Willows sentence example

willows
  • Higher up, in the picturesque gorges, grow rhododendrons, willows, Potentilla fruticosa, Spriaeae, Lonicereae, &c., and the rains must evidently be more copious and better distributed.
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  • The willows in the Arctic drainage basin shrink to shrubs scarcely knee-high.
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  • Grasses, mosses and Arctic flowering plants are abundant, but there are no trees excepting occasional dwarf willows.
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  • Forest patches are found in the kloofs and seaward sides of the mountains; willows often border the watercourses; heaths and bulbous plants are common in some areas.
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  • With the exception of some stunted willows the islands are practically destitute of trees, but are covered with a luxuriant growth of herbage, including grasses, sedges and many flowering plants.
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  • Thickets of alders and willows in wet places and new-made land, aspens and large cottonwoods west of the characteristic spruce area (as on Seward Peninsula), are also common.
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  • Willows and cottonwoods grow along streams. The west slope of the Wasatch has been largely denuded of its forests to supply the demands of the towns at its base.
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  • Two species of poplar (P. pruinosa and P. diversifolia), Elaeagnus angustifolia, the ash, and a few willows grow along the rivers.
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  • Other beds yield principally palms, willows, laurels, Eucalyptus or Ferns; but there are no Cycads.
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  • Willows and poplars, with a few other plants of more temperate regions, are found rarely at Aix, and seemingly point to casual introduction from surrounding mountains.
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  • There is a particularly poignant moment in "The Wind in the Willows."
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  • Some types of willows will barely grow a few centimeters in one growing season, others might grow to 10 foot or more!
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  • And the idea of growing short rotation coppice of willows to burn to provide electric power is already being tried.
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  • An old borrow pit fringed by willows contains an interesting aquatic flora including spiked water milfoil and common water crowfoot.
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  • Azhar leaned limply on the lightest of willows, tongue lazily lolling out.
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  • Mr Toad, from The Wind in the Willows, arrived in fine style in a vintage motorcar.
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  • Pollarding willows osier cutting Osiers The osier willow, Salix viminalis, was important to both the riverside economy and the local wildlife.
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  • Many of the native shrub willows are even more limited in range and particularly palatable to animals.
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  • Thus Crack willows are often pollarded to reduce the chances of splitting and to quickly provide more timber.
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  • Trees: Magnificent structures How have trees managed to evolve into 80,000 species, from tiny arctic willows to giant redwoods?
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  • The constituent willows of Sub-Arctic Salix spp. scrub also occur occasionally in a range of other habitats, including several Annex I types.
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  • To the south, hedges are mainly scrubby, with occasional mature willows.
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  • Along the edge of the reeds there is a line of pollarded willows which is regularly cut.
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  • It has the largest known population in the UK of wooly willow Salix lanata, the rarest of the sub-Arctic willows.
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  • An area of basketry willows has been planted in a wet area of the site.
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  • A similar card was drawn up last year by another group, for the dwarf willows.
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  • Poplars, willows, lime, mountain-ash, maples, are favourite habitats, and it is also found on many other trees, including cedar of Lebanon and larch.
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  • The catkins of the poplars differ from those of the nearly allied willows in the presence of a rudimentary perianth, of obliquely cup-shaped form, within the toothed bracteal scales; the male flowers contain from eight to thirty stamens; the fertile bear a onecelled (nearly divided) ovary, surmounted by the deeply cleft stigmas; the two-valved capsule contains several seeds, each furnished with a long tuft of silky or cotton-like hairs.
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  • The moist soil encourages luxuriant thickets of willows (Salicineae), surrounded by dense chevaux-de-frise of wormwood and thornbearing Compositae, and interspersed with rich but not extensive prairies, harbouring a great variety of herbaceous plants; while in the deltas of the Black Sea rivers impenetrable beds of reeds (Arundo phragmites) shelter a forest fauna.
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  • In the north, where the lichen-covered or ice-shaven rocks do not protrude, the ground is covered with a carpet of mosses, creeping dwarf willows, crow berries and similar plants, while the flowers most common are the andromeda, the yellow poppy, pedicularis, pyrola, &c. besides the flowering mosses; but in South Greenland there is something in the shape of bush, the dwarf birches even rising a few feet in very sheltered places, the willows may grow higher than a man, and the vegetation is less arctic and more abundant.
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  • In the mountains of Khmiria and the central plateau there are also the alder, the poplar, the Aleppo pine, the caroub, the tamarisk, the maple, the nettle-tree, several willows and junipers.
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  • In the case of unisexual flowers, whether monoecious, that is, with staminate and pistillate flowers on one and the same plant, such as many of our native trees - oak, beech, birch, alder, &c., or dioecious with staminate and pistillate flowers on different plants, as in willows and poplars, cross pollination only is possible.
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  • On the continent of Europe osiers or willows are bunched in sizes of one metre in girth at the butts and (except in Belgium) are also sold by weight.
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  • On the higher elevations the trees are mostly white pine, yellow pine and hemlock, but in the valleys and lower levels are oaks, hickories, maples, elms, birches, locusts, willows, spruces, gums, buckeyes, the chestnut, black walnut, butternut, cedar, ash, linden, poplar, buttonwood, hornbeam, holly, catalpa, magnolia, tulip-tree, Kentucky coffee-tree, sassafras, wild cherry, pawpaw, crab-apple and other species.
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  • At Laracor, near Trim, Swift rebuilt the parsonage, made a fish-pond, and planted a garden with poplars and willows, bordering a canal.
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  • Among the scanty trees, willows and poplars are commonest.
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  • Farther east and north comes the Turkestan pine (Picea Schrenkiana), while at lower levels there grow willows, black and white poplars, tamarisk, Celtis, as well as Elaeagnus (wild olive), Hippophae rhamnoides (sallow thorn), Rubus fructicosus (blackberry), Prunus spinosa (blackthorn) and P. A rmeniaca (apricot).
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  • Poplars and in some places willows grow along the river-sides, and dense reed brakes, often 6 to 10 ft.
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  • The willows are associated with an area of 6170 Alpine and subalpine calcareous grasslands on steep, rocky and remote ground.
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  • A humorous, touching tale by the author of The Wind in the Willows.
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  • Pollard Willows Old pollard willows are one of the most characteristic features of Cambridgeshire 's wetland landscape.
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  • The Willows: A pleasing room that holds up to 50 people and is available on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays only (no bank holidays).
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  • Described as an oasis in the desert, the lush greenery, romantic weeping willows, and serene lake make a picture perfect wedding day complete.
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  • Instead of buying a tree, you can also gather thin twigs from willows, birches or other small trees and anchor them in a tall glass vase.
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  • It grows on many trees, both evergreen and summer-leafing-orchard trees, Limes, Poplars, Elms, Willows, Hornbeam, Beech, Acacia, Horse-chestnut, Firs-rarely on the Oak in Britain.
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  • Elm trees attract Comma, Mourning Cloak while Willows attract Viceroy.
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  • Willows naturally produce the auxins that stimulate root development, and will encourage your honeysuckle vines to send out new roots from the cut edge.
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  • The collection was inspired by natural textures such as fish scales, willows and jasmine plants.
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  • Mr. Toad's Wild Ride: Based on a character from The Wind in the Willows, this dark ride takes visitors on a wild adventure through the streets of London, England.
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  • Since 1731 it has been composed of the two towns of Clermont and Montferrand, now connected by a fine avenue of walnut trees and willows, 2 m.
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  • The leaves are broader than in most willows, and are generally either deltoid or ovate in shape, often cordate at the base, and frequently with slender petioles vertically flattened.
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  • The poplars are almost entirely confined to the north temperate zone, but a few approach or even pass its northern limit, and they are widely distributed within that area; they show, like the willows, a partiality for moist ground and often line the river-sides in otherwise treeless districts.
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  • Along the upper courses of the rivers are willows and wild olive trees; round the chief settlements the eucalyptus and the pine have been planted.
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  • The Australian Eucalyptus and Casuarina in great variety, and many other imported trees, including syringas, wattles, acacias, willows, pines, cypress, cork and oak all thrive when properly planted and protected from grass fires.
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  • Built in a hollow surrounded by hills, the aspect of the town with the river flowing through it and its broad streets lined with willows is picturesque.
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  • A great mass of pale-green foliage is usually composed of the algarrobo trees, while the course of the river is marked by lines or groups of palms, by fine old willows (Salix humboldtiana), fruit-gardens, and fields of cotton, Indian corn, sugar-cane and alfalfa (lucerne).
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  • Dr Buchanan White, who made a special study of the British willows, grouped them under 17 species with numerous varieties and hybrids.
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  • In addition to their use for timber or basket-making, willows contain a large quantity of tannin in their bark.
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  • The larvae of several nocturnal Lepidoptera feed upon the leaves of the willows, and the trunk of the sallow is often injured by the perforations of the lunar hornet sphinx (Trochilium crabroniforme).
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  • The materials made use of are driftwood, green willows, birch and poplars; also mud and stones intermixed in such a manner as contributes to the strength of the dam; but there is no particular method observed, except that the work is carried on with a regular sweep, and that all the parts are made of equal strength.
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  • Timber trees are almost confined to the river valleys, where willows, yellow wood, iron wood, red wood, mimosas and, in deep gorges, the wild fig are found.
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  • Most of the bluffs along the principal river valleys, especially those in the south-east, are entirely bare of vegetation, but on the bottom lands along the rivers and streams considerable patches of cottonwood and willows are common.
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  • It is commonly supposed that osiers or willows will prove remunerative and flourish with little attention on any poor, wet, marshy soil.
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  • For the successful raising of the finer sorts of willows good, well-drained, loamy upland soil is desirable, which before planting should be deeply trenched and cleared of weeds.
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  • Krabe of Prummern near Aachen, the most scientific and practical of German cultivators, the results of whose experiments have been published in his admirable Lehrbuch der rationellen Weidenkultur (Aix-la-Chapelle, 1886, et seq.) went so far as to assert that willows prefer a dry to a wet soil.
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  • Krabe found that in addition to loam, willows did well on dry ferrugineous, sandy ground with a good top soil of about 6 in.
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  • The willows are cut at the first indication of the sap rising and "couched" in rotten peelings and soil at a slight angle, the butts being on the ground, which should be strewn with damp straw from a manure heap. The tops are covered lightly with rotted peelings and by periodical application of water, fermentation is induced at the bottom, heat is engendered, the leaves force their way through the covering and peeling may begin.
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  • When a line of willows indicates the whereabouts of a brook, the horse should be well collected, a clear place selected, so far as circumstances allow, and the pace increased, though in short strides, up to the very brink.
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  • Pines of three species, junipers, larches, oaks, maples, willows and the Thuja Orientalis have been identified.
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  • Among trees, stunted pines, dwarf oaks, poplars, willows and the cypress are fairly plentiful.
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  • Three species of rhododendron vie with each other in the brilliancy of their masses of red or pink flowers; the common juniper rises higher still, along with three species of bilberry; and several dwarf willows attain nearly to the utmost limit of vegetation.
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  • The occurrence of hybrids in nature explains the difficulty experienced by botanists in deciding on what is a species, and the widely different limitations of the term adopted by different observers in the case of willows, roses, brambles, &c. The artificial process is practically the same in hybridization as in cross-fertilization, but usually requires more care.
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  • The western division consists of low fen or clay soil and presents a monotonous expanse of rich meadow-land, carefully drained in regular lines of canals bordered by stunted willows, and dotted over with windmills, the sails of canal craft and the clumps of elm and poplar which surround each isolated farm-house.
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  • The willows reported by some travellers are in reality a narrow-leaved variety of poplar.
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  • The Willows is a 30-acre park on the Neck shore, and in North Salem is Liberty Hill, another park.
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  • In 1868 he issued the next collection in Under the Willows and other Poems, but in 1865 he had delivered his "Ode recited at the Harvard Commemoration," and the successive centennial historical anniversaries drew from him a series of stately odes.
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  • On the plateau willows, poplars and chestnut trees grow near the streams, but nine-tenths of the country is treeless, except for scrub.
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  • The streams are fringed with willows; fruit trees and alfalfa fields fill the irrigated valleys, and the lower mountain slopes are better covered with a thorny arborescent growth.
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  • East of the Cascades the valleys are usually treeless, save for a few willows and cottonwoods in the vicinity of streams. Over the greater part of this region the sage-brush is the most common plant, and by its ubiquity it imparts to the landscape the monotonous greyish tint so characteristic of the arid regions of the western United States.
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  • Oaks, elms, hickory, honey-locusts, white ash, sycamore and willows, the rapid growing but miserable box-elder and cottonwood, are the most common trees.
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  • Willows are also pretty general, the highest in growth being Salix phyllicifolia, 7 to to ft.
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  • There were oaks, beeches (scarcely distinguishable from existing species), birches, planes and willows (one closely related to the living Salix candida), laurels, represented by Sassafras and Cinnamomum, magnolias and tulip trees (Liriodendron), myrtles, Liquidambar, Diospyros and ivy.
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  • Osiers or willows when tied for market vary locally in girth.
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  • There is no arboreal vegetation on the Pamir, except a few willows and tamarisks along the rivers.
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