Winchester sentence example

winchester
  • Pulling his Winchester from a boot attached to the side of the wagon, he walked toward her.
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  • The foundation was closely modelled on Winchester College, with its warden and fellows, its grammar and song schoolmasters, but a step in advance was made by the masters being made fellows and so members of the governing body.
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  • The whole endowment was in 1535 worth some £ 200 a year, about a fifth of that of Winchester College.
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  • On the 18th of July 1542 it was surrendered to Henry VIII., and its possessions granted to Robert Dacres on condition of maintaining the grammar school and paying the master £10 a year, the same salary as the headmasters of Winchester and Eton, and maintaining the almshouse.
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  • Richard Andrews, the king's secretary, like Chicheley himself a scholar of Winchester and fellow of New College, was named as first warden.
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  • It has been alleged that he was a Wykehamist, a scholar at Winchester College and New College, Oxford.
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  • Dioc.," admitted in 1 4 03, he was not a scholar of Winchester, and in any case was not a scholar of New College.
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  • Nor was he a commoner in college at Winchester or at New College, as his name does not appear in the Hall books, or lists of those dining in hall, at either college.
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  • That he was a day-boy commoner at Winchester is possible, but seems unlikely.
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  • Under the influence of Archbishop Chicheley, who had himself founded two colleges in imitation of Wykeham, and Thomas Bekynton, king's secretary and privy seal, and other Wyke - hamists, Henry VI., on the 11th of October 1440, founded, in imitation of Winchester College, "a college in the parish church of Eton by Windsor not far from our birthplace," called the King's College of the Blessed Mary of Eton by Windsor, as "a sort of first-fruits of his taking the government on himself."
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  • On the 5th of March 1440-1441, the king endowed the college out of alien priories with some scpc, a year, almost exactly the amount of the original endowment of Winchester.
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  • Here he seems to have been so much impressed with Waynflete, that at Michaelmas, 1441, Waynflete ceased to be headmaster of Winchester.
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  • He is credited with having taken half the scholars and fellows of Winchester to Eton to start the school there.
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  • In fact, five scholars and perhaps one commoner left Winchester for Eton in 1443, probably in July, just before the election.
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  • The dedication to Mary Magdalen was no doubt derived from the hospital at Winchester of which the founder had been master.
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  • When Jack Cade's rebellion occurred in 1450 Waynflete was employed with Archbishop Stafford, the chancellor, to negotiate with the rebels at St Margaret's church, Southwark, close to Winchester House.
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  • In the earliest Audit Rolls after the restoration of the college in 1467 there are many entries of visits of Provost Westbury to "the lord of Winchester," which in January1468-1469were for "beginning the work of the church" "and providing money for them."
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  • In the years1471-1472to 1474 Waynflete was largely engaged in completing the church, now called chapel, at Eton, his glazier supplying the windows, and he contracted on the 15th of August 1475 for the rood-loft to be made on one side "like to the rode lofte in Bishop Wykeham's college at Winchester," and on the other like that "of the college of St Thomas of Acres in London."
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  • Magdalen College School was established at the gates and as a part of the college, to be, like Eton, a free grammar school, free of tuition fees for all corners, under a master and usher, the first master being John Ankywyll, a married man, with a salary of CIO a year, the same as at Winchester and Eton.
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  • It is remarkable that he gives the same pecuniary bequests to Winchester and New Colleges as to his own college of Magdalen, but the latter he made residuary devisee of all his lands.
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  • Educated at Reading school and at Winchester college, Henry Vansittart joined the society of the Franciscans, or the "Hellfire club," at Medmenham, his elder brothers, Arthur and Robert, being also members of this fraternity.
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  • Vansittart's brother, Robert Vansittart (1728-1789), who was educated at Winchester and at Trinity College, Oxford, was regius professor of civil law at Oxford from 1757 until his death on the 31st of January 1789.
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  • He was educated at Winchester and University College, Oxford, where he took a first class in classics and a second in mathematics, besides taking a leading part in the Union debates.
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  • He was sent to the Marshalsea, and a few years later was indicted on a charge of praemunire on refusing the oath when tendered him by his diocesan, Bishop Home of Winchester.
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  • He took Devizes and Laycock House, Winchester and Basing House, and rejoined Fairfax in October at Exeter, and accompanied him to Cornwall, where he assisted in the defeat of Hopton's forces and in the suppression of the royalists in the west.
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  • The king (Henry VIII.) happened at the time to be visiting in the immediate neighbourhood, and two of his chief counsellors, Gardiner, secretary of state, afterwards bishop of Winchester, and Edward Fox, the lord high almoner, afterwards bishop of Hereford, were lodged at Cressy's house.
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  • In spite of the veto of the pope Louis accepted the invitation, landed in England in May 1216, and occupied London and Winchester, the fortune of war having in the meantime turned against John.
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  • In 984 he was appointed through Dunstan's influence to the bishopric of Winchester, and in 1006 he succeeded iElfric as archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • In Jersey and in Guernsey there are courts of first instance with appeal to the bishop of Winchester.
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  • In after life he retained a lively feeling of interest in Winchester school, and remembered with admiration and profit the regulative tact of Dr Goddard, and the preceptorial ability of Dr Gabell, who were successively head-masters during his stay there.
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  • He was also a curator of the Bodleian Library, an honorary fellow of Queen's College, a governor of Winchester College and a visitor of Greenwich Observatory.
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  • Beaufort and his brother Henry, bishop of Winchester, were opposed to Arundel and supported by the prince of Wales.
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  • But the arrogance which she displayed in her prosperity alienated the Londoners and the papal legate, Bishop Henry of Winchester.
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  • Routed at the siege of Winchester, she was compelled to release Stephen in exchange for Earl Robert, and thenceforward her cause steadily declined in England.
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  • Among their towns were Magnus Portus (Portsmouth) and Venta Belgarum (Winchester).
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  • At Winchester the paschal candlestick was of silver, and was the gift of Canute..
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  • In this locality was Winchester House, a seat of the bishops of Winchester for five centuries from 1107.
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  • He surrendered all his offices and all his preferments except the archbishopric of York, receiving in return a pension of 1000 marks (equal to six or seven thousand pounds a year in modern currency) from the bishopric of Winchester, and retired to his see, which he had never before visited.
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  • For himself he obtained, in addition to his archbishopric and lord chancellorship, the abbey of St Albans, reputed to be the richest in England, and the bishopric first of Bath and Wells, then of Durham, and finally that of Winchester.
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  • The principal manufactures are hardware, foundry and machine shop products, ammunition and fire-arms (the Winchester Company), carriages and wagons, malt liquors, paper boxes and corsets.
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  • Gauden was advanced in 1662, not as he had wished to the see of Winchester, but to Worcester.
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  • While still young he became a monk, and studied grammar and theology first at Exeter, then at Nutcell near Winchester, under the abbot Winberht.
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  • This was held at Winchester in 1072.
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  • He was bishop of Winchester from 1873 till 1890, when ill-health compelled him to resign.
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  • In 1141 he joined Matilda in London and accompanied her to Winchester, but after a narrow escape from capture he returned to Scotland.
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  • In the spring Banks was ordered to move against Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley, but the latter with superior forces defeated him at Winchester, Virginia, on the 25th of May, and forced him back to the Potomac river.
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  • Of the mansion-house founded by William of Waynflete, bishop of Winchester (c. 1450), in which Cardinal Wolsey resided for three or four weeks after his sudden fall from power in 1529, only the gatehouse remains.
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  • He was made bishop of Rochester in 1891, and was translated to Winchester in 1895.
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  • He was translated to the see of Winchester in 1662.
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  • Edward the Confessor gave the manor to the church of Winchester in 1042, and it remained with the prior and convent of St Swithin until the 13th century, when it passed by exchange to Gilbert de Clare, earl of Gloucester, though the vassals of the prior and convent remained exempt from dues and tronage in the port.
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  • In a synod held here in 954, Dunstan was elected bishop of Winchester.
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  • In 1043, after Edward the Confessor had become king he seized the greater part of Emma's great wealth, and the queen lived in retirement at Winchester until her death on the 6th of March 1052.
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  • He was educated in the Benedictine monastery at Winchester under lEthelwold, who was bishop there from 963 to 984.
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  • Among the sculptor's principal statues are " The Bishop of Carlisle " (1895; Carlisle Cathedral), " General Charles Gordon " (Trafalgar Square, London), " Oliver Cromwell " (Westminster), " Dean Colet " (a bronze group - early Italianate in feeling - outside St Paul's School, Hammersmith), " King Alfred " (a colossal memorial for Winchester), the " Gladstone Monument " (in the Strand, London) and " Dr Mandell Creighton, Bishop of London " (bronze, erected in St Paul's Cathedral).
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  • His first important preferment was as dean of Westminster (1605); afterwards he held successively the bishoprics of Rochester (1608),(1608), Lichfield (161o), Lincoln (1614),(1614), Durham (1617) and Winchester (1628),(1628), and the archbishopric of York (1631).
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  • He was succeeded by Wini, bishop of Winchester, and then came Earconuald (or St Erkenwald), whose shrine was one of the chief glories of old St Paul's.
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  • He afterwards moved his works to Winchester House, Broad Street.
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  • One Elfred, probably a descendant of Ethelred I., formed a plot to seize the king at Winchester; the plot was discovered and Elfred was sent to Rome to defend himself, but died shortly after.
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  • In 1652 Ken entered Winchester College, and in 1656 became a student of Hart Hall, Oxford.
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  • Ordained in 1662, he successively held the livings of Little Easton in Essex, Brighstone (sometimes called Brixton) in the Isle of Wight, and East Woodhay in Hampshire; in 1672 he resigned the last of these, and returned to Winchester, being by this time a prebendary of the cathedral, and chaplain to the bishop, as well as a fellow of Winchester College.
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  • He remained there for several years, acting as curate in one of the lowest districts, preparing his Manual of Prayers for the use of the Scholars of Winchester College (first published in 1674), and composing hymns.
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  • He was once more residing at Winchester in 1683 when Charles came to the city with his doubtfully composed court, and his residence was chosen as the home of Nell Gwynne; but Ken stoutly objected to this arrangement,.
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  • The fleet returned in April 1684, and a few months after, upon a vacancy occurring in the see of Bath and Wells, Ken, now Dr Ken, was appointed bishop. It is said that, upon the occurrence of the vacancy, Charles, mindful of the spirit he had shown at Winchester, exclaimed, "Where is the good little man that refused his lodging to poor Nell?"
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  • The fact that Fareham (Fernham, Ferham) formed part of the original endowment of the see of Winchester fixes its existence certainly as early as the 9th century.
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  • It was a mesne borough held of the bishop of Winchester, but it is probable that during the i 8th century the privileges of the burgesses were allowed to lapse, as by 1835 it had ceased to be a borough.
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  • Educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford, he was elected fellow in 1548 and graduated B.C.L.
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  • Educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford, he was appointed senior student of Christ Church in 1867 and tutor in 1869.
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  • In 1250 the king, by putting strong pressure upon the electors, succeeded in obtaining the see of Winchester for Aymer.
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  • He was pursued to Winchester, besieged in Wolvesey castle, and finally compelled to surrender and leave the kingdom.
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  • He had never been consecrated; accordingly in 1259 the chapter of Winchester proceeded to a new election.
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  • In 1808 he went to Winchester, and in 1810 he was elected to a demyship at Magdalen College, Oxford, where the lectures of Dr Kidd first awakened in him a desire for the cultivation of natural science.
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  • He now took refuge with his kinsman Alphege, bishop of Winchester, whose persuasion, seconded by a serious illness, induced him to become a monk.
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  • He was brought to Canterbury, possibly by Becket, together with a supply of books upon the civil law, to act as counsel (causidicus) to Archbishop Theobald in his struggle, which ended successfully in 1146, to obtain the transfer of the legateship from the bishop of Winchester to himself.
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  • Returning to Oxford, he was elected a fellow of Merton College, and was ordained; and in 1833 he was presented to the rectory of Lavington-with-Graffham in Sussex by Mrs Sargent, whose granddaughter Caroline he married on the 7th of November 1833, the ceremony being performed by the bride's brother-in-law, Samuel Wilberforce, afterwards bishop of Oxford and of Winchester.
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  • In November 1683, some months after the death of the first earl, his father entered him at Winchester as a warden's boarder.
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  • Being shy and constantly taunted with the opinions and fate of his grandfather, he appears to have been rendered miserable by his schoolfellows, and to have left Winchester in 1686 for a course of foreign travel.
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  • He entered the university of Virginia in his seventeenth year and was one of its first graduates; he then studied law at the Winchester (Va.) Law School, and in 1830 was admitted to the bar.
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  • His chief enemies were the higher ecclesiastics, headed by William of Wykeham, bishop of Winchester, who had been excluded from power in 1371.
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  • Escaping by way of Strassburg he found an asylum in England, where he was made a prebendary of Canterbury, received a pension from Edward VI.'s privy purse, and composed his chief work, A Trajedy or Dialogue of the unjust usurped Primacy of the Bishop of Rome (1549) This remarkable performance, originally written in Latin, is extant only in the translation of John Ponet, bishop of Winchester, a splendid specimen of nervous English.
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  • The town is the seat of the Kentucky Wesleyan College (co-educational; Methodist Episcopal, South), opened in 1866, and of the Winchester Trades and Industrial School (1900).
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  • Winchester is in an agricultural, lumbering and stock-raising region, and has various manufactures.
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  • St Michael's contains a Norman font of black marble, comparable with that in Winchester Cathedral.
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  • Southampton gives name to a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of Winchester.
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  • In medieval times Southampton owed its importance to the fact that it was the chief port of Winchester.
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  • The rise of London as a port, the prohibition of the export of wool, the loss of the Winchester market after the suppression of the monastic institutions, and the withdrawal of the court led to the gradual decline of trade from the 16th century onwards until railway facilities and the opening of new dockyards gave Southampton the position it holds to-day.
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  • In 1618 he attended the synod of Dort, and was soon after made dean of the Chapel Royal and translated to Winchester, a diocese which he administered with loving prudence and the highest success.
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  • In 1851 he established his fame as a philologist by The Study of Words, originally delivered as lectures to the pupils of the Diocesan Training School, Winchester.
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  • To this old track the name of " pilgrims' way " has been given, for along it passed the stream of pilgrims coming through Winchester from the south and west of England and from the continent of Europe by way of Southampton to Canterbury Cathedral to view the place of the martyrdom of Thomas Becket, in the north transept, to the relics in the crypt where he was first buried after his murder, in 1170, and the shrine in the Trinity Chapel which rose above his tomb after the translation of the body in 1220.
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  • The principal villages, towns and places near or through which the way passed are as follow: Winchester, Alresvord, Ropley, Alton, Farnham (here the way follows the present main road), Seale, Puttenham, by the ruined chapel of St Catherine, outside Guildford, near where the road crosses the Wey above Shalford,' and by the chapel of St Martha, properly of " the martyr," now restored and used as a church, Albury, Shere, Gomshall, Dorking (near here the Mole is crossed), along the southern slope of Boxhill to Reigate, then through Gatton Park, Merstham, Otford, Wrotham, after which the Medway was crossed, Burham, past the megalithic monument Kit's Coty House, and the site of Boxley Abbey, the oldest after Waverley Abbey of Cistercian houses in England, and famous for its miraculous image of the infant saint Rumbold, and the still more famous winking rood or crucifix.
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  • This road, although its name of the Pilgrims' Way has for long confined it to the road by which the pilgrims came to Canterbury from Winchester, follows a far older track.
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  • It was in early times abandoned for the road from Winchester to which the stream of travel and commerce from the Continent and the south and south-west of England was diverted.
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  • Within six months Story was drowned, but his brother-in-law, Jonas Winchester, took his place in the firm.
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  • On the 2nd of March 1834, Greeley and Winchester issued the first number of The New Yorker, a weekly literary and news paper, the firm then supposing itself to be worth about $3000.
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  • The Epistle attracted considerable notice, and a reply was written by Thomas Cooper, bishop of Winchester, under the title An Admonition to the People of England, but this was too long and too dull to appeal to the same class of readers as the Marprelate pamphlets, and produced little effect.
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  • He was educated at Rugby and at Winchester, and in 1830 went into residence in the university of Oxford as a scholar of Trinity College.
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  • He found in London a circle of learned friends through whom he was introduced to William Warham, archbishop of Canterbury, Richard Foxe, bishop of Winchester and other dignitaries.
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  • He spent a year at Antwerp in the house of Isaac Walton's friend, George Morley, who afterwards became bishop of Winchester.
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  • He was an active visitor of Eton and Winchester, and endowed the grammar school at Reading, where he was himself educated.
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  • In England, the two great schools of Winchester (1382) and Eton (1440) had been founded during the life of Vittorino, but before the revival had reached Britain.
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  • Locke, who had been educated at Winchester and had lectured on Greek at Oxford (1660), nevertheless almost completely eliminated Greek from the scheme which he unfolded in his Thoughts on Education (1693).
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  • During the rest of the century the leading landmarks are the three royal commissions known by the names of their chairmen: (1) Lord Clarendon's on nine public schools, Eton, Winchester, Westminster, Charterhouse, Harrow, Rugby, Shrewsbury, St Paul's and Merchant Taylors' (1861-1864), resulting in the Public Schools Act of 1868; (2) Lord Taunton's on 782 endowed schools (1864-1867), followed by the act of 1869; and (3) Mr Bryce's on secondary education (1894-1895).
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  • He served as archdeacon of Lincoln, canon of York and dean of the court of arches before 1323, when he became bishop of Winchester, an appointment which was made during his visit to Pope John XXII.
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  • The victor quickly turned upon Banks, destroyed his garrison of Front Royal and nearly surrounded his main body; barely escaping, Banks was again defeated at Winchester and driven back to the Maryland border (May 23-25).
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  • The first encounter took place on the Opequan near Winchester.
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  • Previously, the standard bushel used was known as the "Winchester bushel," so named from the standard being kept in the town hall at Winchester; it contained 2150.42 cub.
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  • The cities 'of Kentucky which in 1900 had a population of more than 5000 were: Louisville (pop. in 1900, 204,731); Covingto`t (42,938); Newport (28,301); Lexington (26,369); Paducah (19,446); Owensboro (13,189); Henderson (10,272); Frankfort, the capital (9487); Bowling Green (8226); Hopkinsville (7280); Ashland (6800); Maysville (6423); Bellevue (6332); Dayton (6104), and Winchester (5964).
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  • In 1572, however, the marquess of Winchester, who had been lord high treasurer under Edward, Mary and Elizabeth, died, and Burghley succeeded to his post.
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  • As the marquess of Winchester said of himself, he was sprung from the willow rather than the oak, and he was not the man to suffer for convictions.
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  • He was opposed by the legate Pandulf (1218-1221), who claimed the guardianship of the kingdom for the Holy See; by the Poitevin Peter des Roches, bishop of Winchester, who was the young king's tutor; by the foreign mercenaries of John, among whom Falkes de Breaute took the lead; and by the feudal party under the earls of Chester and Albemarle.
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  • Finally in 1227, Hubert having proclaimed the king of age, dismissed the bishop of Winchester from his tutorship.
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  • He then travelled abroad during 1833-1834, and after a year's work as tutor at Christ Church (1834-1835) was appointed second master at Winchester.
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  • In England the Saxon standards were kept at Winchester before A.D.
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  • It includes Dr Andrewes, afterwards bishop of Winchester, who was familiar with Hebrew, Chaldee, Syriac, Greek, Latin and at least ten other languages, while his knowledge of patristic literature was unrivalled; Dr Overall, regius professor of theology and afterwards bishop of Norwich; Bedwell, the greatest Arabic scholar of Europe; Sir Henry Savile, the most learned layman of his time; and, to say nothing of others well known to later generations, nine who were then or afterwards professors of Hebrew or of Greek at Oxford or Cambridge.
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  • After holding a curacy at Exbury in Hampshire, he became rector of St Thomas's, Winchester (1843), rector of Helmingham, Suffolk (1844), vicar of Stradbroke (1861), honorary canon of Norwich (1872), and dean of Salisbury (1880); but before taking this office was advanced to the new see of Liverpool, where he remained until his resignation, which took place three months before his death at Lowestoft on the 10th of June 1900.
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  • In this he failed, and Henry was crowned in Paris on the 17th of December 1431 by Henry Beaufort, cardinal bishop of Winchester, assisted by the bishops of Beauvais and Noyon.
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  • Like the hall in the castle at Winchester, and Westminster Hall, as originally built, it was divided by 18 pillars and arches, with 3 aisles.
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  • Edred died on the 23rd of November 955 at Frome, in Somersetshire, and was buried in the old minster at Winchester.
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  • This was the earliest Cistercian house in England, founded in 1128 by William Gifford, bishop of Winchester.
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  • Farnham Castle, on a hill north of the town, the seat of the bishops of Winchester, was first built by Henry de Blois, bishop of Winchester, and brother of King Stephen; but it was razed by Henry III.
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  • Waller; and having been dismantled, it was restored by George Morley, bishop of Winchester (1662-1684).
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  • Though there is evidence of an early settlement in the neighbourhood, the town of Farnham (Ferneham) seems to have grown up round the castle of the bishops of Winchester, who possessed the manor at the Domesday Survey.
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  • In 1205 Farnham had bailiffs, and in 1207 it was definitely a mesne borough under the bishops of Winchester.
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  • He served throughout the war, distinguished himself particularly at South Mountain, Winchester, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek, and by successive promotions became a brigadier-general of volunteers and, by brevet, a major-general of volunteers.
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  • Hoadly, being not unskilled in the art of flattery, was translated in 1721 to the see of Hereford, in 1723 to Salisbury and in 1734 to Winchester.
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  • But the title of regent was given by the loyal barons to William Marshal, the aged earl of Pembroke; and Peter des Roches, the Poitevin bishop of Winchester, received the charge of the king's person.
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  • The prelate has always been the bishop of Winchester; the chancellor was formerly the bishop of Salisbury, but is now the bishop of Oxford; the registrarship and the deanery of Windsor have been united since the reign of Charles I.; the king of arms, whose duties were in the beginning discharged by Windsor herald, is Garter Principal King of Arms; and the usher is the gentleman usher of the Black Rod.
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  • On the 22nd of January 1813, at Frenchtown, the American troops under Winchester surrendered to a British and Indian force under Procter.
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  • Winchester is served by the southern division of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected with Boston, Arlington, Medford, Stoneham and Woburn by electric lines.
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  • Through the centre of the township winds the Aberjona river, which empties into Mystic Pond, in Winchester township, both favourite resorts for canoeing, &c. Wedge Pond and Winter Pond, in the centre of the township, are clear and beautiful sheets of water.
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  • The streets of Winchester are heavily shaded, the view as presented from the neighbouring hills being that of a continuous forest stretching from the beautiful Mystic Valley parkway (of the Metropolitan park system), of which more than one-half (50.2 acres) is in the southern part of the township, to the Middlesex Fells Reservation (another Metropolitan park), of which 261.9 acres are in the eastern part; and there are a large public playground and a common.
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  • The town-hall and library building is a fine structure; the library contains about 20,000 volumes, and the museum and collections of the Winchester Historical and Genealogical Society.
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  • Winchester was originally within the limits of Charlestown.
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  • His reign was marked by two serious attacks on the part of the Danes, who destroyed Winchester in 860, in spite of the resistance of the ealdormen Osric and Æthelwulf with the levies of Hampshire and Berkshire, while in 865 they treacherously ravaged Kent.
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  • The total Federal loss (including the garrisons at Winchester and Martinsburg) amounted to 44 killed (the commander was mortally wounded), 12,520 prisoners, and 13,000 small arms. For this terrible loss to the Union army the responsibility seems to have been General Halleck's, though the blame was officially put on Colonel Miles, who died immediately after the surrender.
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  • In 1129 he was given the bishopric of Winchester and allowed to hold his abbey in conjunction with it.
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  • He even contemplated the erection of a new province, with Winchester as its centre, which was to be independent of Canterbury.
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  • He built, among other castles, that of Farnham; and he began the hospital of St Cross at Winchester.
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  • A has inserted a number of Winchester entries, which prove that A is a Winchester book.
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  • He became a close friend of Anselm, aided the first Cistercians to settle in England, and restored Winchester cathedral with great magnificence.
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  • Beaufort, however, gradually retired from public life, and after witnessing the conclusion of the treaty of Troyes died at Wolvesey palace, Winchester, on the 10th of April 1447.
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  • He was buried in Winchester cathedral, the building of which he finished.
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  • He also refounded and enlarged the hospital of St Cross near Winchester.
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  • He was educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford, and after some years as a schoolmaster was appointed tutor of Christ Church, Oxford, in 1891, and official student in 1893.
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  • Lander's division; he was in command on the Federal side at Winchester (23 March 1862) and at Port Republic (9 June); and in March 1863 he resigned his commission.
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  • Ten members are appointed for the diocese of London, six for each of the dioceses of Winchester, Rochester, Lichfield and Worcester; and four for each of the remaining dioceses.
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  • In November 1531 the king rewarded him for his services with the bishopric of Winchester, vacant by Wolsey's death.
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  • He lies buried in his own cathedral at Winchester, where his effigy is still to be seen.
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  • Among beautiful specimens of carved stalls may be mentioned the Early Decorated stalls in Winchester Cathedral, the Early Perpendicular ones in Lincoln Minster, and the early 15th-century canopies in Norwich Cathedral.
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  • This consummated Fox's work in the north, and in 1501 he was once more translated to Winchester, then reputed the richest bishopric in England.
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  • Fox replied with some warmth, and Wolsey had to wait until Fox's death before he could add Winchester to his archbishopric of York and his abbey of St Albans, and thus leave Durham vacant as he hoped for the illegitimate son on whom (aged 18) he had already conferred a deanery, four archdeaconries, five prebends and a chancellorship.
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  • Originally he intended it as an Oxford house for the monks of St Swithin's, Winchester; but he is said to have been dissuaded by Bishop Oldham, who denounced the monks and foretold their fall.
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  • Monumental works, such as his statue of Queen Victoria at Winchester and his work at Windsor, may be handed down as his greatest achievements, but judged as art metal-work, his smaller productions, such as the centrepiece presented by the army and navy to Queen Victoria on her Jubilee, have been more important.
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  • He had been educated at Winchester, and became rector of the Jesuits' College in Goa.
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  • About two years later he was appointed chaplain to the king and master of the hospital of St Cross, Winchester.
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  • There are also no surveys of London, Winchester and some other towns.
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  • Domesday Book was originally preserved in the royal treasury at Winchester (the Norman kings' capital), whence it speaks of itself (in' one later addition) as Liber de Wintonia.
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  • McKinley was promoted first lieutenant in February 1864, and for his services at Winchester was promoted captain on the 25th of July 1864.
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  • The victories of the Opequan, or Winchester (September 19), Fisher's Hill (September 22) and Cedar Creek (October 19), produced great elation in the North and corresponding depression in the Confederacy, and Sheridan was made successively brigadier-general U.S.A. for Fisher's Hill and major-general U.S.A. for Cedar Creek.
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  • Educated at Tiverton and Winchester, he graduated at Oxford (Christ Church) in 1821, and after holding an incumbency in Coventry, 1829-1837, and in Leeds, 1837-1859, was nominated dean of Chichester by Lord Derby.
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  • He was educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford, being elected in 1888 to a fellowship at his own college.
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  • By a treaty of the 19th of October 1818, negotiated by General Andrew Jackson and General Isaac Shelby, the Chickasaws ceded all their claims east of the Mississippi, and early in 1819 Memphis was laid out in accordance with an agreement entered into by John Overton (1766-1833), Andrew Jackson and James Winchester (1752-1826), the proprietors of the land.
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  • He offered him the sees of York or Winchester, and kept them vacant for ten months for his acceptance.
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  • In 1483 he was chosen bishop of St Davids; in 1485 he was made bishop of Salisbury and provost of Queen's College, Oxford, and he became bishop of Winchester in 1493.
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  • In 1043 he was consecrated bishop of Elmham and in 1047 was translated to Winchester; he supported Earl Godwine in his quarrel with Edward the Confessor, and in 1052 arranged the peace between the earl and the king.
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  • In 1070 he was deposed by the papal legates and was imprisoned at Winchester, where he died, probably on the 22nd of February 107 2.
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  • Stigand was an avaricious man and a great pluralist, holding the bishopric of Winchester after he became archbishop of Canterbury, in addition to several abbeys.
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  • In 577 he led the West Saxons from Winchester towards the Severn valley; gained an important victory over some British kings at Deorham, and added the district round Gloucester, Bath and Cirencester to his kingdom.
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  • He was educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford, where he had a distinguished career, taking a first class in Literae Humaniores in 1869.
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  • He was reconciled to Stephen in 1142 and restored to his see; but he now became involved in a quarrel with the powerful Henry of Winchester.
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  • Henry of Winchester, who can have had little sympathy with bishops of Nigel's type, took up their quarrel, and Nigel was forced to go to Rome.
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  • In February 1679 the king had consented to order James to go abroad, and even approved of the attempt of the primate and the bishop of Winchester to convert him to Protestantism.
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  • His education at Winchester, no doubt in the Great Grammar school or High school in Minster Street, was paid for by some patron unnamed by the biographer, perhaps Sir Ralph Sutton, who is named first by Wykeham among his benefactors to be prayed for by his colleges.
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  • That he was, as stated by Archdeacon Thomas Martin, the author of a Life of Wykeham, published in 1597, taught classics, French and geometry by a learned Frenchman on the site of Winchester College, is a guess due to Wykeham's extant letters being in French and to the assumption that he was an architect.
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  • After some unspecified secular employment, Wykeham became "under-notary (vice tabellio) to a certain squire, constable of Winchester Castle," probably Robert of Popham, sheriff of Hampshire, appointed constable on the 25th of April 1340, not as commonly asserted Sir John Scures, the lord of Wykeham, who was not a squire but a knight, and had held the office from 1321, though, from Scures being named as second of his benefactors, Wykeham perhaps owed this appointment to his influence.
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  • These lands were afterwards bought by Wykeham and given to Winchester College.
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  • The inscription, "This made Wykeham," did exist on a small square tower in the Middle Bailey formerly known as Wykeham Tower, now entirely rebuilt with the inscription recopied and known as Winchester Tower.
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  • While in1353-1354£1440 and in 1 3551 35 6 £747 was expended under the supervision of Robert of Bernham, in1357-1358£867 was spent by Wykeham, including Winchester Tower.
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  • He was chief mason for Wykeham's works at Winchester Cathedral and for Winchester College, where his portrait may be seen in the east window of the chapel, and where his contract with the clerk of the works, an ex-scholar of the college, for the building of the outer gate, is still preserved.
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  • On the 7th of October 1366, William Edingdon, the treasurer of England and bishop of Winchester, died; on the 13th of October Wykeham was recommended by the king to the chapter of monks of St Swithun's cathedral priory and elected bishop.
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  • Next year he began buying lands in Upsomborne, Hants, which he gave to Winchester College, and in Oxford, which he gave to New College.
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  • Meonstoke Perrers, part of the endowment of Winchester College, was certainly bought on the 12th of June 1380 from Sir William Windsor, her husband, whose name seems to be derived from Windsor, near Southampton water.
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  • He then set to work to buy endowments for Winchester and New Colleges.
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  • The foundation of Winchester was begun with a bull of Pope Urban VI.
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  • The severance of the school which was to feed the college exclusively, placing it not at Oxford, but at Winchester, and constituting it a separate college, was a new departure of great importance in the history of education.
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  • They state that the colleges were provided to repair the ravages caused by the Black Deaths in the ranks of the clergy, and for the benefit of those whose parents could not without help maintain them at the universities, and the names of the boys appointed by Wykeham and in his time show that "poor and indigent" meant the younger sons of the gentry, and the sons of yeomen, citizens of Winchester or London, and the middle classes generally, who needed the help of exhibitions.
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  • He now showed that he had not by his charities wronged his relations by settling on his greatnephew and heir Thomas Wykeham, whom he had educated at Winchester and New College, Broughton Castle and estates, still held by his descendants in the female line, the family of Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes (peerage of Saye and Sele).
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  • The extraordinary comings and goings of strangers to Winchester College, just opposite the gates of the bishop's palace at Wolvesey in 1399, suggest that he took part in the revolution of Henry IV.
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  • His effigy in the cathedral chantry and a bust on the groining of the muniment tower at Winchester college are no doubt authentic portraits.
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  • The pictures at Winchester and New College are late 16th-century productions.
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  • In the year 991 he was associated with archbishop Sigeric in the conclusion of a peace with the victorious Danes from Maldon, and in 994 he was sent with Bishop 2Elfheah (Alphege) of Winchester to make peace with Olaf at Andover.
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  • In view of the necessity for increasing the episcopate in the 19th century and the objection to the consequent increase of the spiritual peers in the Upper House, it was finally enacted by the Bishoprics Act of 1878 that only the archbishops and the bishops of London, Winchester and Durham should be always entitled to writs summoning them to the House of Lords.
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  • Under this act the coadjutor bishop has the right of succession to the see, or in the case of the archiepiscopal sees and those of London, Winchester and Durham, to the see vacated by the bishop, translated from another diocese to fill the vacancy.
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  • In the autumn he operated in the Shenandoah Valley, and with Early was defeated by Sheridan at Winchester on the 19th of September.
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  • In 1885 a difficulty as to the relation of his mission to Holy Trinity parish, Stepney, led to his resignation, and he next accepted the charge of St Agatha's, Landport, the Winchester College mission.
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  • In 1885 he again resigned, owing to the bishop of Winchester's refusal to sanction the extreme ritual used in the service at St Agatha's.
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  • With the German and other invaders were 1000 English archers, bodyguard to Henry Beaufort, bishop of Winchester, who took part in the crusade as papal legate.
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  • His one public appearance was made at the council of Winchester (1141),(1141), in which the clergy declared for the empress Matilda.
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  • Sir Robert Walpole's residence was extant till 1810; and till 1824 the bishops of Winchester had a palace in Cheyne Walk.
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  • In January 1813 the inhabitants, fearing destruction from the British and their Indian allies, pleaded to the Americans for protection, and about 660 men from the army of General James Winchester (1752-1826), sent from the rapids of the Maumee river, on the 18th of January drove a small British force from the village.
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  • Proctor (1787-1859) with a force of British and Indians surprised the Americans, defeated their right wing, captured General Winchester and obtained from him an order for the surrender of his entire force.
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  • Winchester is served by the Baltimore & Ohio and the Cumberland Valley railways.
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  • The Handley library (1910), a memorial to John Handley, a part of whose estate was bequeathed to establish industrial schools for the poor of Winchester, and an auditorium are owned by the municipality.
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  • The United States National Military Cemetery at Winchester contains the graves of 4480 Union soldiers, 2382 of them unknown, and adjoining it is the Confederate Stonewall Cemetery, with about 8000 graves.
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  • The Virginia Gazette and Winchester Advertiser, the first newspaper published in the Shenandoah Valley, was established here in 1787.
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  • Winchester was chartered as a city in 1852 and in 1906 the corporate limits were enlarged.
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  • In 1830 he was presented by Bishop Sumner of Winchester to the rectory of Brightstone in the Isle of Wight.
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  • In November 1839 he was installed archdeacon of Surrey, in August 1840 was collated canon of Winchester and in October he accepted the rectory of Alverstoke.
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  • After twenty-four years' labour in the diocese of Oxford, he was translated by Gladstone to the bishopric of Winchester.
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  • Of the few towns in the Chalk country, the interest of which is largely historical or scholastic, Salisbury, Winchester, Marlborough and Cambridge are the most distinguished.
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  • The Demon of Tedworth, the Black Dog of Winchester and the Padfoot of Wakefield all shared the characteristics of the Barghest of York.
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  • He was a Federalist representative in Congress in 1797-1799, and died in Winchester, Virginia, on the 6th of July 1802.
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  • He was educated at Winchester and Christ Church, Oxford, where he obtained a first class in literae humaniores.
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  • Close to the neighbouring village of Old Basing are remains of Basing House, remarkable as the scene of the stubborn opposition of John, fifth marquess of Winchester, to Cromwell, by whom it was taken after a protracted siege in 1645.
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  • An estate of the value of -L200 a year was settled on the boy, and he was sent in succession to a private school at Hyde, Abbey near Winchester, to Eton in 1781, and to Christchurch, Oxford, in 1787.
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  • Ordained in July 1840 by the bishop of Winchester, he at once entered on ministerial work in that city, and during his ministry there and under the influence of the missionaries Henry Martyn and David Brainerd, whose lives he studied, he carried devotional asceticism to an injurious length.
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  • He had some connexion with the Channel Islands, and resided for some time in Jersey; and he held livings in Yorkshire and in Leicestershire before he became archdeacon of Winchester in 1387.
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  • Seeing his opportunity, Henry left his brothers body unburied, rode straight off to Winchester with a handful of companions, and seized the royal treasure.
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  • Twice in every year the sheriffs and other royal officials came up to the exchequer court, which originally sat at Winchester, with their bags of money and their sheaves of accounts.
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  • The citizens of London welcomed him, but he was not secure of his success till by a swift swoop on Winchester he obtained possession of the royal treasurean all-important factor in a crisis, as Henry I.
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  • At Winchester he was acknowledged as king by the bishop, his own brother Henry of Blois, and by the great justiciar, Roger, bishop of Salisbury, and the archbishop, William of Corbeil.
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  • This threw the whole church party on to the side of Matilda; even Henry, bishop of Winchester, the kings own brother, disowned him and passed over to the other side.
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  • She was hailed as a sovereign by a great assembly at Winchester, over which Stephens own brother Bishop Henry presided (April 7, 1141) and entered London in triumph in June.
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  • Their army drove the lately triumphant party out of Winchester, and captured its military chief, Robert, earl of Gloucester.
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  • The king abode for no more than three months in England; he got himself recrowned at Winchester, apparently to wipe out the stain of his German captivity and of an enforced homage which the emperor had extorted from him.
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  • He proceeded to fill the vacancy with a mere Poitevin adventurer, Peter des Roches, whom he had made bishop of Winchester some time before.
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  • At Lincoln, on the 20th of May 1217, the marshal completely defeated an Anglo-French army commanded by the count of Perche and the earls of Winchester and Hereford.
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  • There was first his Poitevin chancellor, Peter des Roches, bishop of Winchester, with a numerous band of his relations and dependents.
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  • Henry secured great English marriages for three of them, and made the fourth, Aymer, bishop of Winchester.
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  • The great group of statutes that date from Edwards earlier years ends with the legislative enactments of 1285, the Second Statute of Westminster and the Statute of Winchester.
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  • The Statute of Winchester, the other great legislative act of 1285, was mainly concerned with the keeping of the peace of the realm.
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  • Among the leaders of this agitation were the clerical ministers whom John of Gaunt had expelled from office in 1371, and chiefly William of Wykeham, bishop of Winchester, the late chancellor; they were helped by Edmund Mortimer, earl of March, a personal enemy of Lancaster, and could count on the assistance of the prince of Wales when he was well enough to take a part in politics.
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  • In Winchester, London, St Albans, Canterbury, Bury, Beverley, Scarborough and many other places the rioting was as violent as in the countryside.
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  • The tiresome and monotonous domestic history of England during the next twenty years consisted of little else than quarrels between Gloucester and the lords of the council, of whom the chief was the dukes halfuncle Henry Beaufort, bishop of Winchester, the last to survive of all the sons of John of Gaunt.
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  • The best-known names among his servants were his great chancellor, Archbishop Morton, Foxe, bishop of Winchester, Sir Reginald Bray, and the lawyers Empson and Dudley.
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  • Like so many of his predecessors he had risen from the lower middle classes, through the royal road of the church; he had served Henry VII.s old councillor Foxe, bishop of Winchester, as secretary, and from his household had passed into that of his master.
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  • The first lay ministry since Edward the Confessors time came into office; Sir Thomas More became lord chancellor, and Anne Boleyns father lord privy seal; the only prominent cleric who remained in office was Stephen Gardiner, who succeeded Wolsey as bishop of Winchester.
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  • Educated at Winchester, he obtained a cadetship in the Bengal infantry in 1842, and served through the second Burmese War.
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  • Magdalen College school was founded in 3447 by William of Waynflete, bishop of Winchester, bearing the name of his great college at Oxford.
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  • The Roman road from Winchester to Bath skirts the south side of Silbury Hill.
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  • Subsequently both dioceses were merged in the vast West-Saxon bishopric of Dorchester, the see of which was afterwards transferred to Winchester, and by Bishop Remigius in 1072 to Lincoln.
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  • Woburn is served by the southern division of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected with Burlington, Lexington, Reading, Stoneham, Wilmington, Winchester, Arlington, Boston and Lowell by electric railways.
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  • It then included a large part of the present Winchester and the greater part of the present Wilmington and Burlington, separately organized in 1730 and 1799 respectively.
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  • Although totally immersed in secular business he received several rich ecclesiastical offices, and in May 1173 he was elected bishop of Winchester, being consecrated at Canterbury in October 1174.
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  • He died on the 21st or 22nd of December 1188, and was buried in Winchester cathedral.
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  • Educated at Exeter College, Oxford, Peter became dean of Windsor, then dean of Exeter; in 1478 bishop of Exeter; and in 1487 bishop of Winchester in succession to William of Waynflete.
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  • The manor of Witney (Wyttineye, Wytnay, Wytney) was held by the see of Winchester before the Conquest.
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  • In the middle of the 18th century it was leased by the bishop of Winchester to the duke of Marlborough.
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  • The government was by the steward and bailiffs of the bishop of Winchester, assisted by constables, wardmen and other officers.
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  • In 1231 the bishop of Winchester received a grant of a five days' fair at Witney at the feast of St Leonard.
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  • A further grant of two yearly fairs was made in 1414 to the bishop of Winchester at his manor of Witney, namely, on the vigil and day of St Clement the Pope, and at the feast of St Barnabas.
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  • In 705, or perhaps earlier, Haddi, bishop of Winchester, died, and the diocese was divided into two parts.
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  • Augustine's at Canterbury, and to those of Winchester, to wear the pileus in choir.
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  • The king's corpse was carried to Winchester, and was honorably interred by the said abbot Dunstan, in the Old Monastery.
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  • As you can see, I can wax lyrical about Winchester Cathedral on purely architectural and historical grounds.
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  • Winchester A paradise for shopping connoisseurs, Winchester boasts a tempting array of independent shops, boutiques and art galleries in scenic settings.
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  • In the years before Hampshire's county lunatic asylum existed, the Winchester workhouse provided care for " lunatic and mentally handicapped paupers " .
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  • Winchester In 1963, the Winchester MkI was the first taxicab to feature fiberglass bodywork.
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  • The quiet last hour on all the markets except Winchester (where its nice to get a breather ).
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  • Claire Winchester did.
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  • Realizing it check says graeme adams insurance Claire winchester.
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  • It is one of two surviving fortified gateways in Winchester.
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  • A little closer to home, some antique dealers in the Winchester area are using very high-pressure tactics.
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  • Head to the center of Winchester and see legendary King Arthur's Round Table.
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  • The fireplace was removed from a large detached mock tudor property in Winchester and came with an Edwardian painted fruitwood mantel.
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  • They recognized its unique location on the river Itchen and established an offshoot from Winchester.
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  • He wrote to the Bishop of Winchester who went to the King and obtained a pardon for Marbeck.
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  • He was also presented to the Rectory of Alton, and became a prebendary of Winchester.
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  • A double quadrangle can still seen today at the Hospital of St Cross at Winchester.
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  • In Stockbridge, which is 8 miles from Winchester, Robert Earl of Gloucester, was fighting a skirmish.
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  • Later he was a musician with the somewhat unconventional City Morris in Winchester.
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  • As archbishop he seems to have been somewhat arbitrary, and his action led to a serious quarrel with Bishop Foxe of Winchester and others in 1512.
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  • He must have come from Winchester College in one of the earliest batches of scholars from that college, the sole feeder of New College, not from St John Baptist College, Winchester, as guessed by Dr William Hunt in the Dict.
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  • On the 31st of August 1407 Guy Mone (he is always so spelt and not Mohun, and was probably from one of the Hampshire Meons; there was a John Mone of Havant admitted a Winchester scholar in 1397), bishop of St David's, died, and on the 12th of October 1407 Chicheley was by the pope provided to the bishopric of St David's.
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  • Chicheley was tenacious of the privileges of his see, and this involved him in a constant struggle with Henry Beaufort, bishop of Winchester.
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  • Meanwhile, our Waynflete had become headmaster of Winchester; Mr William Wanneflete being paid 50s.
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  • For three of them were admitted scholars of King's College, Cambridge, on the rcith of July, that college, by its second charter of the 10th of July 1443 having been placed in the same relation to Eton that New College bore to Winchester; i.e.
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  • So greatly did Waynflete ingratiate himself with Henry that when Beaufort, bishop of Winchester, Henry's uncle, died on the iith of April 1447, the same day Henry wrote to the chapter of Winchester, the prior and monks of St Swithin's cathedral, to elect Waynflete as his successor.
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  • Subsequent visits to Winchester inspired Henry with the idea of rebuilding Eton church on cathedral dimensions.
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  • Biog.) that this was due to some disturbances at Winchester (Proc. P.C. vi.
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  • He died on the r rth of May 1486, and was buried in the chantry chapel of St Mary Magdalen behind the high altar in Winchester cathedral, which he had erected in his lifetime.
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  • From her tuition he passed to that of Dr Griffiths, at Warminster, in Wiltshire, in 1803; and in 1807 he was removed to Winchester, where he remained until 1811, having entered as a commoner, and afterwards become a scholar of the college.
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  • From Winchester he removed to Oxford in 1811, where he became a scholar at Corpus Christi College; in 1815 he was elected fellow of Oriel College; and there he continued to reside until 1819.
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  • He then resided for a time in the house of a physician at Winchester; the physician did as little as the mineral waters; and, after a further trial of Bath, he once more returned to Putney, and made a last futile attempt to study at Westminster.
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  • Not to recur again to his labours, it may be said here that between 1821 and 1828 he published at Winchester, in eleven volumes, an enlarged edition of his original work, entitling it A General History of Birds; but his defects as a compiler, which had been manifest before, rather increased with age, and the consequences were not happy.'
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  • Metrical doxologies are often sung at the end of hymns, and the term has become especially associated with the stanza beginning "Praise God from whom all blessings flow," with which Thomas Ken, bishop of Winchester, concluded his morning and evening hymns.
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  • The planters in the Black Patch had met a combination of the buyers by forming a pool, the Planters' Protective Association, into which 40,000 growers were forced by " night-riding " and other forms of coercion and persuasion, and had thus secured an advance to I I cents a pound from the "regie " buyers and had shown the efficacy of pooling methods in securing better prices for the tobacco crop. Following their example, the planters of the Burley formed the Burley Tobacco Society, a Burley pool, with headquarters at Winchester and associated with the American Society of Equity, which promoted in general the pooling of different crops throughout the country.
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  • He was a brilliant classical scholar, and a famous cricketer and athlete; he was in the Harrow cricket eleven in the first regular matches with Eton (1822) and Winchester (1825), and is credited with bringing about the first Oxford and Cambridge match in 1827, and the first university boat-race in 1828, in both of which he took part.
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  • Among the many difficulties which beset the question, not the least obvious was the length of time during which the Church must remain without a ruler, if - as Sigismund and the German nation demanded - the papal election were deferred till the completion of the internal reforms. The result was decided by the policy of the cardinals, who since May 1417 had openly devoted their whole energies to the acceleration of that election; and union was preserved by means of a compromise arranged by Bishop Henry of Winchester, the uncle of the English king.
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  • P. Winchester of Watertown, who left to the township a legacy for municipal works.
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  • His reign was marked by two serious attacks on the part of the Danes, who destroyed Winchester in 860, in spite of the resistance of the ealdormen Osric and Æthelwulf with the levies of Hampshire and Berkshire, while in 865 they treacherously ravaged Kent.
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  • David was born in a commune in Winchester, Virginia.
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  • The couple plans to marry at Winchester Mansion in San Jose on August 11, 2011.
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  • Winchester House: Owner Sarah Winchester reported seeing ghosts throughout the mansion for years.
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  • The Winchester brothers destroy her when they shatter her mirror with her inside.
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  • One of the most famous haunted houses, the Winchester House, pays constant homage to the number 13 with steps and doors leading nowhere for the confusion of the spirits.
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  • The Winchester Mystery House is a well-know ladmark in San Jose, California.
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  • The house was built by Sarah Winchester, heiress by marriage to the Winchester gun empire.
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  • Many people report sightings of spirits or unusual and unexplained occurrences in the house particularly centered around Sarah Winchester's bedroom, the Hall of Fires and the Seance Room.
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  • Tours of the Winchester Mystery House are available every day except for Christmas Day.
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  • There are a lot of tales on the Internet about well-known haunted houses like the Whaley House in San Diego, California and the Winchester House in San Jose, California.
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  • Whether you are toting a Winchester or a Nikon, you are on the hunt.
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  • The series relies on the internal mythology of hunters Sam and Dean Winchester as they cross the country in their 67 Chevy Impala hunting down urban legends, demons and monsters.
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  • From the pilot episode on, the series focused on the lives of Sam and Dean Winchester (Jared Padalecki and Jensen Ackles).
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  • Raised by their father John Winchester to be hunters, the boys shared a very abnormal childhood, traveling from town to town while their father hunted monsters.
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  • An old friend and hunting partner to John Winchester, Bobby provides the boys with a safe haven and research support while they are on the road.
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  • John Winchester (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) - John's influence is seen in nearly every story that affects the boys.
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  • Mary Winchester (Samantha Smith) - Despite dying in the opening moments of the series pilot, Mary Winchester has appeared in multiple episodes.
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