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wight

wight

wight Sentence Examples

  • RYDE, a municipal borough and watering-place in the Isle of Wight, England, 5 m.

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  • The coast of Wight rises more steeply.

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  • In 1758, under the duke of Marlborough, he shared in the ineffective raid on Cancale Bay, and the troops, after a short sojourn in the Isle of Wight, were sent to join the allied army of Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick in Germany.

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  • Lastly, even the Isle of Wight appears to have had a dynasty of its own.

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  • In the Isle of Wight there is a pair of pendulums arranged as in fig.

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  • All wight! shouted Denisov.

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  • "Well, all wight," said Denisov.

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  • SANDOWN, a watering-place in the Isle of Wight, England, 62 m.

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  • Here he rescued the pagan folk from an impending famine, sent preachers to the Isle of Wight and founded a monastery at Selsey.

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  • The History of the Quakers in Ireland (from 1653 to 1752), by Wight and Rutty, may be consulted.

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  • According to Bede, however, the kingdom was in a state of disunion from the death of Cenwalh to the accession of Ceadwalla in 685, who greatly increased its prestige and conquered the Isle of Wight, the inhabitants of which he treated with great barbarity.

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  • vir.) in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales prefaces his account of Alexander with the statement that his story is so common That every wight that hath discrecioun Hath herd somewhat or all of his fortune.

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  • Meanwhile all hopes of an accommodation with Charles were dispelled by his flight on the 11th of November from Hampton Court to Carisbroke Castle in the Isle of Wight, his Flight object being to negotiate independently with the Scots, the parliament and the army.

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  • - Good characterizations of Plautus, from the literary point of view, are given by Sellar in his Roman Poets of the Republic, and Wight Duff, in his Literary History of Rome (1909).

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  • Following on this he made an interesting experiment, using Morse's method, to connect the Isle of Wight telegraphically with the mainland, by conduction across the Solent in two places, during a temporary failure of the submarine cable in 1882 in that channel.

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  • P. Granville put into practice between Alum Bay in the Isle of Wight and the Needles lighthouse a method which depends upon conduction through sea water.

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  • Later the Bournemouth station was removed to Poole Harbour, and the Alum Bay station to Niton in the Isle of Wight, the distance being thus increased to 30 m.

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  • With this apparatus some of Marconi's earliest successes, such as telegraphing across the English Channel, were achieved, and telegraphic communication at the rate of fifteen words or so a minute established between the East Goodwin lightship and the South Foreland lighthouse, also between the Isle of Wight and the Lizard in Cornwall.

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  • In January 1901 he telegraphed without difficulty by electric waves from the Isle of Wight to the Lizard, viz.

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  • Phosphatic nodules occur also in the Chloritic Marl of the Isle of Wight and Dorsetshire, and at Wroughton, near Swindon.

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  • THOMAS ARNOLD (1795-1842), English clergyman and headmaster of Rugby school, was born at West Cowes, in the Isle of Wight, on the 13th of June 1795.

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  • He reduced Vectis (Isle of Wight) and penetrated to the borders of Somersetshire.

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  • New York is served by the American line, the North German Lloyd line, &c. Regular steamers serve the Channel Islands, Cherbourg and Havre, the principal English ports, Dublin, Belfast and Glasgow; and local steamers serve Cowes (Isle of Wight) and other neighbouring ports.

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  • FRESHWATER, a watering place in the Isle of Wight, England, 12 m.

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  • Phosphatic nodules occur also in the Chloritic Marl of the Isle of Wight and Dorsetshire, and at Wroughton, near Swindon.

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  • In January 1901 he established communication by his system between the Lizard in Cornwall and Niton in the Isle of Wight, a distance of 200 m.

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  • Regular passenger steamers serve Yarmouth in the Isle of Wight.

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  • He attended the queen in her flight to France in 1646, but disapproved of the prince's journey thither, and retired to Jersey, subsequently aiding in the king's escape to the Isle of Wight.

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  • ROBERT HOOKE (1635-1703), English experimental philosopher, was born on the 18th of July 1635 at Freshwater, in the Isle of Wight, where his father, John Hooke, was minister of the parish.

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  • Dying at Rouen in 1439, he left by Isabel, widow of Richard Beauchamp, earl of Worcester, a son, Earl Henry, who was created duke of Warwick, 1445, and is alleged, but without authority, to have been crowned king of the Isle of Wight by Henry VI.

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  • Ordained in 1662, he successively held the livings of Little Easton in Essex, Brighstone (sometimes called Brixton) in the Isle of Wight, and East Woodhay in Hampshire; in 1672 he resigned the last of these, and returned to Winchester, being by this time a prebendary of the cathedral, and chaplain to the bishop, as well as a fellow of Winchester College.

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  • (106,470 acres) in extent (roughly equalling the Isle of Wight).

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  • In the winter of 1853 Tennyson entered into possession of a little house and farm called Farringford, near Freshwater, in the Isle of Wight, which he leased at first, and afterwards bought: this beautiful place, ringed round with ilexes and cedars, entered into his life and coloured it with its delicate enchantment.

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  • Although exceedingly near-sighted, Tennyson was a very close observer of nature, and at the age of eighty his dark and glowing eyes, which were still strong, continued to permit him to enjoy the delicate features of country life around him, both at Aldworth and in the Isle of Wight.

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  • To avenge Richard's death he made a raid on the Isle of Wight, and then took part in the civil wars in France.

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  • Seven years before this the estate of Osborne had been purchased in the Isle of Wight, in order that the queen might have a home of her own.

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  • The funeral in London on the 1st and 2nd of February, including first the passage of the coffin from the Isle of Wight to Gosport between lines of warships, and secondly a military procession from London to Windsor, was a memorable solemnity: the greatest of English sovereigns, whose name would in history mark an age, had gone to her rest.

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  • Eighteen more islands are on the average as large as Jamaica; and more than a hundred are as large as the Isle of Wight."

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  • In that year Walsingham married a second time, his first wife having died in 1564; his second was also a widow, Ursula, daughter of Henry St Barbe and widow of Sir Richard Worsley of Appuldurcombe, captain of the Isle of Wight.

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  • Landowners refused sites, and in the Isle of Wight the people worshipped for many months in a quarry.

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  • SHANKLIN, a watering-place in the Isle of Wight, England, 82 m.

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  • In 1649 he was appointed a governor of the Isle of Wight, and in 1650, as lieutenant-general of the horse, took part in Cromwell's campaign in Scotland and assisted in the victory of Dunbar.

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  • In 530 Cerdic and Cynric are said to have conquered the Isle of Wight, which they gave to two of their relatives, Stuf and Wihtgar.

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  • Suspicion likewise attaches to the name Cerdic, which seems to be Welsh, while we learn from Bede that the Isle of Wight, together with part at least of the Hampshire coast, was colonized by Jutes, who apparently had a kingdom distinct from that of Wessex.

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  • foetidissima (stinking iris), Gladiolus communis, a rare plant found in the New Forest and the Isle of Wight, and Romulea Columnae, a small plant with narrow recurved leaves a few inches long and a short scape bearing one or more small regular funnel-shaped flowers, which occurs at Dawlish in Devonshire.

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  • According to Bede, dEthelwald, king of Sussex, had been previously baptized in Mercia at the suggestion of Wulfhere, who presented him with the Isle of Wight and the district about the Meon.

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  • In 1829, after short pastorates at Bedford (New Meeting) and Newport, Isle of Wight, he accepted a call to the historic Weigh House chapel, London.

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  • CARISBROOKE, a town in the Isle of Wight, England, i m.

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  • From this date lordship of the Isle of Wight was always associated with ownership of the castle, which thus became the seat of government of the island.

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  • Portsmouth Harbour opens into Spithead, one of the arms of the Channel separating the Isle of Wight from the mainland.

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  • There is a railway station (Portsmouth Harbour) on the Hard, from which passenger steamers serve Ryde in the Isle of Wight.

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  • The engagement made with Charles, then a prisoner in the Isle of Wight in 1647, which promised him support on condition of his sanctioning the Solemn League and Covenant and pledging himself to set up after three years a church according to the Confession of Faith, was protested against by the assembly; and from this came the famous " Act of Classes " by which the Covenanters disqualified for public office and even for military service all who had been parties to the engagement.

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  • VENTNOR, a watering-place in the Isle of Wight, England, 122 m.

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  • THE SOLENT, a strait of the English Channel, between the mainland (the coast of Hampshire, England), and the northwestern coast of the Isle of Wight, forming the western entrance to Southampton Water, Spithead being the eastern.

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  • Its length, from the eastern shore of Southampton Water to the Needles rocks off the western extremity of Wight, is 15 m.

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  • The general breadth is from 22 to 3 m., but between Stone Point on the mainland and Egypt Point on the north coast of Wight it narrows to 14 m.; and 32 m.

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  • In 1830 he was presented by Bishop Sumner of Winchester to the rectory of Brightstone in the Isle of Wight.

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  • COWES, a seaport and watering-place in the Isle of Wight, England, 12 m.

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  • West Cowes is served by the Isle of Wight Central railway.

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  • Before he was four-and-twenty he had stood two contested elections for the university of Cambridge, at which he was defeated, and he entered parliament for a pocketborough, Newtown, Isle of Wight, in June 1807.

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  • The coast-line of Anglesea and the Isle of Wight, but of no other islands, is included.

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  • The east and south coasts show considerable stretches of uniform uninflected coast-line, and except for the Farne Islands and Holy Island in the extreme north, the flat islands formed by ramifications of the estuaries on the Essex and north Kent coasts, and the Isle of Wight in the south, they are without islands.

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  • A flat coast follows as far as Selsey Bill and Spithead, but the south coast 410 [Physical Geography] of the Isle of Wight shows a succession of splendid cliffs.

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  • From the upland of Salisbury Plain, which corresponds to the axis of the anticline marking the centre of the double fold into which the strata of the south of England have been thrown, the great Chalk escarpment runs north-eastward; fingers of Chalk run eastward one each side of the Weald, forming the North and South Downs, while the southern edge of the Chalk sheet appears from beneath the Tertiary strata at several places on the south coast, and especially in the Isle of Wight.

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  • The Hampshire Basin forms a triangle with Dorchester, Salisbury and Worthing near the angles, and the rim of Chalk to the south appears in broken fragments in the Isle of Purbeck, the Isle of Wight, and to the east of Bognor.

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  • Again, in the Hampshire Basin and Isle of Wight, Eocene and Oligocene formations rest upon the Chalk.

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  • We there learn that the following place-names are ultimately of Celtic origin: - Brougham, Catterick, York, Lincoln (Lindum), Manchester (Mancunium), Doncaster (Danum), Wroxeter (Viroconium), Lichfield (Letocetum), Gloucester (Glevum), Cirencester (Corinium), Colchester (Camulodunum), London, Reculver, Richborough (Rutupiae), Dover, Lymne, Isle of Wight, Dorchester (Durnovaria), Sarum, Exeter (Isca), Brancaster (Branodunum), Thanet.

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  • Isle of Wight.

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  • Special provision has also been made for the highways in the Isle of Wight and in South Wales, where the roads were formerly regulated by special acts, and not by the ordinary Highway Acts.

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  • Being lord of the Isle of Wight at the time, he was in 1467 appointed one of the ambassadors to treat with the duke of 1 Rivers and Canals, znd ed.

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  • He is said to have had a vision, while he was at Amiens, of his wife, with her hair over her shoulders, bearing a dead child in her arms, on the very night that Mrs Donne, in London (or more probably in the Isle of Wight), was delivered of a still-born infant.

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  • By the help of the prime minister he entered parliament for the borough of Newtown in the Isle of Wight in July 1793.

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  • It forms the southern and residential quarter of Portsmouth, and overlooks Spithead, the inlet of the English Channel between the Isle of Wight and the mainland on the north-east.

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  • The principal buildings are All Saints church, erected in 1870 from the designs of Sir Gilbert Scott, and other churches, the market house and town hall, the Royal Victoria Yacht club-house, the theatre and the Royal Isle of Wight Infirmary.

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  • - Section of the Isle of Wight - a Monoclinal Curve.

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  • The most notable instance of this structure in Britain is that of the Isle of Wight, of which a section is given in fig.

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  • I of Wight fit in happily with the English annals constructed long centuries after by King Alfreds scribes in the first edition of the AngloSaxon Chronicle.

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  • All through the summcr Harold held a fleet concentrated under the lee of the Isle of Wight, waiting to intercept Williams armament, while the fyrd of Wessex was ready to support him if the enemy should succeed in making a landing.

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  • Newport, Isle Of Wight, England >>

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  • in the Isle of Wight, assisting him in the abortive negotiations with parliament on the question of episcopacy.

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  • In the Isle of Wight a serious epidemic broke out in 1906 which caused great destruction to bee-life in the following year.

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  • They settled in Kent and the Isle of Wight together with the adjacent parts of Hampshire.

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  • Fossil wood of the Pinites type (Pityoxylon) has been described from England, France, Germany, Sweden, Spitsbergen, North America and elsewhere; some of the best British examples have been obtained from the so-called Pine-raft, the remains of water-logged and petrified wood of Lower Greensand age, seen at low water near Brook Point in the Isle of Wight.

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  • Among the fruits Ettingshausen records Quercus, Liquidambar, Laurus, Nyssa, Diospyros, Symplocos, Magnolia, Victoria, Hightea, Sapindus, Cupania, Eugenia, Eucalyptus, Amygdalus; he suggests that the fruits of the London Clay of Sheppey may belong to the same plants as the leaves found at Alum Bay in the Isle of Wight.

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  • Gardner, Flora of Alum Bay, in " Geology of the Isle of Wight," Mem.

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  • At the same time he conquered the Isle of Wight, which he gave to Æthelwalh, king of Sussex.

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  • The Diocese has three archdeacons, one of whom serves the Isle of Wight.

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  • bewitched people from the entry gates at the Isle of Wight and Bath.

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  • commando raid on the Isle of Wight.

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  • dredged from the seabed off the Isle of Wight.

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  • dredged from the seabed off the Isle of Wight.

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  • Growing up on the traveling fairgrounds he went on to become a wealthy nightclub owner on the Isle of Wight.

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  • Moving to the Isle of Wight The Town of Cowes is internationally famed for the Cowes Week sailing regatta held annually in August.

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  • Andrew Goddard's oil paintings are of the tidal mud flats of the river Yar in the Isle of Wight.

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  • flotilla of yachts to sail around the Isle of Wight?

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  • Ferries, including the hovercraft - to Hayling Island, the Isle of Wight and Gosport.

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  • isle of wight has some well established f.. .

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  • The entrance was quite lumpy with poor visibility across to the Isle of Wight.

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  • None of our stegosaur metacarpals are from the Isle of Wight, but we have some from Dorset.

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  • meth labs within London and a number of small domestic labs on the Isle of Wight.

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  • Jerry, driving a minibus, entered the picture around 3am, on his way home to north London from the Isle of Wight.

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  • mud flats of the river Yar in the Isle of Wight.

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  • Andrew Goddard's oil paintings are of the tidal mud flats of the river Yar in the Isle of Wight.

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  • It is an excellent vantage point with spectacular views across the sea to the Isle of Wight.

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  • A couple from the Isle of Wight recently spent a weekend in North Devon to receive some help with their miniature poodle.

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  • A major beach recharge project was completed in 1987, using shingle dredged from the seabed off the Isle of Wight.

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  • Moving to the Isle of Wight The Town of Cowes is internationally famed for the Cowes Week sailing regatta held annually in August.

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  • Mary Ann was dispatched to Osborn House on the Isle of Wight, where a small sanatorium was set up for the estate workers.

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  • scarce resource for the Isle of Wight.

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  • seaport town on the Isle of Wight, an island due south of the major southern English port of Southampton.

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  • secluded location on the Isle of Wight makes any holiday here feel almost like you're abroad.

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  • The delightfully secluded location on the Isle of Wight makes any holiday here feel almost like you're abroad.

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  • Currently promoting their latest album ' Supernature ', Goldfrapp are set to bring a sprinkling of glamor to the Isle Of Wight Festival.

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  • A totally trustworthy gentleman called Johnny Quinn offered us a residency at the Ryde Castle Hotel on the Isle of Wight.

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  • It is an excellent vantage point with spectacular views across the sea to the Isle of Wight.

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  • Mrs Chaplin Year 8 Visit to Little Canada, Isle of Wight This year 70 students enjoyed this residential activity weekend.

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  • The Isle of Wight has a more imposing wench, clothed with a little drapery.

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  • Lo, lo, the wretched wight, Who God disdaining, His mischief made his might, His guard his gaining.

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  • wight team early 1990's.

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  • In 1978, The Prince took time off from the Regatta to go windsurfing off the Isle of Wight.

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  • He then retired to Freshwater, in the Isle of Wight, and took an active interest in the affairs of the Royal Astronomical Society, of which he became honorary secretary in 1862 and president in 1866.

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  • He speedily secured the admission of the secluded members, having meanwhile been in continual communication with Monk, was again one of the fresh council of state, consisting entirely of friends of the Restoration, and accepted from Monk a commission to be governor of the Isle of Wight and captain of a company of foot.

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  • at the Isle of Wight.

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  • vir.) in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales prefaces his account of Alexander with the statement that his story is so common That every wight that hath discrecioun Hath herd somewhat or all of his fortune.

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  • Meanwhile all hopes of an accommodation with Charles were dispelled by his flight on the 11th of November from Hampton Court to Carisbroke Castle in the Isle of Wight, his Flight object being to negotiate independently with the Scots, the parliament and the army.

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  • - Good characterizations of Plautus, from the literary point of view, are given by Sellar in his Roman Poets of the Republic, and Wight Duff, in his Literary History of Rome (1909).

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  • Following on this he made an interesting experiment, using Morse's method, to connect the Isle of Wight telegraphically with the mainland, by conduction across the Solent in two places, during a temporary failure of the submarine cable in 1882 in that channel.

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  • P. Granville put into practice between Alum Bay in the Isle of Wight and the Needles lighthouse a method which depends upon conduction through sea water.

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  • Later the Bournemouth station was removed to Poole Harbour, and the Alum Bay station to Niton in the Isle of Wight, the distance being thus increased to 30 m.

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  • In January 1901 he established communication by his system between the Lizard in Cornwall and Niton in the Isle of Wight, a distance of 200 m.

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  • With this apparatus some of Marconi's earliest successes, such as telegraphing across the English Channel, were achieved, and telegraphic communication at the rate of fifteen words or so a minute established between the East Goodwin lightship and the South Foreland lighthouse, also between the Isle of Wight and the Lizard in Cornwall.

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  • In January 1901 he telegraphed without difficulty by electric waves from the Isle of Wight to the Lizard, viz.

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  • THOMAS ARNOLD (1795-1842), English clergyman and headmaster of Rugby school, was born at West Cowes, in the Isle of Wight, on the 13th of June 1795.

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  • Regular passenger steamers serve Yarmouth in the Isle of Wight.

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  • He attended the queen in her flight to France in 1646, but disapproved of the prince's journey thither, and retired to Jersey, subsequently aiding in the king's escape to the Isle of Wight.

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  • ROBERT HOOKE (1635-1703), English experimental philosopher, was born on the 18th of July 1635 at Freshwater, in the Isle of Wight, where his father, John Hooke, was minister of the parish.

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  • He reduced Vectis (Isle of Wight) and penetrated to the borders of Somersetshire.

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  • The History of the Quakers in Ireland (from 1653 to 1752), by Wight and Rutty, may be consulted.

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  • Dying at Rouen in 1439, he left by Isabel, widow of Richard Beauchamp, earl of Worcester, a son, Earl Henry, who was created duke of Warwick, 1445, and is alleged, but without authority, to have been crowned king of the Isle of Wight by Henry VI.

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  • Ordained in 1662, he successively held the livings of Little Easton in Essex, Brighstone (sometimes called Brixton) in the Isle of Wight, and East Woodhay in Hampshire; in 1672 he resigned the last of these, and returned to Winchester, being by this time a prebendary of the cathedral, and chaplain to the bishop, as well as a fellow of Winchester College.

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  • (106,470 acres) in extent (roughly equalling the Isle of Wight).

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  • Hosmer, Daniel Wight and Austin Bacon, in vol.

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  • In the winter of 1853 Tennyson entered into possession of a little house and farm called Farringford, near Freshwater, in the Isle of Wight, which he leased at first, and afterwards bought: this beautiful place, ringed round with ilexes and cedars, entered into his life and coloured it with its delicate enchantment.

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  • Although exceedingly near-sighted, Tennyson was a very close observer of nature, and at the age of eighty his dark and glowing eyes, which were still strong, continued to permit him to enjoy the delicate features of country life around him, both at Aldworth and in the Isle of Wight.

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  • In 1784 Francis was returned by the borough of Yarmouth, Isle of Wight; and although he took an opportunity to disclaim every feeling of personal animosity towards Hastings, this did not prevent him, on the return of the latter in 1785, from doing all in his power to bring forward and support the charges which ultimately led to the impeachment resolutions of 1787.

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  • To avenge Richard's death he made a raid on the Isle of Wight, and then took part in the civil wars in France.

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  • New York is served by the American line, the North German Lloyd line, &c. Regular steamers serve the Channel Islands, Cherbourg and Havre, the principal English ports, Dublin, Belfast and Glasgow; and local steamers serve Cowes (Isle of Wight) and other neighbouring ports.

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  • Seven years before this the estate of Osborne had been purchased in the Isle of Wight, in order that the queen might have a home of her own.

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  • The funeral in London on the 1st and 2nd of February, including first the passage of the coffin from the Isle of Wight to Gosport between lines of warships, and secondly a military procession from London to Windsor, was a memorable solemnity: the greatest of English sovereigns, whose name would in history mark an age, had gone to her rest.

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  • Eighteen more islands are on the average as large as Jamaica; and more than a hundred are as large as the Isle of Wight."

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  • In 1758, under the duke of Marlborough, he shared in the ineffective raid on Cancale Bay, and the troops, after a short sojourn in the Isle of Wight, were sent to join the allied army of Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick in Germany.

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  • FRESHWATER, a watering place in the Isle of Wight, England, 12 m.

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  • In that year Walsingham married a second time, his first wife having died in 1564; his second was also a widow, Ursula, daughter of Henry St Barbe and widow of Sir Richard Worsley of Appuldurcombe, captain of the Isle of Wight.

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  • Landowners refused sites, and in the Isle of Wight the people worshipped for many months in a quarry.

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  • Lastly, even the Isle of Wight appears to have had a dynasty of its own.

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  • SHANKLIN, a watering-place in the Isle of Wight, England, 82 m.

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  • In 1649 he was appointed a governor of the Isle of Wight, and in 1650, as lieutenant-general of the horse, took part in Cromwell's campaign in Scotland and assisted in the victory of Dunbar.

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  • In 530 Cerdic and Cynric are said to have conquered the Isle of Wight, which they gave to two of their relatives, Stuf and Wihtgar.

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  • Suspicion likewise attaches to the name Cerdic, which seems to be Welsh, while we learn from Bede that the Isle of Wight, together with part at least of the Hampshire coast, was colonized by Jutes, who apparently had a kingdom distinct from that of Wessex.

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  • According to Bede, however, the kingdom was in a state of disunion from the death of Cenwalh to the accession of Ceadwalla in 685, who greatly increased its prestige and conquered the Isle of Wight, the inhabitants of which he treated with great barbarity.

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  • SANDOWN, a watering-place in the Isle of Wight, England, 62 m.

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  • Here he rescued the pagan folk from an impending famine, sent preachers to the Isle of Wight and founded a monastery at Selsey.

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  • In the Isle of Wight there is a pair of pendulums arranged as in fig.

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  • foetidissima (stinking iris), Gladiolus communis, a rare plant found in the New Forest and the Isle of Wight, and Romulea Columnae, a small plant with narrow recurved leaves a few inches long and a short scape bearing one or more small regular funnel-shaped flowers, which occurs at Dawlish in Devonshire.

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  • But Charles left his ally in the lurch and concluded the peace of Crepy that same month; and in 1545 Henry had to face alone a French invasion of the Isle of Wight.

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  • According to Bede, dEthelwald, king of Sussex, had been previously baptized in Mercia at the suggestion of Wulfhere, who presented him with the Isle of Wight and the district about the Meon.

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  • In 1829, after short pastorates at Bedford (New Meeting) and Newport, Isle of Wight, he accepted a call to the historic Weigh House chapel, London.

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  • CARISBROOKE, a town in the Isle of Wight, England, i m.

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  • From this date lordship of the Isle of Wight was always associated with ownership of the castle, which thus became the seat of government of the island.

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  • Portsmouth Harbour opens into Spithead, one of the arms of the Channel separating the Isle of Wight from the mainland.

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  • There is a railway station (Portsmouth Harbour) on the Hard, from which passenger steamers serve Ryde in the Isle of Wight.

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  • The engagement made with Charles, then a prisoner in the Isle of Wight in 1647, which promised him support on condition of his sanctioning the Solemn League and Covenant and pledging himself to set up after three years a church according to the Confession of Faith, was protested against by the assembly; and from this came the famous " Act of Classes " by which the Covenanters disqualified for public office and even for military service all who had been parties to the engagement.

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  • VENTNOR, a watering-place in the Isle of Wight, England, 122 m.

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  • THE SOLENT, a strait of the English Channel, between the mainland (the coast of Hampshire, England), and the northwestern coast of the Isle of Wight, forming the western entrance to Southampton Water, Spithead being the eastern.

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  • Its length, from the eastern shore of Southampton Water to the Needles rocks off the western extremity of Wight, is 15 m.

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  • The general breadth is from 22 to 3 m., but between Stone Point on the mainland and Egypt Point on the north coast of Wight it narrows to 14 m.; and 32 m.

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  • The coast of Wight rises more steeply.

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  • In 1830 he was presented by Bishop Sumner of Winchester to the rectory of Brightstone in the Isle of Wight.

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  • COWES, a seaport and watering-place in the Isle of Wight, England, 12 m.

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  • West Cowes is served by the Isle of Wight Central railway.

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  • Before he was four-and-twenty he had stood two contested elections for the university of Cambridge, at which he was defeated, and he entered parliament for a pocketborough, Newtown, Isle of Wight, in June 1807.

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  • The coast-line of Anglesea and the Isle of Wight, but of no other islands, is included.

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  • The east and south coasts show considerable stretches of uniform uninflected coast-line, and except for the Farne Islands and Holy Island in the extreme north, the flat islands formed by ramifications of the estuaries on the Essex and north Kent coasts, and the Isle of Wight in the south, they are without islands.

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  • A flat coast follows as far as Selsey Bill and Spithead, but the south coast 410 [Physical Geography] of the Isle of Wight shows a succession of splendid cliffs.

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  • From the upland of Salisbury Plain, which corresponds to the axis of the anticline marking the centre of the double fold into which the strata of the south of England have been thrown, the great Chalk escarpment runs north-eastward; fingers of Chalk run eastward one each side of the Weald, forming the North and South Downs, while the southern edge of the Chalk sheet appears from beneath the Tertiary strata at several places on the south coast, and especially in the Isle of Wight.

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  • The Hampshire Basin forms a triangle with Dorchester, Salisbury and Worthing near the angles, and the rim of Chalk to the south appears in broken fragments in the Isle of Purbeck, the Isle of Wight, and to the east of Bognor.

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  • Again, in the Hampshire Basin and Isle of Wight, Eocene and Oligocene formations rest upon the Chalk.

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  • We there learn that the following place-names are ultimately of Celtic origin: - Brougham, Catterick, York, Lincoln (Lindum), Manchester (Mancunium), Doncaster (Danum), Wroxeter (Viroconium), Lichfield (Letocetum), Gloucester (Glevum), Cirencester (Corinium), Colchester (Camulodunum), London, Reculver, Richborough (Rutupiae), Dover, Lymne, Isle of Wight, Dorchester (Durnovaria), Sarum, Exeter (Isca), Brancaster (Branodunum), Thanet.

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  • Isle of Wight.

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  • Special provision has also been made for the highways in the Isle of Wight and in South Wales, where the roads were formerly regulated by special acts, and not by the ordinary Highway Acts.

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  • Being lord of the Isle of Wight at the time, he was in 1467 appointed one of the ambassadors to treat with the duke of 1 Rivers and Canals, znd ed.

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  • He is said to have had a vision, while he was at Amiens, of his wife, with her hair over her shoulders, bearing a dead child in her arms, on the very night that Mrs Donne, in London (or more probably in the Isle of Wight), was delivered of a still-born infant.

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  • By the help of the prime minister he entered parliament for the borough of Newtown in the Isle of Wight in July 1793.

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  • It forms the southern and residential quarter of Portsmouth, and overlooks Spithead, the inlet of the English Channel between the Isle of Wight and the mainland on the north-east.

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  • RYDE, a municipal borough and watering-place in the Isle of Wight, England, 5 m.

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  • The principal buildings are All Saints church, erected in 1870 from the designs of Sir Gilbert Scott, and other churches, the market house and town hall, the Royal Victoria Yacht club-house, the theatre and the Royal Isle of Wight Infirmary.

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  • - Section of the Isle of Wight - a Monoclinal Curve.

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  • The most notable instance of this structure in Britain is that of the Isle of Wight, of which a section is given in fig.

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  • I of Wight fit in happily with the English annals constructed long centuries after by King Alfreds scribes in the first edition of the AngloSaxon Chronicle.

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  • All through the summcr Harold held a fleet concentrated under the lee of the Isle of Wight, waiting to intercept Williams armament, while the fyrd of Wessex was ready to support him if the enemy should succeed in making a landing.

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  • The French attempted to retaliate in 1545, and burnt some villages in the Isle of Wight and on the coast of Sussex.

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  • Newport, Isle Of Wight, England >>

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  • in the Isle of Wight, assisting him in the abortive negotiations with parliament on the question of episcopacy.

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  • In the Isle of Wight a serious epidemic broke out in 1906 which caused great destruction to bee-life in the following year.

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  • They settled in Kent and the Isle of Wight together with the adjacent parts of Hampshire.

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  • Fossil wood of the Pinites type (Pityoxylon) has been described from England, France, Germany, Sweden, Spitsbergen, North America and elsewhere; some of the best British examples have been obtained from the so-called Pine-raft, the remains of water-logged and petrified wood of Lower Greensand age, seen at low water near Brook Point in the Isle of Wight.

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  • Among the fruits Ettingshausen records Quercus, Liquidambar, Laurus, Nyssa, Diospyros, Symplocos, Magnolia, Victoria, Hightea, Sapindus, Cupania, Eugenia, Eucalyptus, Amygdalus; he suggests that the fruits of the London Clay of Sheppey may belong to the same plants as the leaves found at Alum Bay in the Isle of Wight.

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  • Gardner, Flora of Alum Bay, in " Geology of the Isle of Wight," Mem.

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  • At the same time he conquered the Isle of Wight, which he gave to Æthelwalh, king of Sussex.

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  • Mary Ann was dispatched to Osborn House on the Isle of Wight, where a small sanatorium was set up for the estate workers.

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  • Page 24 Housing: 3.15 Land is a scarce resource for the Isle of Wight.

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  • Cowes Cowes is a seaport town on the Isle of Wight, an island due south of the major southern English port of Southampton.

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  • The delightfully secluded location on the Isle of Wight makes any holiday here feel almost like you 're abroad.

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  • Currently promoting their latest album ' Supernature ', Goldfrapp are set to bring a sprinkling of glamor to the Isle Of Wight Festival.

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  • A totally trustworthy gentleman called Johnny Quinn offered us a residency at the Ryde Castle Hotel on the Isle of Wight.

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  • Mrs Chaplin Year 8 Visit to Little Canada, Isle of Wight This year 70 students enjoyed this residential activity weekend.

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  • The Isle of Wight has a more imposing wench, clothed with a little drapery.

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  • Lo, lo, the wretched wight, Who God disdaining, His mischief made his might, His guard his gaining.

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  • Right; Leigh Bishop Deep wreck diver Isle of wight team early 1990's.

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  • In 1978, The Prince took time off from the Regatta to go windsurfing off the Isle of Wight.

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  • In the Isle of Wight, and from thence along the shores of Devonshire and Cornwall to the Scilly Isles, they succeed well, forming a fine feature even in cottage gardens, whilst in some larger gardens whole avenues are planted.

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  • Gilliesii is a beautiful sub-tropical tree which thrives against walls in the Isle of Wight.

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  • M. incana grows wild on cliffs in the Isle of Wight, and is the origin of the Biennial, or Brompton and Queen Stocks; M. annua has yielded the Ten-week Stocks, and M. sinuata the others.

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  • Peter Pan - Peter Pan's world and theme park is a children's amusement park located on the Isle of Wight.

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  • Lucid Gems -- Dropped by Wight Night and Gargoyle in Halloweentown.

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  • The day that Claudia Brenner and Rebecca Wight were shot was a sunny spring day on the Appalachian Trail.

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  • Bear Grylls was born on June 7, 1974 in Bembridge, on the Isle of Wight in the United Kingdom.

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  • Born in Donaghadee, Northern Ireland, as Edward Michael Grylls, Bear spent most of his childhood on the Isle of Wight.

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