasants that the unfolding of the oak buds is the cause of the cold wind, for the force of the wind is beyond the influence of the buds.

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  • Let's get in out of this cold wind.

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  • The car rocked slightly with a gust of wind.

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  • He cupped his hand to her ear so she could hear over the howl of the rising wind.

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  • He never wore a coat and she wondered if he even felt the cold west Texas wind.

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  • I still don't know how you can stand that cold wind.

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  • The familiar voice was carried on the wind.

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  • "I smell two demons, and blood," the demon said, raising his head to the wind.

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  • The tall trees were draped in a white robe that had drifted to the earth, not snarled their way downward like the wind driven Eastern storms where snow was a dirty word, not the magical hush that mother nature bestowed on the mountains of the west.

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  • The winter wind has come a-calling and moans through cracks and crevices like so many ghosts visiting from hell, wailing and beckoning for me to join them.

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  • The wind blew the entire night, creaking and groaning about the old building in a mournful dirge.

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  • Thursday's storm had roared into town with uncommon severity, bringing with it not only more than two feet of fresh snow, but a wind that set the white stuff a-dancing and swirling about the town, like a wild rhumba or some native fertility rite.

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  • "Make love to me," she said with a huskiness that made Dean feel if he could clearly see her there would be a coldness in her eyes, like a winter mountain wind.

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  • When the stopping jolt came, it nearly knocked the wind out of him with its abruptness, but he'd fallen only to the level of Shipton's knees.

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  • A rug would help, but it wouldn't stop the wind from climbing the insulationless walls or seeping through the gaps around the mopboards.

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  • The wind yanked Carmen's hair with icy fingers.

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  • Katie followed her into the dairy and closed the door against the wind.

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  • The clouds were breaking up and the wind had switched around to the south.

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  • The warm wind assisted the sun in melting the snow and most of it was already gone, leaving a trail of sloppy mud to the barn.

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  • The house groaned as a gust of wind bombarded it.

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  • A gust of wind tore the hood from her head and snatched at her hair.

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  • At least it wasn't a cold wind, and the snow was melting.

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  • No doubt Tessa was in labor and searching for a private place to give birth - some place high in the rocks, away from the water, but sheltered from the wind.

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  • Josh's words crept through her mind like an icy wind.

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  • A light wind whispered across the grass and a cloud drifted over, blocking the sun from her face.

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  • A gust of pine and jet fuel scented wind whipped by her.

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  • Her hair whipped in the wind chilling his body.

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  • Finally, he broke through the thatch of branches and leaves blocking most of the sun.  The day was darkening.  In the distance, he saw the massive fortress that was Death's, and he saw the Lake of Souls he'd seen in angel memories.  He saw birds but couldn't see through the jungle to where Katie might be.  The branch holding him swayed in a heavy wind that smelled of rain.

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  • Toby took the lead, and the demons, Death and Gabe disappeared as Katie rounded the corner of the palace.  The angel released her and raced into the palace and up a set of stairs.  They ascended several floors, until Katie was sucking wind bad enough to stop.  Toby didn't wait for her, and she stumbled forward.  The interior of the palace was unlit, and the darkness of evening crept into the hallways.

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  • Much later, sometime in the deep hours of the night, he awoke to the sound of thunder and the rush of wind.

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  • "Wind me up and take me anywhere," he'd say, much to her irritation.

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  • I still think it's whistling in the wind, but it'll keep you out of trouble.

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  • The weather remained ominous with dark clouds rolling in, pushed by an ever-increasing wind that churned the sky in threatening waves.

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  • The little plane danced and swayed in the turbulence, constantly buffeted by the increas­ing wind.

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  • He yelled her name but the call was smothered by the cry of the wind and the crash of the surf beyond.

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  • He groped his way down the path, the wind whipping his raincoat behind him, until he felt the mush of soft sand beneath his aching feet.

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  • They decided against it, cautious about frightening off Byrne if he should get wind of the search and realize someone was this close to finding him.

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  • Dean picked up the pace and closed the gap on the yellow­shirted rider, low on his bike to minimize the wind resistance as he raced downward at a dangerous speed.

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  • When we got wind of what he was doing, we picked him up.

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  • He's well formed, slender, not too tall, and strong - but bends with the wind.

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  • If you come over here dressed like that, I'm going to wind up in trouble again.

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  • I knew you'd wind up moving in with him.

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  • One face stood out, a shock of unruly red hair waving in the wind.

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  • A cold gust of wind asked why she was standing out here alone.

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  • "The hill protects them from the cold wind," she explained briefly.

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  • Cold wind swept through the room.

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  • Deep in thought, Darian sat for a long while, until the wind at his back shifted to carry the scent of the sea to him.

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  • Jenn pushed onward, even when a wicked wind began to blow against her.

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  • A second knocked the wind from her.

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  • Somehow I think I'll wind up on the losing side no matter what happens.

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  • The wind came suddenly, and with a vengeance, bouncing leaves and small branches across the yard.

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  • With a startled gasp, she dashed into the cabin, struggling to shut the door against the rising wind.

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  • With the door closed, she ran to the window to gaze in horror as the trees tossed their limbs in protest of the wind.

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  • The room was filled with dust and the wind whistled through the screens, ruffling the pages of her book as it lay on the floor.

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  • The wind screamed around the eves and pounded on the windows.

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  • It roared on the tin roof and plunged off the eves, where the wind caught it and drove it across the yard in horizontal sheets.

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  • I think the wind blew that old maple over.

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  • She followed him out on the porch, gasping as a gust of cold wind met them.

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  • A sudden gust of wind ruffled the leaves of the trees, creating a sound much like the surf.

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  • Hold your horses before you wind up with a run away team.

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  • In Sicily and southern Italy the Sirocco occurs at all seasons; it is a dry, dusty wind from south-east or south-west.

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  • Elsewhere local surface currents are developed, either drifts due to the direct action of the winds, or streams produced by wind action heaping water up against the land; but these nowhere rise to the dignity of a distinct current system, although they are often sufficient to obliterate the feeble tidal action characteristic of the Mediterranean.

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  • The Elster and Geitel apparatus is furnished with a cover, serving to protect the dissipator from the direct action of rain, wind or sunlight.

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  • At most stations a+ and a_ both increase markedly as wind velocity rises.

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  • per hour in wind velocity.

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  • Simpson got similar results at Karasjok; the rise in a + and a_ with increased wind velocity seemed, however, larger in winter than in summer.

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  • The wind velocity did not exceed 20 km.

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  • When he considered all days irrespective of wind velocity, Mazelle found the influence of temperature obliterated.

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  • Dissipation was above the average when cyclonic conditions prevailed, but this seemed simply a consequence of the increased wind velocity.

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  • To Eliminate The Disturbing Influence Of Wind, Different Wind Strengths Are Treated Separately.

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  • Simspon concluded that for a given wind velocity dissipation is practically a linear function of ionization.

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  • 8 45, 1 333, according to whom Typhon, the "snake-footed" earth-spirit, is the god of the destructive wind, perhaps originally of the sirocco, but early taken by the Phoenicians to denote the north wind, in which sense it was probably used by the Greeks of the 5th century in nautical language; and also in Philologus, ii.

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  • (1889), where he endeavours to prove the identity of Typhon with the Phoenician Zephon (BaalZephon, translated in Gesenius's Thesaurus by "locus Typhonis" or "Typhoni saar"), signifying "darkness," "the north wind," and perhaps "snake"; A.

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  • The tower is still standing and is remarkable for its increase in size as it rises, which causes it to rock in a strong wind.

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  • With the improvements in wind instruments this continued, as a more brilliant effect was gained.

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  • The sea-coast is exposed to the fierce bora, or north wind, during the spring.

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  • The prevalent northeast wind cau s es at times a heavy swell on the lake.

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  • He makes the sunshine; the wind is his breath; river valleys are hollowed out at his command.

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  • Farther south, in Patagonia, the prevailing wind is westerly, in which case the Andes again " blanket " an extensive region and deprive it of rain, turning it into an arid desolate steppe.

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  • In the north and on the pampas the north wind is hot and depressing, while the south wind is cool and refreshing.

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  • The north wind usually terminates with a thunderstorm or with a pampero, a cold south-west wind from the Andes which blows with great violence, causes a fall in temperature of 15° to 20°, and is most frequent from June to November - the southern winter and spring.

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  • In the Andean region, a dry, hot wind from the north or north-west, called the Zonda, blows with great intensity, especially in September - October, and causes much discomfort and suffering.

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  • It is followed by a cold south wind which often lowers the temperature 25°.

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  • The prevailing winds, mild and humid, are west winds from the Atlantic; continental climatic influence makes itself felt in the east wind, which is frequent in winter and in the east of France, while the mistral, a violent wind from the north-west, is characteristic of the Mediterranean region.

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  • Broken Bay and other inlets, and several headlands, were also seen and named, but the vessel did not come to an anchor till Moreton Bay was reached, although the wind prevented Cook from entering this harbour.

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  • The number of rainy days throughout the peninsula varies from 160 to over 200 in each year, but violent gusts of wind, called " Sumatras," accompanied by a heavy downpour of short duration, are more common than persistent rain.

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  • The mistral of the Riviera is entirely absent from Algiers, but in summer the city occasionally suffers from the sirocco or desert wind.

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  • The wind circulation over the Atlantic is of a very definite character.

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  • In the North Atlantic the distribution of pressure and resulting wind circulation are very largely modified by the enormous areas of land and frozen sea which surround the ocean on three sides.

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  • On the polar side of the high-pressure area a west wind drift is under the control of the " roaring forties," and on reaching South Africa part of this is deflected and sent northwards along the west coast as the cold Benguella current which rejoins the equatorial.

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  • The dry wind from the Sahara called harmattan, which carries great quantities of fine red sand, causes a fall of temperature in the (European) summer.

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  • avgµos, wind, and p. rpov, a measure), an instrument for measuring either the velocity or the pressure of the wind.

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  • Anemometers may be divided into two classes, (1) those that measure the velocity, (2) those that measure the pressure of the wind, but inasmuch as there is a close connexion between the pressure and the velocity, a suitable anemometer of either class will give information about both these quantities.

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  • The cups are placed symmetrically on the end of the arms, and it is easy to see that the wind always has the hollow of one cup presented to it; the back of the cup on the opposite end of the cross also faces the wind, but the pressure on it is naturally less, and hence a continual rotation is produced; each cup in turn as it comes round providing the necessary force.

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  • Unfortunately, when Dr Robinson first designed his anemometer, he stated that no matter what the size:of the cups or the length of the arms, the cups always moved with one-third of the velocity of the wind.

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  • This result was apparently confirmed by some independent experiments, but it Is very far from the truth, for it is now known that the actual ratio, or factor as it is commonly called, of the velocity of the wind to that of the cups depends very largely on the dimensions of the cups and arms, and may have almost any value between two and a little over three.

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  • The result has been that wind velocities published in many official publications have of ten been in error by nearly 5 0%.

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  • The distortion of the spring determines the actual force which the wind is exerting on the plate, and this is either read off on a suitable gauge, or leaves a record in the ordinary way by means of a pen writing on a sheet of paper moved by clockwork.

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  • ft., but it is now fairly certain that these high values are erroneous, and due, not to the wind, but to faulty design of the anemometer.

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  • The fact is that the wind is continually varying in force, and while the ordinary pressure plate is admirably adapted for measuring the force of a steady and uniform wind, it is entirely unsuitable for following the rapid fluctuations of the natural wind.

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  • A violent gust strikes the plate, which is driven back and carried by its own momentum far past the position in which a steady wind of the same force would place it; by the time the motion has reached the pen it has been greatly exaggerated by the springiness of the connexion, and not only is the plate itself driven too far back, but also its position is wrongly recorded by the pen; the combined errors act the same way, and more than double the real maximum pressure may be indicated on the chart.

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  • In this arrangement a catch is provided so that the plate being once driven back by the wind cannot return until released by hand; but the catch does not prevent the plate being driven back farther by a gust stronger than the last one that moved it.

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  • of fine sewing cotton has been employed to measure the wind velocity passing over a kite, the tension of the cotton being recorded, and this plan has given satisfactory results.

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  • Lind's anemometer, which consists simply of a U tube containing liquid with one end bent into a horizontal direction to face the wind, is perhaps the original form from which the tube class of instrument has sprung.

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  • If the wind blows into the mouth of a tube it causes an increase of pressure inside and also of course an equal increase in all closed vessels with which the mouth is in airtight communication.

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  • 1) utilizes the increased pressure in the open mouth of a straight tube facing the wind, and the decrease of pressure caused inside when the wind blows over a ring of small holes drilled through the metal of a vertical tube which is closed at the upper end.

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  • Thus if the instrument depends on the pressure or suction effect alone, and this pressure or suction is measured against the air pressure in an ordinary room, in which the doors and windows are carefully closed and a newspaper is then burnt up the chimney, an effect may be produced equal to a wind of io m.

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  • It is probable that the wind pressure is not strictly proportional to the extent of the surface exposed.

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  • Similar principles apply in infinite detail to the treatment of wind instruments, and we must never lose sight of them in speculating as to the reasons why the genius of Beethoven was able to carry instrumentation into worlds of which Haydn and Mozart never dreamt, or why, having gone so far, it left anything unexplored.

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  • Larger combinations, being semi-orchestral, especially where the double-bass and wind instruments are used, lend themselves to a somewhat lighter style; thus Beethoven's septet and Schubert's octet are both in the nature of a very large serenade.

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  • Wind instruments produce very special effects in chamber-music, and need an exceedingly adroit technique on the part of the composer.

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  • south, protects Cartagena from the violence of wind and waves.

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  • All creatures he called his "brothers" or "sisters" - the chief example is the poem of the "Praises of the Creatures," wherein "brother Sun," "sister Moon," "brother Wind," and "sister Water" are called on to praise God.

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  • A rising was organized for February 1831; but Francis got wind of it, and, repenting of his dangerous dallying with revolution, arrested Menotti and fled to Austrian territory with his prisoner.

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  • Robinson published a number of papers in scientific journals, and the Armagh catalogue of stars (Places of 5345 Stars observed from 1828 to 1854 at the Armagh Observatory, Dublin, 1859), but he is best known as the inventor (1846) of the cup-anemometer for registering the velocity of the wind.

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  • The fertile leaves or sporophylls are generally aggregated on special shoots to form rioweN which may contain one or both kinds The microspores are set free from the sporangiurn and carried generally by wind or insect agency to the vicinity of the macrospore, which never leaves the ovule.

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  • and, as is well-known, wind and other nhvsieal agencies are very efficient in dissemination.

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  • This may be due to frost, especially in thin-barked trees, and often occurs in beeches, pears, &c.; or it may result from bruising by wind, hailstones, gun-shot wounds in coverts, &c., the latter of course very local.

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  • The pollination, of flowers and the dispersal of seeds by various animals are biological factors; but pollination and dispersal by the wind cannot be so regarded.

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  • The first of these is wind: it cannot be doubted that small seeds can be swept up like dust and transported to considerable distances.

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  • Birds are even more effective than wind in transporting seeds to long distances.

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  • Thus the stream bed, from which at first the water might be blown away into a new channel by a gale of wind, ultimately grows to be the strongest line of the landscape.

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  • The building and handling of vessels also, and the utilization of such uncontrollable powers of nature as wind and tide, helped forward mechanical invention.

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  • While steam has been said to make a ship independent of wind and tide, it is still true that a long voyage even by steam must be planned so as to encounter the least resistance possible from prevailing winds and permanent currents, and this involves the application of oceanographical and meteorological knowledge.

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  • The older navigation by utilizing the power of the wind demands a very intimate knowledge of these conditions, and it is probable that a revival of sailing ships may in the present century vastly increase the importance of the study of maritime meteorology.

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  • The management of the company had meanwhile passed into the hands of others, whose sole object was to settle accounts with the government, and wind up the undertaking.

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  • A Log Book is a marine or sea journal, containing, in the British navy, the speed, course, leeway, direction and force of the wind, state of the weather, and barometric and thermometric observations.

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  • The distance from Rarotonga to New Zealand is about 2000 m., and, with the aid of the trade wind, large canoes could traverse the distance within a month.

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  • The strength of the wind is greater, on the whole, than in the continental parts of W.

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  • The colouring of the steppe changes as if by magic, and only the silvery plumes of the steppe-grass (Stipa pennata) wave in the wind, tinting the steppe a bright yellow.

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  • (2) Wind resistance.

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  • The resistance caused by the wind is very variable, and in extreme cases may double the resistance found from the formulae.

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  • A side wind causes excessive flange friction on the leeward side of the train, and increases the tractive resistances therefore very considerably, even though its velocity be relatively moderate.

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  • By the rain wash and wind action detritus from the mountains is carried to these valley floors, raising their level, and often burying low mountain spurs, so as to cause neighbouring valleys to coalesce.

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  • The mountains are composed in great part of Paleozoic strata, often modified by vulcanism and greatly denuded and sculptured by wind and water erosion.

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  • The climate is rather severe, and the southern part is exposed to the cold north-eastern wind, known as the Bora.

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  • A wind of exceptional violence blows sometimes from the N.N.W.

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  • Although the succession of the periodical winds follows the progress of the seasons as just described, the changes in the wind's direction everywhere take place under the operation of special local influences which often disguise the more general law, and make it difficult to trace.

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  • The south-west monsoon does not generally extend, in its character of a south-west wind, over the land.

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  • In these storms the wind invariably circulates from north by west through south to east.

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  • Such a reduction of temperature is brought about along the greater part of the coasts of India and of the BurmoSiamese peninsula by the interruption of the wind current by continuous ranges of mountains, which force the mass of air to rise over them, whereby the air being rarefied, its specific capacity for heat is increased and its temperature falls, with a corresponding condensation of the vapour originally held in suspension.

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  • "the highest purest light, the gentle wind, the harmony of sounds, the voice of all the aeons, and the beauty of their forms," all these being treated as abstractions and personified.

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  • The army was visited by a plague, and the fleet was prevented from sailing by the total absence of wind.

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  • The mean rise and fall of the tide is about 2 ft., but under certain conditions of wind the variation amounts to 5 ft.

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  • The prevailing winds in most parts are westerly, but sudden changes, as well as the extremes of temperature, are caused mainly by the frequent shifting of the wind from N.W.

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  • He was the child of a nymph by the god of the wind.

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  • Wind is another important factor, as cotton does not do well in localities subject to very high winds; and in exposed situations, otherwise favourable, wind belts have at times to be provided.

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  • Rain is brought by the west wind; the north-west wind, which blows often, moderates the heat.

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  • On the other hand, an ozoneless east wind (sirocco) is occasionally experienced - especially during the second half of May and before the beginning of the rainy season - which has a prejudicial influence on both animal and vegetable life.

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  • On the eastern side are numerous sand hills, formed by the wind into innumerable fantastic shapes, sometimes covered with stunted trees and scanty vegetation, but usually bare and rising to heights of from 150 to 250 ft.

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  • These frolics suggest the wind.

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  • Robin Hood is Hod, the god of the wind, a form of Woden; Maid Marian is Morgen, the dawn-maiden; Friar Tuck is Toki, the spirit of frost and snow."

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  • The sea immediately south of Formosa is the birthplace of innumerable typhoons, but the high mountains of the island protect it partially against the extreme violence of the wind.

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  • The ordinary rise and fall of the river is comparatively slight, but when the west wind blows steadily for a long time, or when Lake Ladoga sends down its vast accumulations of block-ice, inundations of a dangerous kind occur, as in 1777, 1824, 1879 and 1903.

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  • 150) by name, Podarge, the mother of the coursers of Achilles by Zephyrus, the generative wind.

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  • (1892-1893), the Harpies are the hostile spirits of the scorching south wind; E.

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  • Here, too, the sand is raised into ever-changing hills by the force of the wind sweeping over it.

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  • In both alike the scirocco, bringing rain from the south-west, is a prevalent wind, as well as the bora, the fearful north-north-easter of Illyria, which, sweeping down the lateral valleys of the Dinaric Alps, overwhelms everything in its path.

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  • Helped by a strong south wind, the British war-ships passed up the straits and anchored off the Seven Towers.

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  • Aided by lucky changes of wind, he reached Cadiz, was joined by 1 French and 6 Spanish ships under Admiral Gravina, which, added to the 1 r he had with him, gave him a force of 18 sail.

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  • Sometimes, in the months of June, July and August, when the sherki or south wind is blowing, the thermometer at break of day is known to stand at 112° F., while at noon it rises to 1 19° and a little before two o'clock to 122°, standing at sunset at 114°, but this scale of temperature is exceptional.

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  • The climate of Thrace was regarded by the Greeks as very severe, and that country was spoken of as the home of the north wind, Boreas.

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  • Oligoneuria and allies) the legs are aborted, and the creatures are driven helplessly about by the wind.

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  • Bizerta occupies the site of the ancient Tyrian colony, Hippo Zarytus or Diarrhytus, the harbour of which, by means of a spacious pier, protecting it from the north-east wind, was rendered one of the safest and finest.

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  • The nature of the soil appears, however, to be of secondary importance, provided that it is able to hold moisture and that climatic conditions of high and even temperature with considerable rainfall and absence of wind are satisfied.

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  • The flowers are yellow, and the seeds enclosed in a pod are long and thin with numerous long silky fibres attached to them, which enable the seeds to be readily carried by the wind.

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  • In Cumberland, Northumberland, Durham and latterly the United States, the reverberatory furnace is used only for roasting the ore, and the oxidized ore is then reduced by fusion in a low, square blastfurnace (a "Scottish hearth furnace") lined with cast iron, as is also the inclined sole-plate which is made to project beyond the furnace, the outside portion (the "work-stone") being provided with grooves guiding any molten metal that may be placed on the "stone" into a cast iron pot; the "tuyere" for the introduction of the wind was, in the earlier types, about half way down the furnace.

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  • Chilled by the wind, the new-born god went to a fig-tree, partook of its fruit, and clothed himself in its leaves.

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  • Above these, the chapadas lie open to the sun and wind and have a cool, bracing atmosphere even where high sun temperatures prevail.

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  • The prevailing winds on the coast are north-east, warm and humid, and south-west, cool and bracing, though in summer the south-west wind brings rain.

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  • Inland, chiefly in early summer, a hot dry wind, often accompanied by a dust storm, blows from the north.

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  • The north-east wind brings more moisture.

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  • The wind from the north-west, known as the cers, blows with great violence, and the sea-breeze is often laden with pestilential effluvia from the lagoons.

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  • Marine rainbow is the name given to the chromatic displays formed by the sun's rays falling on the spray drawn up by the wind playing on the surface of an agitated sea.

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  • HELM WIND, a wind that under certain conditions blows over the escarpment of the Pennines, near Cross Fell from the eastward, when a helm (helmet) cloud covers the summit.

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  • See "Report on the Helm Wind Inquiry," by W.

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  • It must be remembered that the Arabs, who inhabit an extremely hot country, are very fully clothed, while the Fuegians at the extremity, of Cape Horn, exposed to all the rigours of an antarctic climate, have, as sole protection, a skin attached to the body by cords, so that it can be shifted to either side according to the direction of the wind.

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  • The plan which he laid to attack it in the Golfe Jouan in June may possibly have served to some extent as an inspiration, if not as a model, to Nelson for the battle of the Nile, but the wind was unfavourable, and the attack could not be carried out.

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  • The Tower was injured, and a portion of the roof of the church of St Mary-leBow, Cheapside, was carried off and fell some distance away, being forced into the ground as much as 20 ft., a proof of the badness of the thoroughfares as well as of the force of the wind.

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  • A violent east wind fomented the flames which ra ed durin the whole of Monda and Fire.

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  • On Tuesday night the wind fell somewhat, and on Wednesday the fire slackened.

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  • As a result of its relatively great depth there are seldom any great fluctuations of level in this lake due to wind disturbance, but the lake follows the general rule of the Great Lakes (q.v.) of seasonal and annual variation.

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  • wind is fairly constant in the inland regions during the middle of the day.

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  • A hot wind from the N.W.

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  • The dust caused much annoyance whenever there was any wind.

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  • The weather, as it turned out, was none too favourable on several of the preliminary nights, but, owing to its direction, the wind did not greatly retard the work of removal.

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  • The artillery still remaining to be embarked was for the most part got afloat during the early hours of darkness, and the infantry followed; but the wind soon began to rise ominously, blowing home from W.

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  • (where rapids interrupt the currents) the valleys open out and the rivers wind in tortuous channels often choked by sandbanks.

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  • Adapa while fishing had broken the wings of the south wind, and was accordingly summoned before the tribunal of Anu in heaven.

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  • Moreover the rain penetrates into the small interstices between its particles and dissolves out some of the materials which bind the whole into a solid stone, the surface then becoming a loose powdery mass which falls to the ground below or is carried away by the wind.

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  • On the other hand it should not be too open in texture or the roots do not get a proper hold of the ground and are easily disturbed by wind: moreover such soils are liable to blow away, leaving the underground parts exposed to the air and drought.

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  • Wind and hail may break plants or damage leaves, especially if required for wrapper purposes.

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  • The provision of wind breaks is the only effective remedy.

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  • the direction of the prevailing wind, and the cusps to leeward.

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  • In the south of the Nafud, where Huber found the prevailing wind to be from the south, the falks are turned in that direction.

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  • a steady and often strong wind blows from the south-south-east, which dies away later.

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  • At Tunis the temperature rarely exceeds 90°, except with a wind from the Sahara.

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  • When the wind rises above the snow-capped Andes, the last particle of moisture is wrung from it that a very low temperature can extract.

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  • Passing the summit of that range, it rushes down as a cool and dry wind on the Pacific slopes beyond.

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  • Meeting with no evaporating surface, and with no temperature colder than that to which it is subjected on the mountain-tops, this wind reaches the ocean before it becomes charged with fresh moisture.

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  • The constantly prevailing wind on the Peruvian coast is from the south, which is a cold wind from the Humboldt current.

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  • The monument, after repeatedly resisting the violence of curiosity, was broken into in 1810 by the French soldiery; the statue was mutilated, and the yellow hair was cut from the broken skeleton, to be preserved in reliquaries and blown away by the wind.

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  • Opposite stands the new Pinakothek, built 1846-1853, the frescoes on which, designed by Kaulbach, show the effects of wind and weather.

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  • hawah, " sink, glide down " (through space); hawwa " blow " (wind).

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  • " He rides through the air, He blows " (Wellhausen), would be a fit name for a god of wind and storm.

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  • The cherub upon which he rides when he flies on the wings of the wind (Ps.

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  • The climate of the locality is better than that of the other districts of Berar; the hot wind which blows during the day in the summer months being succeeded at night by a cool breeze.

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  • For a moment the wind blew the flames aside, leaving the corpses untouched.

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  • These differences are due to the action of the north-westerly wind that blows over Japan from Siberia.

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  • The intervening sea being comparatively warm, this wind arrives at Japan having its temperature increased and carrying moisture which it deposits as snow on the western faces of the Japanese mountains.

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  • Crossing the mountains and descending their eastern slopes, the wind becomes less saturated and warmer, so that the formation of clouds ceases.

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  • They come from tile adjacent continent of Asia, and they de- Wind velop considerable strength owing to the fact that there is an average difference of some 22 mm.

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  • A comparison of the force habitually developed by the wind in various parts of the islands shows that at Suttsu in Yezo the average strength is 9 metres per second, while Izuhara in the island Tsu-shima, Kumamoto in KiOshi and Gifu in the east centre of the main island stand at the bottom of the list with an average wind velocity of only 2 metres.

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  • A calamitous atmospheric feature is the periodical arrival of storms called typhoons (Japanese tai-fu or great wind).

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  • About 1893 a satisfactory machine was ready, and a new series of troubles had to be faced, for it had to be launched at a certain initial speed, and in the face of any wind that might be blowing.

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  • The flowers appear generally before the leaves and are thus rendered more conspicuous, while passage of pollen by the wind is facilitated.

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  • Fertilization is effected by insects, especially by bees, which are directed in their search by the colour and fragrance of the flowers; but some pollen must also be transported by the wind to the female flowers, especially in arctic species which, in spite of the poverty of insect life, set abundant fruit.

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  • The regular tides are hardly perceptible, but, under the influence of barometric pressure and wind, the sea-level occasionally varies as much as ft.

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  • The direct passes across it from Herat (the Baba and the Ardewan) wind amongst masses of disintegrating sandstone for some miles on each side of the dividing watershed, but farther west the rounded knolls of the rain-washed downs may be crossed almost at any point without difficulty.

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  • Want of wind prevented the operation.

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  • Changes of wind made the battle somewhat confused.

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  • A shift of the wind having given him the weather-gage, he concentrated a vigorous attack on Lawson.

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  • But the wind changed again and transferred the weather-gage to the English.

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  • Between the 26th and the 30th of July Tromp, by a series of skilful manoeuvres, united the divided Dutch squadrons in the face of Monk's fleet, and on the 30th he stood out to sea with the wind in his favour, and gave battle.

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  • Danger stimulated the English government to active exertions, and by the 21st of July Monk and Rupert were enabled by a happy combination of wind and tide to set to sea through the passage called the Swin.

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  • wind.

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  • The Dutch admiral, who had the advantage of the wind, fell on the English in the van and centre.

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  • On the nth of August the wind, which had been westerly, turned to the S.E., giving him the weather gage.

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  • Wind also gives rise to differences of level by driving the water before it, and the prevailing westerly wind of the southern Baltic is the chief cause of the sea-level at Kiel being 51 in.

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  • The influence of wind project for laying a telegraph cable between Ireland and on water-level is most remarkable in heavy storms on the flat Newfoundland.

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  • In the region of tropical hurricanes the navies, while in the Mediterranean and in the Indian Ocean converging wind system of a circular storm causes a heaping many soundings were made in connexion with submarine up of water capable of devastating the low coral islands of the cables to the East.

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  • Similar effects are produced in narrow waters by the action of tidal currents, and the influence of a steady wind blowing onor off-shore has a powerful effect in mixing the water.

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  • In small nearly land-locked basins shut off from one another by bars rising to within a short distance of the surface and affected both by strong tidal currents and by a considerable admixture of land water, the contrasts of vertical distribution of temperature with the seasons are strongly marked, and there are also great unperiodic changes effected mainly by wind, as is shown by the investigations of H.

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  • The influence of wind and tide breaks up the frozen surface of the sea, and sheets yielding to the pressures slide over or under one another and are worked together into a hummocky ice-pack, the irregularities on the surface of which, caused by repeated fractures and collisions, may be from 10 to 20 ft.

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  • The west-wind drifts on the poleward side carry back part of the water southward to reunite with the equatorial current, and thus there is set up an anticyclonic circulation of water between io and 40° in each hemisphere, the movement of the water corresponding very closely with that of the wind.

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  • The coincidence of wind and current direction is most marked in the region of alternating monsoons in the north of the Indian Ocean and in the Malay Sea.

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  • The accordance of wind and currents is so obvious that it was fully recognized by seafaring men in the time of the first circumnavigators.

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  • When the wind acts on the surface of the sea it drives before it the particles of the surface layer of water, and, as these cannot be parted from those immediately beneath, the internal friction of the fluid causes the propelling impulse to act through a considerable depth, and if the wind continued long enough it would ultimately set the whole mass of the ocean in motion 'right down to the bottom.

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  • The current set up by the grip of the wind sweeping over the surface is deflected by the earth's rotation about 45° to the right of the direction of the wind in the northern hemisphere and to the left in the southern.

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  • per hour, the drift-current depth in latitude 5° would be approximately 104 fathoms, in latitude 15°, 55 fathoms, and in latitude 45° only from 33 to 38 fathoms. A strong wind of 38 m.

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  • Ekman shows further that in a pure drift current the mean direction of the whole mass of the current is perpendicular to the direction of the wind which sets it in motion.

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  • On the flat coasts of Europe the influence of on-shore wind in driving in warm water, and of off-shore wind in producing an updraught of cold water, has long been familiar to bathers.

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  • The difference in density which occurs between one part of the ocean and another, shares with the wind in the production of currents.

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  • Wind and tide greatly alter the strength of these currents due to difference of density, and the surface outflow may either be stopped or, in the case of the belts, actually reversed by a strong and steady wind.

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  • Modern oceanography has found means to calculate quantitatively the circulatory movements produced by wind and the distribution of temperature and salinity not only at the surface but in deep water.

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  • The climate is one of great extremes of heat and cold, with a dry winter and a usually wet summer, the prevailing wind of winter being N.W.

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  • During the cold season the thermometer at night falls below the freezing point; little or no hot wind is felt before the end of April, and even then it ceases after sunset.

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  • In 1743, from the circumstance that an eclipse not visible in Philadelphia because of a storm had been observed in Boston, where the storm although north-easterly did not occur until an hour after the eclipse, he surmised that storms move against the wind along the Atlantic coast.

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  • From its bracing qualities this wind, which blows in the summer, is known as the "Cape Doctor."

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  • Throughout the dry or cool season the wind blows steadily and almost uninterruptedly (except for an hour or so forenoon and afternoon) from the south-east.

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  • on the right bank of the Aar and on the level floor of the valley, but is much exposed to the south wind (or Fohn), and has several times been in great part destroyed by fire (1632, 1879 and 1891).

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  • It is said that while the archbishop was blessing the fleet the silver cross of his archiepiscopal staff fell off, but that the omen was disregarded by .the irreverence of the Pisans, who declared that if they had the wind they could do without divine help. They advanced in line abreast to meet the first line of the Genoese, fighting according to the medieval custom to ram and board.

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  • The fore-sight was a small globe, and in the original patterns this was placed on a movable leaf on which deflection for speed of one's own ship was given, while deflection for speed of enemy's ship and wind were given on the tangent sight.

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  • are composed chiefly of comminuted shells drifted and deposited by the wind, and they are very irregularly stratified, as is usually the case with wind-blown deposits.

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  • ZEPHYRUS, in Greek mythology, the west wind (whence the English "zephyr," a light breeze), brother of Boreas, the north wind, and son of the Titan Astraeus and Eos, the dawn.

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  • In the Puget Sound Basin an occasional cold east wind during a dry period in winter causes the temperature to fall below zero.

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  • The velocity thus obtained will be affected by the wind.

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  • He found that the time varied between 551seconds when the wind was blowing most strongly with the sound, to 63 seconds when it was most strongly against the sound.

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  • But when the wind is steady its effect may be eliminated by " reciprocal " observations, that is, by observations of the time of passage of sound in each direction over the measured distance..

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  • Let D be the distance, U the velocity of sound in still air, and Tr) the velocity of the wind, supposed for simplicity to blow directly from one station to the other.

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  • To eliminate wind as far as possible reciprocal firing was adopted, the interval between the two firings being only a few seconds.

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  • It is well known that sound travels far better with the wind than against it.

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  • 1857, P by wind.

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  • It is, of course, a matter of common observation that the wind increases in velocity from the surface upwards.

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  • direction in which the wind is going.

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  • The same kind of thing happens with sound-wave fronts when travelling with the wind.

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  • The velocity of any part of a wave front relative to the ground will be the normal velocity of sound + the velocity of the wind at that point.

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  • 14, where we must suppose the wind to be blowing from left to right.

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  • But if the wind is against the sound the velocity of a point of the wave front is the normal velocity-the wind velocity at the point, and so decreases as we rise.

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  • 14, where the wind is travelling from right to left.

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  • But through the wind velocity the first wave is carried to a distance U + w from S, while through the motion of the source the last wave is a distance u from S.

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  • If the velocities of source and receiver are equal then the frequency is not affected by their motion or by the wind.

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  • But if their velocities are different, the frequency of the waves received is affected both by these velocities and by that of the wind.

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  • - The longitudinal vibration of air in cylindrical pipes is made use of in various wind instruments.

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  • The westerly wind is almost constant and, in conjunction with the elevation of the land, greatly modifies the climatic conditions.

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  • In the west the climate is generally delightful, it being there greatly affected by the warm, dry " Chinook " wind which blows from the Pacific Ocean; to some extent the wind modifies the temperature nearly to the eastern border.

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  • It is the prevailing wind of winter in the mountains and in consequence the periods of cold, though often severe, are short.

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  • Storms endangering life and property occur only in the east, caused by a high north wind with snow or rain and a low temperature.

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  • Provision is made for longitudinal expansion due to change of temperature, for distortion due to the sun acting on one side of the structure, and for the wind acting on one side of the bridge.

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  • This is due to the half weight of centre girder, the weight of the cantilever itself, the rolling load on half the bridge, and the wind pressure.

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  • road to pass between the springings and ensured the transmission of the wind stresses to the abutments without interrupting the crossbracing.

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  • (3) The dead load comprises the weight of the main girders, flooring and wind bracing, or the total weight of the superstructure exclusive of any part directly carried by the piers.

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  • (4) The horizontal pressure due to a wind blowing transversely to the span, which becomes of importance in long and high bridges.

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  • Wind Pressure.-Much attention has been given to wind action since the disaster to the Tay bridge in 1879.

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  • As to the maximum wind pressure on small plates normal to the wind, there is not much doubt.

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  • For a plate girder bridge of less height than the train, the wind is to be taken to act on a surface equal to the projected area of one girder and the exposed part of a train covering the bridge.

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  • In the case of braced girder bridges, the wind pressure is taken as acting on a continuous surface extending from the rails to the top of the carriages, plus the vertical projected area of so much of one girder as is exposed above the train or below the rails.

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  • The committee recommended that a factor of safety of 4 should be taken for wind stresses.

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  • In the case of bridges not subject to Board of Trade inspection, the allowance for wind pressure varies in different cases.

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  • in compression boom, 7 o tons in tension boom, 5 o tons in vertical struts, 6.5 tons in diagonal ties, 8 o tons in wind bracing, and 6.5 tons in cross and rail girders.

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  • His strongest arguments are that the wind would easily develop into the messenger of the gods (Len oU pos), and that it was often thought to promote fertility in crops and cattle.

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  • The Homeric epithet 'ApyEtybO rqs, which the Greeks interpreted as "the slayer of Argus," inventing a myth to account for Argus, is explained as originally an epithet of the wind (apyEO-Tris), which clears away the mists (apyos, q5aivco).

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  • The uncertainty of the wind might well suggest the trickery of a thief, and its whistling might contain the germ from which a god of music should be developed.

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  • If he was evolved from the wind, his character had become so anthropomorphic that the Greeks had practically lost the knowledge of his primitive significance; nor did Greek cult ever associate him with the wind.

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  • Cathedral Park in the southern portion, Spearfish Canon in the north, and the extensive fossil forest at the foot of Mattie's Peak are noteworthy; while the Crystal Cave, near Piedmont, and the Wind Cave, near Hot Springs, are almost unrivalled.

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  • The picturesque effect of this sculpturing by water, wind and fire is greatly enhanced by the brilliant colours along the faces of the hills and ravines - grey, yellow, black and every shade of red and brown.

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  • only on Turtle Mountains, in the vicinity of streams, and in a few other places sheltered from wind and sun.

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  • High winds are frequent, and prairie houses are often protected by rows of trees called " wind breaks."

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  • In these instances most of the flowers were abortive, but a few were fertile, which he attributes to the dust of the apices having been wafted by the wind from other plants.

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  • This gives rise to the great morphological difference, that in the former regions, the Astin-tagh and the Kuruk-tagh, the products of disintegration are almost always carried away by the wind, and so disappear; no matter how powerful or how active the disintegration may be, none of the loosened material ever succeeds either in gathering amongst the mountains or in accumulating at their foot.

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  • In reviving that theory at the beginning of the 19th century, Thomas Young stated his conviction that material media offered an open structure to the substance called aether, which passed through them without hindrance " like the wind through a grove of trees."

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  • A strong north-west wind, at such times, is of incalculable value to the farmer."8 Other gall-making dipterous flies are members of the family Trypetidae, which disfigure the seed-heads of plants, and of the family Mycetophilidae, such as the species Sciara tilicola, 9 Low, the cause of the oblong or rounded green and red galls of the young shoots and leaves of the lime.

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  • 1) he entertains Odysseus, gives him a favourable wind to help him on his journey, and a bag in which the unfavourable winds have been confined.

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  • The climate of the archipelago, though generally mild, healthy and favourable to plant life, is by no means uniform, owing to the differences of altitude and shelter from wind in different islands.

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  • F.) Slates are widely used for roofing houses and buildings of every description, and for such purposes they are unequalled, the better sorts possessing all the qualities necessary for protection against wind, rain and storm.

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  • The branches as well as the upper parts of the main streams flow through broad and shallow valleys; the middle courses of the main streams wind their way through reed-covered marshes, the water ebbing and flowing with the tide; in their lower courses they become estuarine and the water flows between low banks.

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  • Nevertheless along the whole line some kind of surveillance was established long before the close of 1861, and, in proportion as the number of vessels available increased, the blockade became more and more stringent, until at last it was practically unbreakable at any point save by the fastest steamers working under unusually favourable conditions of wind and weather.

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  • In summer the east wind brings dense and sudden fogs; while in winter the northerly gales blow straight into the mouths of the harbours.

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  • Between May and September the sirocco, or hot wind of the desert, sweeps at intervals over the country, impregnating the air with fine sand; but in general, with the exception of the vicinity of the marshes, the climate is healthy.

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  • 10) we find "upon a cherub" parallel to "upon the wings of the wind" (cp. Isa.

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  • Partly on account of its great extent, and partly because there is no wide opening to the Arctic regions, the normal wind circulation is on the whole less modified in the North Pacific than in the Atlantic, except in the west, where the south-west logy.

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  • Within the southern monsoon region there is a gradual transition to the northwest monsoon of New Guinea in low latitudes, and in higher latitudes to the north-east wind of the Queensland coast.

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  • Those plants which are widely distributed are generally found to be propagated from seeds which can easily be carried by the wind or by ocean currents, or form the food of migratory birds.

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  • There is no doubt that he saw which way the wind was blowing, and disliked Northumberland's scheme; but he had not the courage to resist the duke to his face.

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  • Orohippus sp. Lower Eocene (Wind river formation).

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  • The roads are protected from every wind except the south, which occasions a heavy surf; but against this a mole was constructed in 1863.

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  • ' The corpse laid out in state was provided by the priest with a jug of water for his journey, and with bunches of cut papers to pass him safely through each danger of the road - the place where the two mountains strike together, the road guarded by the great snake and the great alligator, the eight deserts and the eight hills; they gave him garments to protect him from the cutting wind, and buried a little dog by his side to carry him across the nine waters.

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  • The coarser kinds are sorted, cured (dried in the sun and wind) and stacked ready for market.

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