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wills

wills

wills Sentence Examples

  • She persisted, and a contest of wills followed.

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  • "He has made wills enough!" quietly remarked the princess.

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  • They had knocked heads and locked wills over the death of a Bird Song guest during the prior January's Ice Climbing Festival when bitter words were exchanged.

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  • Adam Ferguson (Institutes of Moral Philosophy, p. 119, new ed., 1800) argues that " the desire for immortality is an instinct, and can reasonably be regarded as an indication of that which the author of this desire wills to do."

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  • The leading men of the party were Mr Robert O'Hara Burke, an officer of police, and Mr William John Wills, of the Melbourne observatory.

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  • Five days later, Burke, Wills and King had repassed the desert to the place on Cooper's Creek (the Barcoo, S.

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  • Burke, Wills and King, when they found themselves so fearfully left alone and unprovided in the wilderness, wandered about in that district till near the end of June.

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  • At last both Wills and Burke died of starvation.

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  • The bodies of Burke and Wills were recovered and brought to Melbourne for a solemn public funeral, and a noble monument has been erected to their honour.

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  • The legislature at Milan having ventured to alter some details of taxation, Eugene received the following rule of conduct from his step-father: Your system of government is simple: the emperor wills it to be thus.

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  • delegated freedom to human wills; and there follows a theodicy, repeating Leibnitz in more modern form.

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  • Matrimonial matters and those relating to wills and succession (called in Scotland " consistorial " causes) were in 1563 taken from the old bishops' courts and given to " commissaries " appointed by the crown with an appeal to the court of session, which by act 1609, c. 6, was declared the king's great consistory.

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  • It placed the general government, he said, in the absurd position of a "servant of four-and-twenty masters, of different wills and different purposes, and yet bound to obey all."

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  • His great difficulty lay in managing his colleagues, who were, especially Henry Clay and John Quincy Adams, able men of strong wills and jarring tempers.

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  • CAMBRIDGE, a city and the county-seat of Guernsey county, Ohio, U.S.A., on Wills Creek, about 75 m.

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  • (1) Mulk is the absolute property of its owner, and can be disposed of by him as he wills without restrictions, save those enumerated lower down (General Dispositions) as general for all the four classes.

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  • It had probate jurisdiction and wills were registered.

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  • Wills 1 has made successful use of it in a research on the effects of temperature, a matter of great industrial importance.

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  • Wills,' J.

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  • P. Wills - 0.720 at 18° C. Phys.

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  • Wills found that the suceptibility was constant in fields ranging from 4200 to 15,000.

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  • P. Wills (Ann.

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  • Thus his name is associated with the Fines and Recoveries Abolition Act 1833; the Inheritance Act 1833; the Dower Act 1833; the Real Property Limitation Act 1833; the Wills Act 1837; one of the Copyhold Tenure Acts 1841; and the Judgments Act 1838.

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  • Thus a privileged land-tenure was createdbookland; the rules as to the succession of kinsmen were set at nought by concession of testamentary power and confirmations of grants and wills; special exemptions from the jurisdiction of the hundreds and special privileges as to levying fines were conferred.

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  • The archbishop had formerly exclusive jurisdiction in all causes of wills and intestacies, where parties died having personal property in more than one diocese of the province of Canterbury, and he had concurrent jurisdiction in other cases.

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  • The universal or infinite is one that realizes itself in finite particular minds and wills, not as accidents or imperfections of it, but as its essential form.

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  • Washington has a state board consisting of three members appointed by the governor to confer with commissioners from other states upon such matters as marriage and divorce, insolvency, descent and distribution of property, the execution and probate of wills, for the purpose of promoting uniformity of legislation respecting them.

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  • This was supplemented at the third council of Constantinople in 680 by the statement that each of the natures contains a will, so that Christ possesses two wills.

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  • The Appalachian Ridges of the western portion begin with North Mountain on the east and end with Wills Mountain on the west.

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  • He pushes the claim even further, requiring, besides entire outward submission to command, also the complete identification of the place of God, without reference to his personal wisdom, piety or discretion; that any obedience which falls short of making the superior's will one's own, in inward affection as well as in outward effect, is lax aect; that going beyond the letter of command, even in things abstractly good and praiseworthy, is disobedience, and that the "sacrifice of the intellect" is the third and highest grade of obedience, well pleasing to God, when the inferior not only wills what the superior wills, but thinks what he thinks, submitting his judgment, so far as it is possible for the will to influence and lead the judgment.

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  • Each probate court, consisting of a single judge, has jurisdiction within its county of the probate of wills, of the granting of administration, in insolvency proceedings, and in relation to the adoption of children; it may appoint and remove guardians of minors, insane persons and spendthrifts, and, upon application, may change a person's name.

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  • Such considerations help us to understand the enormous importance attached in ancient societies to the right of intermarriage, as also to grasp the origin of wills and testaments.

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  • JOHN FECKENHAM (c. 1515-1584), English ecclesiastic, last abbot of Westminster, was born at Feckenham, Worcestershire, of ancestors who, by their wills, seem to have been substantial yeomen.

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  • Following, however, in the footsteps of Schelling, he idealizes the one extended and thinking substance into one mental being; but he thinks that its essence consists in unconscious intelligence and will, of which all individual intelligent wills are only activities.

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  • Taking, then, will to be the essential thing in itself of which we are conscious, he deduces that we can infer that the psychical things in themselves beyond ourselves are also essentially " wills."

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  • Combining with this the central dogma of Fechner that spirit extends throughout the world of bodily appearance, he concludes that the realities of the world are " wills," that bodies are mere appearances of " wills," and that there is one universal and all-embracing spirit which is " will."

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  • He does not accept the universal voluntarism of Schopenhauer and Hartmann, but believes in individual wills, and a gradation of wills, in the organic world.

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  • In a similar way he supposes our wills are included in the collective will of society.

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  • Thirdly, on the grounds that logical thinking adds the notion of substance, as substrate, to experience of the physical, but not of the psychical, and that the most proper being of mind is will, he concludes that wills are not active substances, but substance-generating activities (" nicht thatige Substanzen sondern substanzerzeugende Thdtigkeiten," System, 429) What kind of metaphysics, then, follows from this compound of psychology and epistemology?

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  • Hence, according to Wundt, the world we know is still unitary experience, distinguished, not separated, into subject and object, aggregates of ideas analysed by judgment and combined by inference, an object of idea elaborated into causes and substances by logical thinking, at most a world of our ideas composed out of our sensations, and arranged under our categories of our understanding by our inner wills, or a world of our ideating wills; but nothing else.

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  • Thus, according to him, in the first place reason forms a cosmological " ideal " of a multitude of simple units related; secondly, it forms a psychological " ideal " of a multitude of wills, or substance-generating activities, which communicate with one another by ideas so that will causes ideas in will, while together they constitute a collective will, and it goes on to form the moral ideal of humanity (das sittliche Menschheitsideal); and, thirdly, it forms an ontological " ideal " of God as ground of this moral " ideal," and therewith of all being as means to this end, and an " ideal " of God as world-will, of which the world is development, and in which individual wills participate each in its sphere.

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  • In connexion with the " idees directrices et organisatrices," supposed by the French physiologist Claude Bernard, and the universal will supposed by German voluntarists, Fouillee concludes that the world is a society of wills.

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  • In the first place, the intuition of causality does not require will at all, because we often perceive one bodily member pressing another involuntarily; a man suffering from lockjaw neither wills nor can avoid feeling the pressure of his upper and lower jaws against one another.

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  • The county officers are sheriffs, coroners, prothonotaries, registers of wills, recorders of deeds, commissioners, treasurers, surveyors, auditors or comptrollers, clerks of the courts, and district attorneys, elected for three years.

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  • granted them return of writs, probate of wills and other privileges.

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  • Benjamin Wills Newton, head of the community there, who had been a fellow of Exeter College, Oxford, was accused of departing from the testimony of the Brethren by reintroducing the spirit of clericalism.

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  • Wills, Wanderings among the High Alps (1856), and The " Eagle's Nest" in the Valley of Sixt (1860); G.

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  • "The different natures and the different persons admit of union in one way alone, namely in the way of a complete agreement in respect of will; and thereby is revealed the One (or Monad) in activity in the case of those (wills) which have coalesced; in the manner described."

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  • He had become an incurable hypochondriac. He said long after that he had been mad all his life, or at least not perfectly sane; and, in truth, eccentricities less strange than his have often been thought ground sufficient for absolving felons and for setting aside wills.

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  • Two wills exist on papyrus of the XIIth Dynasty, but they are isolated, and such are not again found among native documents, though they occur in Greek in the Ptolemaic age.

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  • Behind the great natural phen.omena that they 0th ceived all around them, the Egyptians, like other primitive cha :, postulated the existence of divine wills not dissimilar the dnd to their own, though vastly superior in power.

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  • He wished to bring about the subjection of the church, and to this end sold bishoprics to the highest bidder, annulled the wills made in favour of the bishoprics and abbeys, and sought to impose upon his subjects a rationalistic conception of the Trinity.

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  • The central and organizing principle of this is that knowledge is in genesis, that the genesis takes place in the medium of individual minds, and that this fact implies that there is a necessary reference throughout to interests or purposes of the subject which thinks because it wills and acts.

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  • The truth of this will be apparent if it is considered that the Moral and Political Philosophy admittedly embodies two presuppositions: (I) that "God Almighty wills and wishes the happiness of His creatures," and (2) that adequate motives must be supplied to virtue by a system of future rewards and punishments.

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  • That would bar out for ever all risk of a conflict of clerical wills.

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  • OSCAR O'FLAHERTIE WILLS WILDE (1856-1900), English author, son of Sir William Wilde, a famous Irish surgeon, was born in Dublin on the 15th of October 1856; his mother, Jane Francisca Elgee, was well known in Dublin as a graceful writer of verse and prose, under the pen-name of "Speranza."

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  • To the mob the mob-leader is mysterious in his power of bringing luck and salvation; to himself also he is a wonder, since he wills, and to !

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  • Wills, in his In I/ic Land of the Lion and Sun (1883), iS still worth quoting: The character of the Persian is that of an easy-going man with a wish to make things pleasant generally.

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  • Butler's moral theory, like those of his English contemporaries and successors, is defective from not perceiving that the notion of duty can have real significance only when connected with the will or practical reason, and that only in reason which wills itself have we a principle capable of development into an ethical system.

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  • He acts as a notary public; he draws up marine and commercial protests, attests documents brought to him, and, if necessary, draws up wills, powers of attorney, or conveyances.

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  • The most prominent question which emerged in attempting to define further the person of Christ was whether the will belonged to the nature or the person, or, as it came to be stated, whether Christ had two wills or only one.

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  • The church in the sixth oecumenical council at Constantinople (680) declared that Christ had two wills.

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  • 37), yet leaves their wills free (xxxvii.

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  • God has from eternity chosen those whom He wills to save ("election"), and consequently He has also passed over those whom He leaves to perish ("praeterition").'

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  • The orphans court may be held either by the judge of the court of common pleas or by a justice of the supreme court; and it has jurisdiction over controversies respecting the existence of wills, the fairness of inventories, the right of administration and guardianship, the allowance of accounts to executors, administrators, guardians or trustees, and over suits for the recovery of legacies and distributive shares, but it may refer any matter coming before it to a master in chancery.

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  • The prerogative court, which is presided over by the chancellor as ordinary and surrogate-general, or by a vice-ordinary and vice-surrogate-general, may hear appeals from the orphans' court, and has the authority to grant probate of wills and letters of administration and guardianship, and to hear and determine disputes arising therein.

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  • The main street is a winding thoroughfare named in different parts Thorndon Quay, Lambton Quay, Wills Street and Manners Street.

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  • As regards public law Pufendorf, while recognizing in the state (civitas) a moral person (persona moralis), teaches that the will of the state is but the sum of the individual wills that constitute it, and that this association explains the state.

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  • But he breaks away again when he asserts that God ever wills to do good, and is seeking each lost soul until He find it.

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  • It is true that the precise relation between the activities of human wills and other forms of activity in the natural world is a highly speculative problem and one with which the ordinary man is not immediately concerned.

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  • Is it possible to hold that determinist arguments are of so convincing a character as to enable us to perceive at the moment of action the untrustworthy nature of our consciousness that we are free to choose between alternatives and to grasp beneath the appearance the underlying necessity which rules our wills ?

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  • And though reflection upon conduct may lead us to suppose that our past acts were determined, that desire of pleasure or the wish to avoid pain controlled our wills, the unphilosophical observer interprets, in offenders against morality, such arguments as a mere excuse.

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  • On the other hand we have no such immediate consciousness of the necessity which is said to control our wills.

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  • &c.), which overlook the essential distinction between what is and what ought to be; and even in one or two expressions to overleap this distinction extravagantly, as (e.g.) in saying that the man who " wilfully acts contrary to justice wills things to be what they are not and cannot be."

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  • Paley, however, holds that scripture is given less to teach morality than to illustrate it by example and enforce it by new sanctions and greater certainty, and that the light of nature makes it clear that God wills the happiness of his creatures.

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  • but it is evident from the nature of God that he could have no other design in creating mankind than their happiness; and therefore he wills their happiness; therefore that my behaviour so far as it may be a means to the happiness of mankind should be such; so this happiness of mankind may be said to be the criterion of virtue once removed."

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  • The realization of reason, or of human wills so far as rational, thus presents itself as the absolute end of duty; 1 Singularly enough, the English writer who approaches most nearly to Kant on this point is the utilitarian Godwin, in his Political Justice.

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  • The fundamental aim of jurisprudence is to realize external freedom by removing the hindrances imposed on each one's free action through the interferences of other wills.

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  • It is true that Hegel regards the conscious effort to realize one's own conception of good as a higher stage of moral development than the mere conformity to the jural rules establishing property, maintaining contract and allotting punishment to crime, in which the universal will is first expressed; since in such conformity this will is only accomplished accidentally by the outward concurrence of individual wills, and is not essentially realized in any of them.

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  • So intense did the controversy now become, that at last, towards the end of 638, Heraclius published an Ecthesis, or Exposition of the Faith (composed by Sergius), which prohibited the use of the phrase "one energy," because of its disquieting effects on some minds, as seeming to militate against the doctrine of the two natures; while, on the other hand, the expression "two energies" was interdicted because it seemed to imply that Christ had two wills.

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  • I Paul, speaking for the monophysite bishops, had said that what was particularly repugnant in the definition of Chalcedon was the implication of two wills in Christ.

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  • The will, Agatho said, is a property of the nature, so that as there are two natures there are two wills; but the human will determines itself ever conformably to the divine and almighty will.

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  • Among the Arabs the actions of magic and of spirits are regarded as at least as probable and common as duels and concealments of wills in European society.

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  • He had, Dissoludoubtless conscientiously, labored for the recon- tion of the stitution of the Empire; but it often happens that Frankish individual wills produce results other than those at Empire.

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  • The Roman maxim that what the prince wills has the force of law wa4 not disputednor did the Spaniard doubt that the king acting by himself was the prince.

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  • The county courts have exclusive original jurisdiction in the probate of wills and the administration of estates, concurrent jurisdiction with the district courts in civil suits for sums not exceeding $1000, and important jurisdiction in criminal cases.

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  • Its judicial business is principally the probate of wills and matters relating to the administration of estates.

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  • A sheriff, an attorney and a clerk were elected, and regulations for recording deeds and wills were made.

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  • Wills which he made before 1623 show that he had been able to acquire considerable property.

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  • There were subtle differences between the parties regarding living wills.

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  • annulment of marriage on wills 19.

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  • Having one of those strong wills which know no obstacles, he obeyed the behests of his genius and entered Bouchardon's studio.

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  • beneficiarysion of the Scheme to cover beneficiaries under wills is also welcome.

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  • bequeathed in wills make it clear that they were only a contribution.

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  • It would be overly broad to suggest that only those wills of sufficient wealth were proved there.

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  • You will take on a busy caseload of Estates Planning, Trusts and some Wills and Probate.

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  • Medieval wills might found a chantry or make a gift to a specific chapel.

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  • Howard Thomas was a cathedral chorister at King's School, Ely where he studied organ with Dr. Arthur Wills.

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  • wills codicil rental lease leasing - landlord tenant corporation banking and much more.

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  • A man and a woman circle each other in a barbed relationship, a gladiatorial combat and struggle of wills than anything else.

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  • crucible of pain Only ashes now remain; Where years of contravention Wills disbelief into suspension.

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  • Two wills, two minds made one in love divine: Self-will, but not my true will, wholly gone.

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  • Probate Records Only a small number of people ever left wills, but they can help in constructing a family tree.

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  • The news has come as a welcome fillip to farmers says Rob Wills, Executive Manager of the British Livestock Genetics Consortium.

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  • invaluable for anyone studying wills, inventories, accounts, letters and journals, surveys and maps.

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  • We are well aware of the multi-page tomes, written in dense legalese, which many people associate with the writing of wills.

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  • Simon Cotton has studied more medieval Suffolk wills and bequests than anyone.

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  • mumps vaccination tomorrow between 10am and 3pm in the Wills Memorial Building.

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  • probate of wills commences with 21st November, 1553.

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  • probate solicitors who actually draft most wills.

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  • After 1858 wills were registered and proved in the national and district probate registries.

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  • Hopeful Wills In 1976, a religious recluse left his estate to Jesus Christ in the event of a second coming.

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  • Whether, more particularly, it have an independent rightness of its own, or it be right only because God wills it?

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  • Rob Burns invites submission of complete transcriptions of Wills for his countrywide site ' Wills for All ' .

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  • Wills might also be drawn up when the person was about to undertake a lengthy sea voyage or get involved in military action.

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  • water polo team, Wills is an example to us all.

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  • They help to PLAY THE GAME OF LIFE, instead of being played and moved about by other wills and environment.

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  • word-for-word transcripts of 58 Wills, and 57 Probate Inventories.

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  • It has original jurisdiction in cases of habeas corpus, mandamus and prohibition, and appellate jurisdiction in cases involving a greater amount than one hundred dollars; concerning title or boundary of lands, probate of wills; the appointment or qualification of personal representatives, guardians, curators, committees, &c.; concerning a mill, roadway, ferry or landing; the right of a corporation or county to levy tolls or taxes; in cases of quo warranto, habeas corpus, mandamus, certiorari and prohibition, and all others involving freedom or the constitutionalit y of a law; in criminal cases where there has been a conviction for felony or misdemeanour in a circuit, criminal or intermediate court; and in cases relating to the public revenues.

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  • Meanwhile, in the province of Victoria, by means of a fund subscribed among the colonists and a grant by the legislature, the ill-fated expedition of Messrs Burke and Wills was started.

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  • Accordingly, dividing his party, leaving at the depot four men and taking with him Wills and two men, King and Gray, with a horse and six camels, he left Cooper's Creek on the 16th of December and crossed the desert traversed by Sturt fifteen years before.

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  • His guiding spirit is the Holy Spirit, which wills the good: yet it is not free, but restricted, in this temporal epoch, by its antagonist and own twin-brother (Yasna, 30, 3), the Evil Spirit (angro mainyush, Ahriman), who in the beginning was banished by the Good Spirit by means of the famous ban contained in Yasna, 45, 2, and since then drags out his existence in the darkness of Hell as the principle of ill - the arch-devil.

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  • P. Wills - 0.720 at 18° C. Phys.

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  • The second was called for by the preference which the common law gave to a distant collateral over the brother of the half-blood of the first purchaser; the fourth conferred an indefeasible title on adverse possession for twenty years (a term shortened by Lord Cairns in 1875 to twelve years); the fifth reduced the number of witnesses required by law to attest wills, and removed the vexatious distinction which existed in this respect between freeholds and copyholds; the last freed an innocent debtor from imprisonment only before final judgment (or on what was termed mesne process), but the principle stated by Campbell that only fraudulent debtors should be imprisoned was ultimately given effect to for England and Wales in 1869.1 In one of his most cherished objects, however, that of Land Registration, which formed the theme of his maiden speech in parliament, Campbell was doomed to disappointment.

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  • The result was the condemnation of the Monothelites and a recognition of the doctrine that two wills, neither opposed nor intermingled, were united in the person of Christ, in accordance with his twofold nature (see under Councils of Constantinople)

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  • The Old English "books" are derived in a roundabout way from Roman models, and the tribal law of real property was deeply modified by the introduction of individualistic notions as to ownership, donations, wills, rights of women, &c. Yet in this respect also the Norman Conquest increased the store of Roman conceptions by breaking the national isolation of the English Church and opening the way for closer intercourse with France and Italy.

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  • 1820) and William John Wills (b.

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  • He also rejected the optimism of Leibnitz and Hegel, and placed the most irrational of wills at the base of the worst possible of worlds (see further Schopenhauer).

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  • Malkin (1803-1888), John Ball (1818-1889), and Sir Alfred Wills (b.

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  • But she has a voice in public affairs; she has laws to protect her, manages the household and goes unveiled; she has a right to the money she earns; she can inherit under wills, and bequeath property, though to avoid the alienation of real property, succession to it is denied her.

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  • Revenue for state, county and municipal purposes is derived principally from taxes on real estate, tangible personal property, incomes in excess of $1000, wills and administrations, deeds, seals, lawsuits, banks, trust and security companies, insurance companies, express companies, railway and canal corporations, sleeping-car, parlour-car and dining-car companies, telegraph and telephone companies, franchise taxes, poll taxes, an inheritance tax and taxes on various business and professional licences.

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  • In the affairs of nations, large and powerful ones long have imposed their wills on the small and weak ones.

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  • How much more complex than this is the game of war, which occurs under certain limits of time, and where it is not one will that manipulates lifeless objects, but everything results from innumerable conflicts of various wills!

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  • A man is only conscious of himself as a living being by the fact that he wills, that is, is conscious of his volition.

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  • I wonder how many couples realize that their wills are automatically revoked when they register.

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  • Is it a love that wills to the original full communion with God through Christ 's restoration - a redeeming and a salvific act?

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  • Colin Wills, the last tin miner in St. Agnes will strike a symbolic sledgehammer blow linking the past with the present.

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  • Rob Burns invites submission of complete transcriptions of Wills for his countrywide site ' Wills for All '.

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  • You can study for yourself the subtle differences between the parties on living wills.

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  • In becoming the captain of his university 's water polo team, Wills is an example to us all.

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  • There follow word-for-word transcripts of 58 Wills, and 57 Probate Inventories.

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  • Sleep can become a power struggle or test of wills.

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  • Take away the battle of wills between the two of you.

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  • Others, however, appear to fight the idea of rest time each day, creating a battle of wills between themselves and their parents or caregivers.

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  • Estate Planning: Managing accounts as they relate to wills, trusts, or advance funeral preparations.

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  • If it's much more serious than a simple clash of wills, for example, your supervisor is acting in an unethical or illegal way, keep copious notes.

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  • Legal and professional advice: These services often provide assistance with preparing wills, advance directives, powers of attorneys, conducting real estate transactions or establishing a financial portfolio.

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  • Different states have different laws about wills and inheritance.

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  • The county clerk is also responsible for land records and wills.

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  • These records often include the wills and probate.

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  • Check with your library for its local collection, which may include transcripts of obituaries, notices, transcripts of wills and other items of interest.

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  • Estate records and wills are yet another source for valauble ancestor and heir information.

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  • Wills are also important resources, as they will usually name the children and give their ages - sometimes the actual date of birth.

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  • You may find birth, marriage, wills, baptism and death records from parishes in the United Kingdom and other countries as well, dating back to the church's founding.

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  • Family Records - These may include wills, deeds, grants, grandparent collections, journals, diaries, bibles and even household records.

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  • Wills - Along with legal names of heirs, it may give ages or dates of birth.

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  • Wills can help you ascertain the financial situation of your ancestors, as well as the relationships they valued most.

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  • Country singer Mark Wills mentions Stretch Armstrong in his 2002 song, "Nineteen Something".

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  • This is where trouble can begin when these two have a clash of wills; neither will win.

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  • He "wills" her to call him, and when she does he tells her what she is wearing and even the title of the book she is reading.

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  • Watch 2001: A Space Odyssey for the lovely imagery, the impressive score and the human-computer battle of wills.

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