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wilberforce

wilberforce

wilberforce Sentence Examples

  • After an admirable speech, Wilberforce laid on the table twelve resolutions which were intended as the basis of a future motion for the abolition of the trade.

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  • The distribution of Clarkson's book led to his forming connexions with many persons of influence, and especially with William Wilberforce.

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  • Wilberforce's first motion for a committee of the whole House upon the question was made on the 19th of March 1789, and this committee proceeded to business on the 12th of May of the same year.

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  • On the 2nd of April 1792 Wilberforce again moved that the trade ought to be abolished; an amendment in favour of gradual abolition was carried, and it was finally resolved that the trade should cease on the 1st of January 1796.

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  • An appeal was made by Wilberforce in 1821 to Thomas Fowell Buxton to undertake the conduct of this new question in parliament.

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  • An anti-slavery society was established in 1823, the principal members of which, besides Wilberforce and Buxton, were Zachary Macaulay, Dr Lushington and Lord Suffield.

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  • He preached his last sermon in Mr Belson's house at Leatherhead on Wednesday, the 23rd of February 1791; wrote next day his last letter to Wilberforce, urging him to carry on his crusade against the slave trade; and died in his house at City Road on the 2nd of March 1791, in his eighty-eighth year.

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  • Wilberforce, Charles Grant, John Thornton and his son Henry, were among the philanthropists who contributed to his funds; in 1798 the Sunday School Society (established 1785) extended its operations to Wales, making him its agent, and Sunday Schools grew rapidly in number and favour.

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  • In general Edwards was a supporter of the slave trade, and was described by William Wilberforce as a powerful opponent.

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  • The principal are the governor's residence and government offices, the barracks, the cathedral, the missionary institutions, the fruit market, Wilberforce Hall, courts of justice, the railway station and the grammar school.

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  • " There have been," he wrote in later days to Bishop Wilberforce, " two great deaths, or transmigrations of spirit, in my political existence - one, very slow, the breaking of ties with my original party."

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  • In 1797 Wilberforce noted in his diary that Tierney's conduct was "truly Jacobinical"; and in May 1798 Pitt accused him of want of patriotism.

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  • Returning to Oxford, he was elected a fellow of Merton College, and was ordained; and in 1833 he was presented to the rectory of Lavington-with-Graffham in Sussex by Mrs Sargent, whose granddaughter Caroline he married on the 7th of November 1833, the ceremony being performed by the bride's brother-in-law, Samuel Wilberforce, afterwards bishop of Oxford and of Winchester.

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  • Through the influence of Samuel Wilberforce, he was offered the post of sub-almoner to Queen Victoria, always recognized as a stepping-stone to the episcopal bench, and his refusal of it was honourably consonant with all else in his career as an Anglican dignitary, in which he united pastoral diligence with an asceticism that was then quite exceptional.

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  • It was declared in a prefatory note to the volume that the authors were responsible only for their respective articles, but some of these were deemed so destructive that many people banned the whole book, and a noisy demand, led by Samuel Wilberforce, then bishop of Oxford, called on the headmaster of Rugby to dissociate himself from his comrades.

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  • Among his publications, besides many sermons, were A Brief Review of the Episcopal Church in Virginia (1845); Wilberforce, Cranmer, Jewett and the Prayer Book on the Incarnation (1850); Reasons for Loving the Episcopal Church (1852); and Old Churches, Ministers and Families of Virginia (1857); a storehouse of material on the ecclesiastical history of the state.

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  • In 1841 he resigned his living to become curate to Samuel Wilberforce, then rector of Alverstoke, and upon Wilberforce's promotion to the deanery of Westminster in 1845 he was presented to the rectory of Itchenstoke.

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  • In 1845 and 1846 he preached the Hulsean lecture, and in the former year was made examining chaplain to Wilberforce, now bishop of Oxford.

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  • P. Stanley had been named, but rejected by the Irish Church, and, according to Bishop Wilberforce's correspondence, Trench's appointment was favoured neither by the prime minister nor the lord-lieutenant.

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  • This he effectually did in a little masterpiece of religious biography which remained in MS. in the possession of the Harcourt family until it was edited by Samuel Wilberforce, bishop of Oxford, as the Life of Mrs Godolphin (1847), reprinted in the "King's Classics" (1904).

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  • Supported by representative Christian leaders, such as Granville Sharp, Zachary Macaulay, William Wilberforce, Charles Grant and Henry Thornton, with Lord Teignmouth, ex-governorgeneral of India, as its first president, and Dr Porteus, bishop of London, as its friendly counsellor, the new society made rapid progress.

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  • The same story is given in a note in Wilberforce's Correspondence, the scene being somewhat vaguely laid in "Scotland."

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  • If we can believe a note in Wilberforce's Correspondence, he visited London in the spring of the same year, and was introduced by Dundas 5 to Pitt, Wilberforce and others.

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  • When he visited London Wilberforce wrote, " all the world is wild about Dr Chalmers."

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  • - Samuel Wilberforce, bishop of Winchester; Charles J.

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  • Dean Alford, Dr Tregelles, Bishop Wilberforce and Dr Eadie were removed by death.

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  • Famous houses no longer standing were Campden House, in the district north-west of the parish church, formerly known as the Gravel Pits; and Gore House, on the site of the present Albert Hall, the residence of William Wilberforce, and later of the countess of Blessington.

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  • trans., The Sanctuary of the Faithful Soul, London, 1905); all these three works were translated and edited by Father Bertrand Wilberforce, O.P., and have been reprinted several times; and especially Speculum Monachorum (French trans.

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  • One of its masters was Joseph Milner (1744-1797), author of a history of the Church; and among its students were Andrew Marvell the poet (1621-1678) and William Wilberforce the philanthropist (1759-1833), who is commemorated by a column and statue near the dock offices, and by the preservation of the house of his birth in High Street.

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  • in 1906 as the Wilberforce and Historical Museum.

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  • He took home with him a "protest" against the American Colonization Society, signed by Wilberforce, Zachary Macaulay, Samuel Gurney, William Evans, S.

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  • Wilberforce Clarke, London, 1881; compare also Erdmann, De expeditions Russorum Berdaam versus, Kasan, 1826, and Charmoy, Expedition d'Alexandre contre les Russes, St Petersburg, 1829); Iskandarnama-i-Bahri, second part, edited by Dr Sprenger (Calcutta, 1852 and 1869).

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  • Meanwhile the needs of India has been tardily met, on the urgent representations in parliament of William Wilberforce and others, by the consecration of Dr T.

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  • In 1791 Alexander Falconbridge (formerly a surgeon on board slave ships) collected the surviving fugitives and laid out a new settlement (Granville's Town); and the promoters of the enterprise - Granville Sharp, William Wilberforce, Sir Richard Carr Glyn, &c. - hitherto known as the St George's Bay Company, obtained a charter of incorporation as the Sierra Leone Company, with Henry Thornton as chairman.

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  • Wilberforce, O.P. (London, 1895).

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  • ROBERT ISAAC WILBERFORCE (1802-1857), English clergyman and writer, second son of William Wilberforce, was born on the 19th of December 1802.

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  • About this time Wilberforce became very intimate with Manning, and many letters on theological and ecclesiastical questions passed between them.

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  • In 1851 Manning joined the Church of Rome, and three years later Wilberforce took the same step. He was preparing for his ordination when he died at Albano on the 3rd of February 1857.

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  • Wilberforce assisted his brother Samuel to write the Life and to edit the Correspondence of his father.

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  • Samuel Wilberforce >>

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  • SAMUEL WILBERFORCE (1805-1873), English bishop, third son of William Wilberforce, was born at Clapham Common, London, on the 7th of September 1805.

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  • Although a High Churchman Wilberforce held aloof from the Oxford movement, and in 1838 his divergence from the "Tract" writers became so marked that J.

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  • In 1838 Wilberforce published, with his elder brother Robert, the Life of his father, and two years later his father's Correspondence.

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  • The publication of a papal bull in 1850 establishing a Roman hierarchy in England brought the High Church party, of whom Wilberforce was the most prominent member, into temporary disrepute.

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  • Colenso's Commentary on the Romans in 1861, Wilberforce endeavoured to induce the author to hold a private conference with him; but after the publication of the first two parts of the Pentateuch Critically Examined he drew up the address of the bishops which called on Colenso to resign his bishopric. In 1867 he framed the first Report of the Ritualistic Commission, in which coercive measures against ritualism were discountenanced by the use of the word "restrain" instead of "abolish" or "prohibit."

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  • Wilberforce left three sons.

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  • The eldest, Reginald Garton Wilberforce, being the author of An Unrecorded Chapter of the Indian Mutiny (1894).

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  • Ernest Roland Wilberforce (1840-1908)was bishop of Newcastle-on-Tyne from 1882 to 1895, and bishop of Chichester from 1895 till his death.

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  • Besides the works already mentioned, Wilberforce wrote Heroes of Hebrew History (1870), originally contributed to Good Words, and several volumes of sermons.

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  • Wilberforce, who also wrote a one-volume Life (1888).

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  • William Wilberforce >>

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  • His Journals and Letters were published by Samuel Wilberforce in 1837.

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  • WILLIAM WILBERFORCE (1759-1833), English philanthropist whose name is chiefly associated with the abolition of the slave trade, was descended from a Yorkshire family which possessed the manor of Wilberfoss in the East Riding from the time of Henry II.

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  • He was the only son of Robert Wilberforce, member of a commercial house at Hull, by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Bird of Barton, Oxon, and was born at Hull on the 24th of August 1759.

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  • In 1784 Wilberforce was elected for both Hull and Yorkshire.

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  • A journey to Nice in the autumn of the same year with his friend Dr Isaac Milner (1750-1820), who had been a master at Hull grammar school when Wilberforce was there as a boy, and had since made a reputation as a mathematician, and afterwards became president of Queens' College, Cambridge, and dean of Carlisle, led to his conversion to Evangelical Christianity and the adoption of more serious views of life.

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  • Pitt entered heartily into their plans, and recommended Wilberforce to undertake the guidance of the project as a subject suited to his character and talents.

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  • While Clarkson conducted the agitation throughout the country, Wilberforce took every opportunity in the House of Commons of exposing the evils and horrors of the trade.

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  • On the 12th of May of the following year Wilberforce, in co-operation with Pitt, brought the subject of abolition again before the House of Commons; but the friends of the planters succeeded in getting the matter deferred.

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  • On the 27th of January following Wilberforce carried a motion for referring to a special committee the further examination of witnesses, but after full inquiry the motion for abolition in April 1791 was lost by 163 votes to 88.

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  • When the anti-slavery society was formed in 1823, Wilberforce and Clarkson became vice-presidents; but before their aim was accomplished Wilberforce had retired from public life, and the Emancipation Bill was not passed till August 1833, a month after his death.

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  • In 1797 Wilberforce published A Pratical View of the Prevailing Religious System of Professed Christians in the Higher and Middle Classes of this Country Contrasted with Real Christianity, which within half a year went through five editions and was afterwards translated into French, Italian, Dutch and German.

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  • Wilberforce left four sons, two of whom, Samuel and Robert Isaac, are noticed separately.

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  • The youngest, Henry William Wilberforce (1807-1873), was educated at Oriel College, Oxford, and was president of the Oxford Union.

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  • The chief authorities of the career of William Wilberforce are his Life (5 vols., 1838) by his sons, Robert Isaac and Samuel, and his Correspondence (1840) also published by his sons.

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  • A smaller edition of the Life was published by Samuel Wilberforce in 1868.

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  • See also The private papers of William Wilberforce, edited by A.

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  • Wilberforce (1897); Sir James Stephen, Essays in Ecclesiastical Biography (1849); J.

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  • C. Colquhoun, Wilberforce, His Friends and Times (1866); John Stoughton, William Wilberforce (1880); J.

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  • Gurney, Familiar Sketch of Wilberforce (1838); and J.

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  • Wilberforce (1864).

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  • Robert Isaac Wilberforce >>

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  • anti slave campaigner William Wilberforce attacked evolution at a famous Oxford debate in 1860.

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  • That said, Captain Wilberforce continues to be an engaging live presence and his brand of pop classicism is always welcome down my way.

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  • The IT room is on the 4th floor of the Wilberforce Building, alongside staff offices.

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  • The House of Lords, applying Lord Wilberforce's " aftermath test, " dismissed the plaintiffs ' actions.

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  • Besides travelling through many states of the United States to deliver anti-slavery lectures, Lundy visited Haiti twice - in 1825 and 1829, the Wilberforce colony of freedmen and refugee slaves in Canada in 1830-1831, and in 1832 and again in 1833 Texas, all these visits being made, in part, to find a suitable place outside the United States to which emancipated slaves might be sent.

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  • The distribution of Clarkson's book led to his forming connexions with many persons of influence, and especially with William Wilberforce.

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  • Wilberforce's first motion for a committee of the whole House upon the question was made on the 19th of March 1789, and this committee proceeded to business on the 12th of May of the same year.

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  • After an admirable speech, Wilberforce laid on the table twelve resolutions which were intended as the basis of a future motion for the abolition of the trade.

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  • On the 2nd of April 1792 Wilberforce again moved that the trade ought to be abolished; an amendment in favour of gradual abolition was carried, and it was finally resolved that the trade should cease on the 1st of January 1796.

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  • An appeal was made by Wilberforce in 1821 to Thomas Fowell Buxton to undertake the conduct of this new question in parliament.

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  • An anti-slavery society was established in 1823, the principal members of which, besides Wilberforce and Buxton, were Zachary Macaulay, Dr Lushington and Lord Suffield.

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  • He preached his last sermon in Mr Belson's house at Leatherhead on Wednesday, the 23rd of February 1791; wrote next day his last letter to Wilberforce, urging him to carry on his crusade against the slave trade; and died in his house at City Road on the 2nd of March 1791, in his eighty-eighth year.

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  • Wilberforce, Charles Grant, John Thornton and his son Henry, were among the philanthropists who contributed to his funds; in 1798 the Sunday School Society (established 1785) extended its operations to Wales, making him its agent, and Sunday Schools grew rapidly in number and favour.

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  • In general Edwards was a supporter of the slave trade, and was described by William Wilberforce as a powerful opponent.

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  • The principal are the governor's residence and government offices, the barracks, the cathedral, the missionary institutions, the fruit market, Wilberforce Hall, courts of justice, the railway station and the grammar school.

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  • " There have been," he wrote in later days to Bishop Wilberforce, " two great deaths, or transmigrations of spirit, in my political existence - one, very slow, the breaking of ties with my original party."

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  • In 1797 Wilberforce noted in his diary that Tierney's conduct was "truly Jacobinical"; and in May 1798 Pitt accused him of want of patriotism.

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  • Returning to Oxford, he was elected a fellow of Merton College, and was ordained; and in 1833 he was presented to the rectory of Lavington-with-Graffham in Sussex by Mrs Sargent, whose granddaughter Caroline he married on the 7th of November 1833, the ceremony being performed by the bride's brother-in-law, Samuel Wilberforce, afterwards bishop of Oxford and of Winchester.

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  • Through the influence of Samuel Wilberforce, he was offered the post of sub-almoner to Queen Victoria, always recognized as a stepping-stone to the episcopal bench, and his refusal of it was honourably consonant with all else in his career as an Anglican dignitary, in which he united pastoral diligence with an asceticism that was then quite exceptional.

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  • It was declared in a prefatory note to the volume that the authors were responsible only for their respective articles, but some of these were deemed so destructive that many people banned the whole book, and a noisy demand, led by Samuel Wilberforce, then bishop of Oxford, called on the headmaster of Rugby to dissociate himself from his comrades.

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  • Among his publications, besides many sermons, were A Brief Review of the Episcopal Church in Virginia (1845); Wilberforce, Cranmer, Jewett and the Prayer Book on the Incarnation (1850); Reasons for Loving the Episcopal Church (1852); and Old Churches, Ministers and Families of Virginia (1857); a storehouse of material on the ecclesiastical history of the state.

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  • In 1841 he resigned his living to become curate to Samuel Wilberforce, then rector of Alverstoke, and upon Wilberforce's promotion to the deanery of Westminster in 1845 he was presented to the rectory of Itchenstoke.

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  • In 1845 and 1846 he preached the Hulsean lecture, and in the former year was made examining chaplain to Wilberforce, now bishop of Oxford.

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  • P. Stanley had been named, but rejected by the Irish Church, and, according to Bishop Wilberforce's correspondence, Trench's appointment was favoured neither by the prime minister nor the lord-lieutenant.

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  • "ALBERT BASIL ORME WILBERFORCE (1841-1916), English divine (see 28.630), died May 13 1916.

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  • This he effectually did in a little masterpiece of religious biography which remained in MS. in the possession of the Harcourt family until it was edited by Samuel Wilberforce, bishop of Oxford, as the Life of Mrs Godolphin (1847), reprinted in the "King's Classics" (1904).

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  • Supported by representative Christian leaders, such as Granville Sharp, Zachary Macaulay, William Wilberforce, Charles Grant and Henry Thornton, with Lord Teignmouth, ex-governorgeneral of India, as its first president, and Dr Porteus, bishop of London, as its friendly counsellor, the new society made rapid progress.

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  • The same story is given in a note in Wilberforce's Correspondence, the scene being somewhat vaguely laid in "Scotland."

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  • If we can believe a note in Wilberforce's Correspondence, he visited London in the spring of the same year, and was introduced by Dundas 5 to Pitt, Wilberforce and others.

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  • When he visited London Wilberforce wrote, " all the world is wild about Dr Chalmers."

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  • - Samuel Wilberforce, bishop of Winchester; Charles J.

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  • Dean Alford, Dr Tregelles, Bishop Wilberforce and Dr Eadie were removed by death.

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  • Famous houses no longer standing were Campden House, in the district north-west of the parish church, formerly known as the Gravel Pits; and Gore House, on the site of the present Albert Hall, the residence of William Wilberforce, and later of the countess of Blessington.

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  • trans., The Sanctuary of the Faithful Soul, London, 1905); all these three works were translated and edited by Father Bertrand Wilberforce, O.P., and have been reprinted several times; and especially Speculum Monachorum (French trans.

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  • One of its masters was Joseph Milner (1744-1797), author of a history of the Church; and among its students were Andrew Marvell the poet (1621-1678) and William Wilberforce the philanthropist (1759-1833), who is commemorated by a column and statue near the dock offices, and by the preservation of the house of his birth in High Street.

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  • in 1906 as the Wilberforce and Historical Museum.

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  • The evangelical movement had produced philanthropists like Wilberforce and Granville Sharp, and the Eclectic Society, a group of clergy and laymen who fell to discussing the new missionary movements.

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  • He took home with him a "protest" against the American Colonization Society, signed by Wilberforce, Zachary Macaulay, Samuel Gurney, William Evans, S.

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  • Wilberforce Clarke, London, 1881; compare also Erdmann, De expeditions Russorum Berdaam versus, Kasan, 1826, and Charmoy, Expedition d'Alexandre contre les Russes, St Petersburg, 1829); Iskandarnama-i-Bahri, second part, edited by Dr Sprenger (Calcutta, 1852 and 1869).

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  • Meanwhile the needs of India has been tardily met, on the urgent representations in parliament of William Wilberforce and others, by the consecration of Dr T.

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  • In 1791 Alexander Falconbridge (formerly a surgeon on board slave ships) collected the surviving fugitives and laid out a new settlement (Granville's Town); and the promoters of the enterprise - Granville Sharp, William Wilberforce, Sir Richard Carr Glyn, &c. - hitherto known as the St George's Bay Company, obtained a charter of incorporation as the Sierra Leone Company, with Henry Thornton as chairman.

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  • Wilberforce, O.P. (London, 1895).

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  • ROBERT ISAAC WILBERFORCE (1802-1857), English clergyman and writer, second son of William Wilberforce, was born on the 19th of December 1802.

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  • About this time Wilberforce became very intimate with Manning, and many letters on theological and ecclesiastical questions passed between them.

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  • In 1851 Manning joined the Church of Rome, and three years later Wilberforce took the same step. He was preparing for his ordination when he died at Albano on the 3rd of February 1857.

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  • He left two sons, the younger of whom, Edward Wilberforce (b.

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  • Edward's son, Lionel Robert Wilberforce (b.

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  • Wilberforce assisted his brother Samuel to write the Life and to edit the Correspondence of his father.

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  • Samuel Wilberforce >>

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  • SAMUEL WILBERFORCE (1805-1873), English bishop, third son of William Wilberforce, was born at Clapham Common, London, on the 7th of September 1805.

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  • Although a High Churchman Wilberforce held aloof from the Oxford movement, and in 1838 his divergence from the "Tract" writers became so marked that J.

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  • In 1838 Wilberforce published, with his elder brother Robert, the Life of his father, and two years later his father's Correspondence.

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  • The publication of a papal bull in 1850 establishing a Roman hierarchy in England brought the High Church party, of whom Wilberforce was the most prominent member, into temporary disrepute.

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  • Colenso's Commentary on the Romans in 1861, Wilberforce endeavoured to induce the author to hold a private conference with him; but after the publication of the first two parts of the Pentateuch Critically Examined he drew up the address of the bishops which called on Colenso to resign his bishopric. In 1867 he framed the first Report of the Ritualistic Commission, in which coercive measures against ritualism were discountenanced by the use of the word "restrain" instead of "abolish" or "prohibit."

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  • Wilberforce left three sons.

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  • The eldest, Reginald Garton Wilberforce, being the author of An Unrecorded Chapter of the Indian Mutiny (1894).

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  • Ernest Roland Wilberforce (1840-1908)was bishop of Newcastle-on-Tyne from 1882 to 1895, and bishop of Chichester from 1895 till his death.

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  • Albert Basil Orme Wilberforce (b.

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  • Besides the works already mentioned, Wilberforce wrote Heroes of Hebrew History (1870), originally contributed to Good Words, and several volumes of sermons.

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  • See Life of Samuel Wilberforce, with Selections from his Diary and Correspondence (1879-1882), vol.

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  • Wilberforce, who also wrote a one-volume Life (1888).

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  • William Wilberforce >>

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  • His Journals and Letters were published by Samuel Wilberforce in 1837.

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  • WILLIAM WILBERFORCE (1759-1833), English philanthropist whose name is chiefly associated with the abolition of the slave trade, was descended from a Yorkshire family which possessed the manor of Wilberfoss in the East Riding from the time of Henry II.

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  • He was the only son of Robert Wilberforce, member of a commercial house at Hull, by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Bird of Barton, Oxon, and was born at Hull on the 24th of August 1759.

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  • In 1784 Wilberforce was elected for both Hull and Yorkshire.

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  • A journey to Nice in the autumn of the same year with his friend Dr Isaac Milner (1750-1820), who had been a master at Hull grammar school when Wilberforce was there as a boy, and had since made a reputation as a mathematician, and afterwards became president of Queens' College, Cambridge, and dean of Carlisle, led to his conversion to Evangelical Christianity and the adoption of more serious views of life.

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  • Pitt entered heartily into their plans, and recommended Wilberforce to undertake the guidance of the project as a subject suited to his character and talents.

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  • While Clarkson conducted the agitation throughout the country, Wilberforce took every opportunity in the House of Commons of exposing the evils and horrors of the trade.

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  • On the 12th of May of the following year Wilberforce, in co-operation with Pitt, brought the subject of abolition again before the House of Commons; but the friends of the planters succeeded in getting the matter deferred.

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  • On the 27th of January following Wilberforce carried a motion for referring to a special committee the further examination of witnesses, but after full inquiry the motion for abolition in April 1791 was lost by 163 votes to 88.

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  • When the anti-slavery society was formed in 1823, Wilberforce and Clarkson became vice-presidents; but before their aim was accomplished Wilberforce had retired from public life, and the Emancipation Bill was not passed till August 1833, a month after his death.

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  • In 1797 Wilberforce published A Pratical View of the Prevailing Religious System of Professed Christians in the Higher and Middle Classes of this Country Contrasted with Real Christianity, which within half a year went through five editions and was afterwards translated into French, Italian, Dutch and German.

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  • Wilberforce left four sons, two of whom, Samuel and Robert Isaac, are noticed separately.

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  • The youngest, Henry William Wilberforce (1807-1873), was educated at Oriel College, Oxford, and was president of the Oxford Union.

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  • The chief authorities of the career of William Wilberforce are his Life (5 vols., 1838) by his sons, Robert Isaac and Samuel, and his Correspondence (1840) also published by his sons.

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  • A smaller edition of the Life was published by Samuel Wilberforce in 1868.

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  • See also The private papers of William Wilberforce, edited by A.

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  • Wilberforce (1897); Sir James Stephen, Essays in Ecclesiastical Biography (1849); J.

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  • C. Colquhoun, Wilberforce, His Friends and Times (1866); John Stoughton, William Wilberforce (1880); J.

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  • Gurney, Familiar Sketch of Wilberforce (1838); and J.

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  • Wilberforce (1864).

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  • Robert Isaac Wilberforce >>

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  • Self-emancipation even in the West Indian provinces of the fancy and imagination--what Wilberforce is there to bring that about?

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  • One nearly arrived in the royal box, and Sir Herbert Wilberforce was solicitous for the safety of the royalty there.

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