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width

width

width Sentence Examples

  • wide, the Bafing at this point having a width of 360 ft.

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  • Geologically considered, the country may be divided into three regions - a central, and the largest, comprising the whole width of the Aravalli system, formed of very old sub-metamorphic and gneissic rocks; an eastern region, with sharply defined boundary, along which the most ancient formations are abruptly replaced by the great basin of the Vindhyan strata, or are overlaid by the still more extensive spread of the Deccan trap, forming the plateau of Malwa; and a western region, of very ill-defined margin, in which, besides some rocks of undetermined age, it is more or less known or suspected that Tertiary and Secondary strata stretch across from Sind, beneath the sands of the desert, towards the flanks of the Aravallis.

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  • He had not ridden many hundred yards after that before he saw to his left, across the whole width of the field, an enormous mass of cavalry in brilliant white uniforms, mounted on black horses, trotting straight toward him and across his path.

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  • in width and from 3 to 5 fathoms deep, navigable for steamers of good size.

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  • The two trees whose girth had been small enough for her wrap her arms around had expanded in width and height, reaching towards the gray sky of the underworld.  Katie craned her neck, unable to see the tops of the trees.  Their trunks had grown outward from the trail until they were as wide as a football field.  Their massive roots ruptured the ground that had been the trail, creating a ravine she could see even from their safe distance.

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  • In the first instance he proposed to place the guiding wheels outside the bearing wheels, and the Nanpantan line was laid on this plan with a width of 5 ft.

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  • In the first instance he proposed to place the guiding wheels outside the bearing wheels, and the Nanpantan line was laid on this plan with a width of 5 ft.

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  • the width is 3700 m.

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  • 4, or the Hamilton Dock, was completed in 1891, having a length on floor of 520 ft., a width of entrance of 94 ft.

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  • Fully splayed, it would almost cover the width of her petite frame.

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  • Dean examined the ground for tracks but the water, which while shallow, in most places covered the width of the narrow passageway and obliterated any footprints.

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  • What had appeared to be a thick, gold, hard band of about three inches in width had molded around her arm and felt no heavier than the clothing she wore.

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  • in width, between the crest of the Apennines and the plain of the Po, is one of the least known and at the same time least interesting portions of Italy.

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  • long; its width varies from 5 m.

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  • in width, forming at times forests of no inconsiderable size.

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  • or less in height and width, with the sides slightly inclined towards one another, and from 30 to 40 ft., or even more, in length; the sides are composed sometimes of slabs, sometimes of rough walling, while the roof is composed of flat slabs; and the bodies were probably disposed in a sitting position.

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  • and Cape Pangara or Sandy Point on the S., it has a width of about 10 m.

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  • in width) on the south-eastern coast of South Island.

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  • minus the width of two of his rails.

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  • Except in hard rock, the top width of a cutting, and therefore the amount of material to be excavated, increases rapidly with the depth; hence if a cutting exceeds a certain depth, which varies with the particular circumstances, it may be more economical, instead of forming the sides at the slope at which the material of which they are composed will stand, to make them nearly vertical and support the soil with a retaining wall, or to bore a tunnel.

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  • Cars of this saloon type have been introduced into England for use on railways which have adopted electric traction, but owing to the narrower loading gauge of British railways it is not usually possible to seat four persons across the width of the car for its whole length, and at the ends the seats have to be placed along the sides of the vehicle.

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  • It has a length of 52 m., and an average width of 1 2 m.

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  • The latter are often swollen at the ends, so that the cross-wall separating two successive cells has a larger surface than if the cells were of uniform width along their entire length.

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  • in width, while that between the gulfs of Sta Eufemia and Squillace, which connects the two portions of the province, does not exceed 20 m.

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  • The width of Liberia inland varies very considerably; it is greatest, about zoo m., from N.E.

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  • 6.92 in.); width between parapets and width of tunnels, 1 m.

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  • wide, except Washington Street, which has a width of 120 ft.

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  • His knowledge of Roman and foreign law, and the general width of his education, freed him from the danger of relying too exclusively upon narrow precedents, and afforded him a storehouse of principles and illustrations, while the grasp and acuteness of his intellect enabled him to put his judgments in a form which almost always commanded assent.

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  • The Po itself, which is here a very large stream, with an average width of 400 to 600 yds., continues to flow with an undivided mass of waters as far as Sta Maria di Ariano, where it parts into two arms, known as the Po di Maestra and Po di Goro, and these again are subdivided into several other branches, forming a delta above 20 m.

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  • with an extreme width of 32 m.

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  • The Po itself, which is here a very large stream, with an average width of 400 to 600 yds., continues to flow with an undivided mass of waters as far as Sta Maria di Ariano, where it parts into two arms, known as the Po di Maestra and Po di Goro, and these again are subdivided into several other branches, forming a delta above 20 m.

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  • in length and scarcely one line in width to more than 2 ft.

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  • in width, still exists.

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  • high, with a width of 60 ft.

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  • from east to west with an average width of 20 m.

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  • Morse and Gale, who assisted him, found, however, that the distance of the plates up and down the canal must be at least three or four times the width of the canal to obtain successful results.

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  • in average width; at its east end is Munjoy Hill, 160 ft.

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  • in length by 4 in width, it consists of a series of precipitous rocks rudely piled into irregular blocks and pinnacles, and strongly contrasting with a rich vegetation.

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  • in width, commonly styled "rinks" - a word which also designates each set of players - and these are numbered in sequence on a plate fixed in the bank at each end opposite the centre of the space.

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  • from the sea a width of nearly 3300 yds.

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  • in length by 4 in width, it consists of a series of precipitous rocks rudely piled into irregular blocks and pinnacles, and strongly contrasting with a rich vegetation.

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  • of Java, from which it is separated by Bali Strait, which is shallow, and scarcely over a mile in width at its narrowest point.

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  • Subsequent improvements on the Sessions patent have resulted in a modified form of vestibule in which the housing is made the full width of the platform, though the contact plate and springs and the flexible connexions remain the same as before.

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  • or so in width, and separating the two fertile but otherwise insignificant islands of Bali and Lombok, makes such a frontier as can hardly be shown to exist elsewhere.

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  • 2.6 in.) radius; width of formation, 3.50 m.

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  • over width of carriage; height of tunnels, 5 m.

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  • in width, running nearly N.E.

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  • in length, and half as much in width, and of a thickness corresponding with that of the quartzite ridges on the hills above.

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  • in height, and have a width of 25 ft.

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  • and S., is 484 m., and its extreme width, E.

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  • over width of carriage; height of tunnels, 5 m.

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  • in length, and half as much in width, and of a thickness corresponding with that of the quartzite ridges on the hills above.

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  • It varies in width from 10 ft.

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  • Its width depends on the numbers of tracks and their gauge; for a double line of standard gauge it is about 25 ft., a space of 6 ft.

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  • 5.5 in.); top width of ballast, 2.10 m.

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  • in extreme length, with an average width of 40 m., and the smaller, West Falkland, is 80 m.

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  • Its width is as a rule about 24 ft.; at present its surface is formed of rough cobbling, upon which there was probably a gravel layer, now washed away.

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  • As the tableland runs northward it decreases both in height and width, until it narrows to a few miles only, with an elevation of scarcely 1500 ft.; under the name of the Blue Mountains the plateau widens again and increases in altitude, the chief peaks being Mount Clarence(4000 ft.), Mount Victoria (3525 ft.), and Mount Hay (3270 ft.).

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  • in width, but some of the finest residences stand on the hills, which form an irregular semicircle behind the city, and command extensive views of the valley.

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  • The width of 4 ft.

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  • As the tableland runs northward it decreases both in height and width, until it narrows to a few miles only, with an elevation of scarcely 1500 ft.; under the name of the Blue Mountains the plateau widens again and increases in altitude, the chief peaks being Mount Clarence(4000 ft.), Mount Victoria (3525 ft.), and Mount Hay (3270 ft.).

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  • The width of 4 ft.

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  • in width, and the distance from sea to sea is further diminished by a large irregular salt-water inlet.

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  • in width, and somewhat greater depth, which receives a number of streams from the central mass of the Apennines.

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  • in width from north to south.

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  • in height by 2 in width.

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  • in width.

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  • The coasts present a number of maritime inlets, forming inland bays, which communicate with the sea by channels of greater or less width.

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  • These collateral bundles are separated from one another by bands of conjunctive tissues called primary medullary rays, which may be quite narrow or of considerable width.

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  • of the great plateau formation of the old continent - the backbone of Asia - which stretches with decreasing altitude and width from of Asia.

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  • Between the ranges lie valleys of about the same width as the bases of the mountains.

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  • long and varies in width from 200 yds.

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  • between the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea in nearly rectangular form for about 280 m., with about the same extreme width in longitude.

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  • Along the eastern border of this delta, and southward of it, along the Mississippi itself, extends a belt of hills or bluffs (sometimes called "cane-hills"), which is cut by deep ravines and, though very narrow in the north, has in the south an average width of about to m.

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  • The valleys vary in width from a few hundred yards to several miles.

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  • The Vicksburg formation lies next in order south-west, in a narrow strip of fairly regular width which alone of the Tertiary formations runs as far west as the Mississippi River; it is probably nowhere more than 110 ft.

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  • in length and the greatest width is 12 m., the total area being 51 sq.

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  • in width, between 65°and too°east and between 28° and 35° north.

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  • It includes an immense high and broken plateau which spreads from south-west to north-east, losing in width and altitude as it advances north-east.

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  • But beyond the eastern shores of the Caspian no system of direct geodetic measurements by first-class triangulation has been possible, and the surveys of Asiatic Russia are separated from those of Europe by the width of that inland sea.

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  • Where the Oxus river takes its great bend to the north from Ishkashim, the breadth of the Afghan territory intervening between that river and the main water-divide of the Hindu Kush is not more than 10 or 12 m.; and east of the Pamir extension of Afghanistan, where the Beyik Pass crosses the Sarikol range and drops into the Taghdumbash Pamir, there is but the narrow width of the Karachukar valley between the Sarikol and the Murtagh.

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  • It thus places a broad width of independent territory between the boundaries of British India (which have remained practically, though not absolutely, untouched) and Afghanistan; and this independent belt includes Swat, Bajour and a part of the Nlohmand territory north of the Kabul river.

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  • The same principle of maintaining an intervening width of neutral territory between the two countries is definitely established throughout the eastern borders of Afghanistan, along the full length of which a definite boundary has been demarcated to the point where it touches the northern limits of Baluchistan on the Gomal river.

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  • It is not true that throughout the whole width of this zone the beds are folded.

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  • But below that city it suddenly widens out, and the width gradually increases through the stretch of 350 m.

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  • From the ovo-testis, which lies near the apex of the visceral coil, a common hermaphrodite duct ve proceeds, which receives the duct of the compact white albuminiparous gland, Ed, and then becomes much enlarged, the additional width being due to the development of glandular folds, which are regarded as forming a uterus u.

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  • in width, but it becomes quite narrow below Zanesville.

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  • across at its greatest width.

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  • and a width of from 20 m.

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  • m., a wide delta is thrust out into the lake, reducing its width to 20 m.

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  • in width, in the north-eastern portion of the country, and a strip along the valley of the San Francisco, where a large amount of the present crop is produced.

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  • in width, and contains about 390,000 sq.

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  • In its long course it varies greatly both in depth and width, in some parts being only a few feet deep and spreading out to a width of more than a mile, while in other and mountainous portions of its course its channel is narrowed to 300 or 400 ft., and its depth is increased in inverse ratio.

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  • and the width between the parapets 382 ft.

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  • long, and has an average width of 65 m.

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  • long, with a minimum width of 6 m.; the water is generally deep and the shoals lying near the usually travelled routes are well marked.

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  • FORMOSA (called Taiwan by the Chinese, and following them by the Japanese, into whose possession it came after their war with China in 1895), an island in the western Pacific Ocean, between the Southern and the Eastern China Sea, separated from the Chinese mainland by the Formosa Strait, which has a width of about 90 m.

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  • in extreme width; on the east coast there is a rich plain called Giran, and there are also some fertile valleys in the neighbourhood of Karenko and Pinan, extending up the longitudinal valleys of the rivers Karenko and Pinan, between which and the east coast the Taito range intervenes; but the rest of the island is mountainous and covered with virgin forest.

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  • A little farther down it becomes completely navigable, and attains a breadth of 4200 ft.; but between the village of Ostrovki and that of Ust-Tosna it passes over a limestone bed, which produces a series of rapids, and reduces the width of the river from 1050 to 840 and that of the navigable passage from 350 to 175 ft.

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  • Waldseemuller (1507) was the first to separate America and Asia by an ocean of considerable width, but J.

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  • But the width of his intellectual sympathies, joined to a constitutional indecision and vis inertiae, prevented him from doing more enduring work.

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  • The strips (inae, philyrae), which were cut with a sharp knife or some such instrument, were laid on a board side by side to the required width, thus forming a layer (scheda), across which another layer of shorter strips was laid at right angles.

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  • in width; the hieratica, I I digiti or 8 in.

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  • The charta Fanniana appears to have been a kind of papyrus worked up from the amphitheatrica, which by flattening and other methods was increased in width by an inch, in the factory of a certain Fannius at Rome.

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  • The Taeniotica, named apparently from the place of its manufacture, a tongue of land (racvial near Alexandria, was sold by weight, and was of uncertain width, perhaps from 4s to 5 in.

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  • So indispensable did it The charta Claudia was made from a composition of the first and second qualities, the Augusta and the Livia, a layer of the former being backed with one of the latter; and the sheet was increased to nearly a foot in width.

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  • The width, however, proved inconvenient, and the broad sheet was liable to injury by tearing.

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  • His figures regarding the width of the different kinds of papyri have generally been understood to concern the width (or height) of the rolls, as distinguished from their length.

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  • It has, however, been observed that in practice the width of extant rolls does not tally in any satisfactory degree with Pliny's measurements; and a more plausible explanation has been offered (Birt, Antik.

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  • to W., though the shores are indented to an extraordinary degree and the bulk of the island is much narrower than the extreme width would indicate.

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  • Yell (2483), separated from the north-east coast of Mainland by Yell Sound, is the second largest island of the group, having a length of 17 m., and an extreme width of 62 m., though towards the middle the voes of Mid Yell and Whale Firth almost divide it into two.

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  • in width, interspersed with small chambers, all excavated at successive levels, in the they reach seven storeys), and communicate with one another by stairs cut out of the living rock.

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  • Each of the larger streams, as well as a large proportion of the smaller ones, is accompanied by a belt of bottom land, of greater or less width, lying low as regards the stream, and liable to overflow at times of high water.

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  • It divides the entrance to the Gulf of Mexico into two passages of nearly equal width, - the Strait of Florida, about I io m.

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  • in width along the coast, and of a mountainous tract, falling steeply on the west and merging into a highland plateau which slopes gradually to the N.E.

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  • The city varies considerably in width, and occupies a total area of about 45 sq.

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  • The streets are of unusual width (varying from 60 ft.

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  • The decisive movement was a passage in strength near Fuenterrabia, to the astonishment of Passage of the the enemy, who in view of the width of the river Bidassoa, and the shifting sands, had thought the crossing October 7, impossible at that point.

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  • long, erected in 1868-1873 and doubled in width in 1894.

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  • in width at the point of junction, and they are clearly non-glacial.

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  • At the town of Farah it has a width of 150 yds.

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  • The width at Oxford is about 150 ft., at Teddington 250 ft., at London Bridge 750 ft., at Gravesend 2100 ft., and between Sheerness and Shoeburyness, immediately above the Nore, 52 m.

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  • In the magnetic balance of du Bois (Magnetic Circuit, p. 346) the uncertainty arising from the presence of a joint is avoided, the force measured being that exerted between two pieces of iron separated from each other by a narrow air-gap of known width.

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  • The play of the beam is limited by a stop S and a screw R, the latter being so adjusted that when the end Y of the beam is held down the two air-gaps are of equal width.

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  • The width of the gap may be diminished until it is no greater than the distance between two neighbouring molecules, when it will cease to be distinguishable, but, assuming the molecular theory of magnetism to be true, the above statement will still hold good for the intermolecular gap. The same pressure P will be exerted across any imaginary section of a magnetized rod, the stress being sustained by the intermolecular springs, whatever their physical nature may be, to which the elasticity of the metal is due.

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  • At the confluence the united stream has a width of 350 yards.

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  • This plain is of varying width, and on some parts of the coast it disappears altogether.

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  • long with a maximum width of 37 m., and Lagoa Mirim is 108 m.

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  • long with a maximum width of 15 m.

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  • The latter region is densely forested from the Atlantic to the Andes, but with a varying width of about 200 m.

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  • Its width varies, as a general rule, between loo and 200 yds.

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  • The streets are irregular in width, some of them narrow and close together, while those leading down to Darling Harbour have a steep incline.

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  • Thus in the case of the circular disk, equidistant (r) from the source of light and from the screen upon which the shadow is observed, the width of the first exterior zone is given by = X(2r)/4(2x), 2x being the diameter of the disk.

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  • We will now apply the integrals (2) to the case of a rectangular aperture of width a parallel to x and of width b parallel to y.

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  • One of these, of width equal, say, to one-tenth of an inch, is inserted in front of the object-glass, and the telescope, carefully focused all the while, is drawn gradually back from the grating until the lines are no longer seen.

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  • Since the limitation of the width of the central band in the image of a luminous line depends upon discrepancies of phase among the secondary waves, and since the discrepancy is greatest for the waves which come from the edges of the aperture, the question arises how far the operation of the central parts of the aperture is advantageous.

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  • By this procedure the width of the central band in the diffraction pattern is halved, and so far an advantage is attained.

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  • Stops, each occupying one-eighth of the width, and with centres situated at the points of trisection, answer well the required purpose.

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  • The value of C for an annular aperture of radius r and width dr is thus dC =271-Jo(Pp)pdp, (12).

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  • 12 -7r2R4 x2 f 2 The roots of Jo(z) after the first may be found from We may compare this with the corresponding result for a rectangular aperture of width a, tlf = X/a; and it appears that in consequence of the preponderance of the central parts, the compensation in the case of the circle does not set in at so small an obliquity as when the circle is replaced by a rectangular aperture, whose side is equal to the diameter of the circle.

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  • In a somewhat similar way a dark linear interruption in a bright ground may be visible, although its actual width is much inferior to the half wave-length.

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  • A rotation of this amount should therefore be easily visible, but the limits of resolving power are being approached; and the conclusion is independent of the focal length of the mirror, and of the employment of a telescope, provided of course that the reflected image is seen in focus, and that the full width of the mirror is utilized.

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  • If 1 2 and 1 1 be the thicknesses traversed by the extreme rays, and a denote the width of the emergent beam, the dispersion is given by 0 Sµ 0 2 - 11)/a, or, if t i be negligible, 0 = Sµt/a (6) The condition of resolution of a double line whose components subtend an angle 0 is that 0 must exceed X/a.

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  • If now we suppose the aperture AB to be covered by a great number of opaque strips or bars of width d, separated by transparent intervals of width a, the condition of things in the directions just spoken of is not materially changed.

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  • We have now to consider the amplitude due to a single element, which we may conveniently regard as composed of a transparent part a bounded by two opaque parts of width id.

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  • 6), and the diffracted rays make an angle ¢ (upon the same side), the relative retardation from each element of width (a+d) to the next is (a+d) (sin 9 +sin op); and this is the quantity which is to be equated to mX.

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  • In either case (as also with a prism) the position of minimum deviation leaves the width of the beam unaltered, i.e.

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  • neither magnifies angular width of the object under view.

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  • Hence, if a be the width of the diffracted beam, and do the angle through which the wave-front is turned, ado = dX, or dispersion = /a ..

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  • The position of the middle of the bright band representative of a mathematical line can be fixed with a spider-line micrometer within a small fraction of the width of the band, just as the accuracy of astronomical observations far transcends the separating power of the instrument.

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  • Trans., 1848, 227), limiting ourselves, however, to the case where the retarded and unretarded beams are contiguous and of equal width.

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  • The linear width of the band (e) is the increment of which alters p by 27r, so that e =27r /tr.

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  • 2s = 277-h/A f (14) e = Af /h (15) The bands are thus of the same width as those due to two infinitely narrow apertures coincident with the central lines of the retarded and unretarded streams, the subject of examination being itself a fine luminous line.

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  • The original investigation of Stokes, here briefly sketched, extends also to the case where the streams are of unequal width h, k, and are separated by an interval 2g.

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  • From (24), (26) we see that the width of the bands is of the order {ba(a+b)la}.

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  • From this we may infer the limitation upon the width of the source of light, in order that the bands may be properly formed.

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  • We will next suppose that the light is transmitted by a slit, and inquire what is the effect of varying the width of the slit upon the illumination at the projection of its centre.

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  • Under these circumstances the arc to be considered is bisected at 0, and its length is proportional to the width of the slit.

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  • If the slit is of 'constant width and we require the illumination at various points on the screen behind it, we must regard the arc of the curve as of constant length.

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  • The observer will, therefore, see a coloured band, about 2° in width, and coloured violet inside and red outside.

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  • below Hamburg, all these anastomosing branches have been reunited, and the Elbe, with a width of 4 to 9 m.

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  • At Kolin the width is about ioo ft., at the mouth of the Moldau about 300, at Dresden 960, and at Magdeburg over 1000.

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  • ft., a width of 656 ft., and a length of 550 yds.

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  • The town is regularly laid out in rectangular blocks of uniform width.

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  • The surface of the state is much broken by the Sierra Madre Occidental, which extends through it from north to south and covers its entire width with parallel ranges, enclosing fertile valleys.

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  • It was a peripteral hexastyle, and must have had at least nineteen columns at the sides; the portion excavated shows that its total width is 744 ft., the width of the cella 382 ft., the lower diameter of the columns 64 ft.

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  • Its greatest length is about 100 m., its greatest width 22 m., its area being approximately 1640 sq.

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  • north of the junction of the Victoria Nile the lake suffers no material diminution in width.

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  • in width, and at Mainz, where it is diverted to the west by the barrier of the Taunus, it is still wider.

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  • broad, but the hills close in again at Andernach, and this ravine-like part of its course cannot be considered as ending till below the Siebengebirge (Seven Mountains), where the river once more expands to a width of1300-1600ft.

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  • and a width of 1200 to 1300 ft., though the Merwede branch exceeds this depth by 8 in.

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  • The coast plain extends inland from 5 to 30 m., increasing in width northward, the whole of Tongaland being low lying.

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  • While the width of the working-place is thus limited by the strength of the roof, its length is determined by other considerations - namely, the rapidity with which the mining work can be conducted and the length of time it is practicable to keep the working-place open, and also by the increased difficulty of handling the minerals sometimes experienced when the workings reach undue length.

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  • The mining of each floor is carried on in sections with small working-places which are first driven of moderate height to their full length and width, leaving a back of ore above and pillars of ore between to support the upper portion of the upper layer or floor.

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  • As the river is here the northern boundary of Afghanistan, and the crest of the Hindu Kush the southern boundary, this distance represents the width of the Afghan kingdom at that point.

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  • of its length the Hindu Kush is a comparatively flat-backed range of considerable width, permitting the formation of small lakes on the crest, and possessing no considerable peaks.

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  • The width of the sheet or plate is regulated by moving guides which are placed in front of the roller and are pushed along by it, while its thickness is regulated by raising or lowering the roller relatively to the surface of the table.

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  • as fast as the previous portions become well filled with roots, which may readily be done by packing up a turf wall at the extremity of the portion to be newly made; an exterior width of 15 ft.

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  • in width, situated on the eastern slopes of the coast ranges and extending from north to south for 260 geographical miles, between the latitudes 25° 45' and 19° 12' S.

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  • This quantity is wrapped in the inner cover, an oblong piece of leaf the length of the cigar to be made, and of width sufficient to enclose the whole material.

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  • In other machines a roll of narrow paper, in width equal to the circumference of the cigarette, is converted into a long tube, filled with tobacco, and automatically cut off into proper lengths.

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  • By means of them the depth and width of the furrow are regulated, whereas in the case of "swing" or wheelless ploughs these points depend chiefly on the skill of the ploughman.

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  • The form of a furrow is regulated by the shape and width of the share, working in combination with a proper shaped breast.

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  • A ploughed field is divided into lands or sections of equal width separated by furrows.

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  • is the usual width; on the heaviest lands it may be as little as 5 yds., and in the latter case the furrows will act as drains into which the water flows from the intervening ridges.'

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  • in width between the shore and the foot-hills.

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  • in length by half a mile in width; the basin in which it lies is barely 3 m.

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  • Khaibar harra, runs north-eastward across the whole width of Nejd, till it is lost in the sands of the eastern Nafud, north of Aneza.

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  • in width that forms the eastern boundary of Nejd, to reappear in the copious springs that fertilize El Hasa and the Bahrein littoral.

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  • in width extends almost continuously from the great Nafud to the Dahna.

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  • in width, a central mountainous tract, embracing the great chain which runs parallel to the coast from near Taif to within 50 m.

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  • in width, and 3 ft.

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  • Not merely because of its central commercial position, but because of its width of view, its political insight, and its constant insistence on the necessity of union, this counter played a leading part in Hanseatic policy.

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  • By these magnificent works of regulation the new bed was brought nearer to the town, and the new river channel has an average width of 915 ft.

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  • in average width.

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  • and a width varying between 9 and 15 in.

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  • and a width of 300 to 400 m., exclusive of territories in dispute.

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  • The Santa and Nepena valleys are separated by a desert 8 leagues in width, on the shores of which there is a good anchorage in the bay of Ferrol, where the port of Chimbote is the terminus of a railway.

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  • Communications.-The problem of easy and cheap transportation between the coast and the interior has been a vital one for Peru, for upon it depends the economic development of some of the richest parts of the republic. The arid character of the coastal zone, with an average width of about 80 m., permits cultivation of the soil only where water for irrigation is available.

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  • For a width of 50o ft.

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  • The island, with a minimum length of 15 m., an average width of 22 m., and an area of about 47 sq.

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  • and S., of 48 m., an extreme width, E.

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  • The coast-line, including the shores of the bays and islands, is extensive; its western portion is only slightly indented, but its eastern portion is deeply indented by Narragansett Bay, a body of water varying in width from 3 to 12 m., and extending inland for about 28 m.

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  • It was true that the bent of his genius was slightly altered, in a direction which seemed less purely and austerely that of the highest art; but his concessions to public taste vastly added to the width of the circle he now addressed.

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  • in length, 490 in width and to in depth), was apparently made for naval exhibitions.

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  • width each.

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  • There arc four narrow avenues connecting this remarkable body of water with the Pacific and the Japan Sea; that on the west, called Shirnonoseki Strait, has a width of 3000 yds., that on the south, known ai Hayarnoto Strait, is 8 m.

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  • and has a width of 5 to lom.

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  • The width of national roads was determined at 42 ft.

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  • extreme front width; others that are fallen may have been taller.

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  • through Bhagalpur, is navigable all the year round, and has an average width of 3 m.

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  • in width, and less than one-tenth of that amount in thickness.

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  • long, while its width varies from 16 to 132 m.

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  • The range has not so many offshoots as occur on the west side of Lebanon; under its precipitous slopes stretch table-lands and broad plateaus, which, especially on the east side looking towards the steppe, steadily increase in width.

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  • Its width varies from 75 to 325 yd.

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  • Then consider a thin annulus thin of the wire of width dx; the charge on it is equal to thin rod.

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  • Traversing this, it receives the waters of the Loue, its chief affluent, and broadening out to a width of 260 ft., at length reaches the Saone at Verdun.

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  • Their mouth is of moderate width, oblique, and armed with small but firmly set teeth.

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  • The total length of the Carpathians is over Boo m., and their width varies between 7 and 230 m., the greatest width of the Carpathians corresponding with its highest altitude.

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  • at full tide, the width of the channel being 300 ft.

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  • in width and its northern half full of water; all the bridges were destroyed, and the E.

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  • in width at the base and about 50 ft.

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  • in width and 16 in depth, it presents an appearance of imposing strength.

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  • east of Herat, the cultivated portion of the valley commences, and it extends, with a width which varies from 8 to 16 m., to Kuhsan, 60 m.

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  • in width, called the Dasht-i-Hamdamao, or Dasht-i-Ardewan, formed by the talus or drift of the higher mountains, which, washed down through centuries of denudation, now forms long sweeping spurs of gravel and sand, scantily clothed with wormwood scrub and almost destitute of water.

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  • The plain lying between this coast range and the Andes dips below sea-level in the gulfs of Ancud and Corcovado (average width, 30 m.).

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  • The width of each of the portions aghc and acfe cut away from the lens was made slightly greater than the focal length of lens X tangent of sun's greatest diameter.

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  • in length, with a width of 650 ft.

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  • In the oldest form of this class of working, where the size of the pillar is equal to the width of the stall or excavation, about 4 of the whole seam will be removed, the remainder being left in the pillars.

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  • in width, while the pillars are 22 yds.

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  • wide, separated from each other by banks of about the same width, are carried forward in long-wall work, as shown on the left side of the figure, the waste being carefully packed behind so as to secure the ventilation.

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  • The width of the groove cut is from 2 to 3 in.

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    0
  • For flat ropes the drum or bobbin consists of a solid disk, of the width of the rope fixed upon the shaft, with numerous parallel pairs of arms or horns, arranged radially on both sides, the space between being just sufficient to allow the rope to enter and coil regularly upon the preceding lap. This method has the advantage of equalizing the work of the engine throughout the journey, for when the load is greatest, with the full cage at the bottom and the whole length of rope out, the duty required in the first revolution of the engine is measured by the length of the smallest circumference; while the assistance derived from gravitating action of the descending cage in the same period is equal to the weight of the falling mass through a height corresponding to the length of the largest lap, and so on, the speed being increased as the weight diminishes, and vice versa.

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  • In some cases, therefore, a combined form is adopted, the body of the drum being cylindrical, and a width equal to three or four laps conical on either side.

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  • When closed by the load the width is sufficient to allow it to enter a funnel-shaped guide on a cross-bar of the frame some distance above the bank level, but on reaching the narrower portion of the guide at the top the plates are forced apart which releases the ropes and brings the lugs into contact with the top of the cross-bar which secures the cage from falling.

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  • in width, and comprising about onethird of the whole structure; the facade has six columns with heads of Hathor, and the ceiling is supported by eighteen great columns.

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  • above the sea, the ravine having an average width of 1 m.

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  • in extreme width.

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  • in width, that doubts have been felt as to whether it was originally intended to be worn on the head or was merely meant to be a votive crown.

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  • in thickness, the width of the circlet being 4 in.

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  • The narrow foot-plateau of British East Africa broadens out to the south of Bagamoyo to a width of over loo m.

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  • In 1905 a sixth graving dock was opened, having a length of 8754 ft., and a width of 90 ft.

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  • Attempts to estimate the width of the gulf separating the Church of England in Elizabeth's time from the corresponding institution as it existed in the early years of her father's reign are likely to be gravely affected by personal bias.

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  • in width, and its towers rise to a height of 204 ft.

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  • long and about a mile in average width, enclosing on the east Harrington or Little Sound, and on the west the Great Sound, which is thickly studded with islets, and protected on the north by the islands of Watford, Boaz, Ireland and Somerset.

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  • 1 Shoals in the river and sand rock at its mouth long prevented the development of an extensive water trade, but in 1896 the United States Government made an appropriation (supplemented in 1902, 1903 and 1904) for deepening, for a width of 300 ft., the channel connecting the city and the ocean to 24 ft., and on the bar 27 ft.

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  • It has a uniform depth of 211 ft., but its width within the lake is reduced to 98 ft.

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  • The reduction in thickness of the bars is accompanied by a slight increase in their width and a very great increase in their length, so that it is generally necessary to cut partly rolled bars into two parts to keep them of convenient dimensions.

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  • In the case of very large silver coins only one blank is cut in the width of the fillet, but bronze fillets are made wider so that three penny blanks are cut out at each stroke of the machine.

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  • Valleys are deeply sunk in the plateau, the largest with bottom lands of sufficient width to give rise to strips of fertile farm land.

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  • Each of the three canals is to have a minimum depth of 12 ft., a minimum bottom width in rivers and lakes of 200 ft., and in other sections a bottom width generally of 75 ft.

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  • These three form a broken chain, North and South Islands being cut asunder by Cook Strait, a channel varying in width from 16 to 90 m.

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  • long and has an average width of 1 m.

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  • The Vistula, here of great width, and subject to destructive floods, enters the province near Thorn, and flowing north in a valley which divides the plateau, enters Danzig Bay by a large delta, the Werder.

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  • and a maximum width of 240 m.; area, 69,127 sq.

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  • in width, and to the northward it widens to too m.

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  • long, has an average width of 12 m., and a depth of more than 1000 ft.

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  • in width facing the south.

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  • in its greatest width.

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  • with a width of 120 ft.

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  • long; then a kind of island (140 ft.), which is overflowed only in spring and summer by the Tigris; next a stretch of the river which, at such times as it is not fordable, is spanned by a bridge of boats, the bridge proper covering only one-sixth of the full width of the stream.

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  • In all countries there are legal regulations fixing the minimum span and height of such bridges and the width of roadway to be provided.

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  • The total length of the bridge is 1005 ft., its width from outside to outside 56 ft., and height above low FIG.

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  • If the pressure on the lead is uniformly varying, the centre of pressure must be within the middle third of the width of the lead; that is, it cannot deviate from the centre of the voussoir -- Scale of Feet 50 100 200 300 FIG.

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  • The width between parapets is now 65 ft., giving a roadway of 35 ft.

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  • The bridge is not continuous in width, there are arch rings on each face, each 16.4 ft.

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  • At Rechtenstein a bridge of two concrete arches has been constructed, span 752 ft., with lead articulations: width of arch 11 ft.; depth of arch at crown and springing 2.1 and 2.96 ft.

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  • 12), begun in 1897 and opened for traffic in 1903, has a span of 1600 ft., a versed sine of 176 ft., and a width of 118 ft.

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  • When raised, the width of 200 ft.

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  • The clear width of the two shore spans is 270 ft.

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  • The width of the bridge between parapets is 60 ft., except across the centre span, where it is 49 ft.

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  • The bridge, which was begun in 1882 and completed in 1889, is at the only narrowing of the Forth in a distance of 50 m., at a point where the channel, about a mile in width, is divided by the island of Inchgarvie.

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  • The span to the centres of the end uprights is 820 ft.; width between centres of main uprights at bed-plate 100 ft., and between centres of main members at end of centilevers 20 ft.

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  • The width FIG.

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  • and the width 46 ft.

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  • In the Forth bridge stability is obtained partly by the great excess of dead over live load, partly by the great width of the river piers.

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  • and varies in width from 30 to 5 0 m.

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  • The width of the estuary is 1 m.

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  • This reduces the width of the Humber mouth to 51 m.

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  • and W., of 360 m., an extreme width, N.

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  • The lowest of these plains is the valley of the Red river, and this valley extends along the eastern edge of the state and varies in width from 25 to 70 m.

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  • above sea level, and in width from 75 m.

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  • in width, which roughly marks the dividing line between the farming lands of the E.

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  • In width of view, thoroughness of investigation and honesty of purpose he is unsurpassed by any historian.

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  • long from north-east to south-west, has a maximum width of nearly 8 m.

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  • long, with a width at entrance of 408 ft.

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  • in width, runs at right angles with Front Street through the business centre of the city, being interrupted by the Capitol Park (about 16 acres).

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  • Along its entire Atlantic border extends the narrow sandy Sinepuxent Beach, which encloses a shallow lagoon or bay also called Sinepuxent at the north, where, except in the extreme north, it is very narrow, and Chincoteague at the south, where its width is in most places from 4 to 5 m.

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  • in width, the broad gently-rolling slopes of the Great Cumberland or Hagerstown Valley occupying its eastern and the Appalachian Ridges its western portion.

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  • in width, is known, as in Morocco and Tunisia.

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  • From here it flows with ever increasing width between two flat shores to the Bec d'Ambes (151 m.), where, after a course of 357 m., it unites with the Dordogne to form the vast estuary known as the Gironde.

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  • it flows through Kulja, its valley reaching a width of 50 m.

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  • wide, and the lanes somewhat less than half that width.

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  • This line of hypothesis and demonstration is typical of the palaeogeographic methods generally - namely, that vertebrate palaeontologists, impressed by the sudden appearance of extinct forms of continental life, demand land connexion or migration tracts from common centres of origin and dispersal, while the invertebrate palaeontologist alone is able to restore ancient coast-lines and determine the extent and width of these tracts.

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  • is 1900 m., its greatest width 750 m., and its least width a little short of 1 4 0 m.

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  • The lowland or tierra caliente region, which lies between the sierras and coast on both sides of Mexico, consists of a sandy zone of varying width along the shore-line, which is practically a tidewater plain broken by inland channels and lagoons, and a higher belt of land rising to an elevation of about 3000 ft.

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  • in width, except in southern Vera Cruz, Tabasco, Campeche and Yucatan, where it extends farther into the interior.

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  • The coastal plain varies in width and character: in some places low and sandy, or swampy, filled with lagoons and intersecting canals; in others more elevated, rolling and very fertile.

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  • Its length (inclusive of the flagellum) varies from 40-60 while its greatest width (including the undulating-membrane) is from 8-30, u; in the very wide individuals breadth is gained more or less at the expense of length.

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  • in length by 1 2 to 2 µ in width, the latter being about 4, u by 3, u (fig.

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  • Its extreme length (east to west) is about 20 m., and its extreme width (north to south) about 92 m.

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  • But in jumping a gate, or a flight of rails, as ordinarily situated, there is no width to be covered, and to make a horse go through the exertion of jumping both high and wide when he need only do one is to waste his power, added to which to ride fast at timber, unless very low with a ditch on the landing side, is highly dangerous.

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  • The young plants are thinned out to a width of 6 or 8 in.

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  • The area of the United States, as here considered, exclusive of Alaska and outlying possessions, occupies a belt nearly twenty degrees of middle latitude in width, and crosses Boundaries sad Area, North America from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The southern boundary is naturally defined on the east by the Gulf of Mexico; its western extension crosses obliquely over the western highlands, along an irregular line determined by aggressive Americans of Anglo-Saxon stock against Americans of Spanish stock.

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  • in width can be readily closed, opened or partially opened under a maximum head of 16 ft.

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  • in width, and to the north of lat.

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  • with a width of about ioo m.

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  • Its northern extremity is separated from the Thessalian coast by a strait, which at one point is not more than a mile and a half in width.

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  • The portion of the district lying along the banks of the Gogra is a low-lying tract, varying considerably in width; south of this, however, the ground takes a slight rise.

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  • From Noshapzaki (Notsu-no-sake or Notsu Cape), the most easterly point of Nemuro province, to Tomari, the most westerly point in Kunashiri, the distance is 71m., and the Kuriles Strait separating Shumshiri from Kamchatka is about the same width.

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  • Its width of view and its recognition of the claims of historical science and pure reason were thoroughly characteristic of Westcott's mode of discussing a theological question.

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  • Great Comoro, or Angazia, the largest and most westerly, has a length of about 38 m., with a width of about 12 m.

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  • the sea about a mile in width.

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  • The palate is narrow from before backwards, this being especially the case in the hares, where it is reduced to a mere bridge between the premolars; in others, as in the rodent-moles (Bathyerginae), it is extremely narrow transversely, its width being less than that of one of the molar teeth.

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  • The limitation of power is introduced as in all optical instruments, by the finiteness of the length of a wave of light which causes the image of an indefinitely narrow slit to spread out over a finite width in the focal plane of the observing telescope.

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  • Lord Rayleigh's expression for the resolving power of different instruments is based on the assumption that the geometrical image of the slit is narrow compared with the width of the diffraction image.

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  • We must now however introduce a new criterion the " purity " and distinguish it from the resolving power: the purity is defined by n l /(n l n2), where n 1 and n, are the frequencies of two lines such that they would just be resolved with the width of slit used.

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  • With wide slits the difference n1 - n2 depends on their width.

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  • The general results may be summarized as follows: if the width of the slit is equal to fX/4D (where X is the wave-length concerned, D the diameter of the collimator lens, and f its focal length) practically full resolving power is obtained and a further narrowing of the slit would lead to loss of light without corresponding gain.

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  • We call a slit of this width a " normal slit.

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  • " With a slit width equal to twice the normal one we lose 6% of resolution, but obtain twice the intensity of light.

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  • With a slit equal in width to eight times the normal one the purity is reduced to o 45R, so that we lose rather more than half the resolving power and increase the light 3.7 times.

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  • It follows that for observations in which light is a consideration spectroscopes should be used which give about twice the resolving power of that actually required; we may then use a slit having a width of nearly eight times that of the normal one.

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  • The determination of the purity-factor requires the measurement of the width of the slit.

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  • If a source of light be placed behind the auxiliary slit a parallel beam of light will pass within the collimator and fall on the slit the width of which is to be measured.

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  • With fairly homogeneous light the diffraction pattern may be observed at a distance, varying with the width of the slit from about the length of the collimator to one quarter of that length.

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  • From the measured distances of the diffraction bands the width of the slit may be easily deduced.

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  • If all molecules moved with the velocity of mean square, the line would be drawn out into a band having on the frequency scale a width 2Nv/V, where v is now the velocity of mean square.

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    0
  • We may therefore still take 2Nu/V to be the width of the band if we define its edge to be the frequency at which its intensity has fallen to 22% of the central intensity.

    0
    0
  • In that case Au/V or the half width of the band measured in wave lengths would be .105 A, or, for the red line, the half width would be 0.044 A.

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    0
  • If the motion were that of a body at white heat, or say a temperature of loco, the velocity of mean square would be 39co metres per second and the apparent width of the band would be doubled.

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  • The homogeneity of vibration may also be diminished by molecular impacts, but the number of shocks in a given time depends on pressure and we may therefore expect to diminish the width of a line by diminishing the pressure.

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    0
  • the number of oxygen molecules per cubic centimetre determines the width of the oxygen lines, though nitrogen molecules may be mixed with them without materially affecting the appearance.

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    0
  • The collimator has a vertical slit at its outer end, the width of which may be regulated by a micrometer screw; in some instruments one half of the slit is covered by a small total reflection prism which permits the examination of two spectra simultaneously.

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  • The plain country extends from the Chambal river in the extreme southwards for about 80 m., with a maximum width from east to west of about 120 m.

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    0
  • The course of the Alabama is tortuous; its width varies from 200 to 300 yds., its depth from 3 to 7 ft.; its length by the United States Survey is 312 m., by steamboat measurement, 420 m.

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  • The second great street, Portage Avenue, of the same width as Main Street, runs at right angles to Main Street, and is the mercantile street of the city.

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  • His expansive nature loved width and space.

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  • is 266 ft., the length of the transepts 130 ft., and the width of the nave and aisles 87 ft.

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  • At opposite ends are breaks in the walls a mile or more in width - one about loon ft., the other at least 3000 ft.

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  • and has an average width of nearly 7 m.

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  • and an extreme width of 288.8 ft.

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  • Streets, Roads, &c. - The streets were paved with gravel: they varied in width up to 282 ft.

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  • wide, but as it flows northwards it increases its width until, at the point where it receives its Apure affluent, it is over 2 m.

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  • The more typical members of the genus are terrestrial in their habits, and their cheek-teeth have nearly the same pattern as in rhinoceroses; while the interval between the upper incisors is less than the width of the teeth; and the lower incisors are only slightly notched at the cutting edge.

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  • In a second section the molar teeth have the same pattern as in Palaeotherium (except that the third lower molar has but two lobes); the interval between the upper incisors exceeds the width of the teeth; and the lower incisors have distinctly trilobed crowns.

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  • The Burnley cloths range in width from 2 9 in.

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  • in width), which has come 50 m.

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  • and has a nearly uniform width of 50 m.

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  • The valleys rarely exceed more than a few miles in width, are usually steep-sided, and frequently are traversed by longitudinal ranges of hills and cross ridges; but the Pennsylvania portion of the Appalachian or Great Valley, which forms a distinct division of the central province and lies between the South Mountains and the long rampart of Blue Mountain, is about to m.

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  • in width on the Maryland border and to the north-east its width increases to 20 m.

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  • It is, however, very narrow, being generally about half a mile in width, except in the middle, where it sends out a peninsula to the east 7 m.

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  • to S.E., along the borders of the Prussian provinces of Hanover and Westphalia and through the principality of Lippe, for a .distance of 70 m., with a width of 2 to 6 m.

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  • Ostend, though the width of the entrance was reduced probably to 300 ft., was not closed, and though the ships sunk in Zeebrugge must have caused great inconvenience and delay it may be doubted whether they actually stopped the passage of submarines for more than a month.

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  • to S., of 62 m., a width of 54 m.

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  • in total length; its maximum width is 100 ft., and at the curves it is banked up to a maximum height of 28 ft.

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  • deep; the width of the channel is to be made 270 ft.

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  • Their width and height are sufficient to transmit (at the position of minimum deviation) the entire beam received from the collimator.

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  • The slit is narrowed down to the desired width, and moved as a whole by a micrometer screw, until it coincides with the cross-hair.

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  • in breadth, according to the size of the border and width of the walk, make a very handsome edging, but they should not be allowed to rise more than an inch and a half above the gravel, the grass being kept short by repeated mowings, and the edges kept trim and well-defined by frequently clipping with shears and cutting once or twice a year with an edging iron.

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  • wide, the side stages being flat, and the centre stage having the middle portion one-third of the width elevated I ft.

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  • A width of 7 or 8 ft., with the glass slope continued down to within a foot or two of the ground, and without any upright front sashes, will be suitable for such a house, which may also be conveniently divided into compartments of from 30 to 50 ft.

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  • to 60 ft.; a convenient width is to ft., which admits of a 31 ft.

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  • high at the ridge, according to width.

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  • If intended for storage only, a width of 9 ft.

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  • The advantage depends on the obstruction given to the descent of the sap. The ring should be cut out in spring, and be of such a width that the bark may remain separated for the season.

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  • in width, and perhaps backed up by evergreens under certain conditions.

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  • The breadth of the dunes naturally varies greatly, the maximum width of about 4375 Yds.

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  • Owing to the unsuitability of the foundations, Dutch dikes are usually marked by a great width, which at the crown varies between 13 and 26 ft.

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  • The value of the goods traffic is not so high, owing, principally, to the want of intercommunication between the various lines on account of differences in the width of the gauge.

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  • The streets are of generous width (loo-140 ft.), and are well shaded by trees.

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  • in the hearth, and it may prove that a width materially greater than 122 ft.

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  • With the width at the bottom thus limited, the furnace builder naturally tries to gain volume as rapidly as possible by flaring or " battering " his walls outwards, i.e.

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  • In limiting the diameter at the tuyeres to 122 ft., the height of the boshes to one which will keep their upper end below the region of pastiness, and their slope to one over which the burning coke will descend freely, we limit the width of the furnace at the top of the boshes and thus complete the outline of the lower part of the furnace.

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  • Moreover, a single pair of rolls suffices for armour plates of any width or thickness, whereas if shafts of different diameters were to be rolled, a special final groove would be needed for each different diameter, and, as there is room for only a few large grooves in a single set of rolls, this would imply not only providing but installing a separate .set of rolls for almost every diameter of shaft.

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  • from its source, flows past the town of Sora, and has a very tortuous course from thence to the sea at Minturnae; its lower valley is for the most part of considerable width, and forms a fertile tract of considerable extent, bordered on both sides by hills covered with vines, olives and fruit trees, and thickly studded with towns and villages.

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  • to 55X25 in., the width being taken at the widest part of the skin after preparation.

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  • long, with an average width of 2460 ft.

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  • in width, and with an average depth of about 20 ft.; it is nearly enclosed by Presque Isle, a long narrow strip of land of about 3000racres from 300 ft.

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  • in width, and the national government has protected its entrance and deepened its channel by constructing two long breakwaters.

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  • The jaws are short and strong, and the width of the zygomatic arches, and great development of the bony ridges on the skull, give ample space for the attachment of the powerful muscles by which they are closed.

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  • to S.E., with an average width of io m.

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  • of the water, but there is generally a width of about 4 of a mile from the hills to the beach.

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  • On the west the flat ground at the foot of the hills has an average width of about 200 yds.

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  • These walls are strengthened at intervals by numerous towers, occupying the full width of the wall, which occur in some parts at a distance of only about too yds., but in general much less frequently.

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  • in width, including the raised footpaths on each side, which occupy a considerable part of the space, so that the carriage-way could only have admitted of the passage of one vehicle at a time.

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  • in width, and the broadest yet found is about 32, while the back streets running parallel to the main lines are only about 14 ft.

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  • (It is to be remembered, however, that the standard width of a Roman highroad in the neighbourhood of Rome itself is about 14 ft.) They are uniformly paved with large polygonal blocks of hard basaltic lava, fitted very closely together, though now in many cases marked with deep ruts from the passage of vehicles in ancient times.

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  • The depth of the feeders depends on their width, and the width on their length.

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  • in width at its junction with the conductor, and it should taper gradually to the extremity, which should be i ft.

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  • in width, a series of cross embankments have been constructed, abutting at the inner ends on those along the Nile, and at the outer ends on the ascending sides of the valley.

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  • This width of flooring was doubled to 223 ft., and along the upstream face a line of sheet piling was driven 16 ft.

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  • The top width of the dam is 23 ft., the bottom width at the deepest part about 82 ft.

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  • from south to north, and with a width of only 20 to 25 m.

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  • 6 in., but in 1908 work was begun f or doubling the bottoit width and increasing the depth to 36 ft.

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  • The most interesting buildings are the cathedral of St Michel, dating from the 13th century but restored in modern times, and St Vincent, a church of the 14th century, remarkable for the width of its nave.

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  • The following data for the apparent angular width of arcs were obtained at Cape Thorsden, the arcs being grouped according to the height of the lower edge above the horizon.

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  • Furthermore, Gyllenskold says that when arcs mounted, as they not infrequently did, from the horizon, their apparent width might go on increasing right up to the zenith, or it might increase until an altitude of about 45° was reached and then diminish, appearing much reduced when the zenith was reached.

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  • Of course the phenomenon might be due to actual change in the arc, but it is at least consistent with the view that arcs are of two kinds, one form constituting a layer of no great vertical depth but considerable real horizontal width, the other form having little horizontal width but considerable vertical depth, and resembling to some extent an auroral curtain.

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  • The average width of the .cultivated land is about I0 m., of which the greater part lies on the left (western) bank of the river; and outside this is a belt, varying from a few hundred yards to 3 or 4 m., of stony and sandy ground, reaching up to the foot of the limestone cliffs, which rise in places to as much as 1000 ft.

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  • to N., having a width of 155 m.

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  • Its greatest width is about 16 m.

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  • The eastern region, between the Nile and the Red Sea, varies in width from 90 to 350 m.

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  • Battle-axes with rounded outline started as merely a sharp edge of metal (io) inserted along a stick (10, if); they become semicircular (12) by the VIth Dynasty, lengthen to double their width in the XIIth, and then thin out to a waist in the middle by the XVIIIth Dynasty.

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  • That of the Mississippi below Ohio has a width of from 20 to 80 m., and its whole extent has been estimated at 50,000 sq.

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  • wide and the width of the transepts from north to south is 1152 ft.

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  • It has nearly the same length as width, namely about 170 m., if its northern gulf (Kichkineh-denghiz) is left out of account.

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  • at its greatest width, extends from W.N.W.

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  • in length by 35 in width, and includes the large district of Laghman north of the Kabul river, as well as that on the south called Ningrahar.

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  • With such views it was not to be wondered at that, from first to last, as has already been indicated, he never lost an opportunity of supporting a policy of width, toleration and comprehension in the Church of England.

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  • It divides its waters, splitting into many channels, leaving broad central islands; and as the width increases, and the depth during dry seasons diminishes, opportunities for fords become comparatively frequent.

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  • Its winter channel may be estimated at from two-thirds to three-fourths of its flood channel, except where it is confined within narrow limits by a rocky bed, as at Kilif, where its un varying width is only 540 yards.

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  • above the ferry at Kilif, a very successful war has been waged by the agricultural Turkman (of the Ersari tribes) against the encroaching sand-waves of the desert; and a strip of riverain soil averaging about a mile in width has been reclaimed and cultivated by irrigation.

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  • The horses are guided from the boat, and a twentyor thirty-foot barge with a heavy load of men and goods will be towed across the river at Kilif (where, as already stated, the width of the river is between 500 and 600 yards only) with ease by two of these animals.

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  • in width, and there is more cultivation on Go Oxus.

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  • in width, covered with coco-nut and areca palms, which to a great extent constitute the wealth of the country.

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  • It is a busy thoroughfare, lined in its first half with magnificent new buildings, and in its second half, where it attains a width of 150 ft., with handsome villas standing in their own gardens, which give the impression rather of a fashionable summer resort than the centre of a great city.

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  • long with a fine harbour at its head, the width of the inlet varying from a half to one mile; Nootka Sound, 6 m.

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  • long and 132 in extreme width, situated about 32° 20' N., and 130 E.

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  • The Gulf itself has an average width of 120 miles.

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  • The body of water thus formed, Superior and Allouez bays, varies in width from to 14 m., and is 91 m.

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  • It varies greatly in width.

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  • across; while farther south, at Haifa, it is of still greater width, and opens into the extensive Merj Ibn `Amir (Plain of Esdraelon) by which almost the whole of Western Palestine is intersected.

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  • in width, with a depth of about seven fathoms at low water, are situated at either end of the detached breakwater.

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  • in width and is about 1400 yds.

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  • m., and varies in width from 90 to nearly 300 m.

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  • in width in the western Deccan parallel with the Ghats, and it is this part of the Deccan, together with the Mysore table-land and the Carnatic, that is most subject to drought.

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  • Its length is about 3 yds., its width about i 2.

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  • The ravine, formed by the Rummel, through erosion of the limestone, varies greatly in width - at its narrowest part the cliffs are only 15 ft.

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  • to E.N.E., having its concave side turned southwards; its width varies from 36 to 53 m.

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  • in width and 71 ft.

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  • in a straight line and attains a maximum width N.

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  • in width, runs the mass of the Coast Range, made up of numerous indistinct chains - most of which have localized individual names - that are broken down into innumerable ridges and spurs, and small valleys drained by short streams of rapid fall.

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  • None of its streams crosses the entire width of the province; they are all lost in its desert sands.

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  • The width of the photographic sheet which receives the spot of light reflected from the mirrors in the above instruments is generally so great that in the case of ordinary changes the curve does-not go off the paper.

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  • The distance from the lake to the principal or Colorado mouth of the river is 95 m., and the average width of the channel 1500 ft.

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  • Between Nikolas Land and the mainland two islands were discovered and named Alexis and Starokadomski, each with a greatest width of about 6 miles.

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  • The width of the avenues is from 120 to 160 ft.

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  • and the width of the streets from 80 to 120 ft.

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  • in width), $3600 (174 fine oz.

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  • The spare between two teeth, measured on the pitch-circle, is made about ~th part wider than the thickness of the tooth on the pitch-circle-that is to say, Thickness of tooth =~ pitch; Width of space =Iis pitch.

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  • wide and 16 fathoms deep, while the western, or Dact-el-Mayun, has a width of about 16 m.

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  • in height and 91 in width) and are richly carved in geometric Saracenic patterns.

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  • in length and 392 in width: only one of its long sides is now visible, and serves as a foundation for several houses in the main street of the modern town.

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  • in width, and 26 ft.

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  • of 400 m., an extreme width E.

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  • While British philosophizing up to a recent date has been notably lacking in width of metaphysical outlook, it has taken a very high place in its handling of the more practical problems of conduct.

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  • For the rest, Spencer's doctrine is valuable more as stimulating to thought by its originality and width of view than as offering direct solutions of ethical problems. Following up the same line of thought, Leslie Stephen with less brilliance but more attention to scientific method has worked out in his Science of Ethics (1882) the conception of morality as a function of the social organism: while Professor S.

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  • The church has greatly increased of late years in width of view and liberality of sentiment, and shelters various tendencies of thought.

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  • The width of the main stream ranges from 520 to 3500 yds.

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  • Its greatest length is about 141 m., from Cape Drepano in the west to Cape St Andrea in the north-east, and its greatest breadth, from Cape Gata in the south to Cape Kormakiti in the north, reaches 60 m.; while it retains an average width of from 35 to 50 m.

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  • The bar by which the power was applied by the pressman was fixed into the arbor, and not into the spindle, so that the lever was the whole width of the press, instead of half, as in Blaeu's wooden press, and it was better placed for the application of the worker's strength.

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  • They may be built on the " deck " principle of two, three, four, or even more reels of paper, and either in single width (two pages wide), or double width (four pages wide).

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  • When presses are made in double width a two-reel machine is known as a quadruple, a three-reel as a sextuple, and a four-reel as an octuple machine.

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  • This press prints from two reels of the double width.

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  • These presses print from eight different reels of the double width, four placed at each end, of the machine, the delivery being in the centre, and from eight sets of spent the stand is turned half way round, and four other full reels already in position are presented ready to be run into the press.

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  • from bridge to bridge and of a width of 15 ft.

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  • The connexions are made by copper rods, each of which, in length, is twice the width of the tank, with a bayonet-bend in the middle, and serves to support the cathodes in the one and the anodes in the next tank.

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  • above the river, and overlooks the thickly wooded valley of the North Saskatchewan river - at this point a mile in width, the river itself being oneeighth of a mile wide.

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  • in extreme width, the greatest depth is only 59 ft., but as its flat shores were formerly subject to inundation its level was sunk 6 ft.

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  • It is belted by a zone of birch woods, with occasional mountain-ash and aspen, varying in width from about 20 m.

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  • of September the delegates came to an agreement, the principal points of which were: that such disputes between the two countries which could not be settled by direct diplomatic negotiations, and which did not affect the vital interests of either country, should be referred to the permanent court of arbitration at the Hague, that on either side of the southern frontier a neutral zone of about fifteen kilometres width should be established, and that within eight months the fortifications within the Norwegian part of the zone should be destroyed.

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  • Snoilsky was prominent for the richness of his lyrical style, his cosmopolitan interests and his great width of culture.

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  • with an average width of about 60 m.

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  • In the north both the Cretaceous and Tertiary beds of this zone are limited in extent, but towards the south Mesozoic beds, which are at least in part Cretaceous, form a band of considerable width.

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  • The flat top of such a range is called a chapada or taboleira, and its width in places is from 32 to 56 m.

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  • The sandy, coastal plain, with a width of 12 to 18 m., is nearly bare of vegetation.

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  • The rest of the costume is composed of the tumbun or shalvar, short skirts of great width, held by a running stringthe outer one being usually of silk, velvet, or Kashmir shawl, often trimmed with gold lace, or, among the poor, of loud-patterned chintz or print.

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  • respectively in width; while the largest measures about 900 ft.

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  • His versatility, firmness combined with tact, width of view, and painstaking struggle for accuracy were largely responsible for the maintenance of its high standard.

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  • Thinking that the shallowness of the harbour was due to the width of its mouth, he built a mole part-way across the latter; the result, however, was that the silting up of the harbour proceeded more rapidly than before.

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  • were formerly called, laid out and kept to an equal width or nearly so by parallel hedges, which should be so close and thick that the eye cannot readily penetrate them.

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  • From west to east the Little Karroo has a length of some 200 m., whilst its average width is 30 m.

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  • A narrow width of the coast districts collects its waters for discharge into the Arabian Sea direct.

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  • From the summit of the Kaisargarh peak a magnificent view is obtained which practically embraces the whole width of northern Baluchistan.

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  • long with a width of 30 to go m., and an area of about 36,000 sq.

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  • In its normal state the jet resolves itself into drops, which even before passing the summit, and still more after passing it, are scattered through a considerable width.

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  • The mountain region has a width of 70 to 150 m., and is filled with short parallel ranges trending parallel to the plateau escarpment.

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  • They aimed at a rational and intelligible faith, professedly in order to make religion, in all its width and depth, the heritage of every man.

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  • for 750 m., with a width of from 80 to 300 m.

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  • m.) is twice as great as that of the Elbe, and its width and depth are also greater.

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  • Those of Bashkaus, Chulyshman, and Chulcha, all three leading to the beautiful alpine lake of Teletskoye (length, 48 m.; maximum width, 3 m.; altitude, 1700 f t.; area, 87 sq.

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  • But the chief wealth of the northern Altai is in the Kuznetsk coal-basin, also containing iron-ores, which fills up a valley between the Kuznetsk Ala-tau and the Salair range for a length of about 270 m., with a width of about 65 m.

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  • in width, with shallow waters of inconsiderable salinity (greatest depth, 22 fathoms), freezes to some extent every year.

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  • The flood of 1900, when the river both above and below Rome extended over the whole width of its valley, from hill to hill, and over most of the low ground at its mouth, gave an idea of the conditions which must have existed in prehistoric days.

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  • wide, but within the width increases to 3 m.

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  • in width, and the transepts 144 ft.

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  • long, with a greatest width of 60 m., while North Channel is 120 m.

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  • long, with an extreme width of 16 m., the whole lake having an area of 23,200 sq.

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  • wide, it has an average width of i m.

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  • and S., of 166 m., an extreme width, E.

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  • In width the range varies from 4 or 5 m.

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  • and S.W., of 60 m., and a width varying from 9 to 18 m.

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  • The width of the marsh varies from 1 to 6 m., being least in the extreme N.

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  • to S.W.; maximum width, t m.), which is a reservoir and feeder for the canal's eastern and western branches, and which was enlarged considerably when the canal was built.

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  • in width), 3 that is employed in operating the road or canal is taxed by the state for local purposes.

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  • to S.E., and had a maximum width of 50 m.

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  • and an average width from north to south of Soo m.

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  • The mines there occur in gneiss and schists, which are probably of Archean age; the lode has in places been worked for a width of over 200 ft.

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  • The Broken Hill silver lode is the largest as yet discovered; it varies in width from 10 ft.

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