Whose Sentence Examples

whose
  • Whose goals are we talking about here, mine or yours?

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  • So whose bones are they?

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  • He would understand on whose side justice lies.

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  • Whose child is it? they asked him.

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  • She meant what she said; she had no friends, but a long time ago, she'd had one whose family had a summer cottage near the coast.

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  • And whose sheep are these?

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  • The web is a force for truth, connectedness, understanding, and communication—all things whose absence can trigger war.

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  • Two hundred years ago there lived in Boston a little boy whose name was Benjamin Franklin.

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  • The educated man is the man whose expression is educated.

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  • I buy my eggs from a farmer whose chickens roam free.

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  • Whose problem will it be?

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  • She looked up at Jule, whose features were grim.

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  • When asked the colour of some one whose occupation she did not know she seemed bewildered, and finally said "blue."

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  • But the fourth lawyer, whose name was Abraham Lincoln, stopped.

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  • At a little distance from the palace we might easily mistake it for a mountain whose peaks were mounting heavenward to receive the last kiss of the departing day.

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  • The sailors agreed; for they were anxious to hear the musician whose songs were famous all over the world.

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  • He did not know whose it was; it belonged to the pond.

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  • I asked him whose subject he was, and he jabbered in his own way.

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  • To each of them he made some careless and agreeable remark except to Pierre and Helene, whose presence he seemed not to notice.

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  • And the people whose houses or lives it saves?

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  • I regard my pupil as a free and active being, whose own spontaneous impulses must be my surest guide.

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  • I would drink deeper; fish in the sky, whose bottom is pebbly with stars.

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  • Among them stood a man whose white shirt was stained with blood.

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  • The man hiding in the corner of her mind, he whose death plagued Damian for thousands of years.

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  • It was Lon, whose gaze went to her as he approached.

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  • Lon knelt by a vamp whose chest still moved.

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  • Instincts took her in the direction of the stream, and she reached the top of a shallow ravine in whose valley the stream flowed.

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  • It certainly is fair to look at that class by whose labor the works which distinguish this generation are accomplished.

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  • Martha, whose stay with them was at first a simple good deed, then a delight and now so very much more.

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  • I knew immediately whose bones they were.

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  • In 2005, rice became the first crop plant whose complete genome had been compiled.

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  • What could all that matter in comparison with the will of God, without Whose care not a hair of man's head can fall?

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  • Pierre wished to say something, looked at her with eyes whose strange expression she did not understand, and lay down again.

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  • Claire was all that remained of his brother, and he'd loved her out of respect for a man whose death he'd never been able to accept.

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  • Unlike the others whose paths she'd crossed earlier, he didn't ignore her.

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  • It was a good old Friend, whom everybody loved--a-white-haired, pleasant-faced minister, whose words were always wise.

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  • In front, at a weary gallop and using his leather whip, rode an officer, disheveled and drenched, whose trousers had worked up to above his knees.

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  • Through the smoke, as he approached the gate, Petya saw Dolokhov, whose face was of a pale-greenish tint, shouting to his men.

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  • If it were a man whose existence thou didst doubt I could bring him to thee, could take him by the hand and show him to thee.

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  • She twisted in her chair to see a man near the dark windows whose eyes were the color of her bright purple Easter dress.

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  • Her tortured thoughts went to the thousands of men, killed by the only family she'd known, whose souls were trapped for eternity beneath the ground.

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  • A long time ago there lived a poor slave whose name was Aesop. He was a small man with a large head and long arms.

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  • They can be connected to sensors whose sensitivity dwarfs anything a human can do.

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  • I know of those whose serene and wise speculations on this theme would soon reveal the limits of his mind's range and hospitality.

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  • Halfway across stood Prince Nesvitski, who had alighted from his horse and whose big body was jammed against the railings.

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  • Pierre felt himself to be an insignificant chip fallen among the wheels of a machine whose action he did not understand but which was working well.

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  • Whenever an event occurs a man appears or men appear, by whose will the event seems to have taken place.

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  • He focused on the woman whose body was pressed beneath his.

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  • The ground around the monument was rich with the long dead whose souls were trapped.

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  • In Scotland there once lived a poor shepherd whose name was James Hogg.

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  • Rostov reined in his horse, whose spirits had risen, like his own, at the firing, and went back at a footpace.

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  • When the kitchen door opened suddenly, they jerked apart and turned guilty faces to Sarah, whose expression made it clear she had seen and comprehended their actions.

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  • The next stop on his list was visiting Ms. Lydia Larkin, deputy sheriff, whose presentation of a speeding ticket and general attitude still pissed him off, just remembering it.

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  • Those plants of whose greenness withered we make herb tea for the sick serve but a humble use, and are most employed by quacks.

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  • She wanted to make sure the woman whose gaze had gone from confident to sad ended up okay.

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  • She glanced at Ashley, whose eyes were wide.

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  • Deliver me from a city built on the site of a more ancient city, whose materials are ruins, whose gardens cemeteries.

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  • At last, she forced herself to lie down and tried not to think of the man named Jule, whose soul still lingered.

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  • She knew better than to relax around her father, whose hand was likely to fly at the drop of a hat.

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  • He didn't seem like the kind whose moods shifted like her father's.

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  • Jule, whose soul had somehow lingered in her body when she'd touched him, and who had become the only man she'd ever felt safe around.

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  • Jake led him into the Gregorian mansion, whose stone walls resembled an old school fortress.

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  • The man in whose arms she lay was not only her husband by Immortal and demon laws but the Dark One who turned her into a demon.

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  • Bird Song's parlor began filling with guests whose canceled activities put them in a what-do-you-do-next? mood of bewilderment.

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  • With the DNA you could tell whose finger it was, if you happened to have the rest of the guy's body or a few squirts of his liquids.

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  • I don't know whose bones were in the Lucky Pup Mine, but Josh Mulligan died in 1987 of cirrhosis of the liver from drinking too much.

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  • She considered debating with the nurse at the front desk, whose friendly grey eyes were familiar.

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  • A long time ago there lived, in Pennsylvania, a little boy whose name was Benjamin West.

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  • He did not know that the brick buildings, built to plan, were being built by serfs whose manorial labor was thus increased, though lessened on paper.

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  • In my perplexity I did not know whose aid and advice to seek.

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  • There had been none since Claire, whose powers had been so weak, she couldn't even be blood bound.

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  • He glanced at Harmony, whose green gaze was on the ocean.

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  • He lowered his sword and straightened from a sparring match with Rhyn, whose pewter eyes glowed unnaturally.

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  • He could, however, pity the woman whose hand was cut off.

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  • In the center of the chamber was a small fountain whose waters had long gone dry.

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  • Long, long ago, there lived in Persia a little prince whose name was Cyrus.

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  • Others there are whose hands have sunbeams in them, so that their grasp warms my heart.

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  • A French gentleman, whose name I cannot remember, showed me the great French bronzes.

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  • To him whose elastic and vigorous thought keeps pace with the sun, the day is a perpetual morning.

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  • My "best" room, however, my withdrawing room, always ready for company, on whose carpet the sun rarely fell, was the pine wood behind my house.

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  • I live in the angle of a leaden wall, into whose composition was poured a little alloy of bell-metal.

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  • He asked, "Whose company?" but he really meant, "Are you frightened here?" and the artilleryman understood him.

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  • Pierre did not answer, but looked cordially into the Frenchman's eyes whose expression of sympathy was pleasing to him.

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  • The energy around them was lively; they were brothers whose bond was formed during their years in the bowels of hell.

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  • She couldn't help thinking the creature whose job it was to trick people into Hell wasn't above lying to the human mate he took.

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  • Unlike Darkyn, whose hair was short, Zamon's long hair was captured in a braid.

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  • He might not have known whose trail out of the tunnel he was sabotaging—just some trespasser in his precious mine.

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  • A band tooted practice blasts, someone was yelling directions through an old fashioned megaphone, which were ignored, and Suzanne, whose nightly music show serenaded the tourists, warmed up the Star Spangled Banner in a voice that needed no mike.

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  • There, amid a cluster of floats, Boy Scouts and ballerinas, four of Fred's lady friends were in the final stages of hanging bunting about a beautiful old touring car whose vintage or name Dean couldn't identify.

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  • There's a woman whose husband owned the land where the mine is located and she may know something helpful, Dean told her.

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  • Fred was referring to a coffee klatch of elderly town patriarchs whose words and advice on just about anything was often quoted in the local paper.

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  • Sometimes, he thought there was none of the human left at all, just an incarnated goddess whose fascination with her new world extended to him.

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  • Deidre crossed to him, unafraid of the creature whose appearance often made grown Immortals quake and grovel.

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  • This was Darian, not the shell of a man whose mind was stuck somewhere else.

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  • You're the only one I've ever met whose mind I couldn't read.

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  • He took the hand whose fingers were lightly traveling his face.

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  • In grammar he followed Hayyuj, whose pupil he was.

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  • So he employed a wise man whose name was Al Farra to be their teacher.

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  • Parents whose children are in the military generally aren't the ones hawkishly pushing for war.

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  • A gentleman in Philadelphia has just written to my teacher about a deaf and blind child in Paris, whose parents are Poles.

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  • The menu features a tapas, lunch and dinner menu whose selections include garden salads, seafood, beef and chicken tapas, and authentic entrée selections such as paella, red snapper, tuna, skirt steak, filet mignon and suckled pig.

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  • Those whose fishing poles don't score dinner can enjoy a variety of restaurants in town.

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  • I'm interested in a young woman whose name will be familiar to you.

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  • He watched Dusty, whose grip tightened on the wheel as he muttered curses.

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  • Half a head shorter than Xander, Jule was speaking quietly to the vamp, whose arms were crossed and head tilted in consideration.

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  • The second traitor came soon after, a man whose past stunned her.

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  • Deidre gazed at the strange human forest, whose trees weren't alive like those of her underworld.

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  • Rhyn, whose last words to her had been to find him, if she wanted to know the full story.

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  • He shook the hand of his brother and friend, whose black skin clashed with his.

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  • She looked at Mansr, whose sharp gaze took in her features.

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  • The last vamp whose mind I read was convinced it was a treasure hunt.

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  • Her gaze returned to Sofi, whose body was under distress.

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  • Jenn looked from the next guardsman to the Other whose lightning lit up its hands.

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  • There were a great many children whose cheerful voices and tiny forms darted by him several times.

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  • There were two smaller kingdoms whose territories overlapped in between.

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  • She remembered the strong, thoughtful little boy whose life she decided to sacrifice for her cause.

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  • For twenty-two years I have lived amongst these pollarded trees, these rutty roads, beside these tangled thickets and streams along whose banks only children and sheep can pass.

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  • Matters improved considerably under Charles Emmanuel III., in whose reign of forty-three years (1730-1773) the prosperity of the island was much increased.

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  • It was a bitter mortification to Alexander, before whose imagination new vistas had just opened out eastwards, where there beckoned the unknown world of the Ganges and its splendid kings.

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  • Hugh de la Marche, whose betrothed wife, Isabella of Angouleme, King John of England seized (thus bringing upon himself the loss of the greater part of his French possessions), was a nephew of Guy of Lusignan.

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  • It appears in early times, when Thessaly was mainly governed by a few aristocratic families, as an important city under the rule of the Aleuadae, whose authority extended over the whole district of Pelasgiotis.

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  • The great majority of the two hundred galleys and eight galeasses, of which the fleet was composed, came from Venice, under the command of the proveditore Barbarigo; from Genoa, which was in close alliance with Spain, under Gianandrea Doria; and from the Pope whose squadron was commanded by Marc Antonio Colonna.

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  • In the Far East there was once a prince whose name was Gautama.

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  • She stared up at Bordeaux, whose attention was focused on the rock above them.

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  • She stepped back over his body, unwilling to lower her guard against the large vamp whose gaze was on her.

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  • Creatures like you, whose hearts I would cut out with my nails if I had nothing else.

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  • A young couple whose life dream was owning a Bird Song look-alike learned from Fred the principals would be absent for the day and offered to stick around playing temporary innkeepers.

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  • There followed a call from Groucho, whose name Dean learned was Coleridge, telling of a report that the Boyd pair was sighted in Kansas, stopped for a tail light violation on Sunday afternoon.

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  • The Dark One that ruled Hell since the time-before-time had fallen to a ruthless demon lord whose goal had long been to take over the mortal realm.

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  • There was no way of knowing whose souls had crossed over to the mortal world, but he was going to trust that Fate was on his side, for the time being.

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  • Rhyn, whose large hands all but swallowed the tea cup, had made an attempt to be civilized.

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  • The Council split on sanctioning me, and those whose support Jetr swayed for me are sending their armies to battle.

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  • Her heart still hurt for her brother, whose road was dark and lonely.

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  • But as a mortal, she'd tire faster than Claire, whose magic would continue to feed off the surroundings to keep her energized.

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  • Three guards surrounded Rissa, whose writhing, squealing horse was as much of a menace to her as the attackers flooding from the forest.

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  • Allin glanced at the man beside him, whose frown seemed permanent.

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  • Taran bowed to Memon, whose dark chuckle was anything but assuring.

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  • He wondered if the demon had taken her as it had Memon, who looked well but whose skin was cold as death.

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  • He stalked away with a look at Hilden, whose hand rested on the hilt of his sword.

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  • Taran tore out of the great hall, followed closely by the madman, whose agitated demon swam visibly beneath his skin.

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  • A stainless steel sink was set into home made cabinets, whose cutting board top was marred with years of use.

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  • His attention shifted to his mother, whose breathing was shallow enough, he barely heard it with his super sensitive hearing.

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  • The ground floor consisted of formal dining and living areas, to include a hearth whose chimney stretched all the way to the top of the condo, two stories up.

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  • After randomly crossing paths with someone whose mind he couldn't penetrate, he'd suddenly found her in his house.

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  • Something like the Others, whose magic might give them insight into things Xander couldn't see.

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  • Gerry catered to Toni, whose chest was thrust even farther out than before.

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  • Disappointed, she turned her attention to Xander, whose half-smile was one of warning, not comfort.

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  • Jessi almost begged her cousin not to leave her alone with Xander, whose direct gaze hadn't left her.

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  • He wasn't there, though the man whose name she thought was Charlie was sleeping on the couch.

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  • She liked the idea of being special, especially with the hoard of beautiful women in front of her whose perfect bodies left her feeling plain.

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  • He belonged to a noble family of Scotch descent, tracing its origin to Walter Stutt, who in 1420 accompanied the earls of Buchan and Douglas to the court of France, and whose family afterwards rose to be counts of Tracy.

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  • Guiteau, whose mind had no doubt been somewhat influenced by the abuse lavished upon the president by his party opponents; and on the 19th of September 1881, he died at Elberon, New Jersey, whither he had been removed on the 6th.

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  • Leslie Stephen advised Thomas Hardy, then an aspiring contributor to the Cornhill, to read George Sand, whose country stories seemed to him perfect.

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  • In the past many conflicting estimates were made of the character and achievements of the pope during whose pontificate Protestantism first took form.

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  • The countship of Angouleme dated from the 9th century, the most important of the early counts being William Taillefer, whose descendants held the title till the end of the 12th century.

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  • In October 1847 he wrote to Pius IX., offering his services to the Church, whose cause he for a moment believed to be that of national liberty.

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  • Let a conductor, say a metallic sphere, be supported by a metal rod of negligible electric capacity whose other end is earthed.

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  • The governor appoints, subject to the consent of a majority of the members elected to the Senate, all officers whose appointment or election is.

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  • It is true that Cynthia, whose health appears to have been weak, does not seem to have survived the separation long.

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  • The first is most obvious in the scenes of quiet description and emotion in whose presentation he particularly excels.

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  • In the Armenian and Coptic rites the vestment is often elaborately embroidered; in the other rites the only ornament is a cross high in the middle of the back, save in the case of bishops of the Orthodox Church, whose sticharia are ornamented with two vertical red stripes (7rorayof, " rivers").

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  • Marble terraces and balustrades surround the tank, and a marble causeway leads across the water to the temple, whose gilded walls, roof, dome and cupolas, with vivid touches of red curtains, are reflected in the still water.

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  • Again in the Netherlands, he made a treaty with Francis II., duke of Brittany, whose independence was threatened by the French regent, Anne of Beaujeu, and the struggle with France was soon renewed.

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  • Artisans came from a great distance to view and honour the image of the popular writer whose best efforts had been dedicated to the cause and the sufferings of the workers of the world; and literary men of all opinions gathered round the grave of one of their brethren whose writings were at once the delight of every boy and the instruction of every man who read them.

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  • The chief, whose title is nawab, is a Mahommedan, of Afghan descent.

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  • In the Black Sea they exploited the shores of Pontus and Scythia, whose products they exchanged for textiles spun from the wool of their own country.

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  • In the ensuing party struggles the city passed under a tyrant, Theagenes (about 640), whose rule was too brief to produce great changes.

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  • At Leiden, Utrecht, Groningen, Franeker, Breda, Nimeguen, Harderwyk, Duisburg and Herborn, and at the Catholic university of Louvain, Cartesianism was warmly expounded and defended in seats of learning, of which many are now left desolate, and by adherents whose writings have for the most part long lost interest for any but the antiquary.

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  • Reason is in his idea not the individual reason, but the fountain of natural truth, whose chief channels are the various systems of heathen philosophy, and more especially the thoughts of Plato and the methods of Aristotle.

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  • In his adoption of a purely defensive policy at the beginning of the Peloponnesian War, he miscalculated the temper of the Athenians, whose morale would have been better sustained by a greater show of activity.

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  • The third player, who does any measuring that may be necessary to determine which bowl or bowls may be nearest the jack, holds almost as responsible a position as the captain, whose place, in fact, he takes whenever the skip is temporarily absent.

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  • Her great beauty and romantic history made her the fashion, and she attracted the notice of the regent, Philip, duke of Orleans, whose offers she had the strength of mind to refuse.

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  • In 1 3 42 it was purchased by the count of Wurttemberg, whose descendants afterwards acquired the title of duke.

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  • No such charges are brought by the prophet against the exiles, in whose simple life, indeed, there was little or no opportunity for flagrant violation of law.

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  • It is remarkable for its fine tower and chime of bells, and contains the splendid allegorical monument of William the Silent, executed by Hendrik de Keyser and his son Pieter about 1621, and the tomb of Hugo Grotius, born in Delft in 1583, whose statue, erected in 1886, stands in the market-place outside the church.

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  • In addition to this Bedouin organization there was the curious institution of an elective monarchy, some of whose kings are catalogued in Gen.

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  • He was the father of Herod the Great, whose family thus was Idumaean in origin.

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  • She was the guiding spirit of the first Fronde, when she brought over Armand, Prince de Conti, her second brother, and her husband to the malcontents, but she failed to attract Conde himself, whose loyalty to the court overthrew the first Fronde.

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  • Rich gold placers had already been discovered, and in 1875 the Sioux Indians within whose territory the hills had until then been included, were removed, and the lands were open to white settlers.

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  • Away in the East Cyrus had been succeeded in 529 B.C. by Cambyses, who had annexed Egypt and on whose death in 522 a Magian impostor, Gaumata, had seized the throne.

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  • The three lakes - whose greatest lengths are 260, 122 and 119 m.

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  • After 1390 - but whilst he was still a young man - he made the acquaintance of Geoffrey Chaucer, with whose son Thomas he was on terms of considerable intimacy.

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  • There is a fine park outside the town belonging to the duke of Arenberg, whose ancestor, Charles de Ligne, bought it from Henry IV.

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  • About 1565 he was knighted at the same time as James Stirling, his colleague, whose daughter John Napier subsequently married.

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  • The Canonis Descriptio on its publication in 1614, at once attracted the attention of Edward Wright, whose name is known in connexion with improvements in navigation, and Henry Briggs, then professor of geometry at Gresham College, London.

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  • The different editions of the Descriptio and Constructio, as well as the reception of logarithms on the continent of Europe, and especially by Kepler, whose admiration of the invention almost equalled that of Briggs, belong to the history of logarithms (q.v.).

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  • When Napier published the Canonis Descriptio England had taken no part in the advance of science, and there is no British author of the time except Napier whose name can be placed in the same rank as those of Copernicus, Tycho Brahe, Kepler, Galileo, or Stevinus.

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  • The synod at its first meeting chooses a minister as its moderator whose duties, though somewhat more restricted, are similar to those of presbyterial moderators.

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  • To share with the minister such general oversight is not regarded by intelligent and influential laymen as an incongruous or unworthy office; but to identify the duties of the eldership, even in theory, with those of the minister is a sure way of deterring from accepting office many whose counsel and influence in the eldership would be invaluable.'

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  • In the extreme north-west an elevated region, whose aridity is caused by the " blanketing " influence of the eastern Andean ranges, extends.

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  • On the 31st of August of the same year a series of proposals upon the currency question was submitted to congress by the president, whose real object was to counteract the too rapid appreciation of the inconvertible paper money.

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  • The ministry employs inspectors, whose duty it is to visit the different parts of the country and to report on their respective position and wants.

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  • Mention may also be made of the Tribunal des Conflits, a special court whose function it is to decide which is the competent tribunal when an administration and a judicial court both claim or refuse to deal with a given case.

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  • It is at the disposal of the minister of war, who can decree the recall of all men discharged to the reserve the previous year and all those whose time of service has for any reason been shortened.

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  • The oversight of all the colonies and protectorates save Algeria and Tunisia is confided to a minister of the colonies (law of March 20, 1894)1 whose powers correspond to those exercised in France by the minister of the interior.

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  • Driven from it in 1795, he was restored by Lucien Bonaparte, during whose time of office he served as secretary to the prefecture of the Upper Marne.

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  • It was one of the five Wendish towns whose alliance extorted from King Eric of Norway a favourable commercial treaty in 1284-1285; and in the 14th century it was second only to Lubeck in the Hanseatic League.

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  • Since 1860 several visits have been paid to the group by scientific investigators - by Dr Habel in 1868; Messrs Baur and Adams, and the naturalists of the "Albatross," between 1888 and 1891; and in 1897-1898 by Mr Charles Harris, whose journey was specially undertaken at the instance of the Hon.

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  • On each side of this, in the western pediment, is a group of two combatants over a fallen warrior; in the eastern pediment, a warrior whose opponent is falling into the arms of a supporting figure; other figures also - the bowmen especially - face towards the angles, and so give more variety to the composition.

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  • Two miles north-east is the famous Silla de Caracas, whose twin summits, like a gigantic old-fashioned saddle (silla), rise to an elevation of 8622 ft.; and the Naiguete, still farther eastward, overlooks the valley from a height of 9186 ft.

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  • Here may be noticed three genera of large extinct marsupials from the Pleistocene of Australia whose affinities appear to ally them to the wombat-group on the one hand and to the phalangers on the other.

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  • The same deposits have yielded remains of small mammals whose dentition approximates more nearly to that of either polyprotodont marsupials or insectivores; and these may be conveniently noticed here without prejudice to their true affinities.

    1
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  • When he died three years later Lauenburg passed to his nephew, George Louis, elector of Hanover, afterwards king of Great Britain as George I., whose rights were recognized by the emperor Charles VI.

    1
    0
  • He violently attacked Politian (Poliziano), whose Miscellanea (a collection of notes on classical authors) were declared by Merula to be either plagiarized from his own writings or, when original, to be entirely incorrect.

    1
    0
  • In 1613 he led a large army against his persecutor, on whose murder by two of his officers that year Bethlen was placed on the throne by the Porte, in opposition to the wishes of the emperor, who preferred a prince who would incline more towards Vienna than towards Constantinople.

    1
    0
  • Till middle life he was also lieutenant-general in Aragon for his brother and predecessor Alphonso V., whose reign was mainly spent in Italy.

    1
    0
  • By his beloved consort Ulrica Leonora of Denmark, from the shock of whose death in July 1693 he never recovered, he had seven children, of whom only three survived him, a son Charles, and two daughters, Hedwig Sophia, duchess of Holstein, and Ulrica Leonora, who ultimately succeeded her brother on the Swedish throne.

    1
    0
  • Even the manuscripts left at his death were so incomplete that Todhunter, into whose hands they were put, found it impossible to use them in the publication of a second edition of the original treatise, and wisely printed them, in 1865, in a supplementary volume.

    1
    0
  • At Bombay, which he reached in September 1807, he was the guest of Sir James Mackintosh, whose eldest daughter he married in January 1808, proceeding soon after to Bagdad as resident.

    1
    0
  • Valentinian was restored in 388 by Theodosius, through whose influence he was converted to Orthodox Catholicism.

    1
    0
  • Crispi, whose strong anti-clerical convictions did not prevent him from regarding the papacy as preeminently an Italian institution, was determined both to prove to the Catholic world the practical independence of the government of the Church and to retain for Rome so potent a centre of universal attraction as the presence of the future pope.

    4
    3
  • The document itself provided for an elected committee of twenty-five barons, whose duty was to compel John, by force if necessary, to keep his promises; but this was evidently regarded as insufficient, and the matter was dealt with in a supplementary treaty (Conventio facia inter regem Angliae et barones ejusdum regni).

    1
    0
  • Driesch [13], to whose memoirs the reader must be referred for further details.

    2
    1
  • Leading examples may be found in the various prosecutions of St Athanasius, in whose case also there is the germ of an appeal, tanquam ab abusu.

    2
    1
  • The vascular supply of the leaf (leaf-trace) consists of a single strand only in the haplostelic and some of the more primitive siphonostelic forms. In the microphyllous groups Leaf.trace of Pteridophytes (Lycopodiales and Equisetales) in and Petlolar which the leaves are small relatively to the stem, the Strands, single bundle destined for each leaf is a small strand whose departure causes no disturbance in the cauline stele.

    1
    0
  • The limit of each years increment of secondary wood, in those plants whose yearly activity is interrupted by a regular winter or dry season, is marked by a more or less distinct line, which is produced by the sharp contrast between the wood formed in the late summer of one year (characterized by the sparseness or small diameter of the tracheal elements, or by the preponderance of fibres, or by a combination of these characters, giving a denseness to the wood) and the loose spring wood of the next year, with its absence of fibres, or its numerous large tracheae.

    1
    0
  • Each is a small protoplasmic body, in the meshes of whose vubstance the green coloring matter chlorophyll is contained in some form of solution.

    1
    0
  • This has been done with success and in great detail by Grisebach, whose Vegetation der Erde from this point of view is still unsurpassed.

    1
    0
  • Moreover, under piaculum are confused purification, propitiations and expiations; Smith's contention that purifications, whose magical character he recognizes but interprets as late, are not sacrificial, is far from conclusive.

    1
    0
  • Nicolas of Basel, the mysterious layman from whose visit Tauler dates his true religious life, seems to have been the chief organizing force among the Gottesfreunde.

    1
    0
  • Here there is only space to name Bontius, Clusius, Hernandez (or Fernandez), Marcgrave, Nieremberg and Piso, 6 whose several works describing the natural products of both the Indies - whether the result of their own observation or compilation - together with those of Olina and Worm, produced a marked effect, since they led up to what may be deemed the foundation of scientific ornithology.'

    1
    0
  • Among the servants there was a little page whose name was Carl.

    20
    19
  • A blue-robed man, whose fittest roof is the overarching sky which reflects his serenity.

    25
    24
  • He told her about Cynthia and she talked about someone named Jack who was a med student whose family thought she was a jerk and they both decided life was too damned complicated and lots of the times it sucked, but not at times like this.

    0
    0
  • Taran released him and turned to stare hard at Sirian, whose calm features hid any emotion he might feel.

    0
    0
  • It was her remaining guard, Ledden, whose watchful gaze had rarely left the enemy's men outside the door.

    0
    0
  • Relieved, horrified, she focused on subduing the demon, whose angry pacing in her chest made her want to double over in pain.

    0
    0
  • If I'm the first person whose mind you can't read, doesn't it scare you that you can't tell what I'm thinking?

    0
    0
  • He was about to find out whose side she was on; he only hoped it didn't piss him off.

    0
    0
  • He was accompanied by his brother, the Grey God, Darian, whose unusual power bent the air around him in a mix of light and shadows.

    0
    0
  • Brandon was all but clinging to his cousin, whose gray eyes were taking in the group uneasily.

    0
    0
  • There were five in the foyer, men whose eyes glowed red like Xander's.

    0
    0
  • He paced to Damian's side, purposely not looking at Jessi, whose nearness was making him crazy enough.

    0
    0
  • He focused his mind magic on the Other, whose ancient mind was older than Xander's.

    0
    0
  • On the accession of the latter to the throne, Andrew Stone was appointed treasurer to Queen Charlotte, and attaching himself to Lord Bute he became an influential member of the party known as "the king's friends," whose meetings were frequently held at his house.

    0
    0
  • In this respect the Asiatic species differs very widely from its African relative, whose nutriment is largely composed of boughs and roots.

    0
    0
  • The serfs, whose wrongs seldom attracted notice in an age indifferent to the claims of common humanity, found a friend in this severe monarch, and he protected even the despised and persecuted Jews.

    0
    0
  • Verres may not have been quite so black as he is painted by Cicero, on whose speeches we depend entirely for our knowledge of him, but there can hardly be a doubt that he stood pre-eminent among the worst specimens of Roman provincial governors.

    0
    0
  • A new paper was started, to which was given the name of Kossuth Hirlapia, so that from the first it was Kossuth rather than the Palatine or the president of the ministry whose name was in the minds of the people associated with the new government.

    0
    0
  • The chief, whose title is Rana, is a Rajput of the Sisodhyia clan, connected with the Udaipur family.

    0
    0
  • Brunn, whose comparative method in art-criticism he much developed.

    0
    0
  • The city confers the title of marquis on the Osorio family, the ruins of whose palace, sacked in 1810 by the French, are still an object of interest.

    0
    0
  • This spirit might easily be confounded with the sun, whose power was supposed to be stored up in the warmthgiving tree.

    0
    0
  • The leaf-stalks and flowerstalks are traversed by longitudinal air-passages, whose disposition varies in different species.

    0
    0
  • He on his part was more and more repelled by a superior woman determined to live her own intellectual life, and she on hers discovered that she was mated, if not to a clown, at least to a hobereau whose whole heart was in his cattle and his turnips.

    0
    0
  • Musset, though he depended on her exertions, was first bored and then irritated at the sight of this terrible vache a ecrire, whose pen was going for eight hours a day, and sought diversion in the cafés and other less reputable resorts of pleasure.

    0
    0
  • In the former woman appears as the serpent whose trail is over all; in the latter, written twenty-five years after the event, she is the guardian angel abused and maltreated by men.

    0
    0
  • Michel de Bourges was the counsel whose eloquent pleadings brought the suit for a judicial separation to a successful issue in 1836.'

    0
    0
  • The insects belong to the family Elateridae, whose characters are described under Coleoptera.

    0
    0
  • These decrees were issued together with a pastoral letter of Bishop de' Ricci, and were warmly approved by the grand-duke, at whose instance a national synod of the Tuscan bishops met at Florence on the 23rd of April 1787.

    0
    0
  • In the matter of the rhythms, caesuras and elisions which it allows, the metrical treatment is much more severe than that of Catullus, whose elegiacs are comparatively rude and barbarous; but it is not bound hand and foot, like the Ovidian distich, in a formal and conventional system.

    0
    0
  • In 1756 the old nawab died, and was succeeded by his grandson Surajud-Dowlah, a young madman of 19, whose name is indelibly associated with the tragedy of the Black Hole.

    0
    0
  • The Bhonsla Mahratta raja of Nagpur, whose dominions bordered on Bengal, was won over by the diplomacy of an emissary of Hastings.

    0
    0
  • In his case the ancestral hoards were under the control of his mother, the begum of Oudh, into whose hands they had been allowed to pass at the time when Hastings was powerless in council.

    0
    0
  • These are subdivided into twenty provinces, each administered by an administrator of native affairs by whose side is the provincial council consisting of natives and occupied with the discussion of ways and means and questions of public works.

    0
    0
  • The planets were shown to have visible disks, and to be attended by satellites whose distance and position angle relative to the planet it was desirable to measure.

    0
    0
  • The short screw whose divided milled head is shifts the zero of the micrometer by pushing, without turning, the short sliding rod whose flat end forms the point d'appui of the micrometer screw at I.

    0
    0
  • The island has a bad reputation for malaria, due to the fact that it offers a considerable quantity of breeding places for the Anopheles claviger, the mosquito whose bite conveys the infection.

    0
    0
  • The native tribes opposed the Romans, but were conquered after several campaigns; 8 the island became a province under the government of a praetor or propraetor, to whose jurisdiction Corsica was added soon afterwards.

    0
    0
  • The campaign which followed was a triumph for Selim, whose firmness and courage overcame the pusillanimity and insubordination of the Janissaries.

    0
    0
  • The new administration was headed by Buckingham, in whose toleration and comprehension principles Ashley shared to the full.

    0
    0
  • The expansion of Levantine trade which ensued in the Hellenistic age brought especial profit to Rhodes, whose standard of coinage and maritime law became widely accepted in the Mediterranean.

    0
    0
  • Australia contains four cities whose population exceeds ioo,000, and fifteen with over 10,000.

    0
    0
  • In 1642 Abel Janszoon Tasman sailed on a voyage of discovery from Batavia, the headquarters of the governor and council of the Dutch East Indies, under whose auspices the expedition was undertaken.

    0
    0
  • After a visit to the Mauritius, then a Dutch possession, Tasman bore away to the south-east, and on the 24th of November sighted the western coast of the land which he named Van Diemen's Land, in honour of the governor under whose directions he was acting.

    0
    0
  • The first English navigator to sight the Australian continent was William Dampier, who made a visit to these shores in 1688, as supercargo of the " Cygnet," a trader whose crew had turned buccaneers.

    0
    0
  • After successfully observing the transit from the island of Tahiti, or Otaheite, as Cook wrote it, the " Endeavour's " head was turned south, and then north-west, beating about the Pacific in search of the eastern coast of the great continent whose western shores had been so long known to the Dutch.

    0
    0
  • During the sojourn in Botany Bay the crew had to perform the painful duty of burying a comrade - a seaman named Forby Sutherland, who was in all probability the first British subject whose body was committed to Australian soil.

    0
    0
  • Austin, and the brothers Gregory, whose discoveries have great importance from a geographical point of view.

    0
    0
  • A population of 30,000, three- New fourths of them convicts, formed the infant common- South wealth, whose attention was soon directed to the profit- wales.

    0
    0
  • Then came General Sir Richard Bourke, whose wise and liberal administration proved most beneficial.

    0
    0
  • There was distrust in the minds of the depositors, especially those whose holdings were small, and most of the banks were, at a very early period, subjected to the strain of repaying a large proportion of their deposits as they fell due.

    0
    0
  • Before the end of 1906 fifty-two separate trades in Victoria had obtained special boards, by whose determinations their operations were controlled.

    0
    0
  • In New South Wales, whose example was followed by Western Australia, the machinery adopted for fixing the statutory rate of wages was of a somewhat different type.

    0
    0
  • From its pleasant situation in a hilly, wooded district near the headwaters of the Cray stream, Orpington has become in modern times a favourite residential locality for those whose business lies in London.

    0
    0
  • Under the latter prince the country prospered greatly, and having introduced the principle of primogeniture, he died and was succeeded by his infant son, Bernard Ernest Freund (1800-1882), whose mother, Eleanora of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, governed in his name until 1821.

    0
    0
  • Shortly afterwards Artabanus died, and was succeeded by his son, Vardanes, whose reign was still more turbulent than that of his father.

    0
    0
  • Ujjain, known as Avanti in the Buddhist period and as Ozene to the Greeks, is one of the seven sacred cities of the Hindus and the traditional capital of King Vikramaditya, at whose court the "nine gems" of Sanskirt literature are said to have flourished.

    0
    0
  • He purchased from the family of Neleus of Skepsis in the Troad manuscripts of the works of Aristotle and Theophrastus (including their libraries), which had been given to Neleus by Theophrastus himself, whose pupil Neleus had been.

    0
    0
  • William, however, whose position had been strengthened by his nomination to the post of ruwaard of Brabant, determined to welcome Matthias and use him for his own purposes.

    0
    0
  • On the 17th of March 1528 he married Ottilie Beham, a gifted lady, whose brothers, pupils of Albrecht Durer, had got into trouble through Anabaptist leanings.

    0
    0
  • After the decline of the power of Rome, the dominant force in Asiatic commerce and navigation was Persia, and from that time onward, until the arrival of the Portuguese upon the scene early in the 16th century the spice trade, whose chief emporia were in or near the Malay Peninsula, was in Persian or Arab hands.

    0
    0
  • Vermont (vert mont), the Green Mountain State, was so named from the evergreen forests of its mountains, whose principal trees are spruce and fir on the upper slopes and white pine and hemlock on the lower.

    0
    0
  • In May he defeated a greatly superior royalist force at Grantham, proceeding afterwards to Nottingham in accordance with Essex's plan of penetrating into Yorkshire to relieve the Fairfaxes; where, however, difficulties, arising from jealousies between the officers, and the treachery of John Hotham, whose arrest Cromwell was instrumental in effecting, obliged him to retire again to the association, leaving the Fairfaxes to be defeated at Adwalton Moor.

    0
    0
  • Although the idol of his victorious army, and in a position enabling him to exercise autocratic power, he laboured unostentatiously for more than a year and a half as a member of the parliament, whose authority he supported to the best of his ability.

    0
    0
  • There followed a campaign against the idols whose temples and books were destroyed.

    0
    0
  • Grattan was a reformer and a patriot without a tincture of democratic ideas; Wolfe Tone was a revolutionary whose principles were drawn from the French Convention.

    0
    0
  • A creditor is not bound to give change to the debtor, whose duty it is to make tender in lawful money the whole amount due, or more, without asking for change.

    0
    0
  • Where a debtor has committed any act of bankruptcy a creditor or creditors whose aggregate claims are not less than £50 may proceed against him in bankruptcy.

    0
    0
  • Those whose stubborn persistence in error survived all these inducements to repent were sent into exile.

    0
    0
  • This shows that the principle of the dissipation of energy has control over the actions of those agents only whose faculties are too gross to enable them to grapple individually with the minute portions of matter which are the seat of energy.

    0
    0
  • Just as there were supposed to be several Pans and Fauns, so there were many Silenuses, whose father was called Papposilenus ("Daddy Silenus"), represented as completely covered with hair and more animal in appearance.

    0
    0
  • God, he says, is to be regarded not as an absolute but as an Infinite Person, whose nature it is that he should realize himself in finite persons.

    0
    0
  • At South Manchester, an attractive industrial village, a silk mill was built in 1838; the silk mills of one firm (Cheney Brothers) here cover about 12 acres; the company has done much for its employees, whose homes are almost all detached cottages in attractive grounds.

    0
    0
  • Ten years later Manson discovered a second species, Filaria perstans, whose larvae live in the blood.

    0
    0
  • The presence of these parasites seems at times to have little effect on the host, and men in whose system it is calculated there are some 40-50 million larvae have shown no signs of disease.

    0
    0
  • The amelu was a patrician, the man of family, whose birth, marriage and death were registered, of ancestral estates and full civil rights.

    0
    0
  • Ships, whose tonnage was estimated at the amount of grain they could carry, were continually hired for the transport of all kinds of goods.

    0
    0
  • With the judges were associated a body of elders, who shared in the decision, but whose exact function is not yet clear.

    0
    0
  • The application of this to telegraphic purposes was suggested by Laplace and taken up by Ampere, and afterwards by Triboaillet and by Schilling, whose work forms the foundation of much of modern telegraphy.

    0
    0
  • The same revolution vested supreme authority in a non-resident and inefficient autocrat, whose title gave him the right to interfere in Italian affairs, but who lacked the power and will to rule the people for his own or their advantage.

    0
    0
  • The discords which followed on the break-up of the Carolingian power, and the weakness of the so-called Italian emperors, who were unable to control the feudatories (marquises of Ivrea and Tuscany, dukes of Friuli and Spoleto), from whose ranks they sprang, exposed Italy to ever-increasing misrule.

    0
    0
  • She was the last heiress of the great house of Canossa, whose fiefs stretched from Mantua across Lombardy, passed the Apennines, included the Tuscan plains, and embraced a portion of the duchy of Spoleto.

    0
    0
  • This led to the establishment of podests, who represented a compromise between two radically hostile parties in the city, and whose business it was to arbitrate and keep the peace between them.

    0
    0
  • The king, too, was in close sympathy with the societys aims, but for the present it was necessary to hide this attitude from the eyes of the Powers, whose sympathy Cavour could only hope to gain by professing hostility to everything that savoured of revolution.

    0
    0
  • It was fortunate for Italy that during the whole period 1869 1876 the direction of her foreign policy remained in the experienced hands of Visconti-Venosta, a statesman whose Foreign trustworthiness, dignity and moderation even political policy opponents have been compelled to recognize.

    0
    0
  • Depretis recalled Nigra from Paris and replaced him by General Cialdini, whose ardent plea for Italian intervention in favor of France in 1870, and whose comradeship with Marshal Macmahon in 1859, would, it was supposed, render him persona gratissima to the French government.

    0
    0
  • Parliament had degenerated into a congeries of personal groups, whose members were eager only to overturn cabinets in order to secure power for the leaders and official favors for themselves.

    0
    0
  • No concession could be denied to deputies, or groups of deputiec, whose support was indispensable to the life of the cabinet, nor, under such conditions, was it possible to place any effective check upon administrative abuses in which politicians or their electors were interested.

    0
    0
  • The movement was strongly supported by King Humbert, whose intrepidity in visiting the most dangerous spots at Busca and Naples while the epidemic was at its height, reassuring the panic-stricken inhabitants by his presence, excited the enthusiasm of his people and the admiration of Europe.

    0
    0
  • The extension of the Italian zone excited the suspicions of John, negus of Abyssinia, whose apprehensions were assiduously fomented by Alula, ras of Tigr, and by French and Greek adventurers.

    0
    0
  • The negus next marched against Menelek, king of Shoa, whose neutrality Italy had purchased with 5000 Remington.

    0
    0
  • On the 29th of June Rudini was succeeded in the premiership by General Luigi Pelloux, a Savoyard, whose only title to office was the confidence of the king.

    0
    0
  • The churchmen headed by Stanislaus Szczepanowski, bishop of Cracow, took the side of the nobles, whose grievances seem to have been real.

    0
    0
  • During his residence in Thrace he joined the expedition of the Argonauts, whose leader Jason had been informed by Chiron that only by the aid of Orpheus would they be able to pass by the Sirens unscathed.

    0
    0
  • The term parenchyma is applied to tissues whose cells are isodiametric or cylin.drical in shape, prosenchyma tissues consisting of long narrow cells, with pointed ends.

    0
    0
  • Opposed to the thalloid forms are the group of leafy Liverworts (Acrogynae), whose plant-body consists of a thin supporting stem bearing leaves.

    0
    0
  • Besides the hydrom and leptom, and situated between them, there is a tissue which perhaps serves to conduct soluble carbohydrates, and whose cells are ordinarily full of starch.

    0
    0
  • Hence such tracheae are only laid down in organs whose growth in length has ceased.

    0
    0
  • In the megaphyllous forms, on the other hand, (Ferns) whose leaves are large relatively to the stem, the departure of the correspondingly large trace causes a gap (leaf-gap) in the vascular cylinder, as already described.

    0
    0
  • The stele of Equisetum is of a very peculiar type whose relations are not completely clear.

    0
    0
  • The lenticels of the stem are usually formed beneath stomata, whose function they take up after the stomata have been ruptured and cast off with the rest of the epidermis.

    0
    0
  • The naked cells which have been alluded to live in water, and call therefore for no differentiation in connection with this necessity; but those which are surrounded by a cell-wall always develop within themselves a vacuole or cavity which occupies the greater part of their interior, and the hydrostatic pressure of whose contents keeps tha protoplasm in contact with the membrane, setting up a condition of turgidity.

    0
    0
  • The latter ultimately reaches the external air by diffusion through the stomata, whose dimensions vary in proportion as the amount of water in the epidermal cells becomes greater or less.

    0
    0
  • We find them to consist of representatives of the great classes of foodstuffs on which animal protoplasm is nourished, and whose presence renders seeds such valuable material for animal consumptien.

    0
    0
  • As the tube grows down the hair it maintains its own independence, and does not fuse with the contents of the root-hair, whose protoplasm remains quite distinct and separate.

    0
    0
  • This is the absorption of elaborated compounds from their environment, by whose decomposition the potential energy expended in their construction can be liberated.

    0
    0
  • Helophytes.These are marsh plants which normally have ii, leir roots in soaking soil but whose branches and foliage are more less aerial.

    0
    0
  • Such groups are interesting in that they are vegetation units whose physiognomy is, in a broad sense, related more to climatic than to edaphic conditions.

    0
    0
  • In the Gnetaceous Welwitschia it possesses a vegetable type whose extraordinary peculiarities make it seem amongst contemporary vegetation much as some strange and extinct animal form would if suddenly endowed with life.

    0
    0
  • Pytheas, whose own narrative is not preserved, coasted the Bay of Biscay, sailed up the English Channel and followed the coast of Britain to its most northerly point.

    0
    0
  • Ptolemy Euergetes (247-222 B.C.) rendered the greatest service to geography by the protection and encouragement of Eratosthenes, whose labours gave the first ap proximate knowledge of the true size of the spherical The .

    0
    0
  • The emperor Justinian (483-565), in whose reign the greatness of the Eastern empire culminated, sent two Nestorian monks to China, who returned with eggs of the silkworm concealed in a hollow cane, and thus silk manufactures were established in the Peloponnesus and the Greek islands.

    0
    0
  • The earliest Arabian traveller whose observations have come down to us is the merchant Sulaiman, who embarked in the Persian Gulf and made several voyages to India and China, in the middle of the 9th century.

    0
    0
  • Amongst his contemporaries were Istakhri, who travelled through all the Mahommedan countries and wrote his Book of Climates in 950, and Ibn Haukal, whose Book of Roads and Kingdoms, based on the work of Istakhri, was written in 976.

    0