Whom sentence example

whom
  • Actually, she knew very little about the man with whom she had promised to spend the summer.
    1049
    471
  • Whom will you send for?
    631
    229
  • He saw a gentleman whom he presumed to be the director, and told him about Helen.
    644
    326
  • At the porch he met two of the landed gentry, one of whom he knew.
    468
    241
  • To whom did you apply?
    307
    113
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  • Here in dwells an old man with whom I would like to converse.
    334
    180
  • Whom are they firing at?
    265
    116
  • How different if must be, he thought, making love with someone for whom you really cared.
    389
    241
  • He saw the kind faces of those whom he loved.
    219
    114
  • She was surprised to see three people within, none of whom looked like they fit in the refined, elegant spaces of the parlor.
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  • It is the work of a brave man surely, in whom there was no guile!
    156
    85
  • He was peppered with questions from the rescuers, many of whom he recognized, but he held responses to a negative shake of his head and Billy Langstrom's name.
    174
    109
  • What are we scared at and of whom are we afraid?
    124
    59
  • The famous men of whom I have told you in this story are commonly called the Seven Wise Men of Greece.
    169
    108
  • He said, "They are mine, they are personal and I will choose with whom to share them."
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    73
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  • He whirled to face the man of whom he thought.
    123
    69
  • Dean felt equally acrimonious toward the overbearing state official whom he hadn't seen since the winter and who, in Dean's mind, had no business being back in Ouray.
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    74
  • Fear fluttered through her, and her gaze flew to Kris, whom she trusted little more than his sadistic brother.
    109
    62
  • I ran it by Quinn and Martha, both of whom kicked the decision back to me.
    98
    54
  • The adobe structure was guarded by several more Guardians, none of whom looked like Damian from the distance.
    93
    50
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  • "From whom did you get this?" she asked.
    107
    64
  • Whom have you come from?
    98
    56
  • "Then to whom shall we take it?" asked the messengers.
    79
    41
  • When Pierre saw the Emperor he was coming out accompanied by two merchants, one of whom Pierre knew, a fat otkupshchik.
    49
    17
  • "My two trusted advisors, neither of whom trusts the other," Memon said, entertained.
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  • "Whom do you want?" someone inquired.
    36
    8
  • This charcoal man, whom I know very well, ran past me with a child in his arms.
    60
    33
  • The people whom they met gazed at them and wondered who they could be.
    59
    33
  • However, practically speaking, it sometimes has a corrupting influence on those whom it empowers to act for the state.
    53
    28
  • She felt agitated and tormented, and the cause of this was Kuragin whom she could not help watching.
    41
    17
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  • An old peasant whom Prince Andrew in his childhood had often seen at the gate was sitting on a green garden seat, plaiting a bast shoe.
    46
    23
  • Her actions toward Julie, her mother and to Betsy with whom she shares a special relationship are markedly different.
    55
    33
  • One real runaway slave, among the rest, whom I helped to forward toward the north star.
    41
    19
  • Pierre was staying at Prince Vasili Kuragin's and sharing the dissipated life of his son Anatole, the son whom they were planning to reform by marrying him to Prince Andrew's sister.
    37
    15
  • To whom should I confess my blunder?
    48
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  • Whom shall I announce?
    30
    12
  • Understanding at once to whom she alluded, Prince Vasili said in a whisper:
    36
    18
  • Who is that intemperate and brutal man whom we would redeem?
    34
    17
  • Me whom everyone is so fond of?
    47
    30
  • I don't care to whom you've betrayed me.
    30
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  • Rostov, in dismay, began justifying himself, but seeing the kindly, jocular face of the general, he took him aside and in an excited voice told him the whole affair, asking him to intercede for Denisov, whom the general knew.
    33
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  • The soldier to whom the laughers referred was Dolokhov.
    32
    17
  • "How was it a gun was abandoned?" asked Bagration, frowning, not so much at the captain as at those who were laughing, among whom Zherkov laughed loudest.
    27
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  • And the point is that we knew whom he had it from.
    33
    18
  • Everybody is wondering to whom the count will leave his fortune, though he may perhaps outlive us all, as I sincerely hope he will...
    19
    5
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  • But to whom should I say that?
    27
    13
  • With whom am I speaking?
    44
    31
  • Why was Napoleon III a criminal when he was taken prisoner at Boulogne, and why, later on, were those criminals whom he arrested?
    29
    16
  • Commanded by the Emperor himself they could not fail to vanquish anyone, be it whom it might: so thought Rostov and most of the officers after the review.
    16
    4
  • See whom she looks like!
    21
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  • Pierre, not knowing whom to answer, looked at them all and smiled.
    72
    61
  • It's that protege of yours, that sweet Princess Drubetskaya, that Anna Mikhaylovna whom I would not take for a housemaid... the infamous, vile woman!
    16
    5
  • Turning to his adjutant he ordered him to bring down the two battalions of the Sixth Chasseurs whom they had just passed.
    25
    14
  • You may go and kill whom you please, but I don't want to do so anymore!
    19
    8
  • 'From whom did you get the proclamation?' 'I wrote it myself.'
    25
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  • I should not talk so much about myself if there were anybody else whom I knew as well.
    23
    13
  • However painful it may be to me, should the Almighty lay the duties of wife and mother upon me I shall try to perform them as faithfully as I can, without disquieting myself by examining my feelings toward him whom He may give me for husband.
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  • Excited and irritated by these thoughts Prince Andrew went toward his room to write to his father, to whom he wrote every day.
    19
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  • Whom have they brought?
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  • There was one other with whom I had "solid seasons," long to be remembered, at his house in the village, and who looked in upon me from time to time; but I had no more for society there.
    15
    7
  • This is what they have done with me! thought he, full of an irrepressible fury that welled up within him against the someone to whom what was happening might be attributed.
    15
    7
  • "Well, you know whom," said Pierre, with a meaning glance from under his brows.
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  • The boy with the thin neck stretching out from the turn-down collar-- whom everyone had forgotten--gazed at Pierre with even greater and more rapturous joy.
    13
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  • The soldiers, of whom there are the most, form the lower section of the cone and its base.
    13
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  • Effie explained effusively how she and her sister had spent the day resurrecting their long lost great-aunt, whom Dean wondered if they were about to dub Saint Annie.
    16
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  • The countess wished to have a tête-à-tête talk with the friend of her childhood, Princess Anna Mikhaylovna, whom she had not seen properly since she returned from Petersburg.
    10
    4
  • This young man, of whom I spoke to you last summer, is so noble-minded and full of that real youthfulness which one seldom finds nowadays among our old men of twenty and, particularly, he is so frank and has so much heart.
    12
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  • Just before five o'clock he went to the kitchen to begin preparing spaghetti for Fred and himself, and Martha, whom they had invited to again stay for supper.
    10
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  • First, it will consider all your friends, people with whom you have actual intimate relationships, and it will look at where they go for Italian food.
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  • He did not know whom to answer, and for a few seconds collected his thoughts.
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  • The insult was the more pointed because it concerned not himself but another, his daughter, whom he loved more than himself.
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  • After Kaysarov, others whom Pierre knew came up to him, and he had not time to reply to all the questions about Moscow that were showered upon him, or to listen to all that was told him.
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  • 'From whom did you get it?' and so on till he reached Vereshchagin, a half educated tradesman, you know, 'a pet of a trader,' said the adjutant smiling.
    10
    5
  • The officer of the Horse Guards went to a general with whom Ermolov was often to be found.
    10
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  • He refused to use his full influence in favour of the candidacy of Charles of Valois, brother of Philip IV., lest France became too powerful; and recognized Henry of Luxemburg, whom his representatives crowned emperor at the Lateran in 1312.
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    0
  • There isn't a living soul in this part of the world to whom I can go for advice in this, or indeed, in any other educational difficulty.
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  • It is impossible to isolate a child in the midst of society, so that he shall not be influenced by the beliefs of those with whom he associates.
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  • I am not one of those on whom fortune deigns to smile.
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  • "That's right," said the man, whom Petya took to be an hussar.
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    5
  • Might have Shipton faked the accident in some sick attempt to place the blame on David Dean whom he obviously despised?
    3
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  • Plane tickets for the next day's flight to Virginia were on Dean's desk with a list of the time he was to leave his house, where he should park at the airport and a description of Detective Norman Hunter whom he was to meet in Norfolk.
    3
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  • Why was he getting so miffed, and whom did he consider outsiders?
    3
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  • Frazer formerly held Virbius to be a wood and tree spirit, to whom horses, in which form tree spirits were often represented, were offered in sacrifice.
    3
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  • The Sicilians refused to be made over once more to the hated French whom they had expelled in 1282, and found a national leader in the regent Frederick.
    3
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  • The queen-mother had at this time fallen in love with Henry Stewart, second son of Lord Avondale, whom she married immediately after obtaining her divorce from Angus in 1527.
    3
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  • Two years later she was reconciled to her husband, by whom she had no children; and, continuing to the end to intrigue both in Scotland and England, she died at Methven Castle on the 18th of October 1541.
    3
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  • All the people whom they saw spoke in praise of his wisdom.
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  • If any one whom she is touching laughs at a joke, she laughs, too, just as if she had heard it.
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  • He knew a lady on one of the boulevards whom he visited of an evening.
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  • Thirdly, he had a son whom it would be a pity to entrust to a chit of a girl.
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  • Nicholas' Day and the prince's name day--all Moscow came to the prince's front door but he gave orders to admit no one and to invite to dinner only a small number, a list of whom he gave to Princess Mary.
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  • "She is bringing me my daughter whom I have just saved from the flames," said he.
    6
    3
  • I admit I was sulking, not sure who was annoyed with whom; tiring of surely looks.
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  • Like the assassin who obsessed about birthdays and clothing, there were two sides to the man before her: the warm, friendly stranger with whom she'd felt so comfortable she confided to him over the phone without knowing anything about him, and the tattooed thug before them in snug biker leathers.
    2
    0
  • He always peeked at his friend, whom he'd dropped off in Hell to serve an undeserved sentence.
    3
    1
  • Shipton's traveling companion, Penelope Something, hysterically filled in what little she knew to Jake Weller and Emile Corday, both of whom visited the patient at the hospital.
    2
    0
  • Arthur may be missed, but I don't know by whom.
    2
    0
  • Gerald had two married sisters and a passel of nieces and nephews – all of whom he was openly proud.
    2
    0
  • Davila was murdered, while on his way to take possession of the government of Cremona for Venice in July 1631, by a ruffian, with whom some dispute seems to have arisen concerning the furnishing of the relays of horses ordered for his use by the Venetian government.
    2
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  • Eadberht showed considerable independence in his dealings with the church, and his brother Ecgberht, to whom the well-known letter of Bede is addressed, was from 734 to 766 archbishop of York.
    2
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  • In 790 the banished !Ethelred returned to the throne and drove out Osred, whom he put to death in 792. !Ethelred, who had married iElflaed the daughter of Offa, also killed Olf and Olfwine, the sons of Olfwald and was murdered himself at Corbridge in 796.
    2
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  • In 1858 Garfield had married Miss Lucretia Rudolph, by whom he had seven children.
    2
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  • In February 1700 Dampier called at Juan Fernandez and while there Captain Straddling of the "Cinque Porte" galley quarrelled with his men, forty-two of whom deserted but were afterwards taken on board by Dampier; five seamen, however, remained on shore.
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  • Professor Suess, to whom the above description is due, finds that the Mediterranean forms no exception to the rule in affording no evidence of elevation or depression within historic times; but it is noteworthy that its present basin is remarkable in Europe for its volcanic and seismic activity.
    2
    0
  • The history of their decline differs from that of the Murabtis, whom they had displaced.
    2
    0
  • Casimir Dudevant, whom she married on the 11th of December 1822, was the natural son of a Baron Dudevant.
    2
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  • On the staff of Figaro was another compatriot with whom she was already intimate as a visitor at Nohant.
    2
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  • " I care little about growing old; I care far more not to grow old alone, but I have never met the being with whom I could have chosen to live and die, or if I ever met him I knew not how to keep him.
    2
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  • In a cottage in the environs of Paris called Le Moulin joli, there sat at the same table an old man engraving and an old woman whom he called his meuniere also engraving.
    2
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  • Solange, who inherited all her mother's wild blood with none of her genius, on the eve of a marriage that had been arranged with a Berrichon gentleman, ran away with Clesinger, a sculptor to whom she had sat for her bust.
    2
    0
  • Here she met two men, one of whom indoctrinated her with religious mysticism,- the other with advanced socialism, Lamennais and Pierre Leroux.
    2
    0
  • He had named them Roman patricians; the latter he had placed in charge of Florence; the former, for whom he planned to carve out a kingdom in central Italy of Parma, Piacenza, Ferrara and Urbino, he had taken with himself to Rome and married to Filiberta of Savoy.
    2
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  • The new duke of Urbino was the Lorenzo de' Medici to whom Machiavelli addressed The Prince.
    2
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  • Latin legend represented her as landing on the coast of Latium and marrying Pilumnus or Picumnus, from whom Turnus, king of the Rutulians, was descended.
    2
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  • By his rigorous imposts he alienated the favour of his subjects, and especially of the clergy, whom he otherwise sought to control firmly.
    2
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  • His confessor, Yakov Ignatiev, whom he promised to obey as "an angel and apostle of God," was his chief counsellor in these days.
    2
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  • In 1906 there were in the state 301,565 members of religious denominations, of whom 86.2% were Protestants.
    2
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  • The House of Delegates is composed (1910) of eighty-six members, of whom each county chooses at least one.
    2
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  • It dates from the 11th century, and once belonged to the Ogilvies, from whom it passed in 1535 to the Gordons.
    2
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  • He would thus have married and had at least one child, from whom the contemporary of Pliny was descended.
    2
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  • Her wealth made it certain that he would be the richest man in France, and he determined to play a part equal to that of his great-grandfather, the regent, whom he resembled in character and debauchery.
    2
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  • The bishops appointed "chatelains," one of whom was the celebrated "Wild Boar of the Ardennes," William de la Marck.
    2
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  • He is assisted by the conseil colonial numbering sixteen members, six of whom are French citizens elected by the French, six natives elected by the natives, the other four being members of the chamber of commerce of Saigon and the conseil prive.
    2
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  • This last was the belief of the Protestant Reformers, for whom the Bible was in matters of doctrine the ultimate court of appeal.
    2
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  • - p west coast, which must from their names have been Greek, though we do not know when or by whom they were founded.
    2
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  • In 1717, however, Cardinal Alberoni retook Cagliari for Spain; but this state of things was short-lived, for in 1720, by the treaty of London, Sardinia passed in exchange for Sicily to the dukes of Savoy, to whom it brought the royal title.
    2
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  • Pop. (1890) 7557; (1900) 10,433 (of whom 1916 were foreign-born); (1910 census) 12,446.
    2
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  • (1465-1521) succeeded in 1 512 his father Bayezid II., whom he dethroned, and whose death, following immediately afterwards, gave rise to suspicions which Selim's character certainly justified.
    2
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  • At the age of eighteen, on the 25th of February 1639, he married Margaret, daughter of Lord Coventry, with whom he and his wife lived at Durham House in the Strand, and at Canonbury House in Islington.
    2
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  • He urged on the bill by which Catholics were prohibited from sitting in either House of Parliament, and was bitter in his expressions of disappointment when the Commons passed a proviso excepting James, against whom the bill was especially aimed, from its operation.
    2
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  • The Cilnii with whom Maecenas was connected were a noble Etruscan family.
    2
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  • In the 9th century the Bulgarians became masters of Naissus, but had to cede it to the Hungarians in the iith century, from whom the Byzantine emperor Manuel I.
    2
    0
  • There was a caliph of Persia whose name was Al Mamoun. He had two sons whom he wished to become honest and noble men.
    12
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  • During World War II, when General Patton got sacked for slapping a soldier whom he regarded as cowardly, the Germans couldn't believe it: Their officers could have soldiers shot without trial!
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  • There were about forty persons present, all of whom were writers and publishers.
    11
    9
  • Entering the drawing room, where the princesses spent most of their time, he greeted the ladies, two of whom were sitting at embroidery frames while a third read aloud.
    5
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  • "What about your master?" he asked Lavrushka, Denisov's orderly, whom all the regiment knew for a rogue.
    8
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  • Just facing it, on the crest of the opposite hill, the village of Schon Grabern could be seen, and in three places to left and right the French troops amid the smoke of their campfires, the greater part of whom were evidently in the village itself and behind the hill.
    16
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  • Decide, my dear, good, gentle Marie, whom I have always loved as a daughter!
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  • In spite of Prince Andrew's disagreeable, ironical tone, in spite of the contempt with which Rostov, from his fighting army point of view, regarded all these little adjutants on the staff of whom the newcomer was evidently one, Rostov felt confused, blushed, and became silent.
    6
    4
  • But of course you know her already, he said, evidently trying to entertain a visitor with whom he now found nothing in common.
    4
    2
  • They are like wolves whom nothing but flesh can appease.
    4
    2
  • Just as it is impossible to say when it was decided to abandon Moscow, so it is impossible to say precisely when, or by whom, it was decided to move to Tarutino.
    5
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  • No one replied a word to Dolokhov's laughter, and a French officer whom they could not see (he lay wrapped in a greatcoat) rose and whispered something to a companion.
    8
    6
  • I was still skating with Brennan and never came out and said Howie, whom I referred to by name, was the tipster.
    68
    67
  • Dean pulled down the top on his Jeep and slowly drove uptown, giving off what he hoped were candidate smiles and waves to the locals, all of whom seemed to be walking the sun drenched street.
    1
    0
  • Paulette Dawkins, whom Dean thought was dining with her clan, bounded into the kitchen to report a mouse sighting in her room.
    10
    9
  • From 1594 to 1641 the duchy remained vested in the French family of La Tour d'Auvergne, one of whom (Henry, viscount of Turenne and marshal of France) had married in 1591 Charlotte de la Marck, the last of her race.
    1
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  • The youngest servant of the Company claimed the right of trading on his own account, free from taxation and from local jurisdiction, not only for himself but also for every native subordinate whom he might permit to use his name.
    1
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  • She bore him two children, of whom one died in infancy at Murshidabad, and was shortly followed to the grave by her mother.
    1
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  • The Mahrattas at this time had got possession of the person of the Mogul emperor, Shah Alam, from whom Clive obtained the grant of Bengal in 1765, and to whom he assigned in return the districts of Allahabad and Kora and a tribute of 30o,000.
    1
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  • The directors of the Company were disposed to act upon this resolution; but in the court of proprietors, with whom the decision ultimately lay, Hastings always possessed a sufficient majority.
    1
    0
  • But he was now destined to learn that his enemy Francis, whom he had discomfited in the council chamber at Calcutta, was more than his match in the parliamentary arena.
    1
    0
  • He was bitterly denounced by slaveholders and also by such non-slaveholders as disapproved of all antislavery agitation, and in January 1827 he was assaulted and seriously injured by a slave-trader, Austin Woolfolk, whom he had severely criticized in his paper.
    1
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  • Their daughter marries Eustache, count of Boulogne, and had three sons, the eldest of whom, Godefroid (Godfrey), is the future king of Jerusalem.
    1
    0
  • He was the uncle and guardian of Conradin of Hohenstaufen, whom he assisted to make his journey to Italy in 1267, and accompanied as far as Verona.
    1
    0
  • The minority, among whom were prominent Ca" "pals Rauscher and Schwarzenberg, Hefele, bishop of Rotterdam (the historian of the councils) Cardinal Mathieu, Mgr Dupanloup, Mgr Maret, &c., &c., did not pretend to deny the papal infallibility; they pleaded the inopportuneness of the definition and brought forward difficulties mainly of an historical order, in particular the famous condemn ion of Pope Honorius by the 6th ecumenical council of Const: ntinople in 680.
    2
    1
  • The scenery is fine, but wild and desolate in most parts, and of a kind that appeals rather to the northern genius than to the Italian, to whom, as a rule, Sardinia is not attractive.
    1
    0
  • 8 45, 1 333, according to whom Typhon, the "snake-footed" earth-spirit, is the god of the destructive wind, perhaps originally of the sirocco, but early taken by the Phoenicians to denote the north wind, in which sense it was probably used by the Greeks of the 5th century in nautical language; and also in Philologus, ii.
    2
    1
  • What might have happened we cannot tell; but Descartes threw himself on the protection of the French ambassador and the prince of Orange, and the city magistrates, from whom he vainly demanded satisfaction in a dignified letter,2 were snubbed by their superiors.
    2
    1
  • Through Chanut, with whom she was on terms of familiarity, she came to hear of Descartes, and a correspondence which the latter nominally carried on with the ambassador was in reality intended for the eyes of the queen.
    1
    0
  • " The majority of men," he says himself, " do not think of God as an infinite and incomprehensible being, and as the sole author from whom all things depend; they go no further than the letters of his name."
    1
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  • Such a remnant, amongst whom might be members of the priestly and royal families, would gather strength and boldness as the troubles of Babylon See the note on Ps.
    1
    0
  • His first wife died in 1563, and in 1572 he married a cousin, Elizabeth Mowbray, by whom he had three sons, the eldest of whom was named Alexander.'
    1
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  • The then king of Scotland having wars, did convocate his lieges to battle, amongst whom that was commanded was the earl of Lennox, who, keeping his eldest son at home, sent his two sons to serve for him with the forces that were under his command...
    1
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  • In this way his independence among the people to whom he ministers is to a large extent secured.
    1
    0
  • Great attention is given to the education of the ministry, a considerable number of whom, in recent years, have taken arts degrees at Oxford and Cambridge.
    1
    0
  • In New York state there were 199,923 Presbyterians, of whom 186,278 were members of the Northern Church and 10,115 of the United Presbyterian Church of North America.
    1
    0
  • During the Reconstruction the people of the South were divided thus: nearly all native whites (the most prominent of whom were disfranchised) on one side irrespective of former political faith, and on the other side the ex-slaves organized and led by a few native and Northern whites called respectively scalawags and carpet-baggers, who were supported by the United States government and who controlled the Southern state governments.
    1
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  • Cabot, with a large following, entered the Parana and established a settlement just above the mouth of the river Carcaranal, to which he gave the name of San Espiritu, among the Timbu Indians, with whom he formed friendly relations.
    1
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  • The rule of Rosas was now one of tyranny and almost incessant bloodshed in Buenos Aires, while his partisans, foremost amongst whom was General Ignacio Oribe, endeavoured to exterminate the Unitarians throughout the provinces.
    1
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  • It was at his house, full of all the wondrous, half-forbidden novelties of the west, that Alexius, after the death of his first consort, Martha, met Matvyeev's favourite pupil, the beautiful Natalia Naruishkina, whom he married on the 21st of January 1672.
    1
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  • The prefect supervises the execution of the laws; has wide authority in regard to policing, public hygiene and relief of pauper children; has the nomination of various subordinate officials; and is in correspondence with the subordinate functionaries in his department, to whom he transmits the orders and instructions of the government.
    1
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  • At the head of the administration is a governor under whom is a secretary-general, who replaces him at need.
    2
    1
  • In Virgil, Juturna appears as the sister of Turnus (probably owing to the partial similarity of the names), on whom Jupiter, to console her for the loss of her chastity, bestowed immortality and the control of all the lakes and rivers of Latium.
    1
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  • He states that Bishop Caldwell,' whom he calls " the great missionary scholar of the Dravidian tongue," showed that the south and western Australian tribes use almost the same words for " I, thou, he, we, you, as the Dravidian fishermen on the Madras coast."
    1
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  • More than half the combatants (8357, of whom 3000 were Swedes) actually perished on the battle-field.
    1
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  • Pop. (1890) 10,527; (1900) 11,683, of whom 2131 were foreign-born; (1906, estimate) 12, 379.
    1
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  • He courageously aided the escape of Youssouff, pursued by the soldiers of the bey, of whom he was one of the officers, for violation of the seraglio law.
    1
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  • Religious toleration was granted, but with the important exception that some harsh measures were enacted against Anglicans and Roman Catholics, to neither of whom was liberty of worship accorded.
    1
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  • When Commodore Perry arrived in 1853, there were on Peel Island thirty-one inhabitants, four being English, four American, one Portuguese and the rest natives of the Sandwich Islands, the Ladrones, &c.; and when Mr Russell Robertson visited the place in 1875, the colony had grown to sixty-nine, of whom only five were pure whites.
    2
    1
  • In 1900 it had a population of 11,781, of whom 8878 were French-speaking, while there were 8277 Protestants to 3424 Romanists and 56 Jews.
    2
    1
  • Bonaparte, with whom Tone had several interviews about this time, was much less disposed than Hoche had been to undertake in earnest an Irish expedition; and when the rebellion broke out in Ireland in 17 9 8 he had started for Egypt.
    2
    1
  • Tetzel was selected as the most efficient salesman; he was appointed general sub-commissioner for indulgences, and was accompanied by a clerk of the Fuggers from whom Albrecht had borrowed the money to pay his first-fruits.
    1
    0
  • He is the constant companion of Dionysus, whom he was said to have instructed in the cultivation of the vine and the keeping of bees.
    1
    0
  • This time he was successful; he made his way to Egypt, where the crusaders were besieging Damietta, got himself taken prisoner and was led before the sultan, to whom he openly preached the Gospel.
    1
    0
  • They felt they must resist him to the death, and with the troops scattered throughout Italy, and the newly enfranchised Italians, to whom it was understood that Sulla was bitterly hostile, they counted confidently on success.
    1
    0
  • But on Sulla's advance at the head of his 40,000 veterans many of them lost heart and deserted their leaders, while the Italians themselves, whom he confirmed in their new privileges, were won over to his side.
    1
    0
  • The bishops, who were ex officio inquisitors in their own dioceses, had not succeeded in putting a stop to the evils, nor had the friars, by whom they had been practically superseded.
    1
    0
  • In December he was sent by the queen dowager to secure Stirling, and in 1560 was despatched on a mission to France, visiting Denmark on the way, where he either married or seduced Anne, daughter of Christopher Thorssen, whom he afterwards deserted, and who came to Scotland in 1563 to obtain redress.
    1
    0
  • The queen required a protector, whom she found, not in the feeble Darnley, nor in any of the leaders of the factions, but in the strong, determined earl who had ever been a stanch supporter of the throne against the Protestant party and English influence.
    1
    0
  • Moreover, the authorities on whom he relied have had to be corrected since in many points of detail in the light of later archaeological research.
    1
    0
  • With Plutarch, who dedicated to him his treatise IIEpi Tov irpwrov 11vxpov, with Herodes Atticus, to whom he bequeathed his library at Rome, with Demetrius the Cynic, Cornelius Fronto, Aulus Gellius, and with Hadrian himself, he lived on intimate terms; his great rival, whom he violently attacked in his later years, was Polemon of Smyrna.
    1
    0
  • Of the very numerous works of Favorinus, we possess only a few fragments (unless the KopcvOcaKOs Xoryos attributed to his tutor Dio Chrysostom is by him), preserved by Aulus Gellius, Diogenes Laertius, Philostratus, and SuIdas, the second of whom borrows from his HavroSairrt iiropca (miscellaneous history) and his 'Airo,uvmuovEUµara (memoirs).
    1
    0
  • His later life was spent in various parts of the Moslem world, in Aleppo with Saif-ud-Daula (to whom he dedicated the Book of Songs), in Rai with the Buyid vizier Ibn `Abbad and elsewhere.
    1
    0
  • The figures are no longer abstractions; they are concrete examples of the folly of the bibliophile who collects books but learns nothing from them, of the evil judge who takes bribes to favour the guilty, of the old fool whom time merely strengthens in his folly, of those who are eager to follow the fashions, of the priests who spend their time in church telling "gestes" of Robin Hood and so forth.
    1
    0
  • From this point to the end of the period the Jews were dependents of Rome, free to attend to their own affairs, so long as they paid taxes to the subordinate rulers, Herodian or Roman, whom they detested equally.
    1
    0
  • But I'm afraid you cannot rule the Emerald City, as you used to, because we now have a beautiful Princess whom everyone loves dearly.
    28
    27
  • Great Expecter! to converse with whom was a New England Night's Entertainment.
    10
    9
  • How strange, how extraordinary, how joyful it seemed, that her son, the scarcely perceptible motion of whose tiny limbs she had felt twenty years ago within her, that son about whom she used to have quarrels with the too indulgent count, that son who had first learned to say "pear" and then "granny," that this son should now be away in a foreign land amid strange surroundings, a manly warrior doing some kind of man's work of his own, without help or guidance.
    9
    8
  • When everything was ready, the stranger opened his eyes, moved to the table, filled a tumbler with tea for himself and one for the beardless old man to whom he passed it.
    2
    1
  • On his right sat the Italian abbe whom Pierre had met at Anna Pavlovna's two years before.
    3
    2
  • A little behind the hussars came Denisov, accompanied by two infantry officers with whom he was talking.
    3
    2
  • As happens to some people, especially to men who judge those near to them severely, he always on meeting anyone new-- especially anyone whom, like Speranski, he knew by reputation--expected to discover in him the perfection of human qualities.
    3
    2
  • Already from his military experience and what he had seen in the Austrian campaign, he had come to the conclusion that in war the most deeply considered plans have no significance and that all depends on the way unexpected movements of the enemy--that cannot be foreseen--are met, and on how and by whom the whole matter is handled.
    4
    3
  • Among those whom Julie's guests happened to choose to gossip about were the Rostovs.
    10
    9
  • For whom then is the trial intended?
    9
    8
  • He asked one, 'From whom did you get it?' 'From so-and-so.'
    4
    3
  • She packed, repacked, pressed, made the butler's assistant and Petya--whom she had drawn into the business of packing--press on the lid, and made desperate efforts herself.
    4
    3
  • Two French soldiers ran past Pierre, one of whom carried a lowered and smoking gun.
    2
    1
  • She was overcome by sweet sorrow and tears were already rising in her eyes; then she suddenly asked herself to whom she was saying this.
    2
    1
  • One group of the French stood close to the road, and two of them, one of whom had his face covered with sores, were tearing a piece of raw flesh with their hands.
    2
    1
  • How is it? said the man--a singer and a wag--whom Morel was embracing.
    2
    1
  • The French did not need to be informed of the fact that half the prisoners--with whom the Russians did not know what to do- -perished of cold and hunger despite their captors' desire to save them; they felt that it could not be otherwise.
    3
    2
  • Natasha had married in the early spring of 1813, and in 1820 already had three daughters besides a son for whom she had longed and whom she was now nursing.
    3
    2
  • But the father whom the boy did not remember appeared to him a divinity who could not be pictured, and of whom he never thought without a swelling heart and tears of sadness and rapture.
    3
    2
  • The noncommissioned officers (of whom there are fewer) perform the action itself less frequently than the soldiers, but they already give commands.
    2
    1
  • The white inhabitants numbered (1909) 33 0 of whom 300 were German.
    0
    0
  • Thus perished at the age of thirty-six one of the most chivalrous and gifted of a gallant band of brothers, four of whom laid down their lives in their country's cause.
    0
    0
  • (1206-1270), king of Hungary, was the son of Andrew II., whom he succeeded in 1235.
    0
    0
  • He also largely employed Jews and Ishmaelites,' the financial specialists of the day, whom he rewarded with lands and titles.
    0
    0
  • Nicaean emperor, Theodore Lascaris, whom his own father brought home with him from his crusade.
    0
    0
  • She bore him, besides his two sons Stephen and Bela, seven daughters, of whom St Margaret was the most famous.
    0
    0
  • A little later Lingen was sold to the emperor Charles V., from whom it passed to his son, Philip II.
    0
    0
  • His son, Jean de Chabannes, left three heiresses, of whom the second left a daughter who brought the countship to Philippe de Boulainvilliers, by whose heirs it was sold in 1 554 to the dukes of Montmorency.
    0
    0
  • In 1776 he answered Gibbon's chapters on Christianity, and had the honour of being one of the only two opponents whom Gibbon treated with respect.
    0
    0
  • Pop.(1890), 8222; (1900), 10,601, of whom 3771 were foreign-born; (1910 census) 13,641.
    0
    0
  • 8 horns, 4 of whom are also required to play 4 specially constructed tenor and bass tubas.
    0
    0
  • During the short reign of Valentinian there were wars in Africa, in Germany and in Britain, and Rome came into collision with barbarian peoples of whom we now hear for the first time - Burgundians, Saxons, Alamanni.
    0
    0
  • During his reign the coasts of Gaul were harassed by the Saxon pirates, with whom the Picts and Scots of northern Britain joined hands, and ravaged the island from the wall of Antoninus to the shores of Kent.
    0
    0
  • Next come the mercantile castes, mostly belonging to the Jain sect; these are followed by the powerful cultivating tribes, such as the Jats and Gujars, and then come the so-called aboriginal tribes, chief of whom are the Minas, Bhils and Meos.
    0
    0
  • In 1836 Cooke, to whom the idea appears to have been suggested by Schilling's method, invented a telegraph in which an alphabet was worked out by the single and combined movement of three needles.
    0
    0
  • The next worker at the telephone, and the one to whom the present great commercial importance of the instrument is due, Bell's re- was Bell.
    0
    0
  • An exchange is a central station to which wires are brought from the various subscribers in its neighbourhood, any two of whom can be put in telephonic communication with each other when the proper pairs of wires are joined together in the exchange.
    0
    0
  • Then, having obtained particulars of the subscriber's requirement, the operator connected the second plug to the spring-jack of the wanted subscriber, whom she rang up. When.
    0
    0
  • The operator, whose attention is thus attracted, inserts a peg in the jack, then throws over the speaking key of the cord circuit, and having ascertained particulars of the requirement places the other peg of the pair in the nearest multiple jack of the wanted subscriber, whom she proceeds to ring up. In the meantime the callinglamp has darkened; and each subscriber's line being equipped with a cut-off relay whose function it is to disconnect tl, e calling apparatus while the circuit is in use, the insertion o r a peg is immediately followed by the disappearance of the calling signal.
    0
    0
  • Two years later he was canonized by Gregory IX., whom, as Cardinal Hugolino of Ostia, he had chosen to be the protector of his order.
    0
    0
  • With Edward Cooper (son of Peter Cooper, whom Hewitt greatly assisted in organizing Cooper Union, and whose daughter he married) he went into the manufacture of iron girders and beams under the firm name of Cooper, Hewitt & Co.
    0
    0
  • His tutors were the learned Janos Vitez, bishop of Nagyvarad, whom he subsequently raised to the primacy, and the Polish humanist Gregory Sanocki.
    0
    0
  • His military training proceeded under the eye of his father, whom he began to follow on his campaigns when only twelve years of age.
    0
    0
  • Like Napoleon, with whom he has often been compared, he was equally illustrious as a soldier, a statesman, an orator, a legislator and an administrator.
    0
    0
  • The number of foreigners in Italy in 1901 was 61,606, of whom 37,762 were domiciled within the kingdom.
    0
    0
  • Owing to the comnaratively small amount of letters, it is found possible to have a travelling post office on all principal trains (while almost every train has a travelling sorter, for whom a compartment is reserved) without a late fee being exacted in either case.
    0
    0
  • Protestants number some 65,000, of whom half are Italian and half foreign.
    0
    0
  • Each provincial administrative junta is composed, in part, of government nominees, and in larger part of elective elements, elected by the provincial council for four years, half of whom require to be elected every two years.
    0
    0
  • Fr8nkislj After them followed ten sovereigns, some of whom have been misnamed Italians by writers too eager to catch at any resemblance of national glory for a ~ people passive in the hands of foreign masters.
    0
    0
  • The country by this time had become thickly covered over with castles, the seats of greater or lesser nobles, all of whom were eager to detach themselves from strict allegiance to the Regno.
    0
    0
  • The cities, exposed to pillage by Huns in the north and Saracens in the south, and ravaged on the coast by Norse pirates, asserted their right to enclose themselves with walls, and taught their burghers the use of arms. Within the circuit of their ramparts, the bishops already began to exercise authority in rivalry with the counts, to whom, since the days of Theodoric, had been entrusted the government of the Italian burghs.
    0
    0
  • We have to foJiow the fortunes of unexpected allies, upon whom in no small measure his success depended.
    0
    0
  • Opposed by an anti-pope whom the emperor favored, Alexander found it was his truest policy to rely for support upon the antiimperialist communes.
    0
    0
  • Equally contemptible in its political results and void of historical interest was the brief visit of John of Bohemia, son of Henry VII., whom the Ghibellines next invited to assume their leadership. He sold a few privileges, conferred a few titles, and recrossed the Alps in 1333.
    0
    0
  • Mercenary troops are said to have been first levied from disbanded Germans, together with Breton and English adventurers, whom the Visconti and Castruccio took into their pay.
    0
    0
  • The last member of the Visconti family of whom we had occasion to speak was Azzo, who bought the city in 1328 from Duchy of Louis of Bavaria.
    0
    0
  • In others the petty tyrants whom thc Visconti had uprooted reappeared.
    0
    0
  • But Charles Charles Albert, who, whatever his faults, had a generous Albertre- nature, was determined that so long as be had an news the army in being he could not abandon the Lombards War, and the Venetians, whom he had encouraged in their resistance, without one more effort, though he knew full well that he was staking all on a desperate chance.
    0
    0
  • Formerly a friend and disciple of Mazzini, with whom he had broken on the question of the monarchical form of government which Crispi believed indispensable to the unification of Italy, he had afterwards been one of Garibaldis most efficient coadjutors and an active member of the party of action.
    0
    0
  • Robilant, for whom the Skiernie~vice pact was no secret, followed a firmly independent policy throughout the Bulgarian crisis of 1885-1886, declining to be drawn into any action beyond that required by the treaty of Berlin and the protection.
    0
    0
  • In December 1894 the revolt broke out, but Major Toselli with a small force marched rapidly against Bath Agos, whom he routed and killed at Halai.
    0
    0
  • Marching rapidly, however, Albertone outdistanced the other columns, but, in consequence of allowing his men an hours rest, arrived upon the scene of action when the Abyssinians, whom it had been hoped to surprise at dawn, were ready to receive the attack.
    0
    0
  • The Italian loss is estimated to have been more than 6000, of whom 3125 were whites.
    0
    0
  • In the spring of 1908 there were agrarian strikes at Parma; the labor contracts had pressed hardly on the peasantry, who had cause for complaint; but while some improvement had been effected in the new contracts, certain unscrupulous demagogues, of whom Alceste De Ambris, representing the syndacalist wing of the Socialist party, was the chief, organized a widespread agitation.
    0
    0
  • Muratoris great collection, the Rerum Italicarum 5cr iptores in combination with his Dissertationes, the chronicles and other historical material published by the Archjvjo Storjco Italiano, and the woiks of detached annalists of whom the \Tjllanj are the most notable, take first rank.
    0
    0
  • Although these annals were no doubt destroyed at the time of the burning of Rome by the Gauls, they were restored as far as possible and continued until the pontificate of P. Mucius Scaevola, by whom they were finally published in eighty books.
    0
    0
  • Declining to appear, she was declared contumacious, and on the 23rd of May the archbishop gave judgment declaring the marriage null and void from the first, and so leaving the king free to marry whom he pleased.
    0
    0
  • The course taken by Cranmer in promoting the Reformation exposed him to the bitter hostility of the reactionary party or " men of the old learning," of whom Gardiner and Bonner were leaders, and on various occasions - notably in 1543 and 1 545 - conspiracies were formed in the council or elsewhere to effect his overthrow.
    0
    0
  • On the accession of Mary he was summoned to the council - most of whom had signed the same device - reprimanded for his conduct, and ordered to confine himself to his palace at Lambeth until the queen's pleasure was known.
    0
    0
  • The ritual recognizes four principal priests (ritvij), each of whom is assisted by three subordinates: viz.
    0
    0
  • Being intended for the Hotri's use, both these works treat exclusively of the hymns and verses recited by that priest and his assistants, either in the form of connected litanies or in detached verses invoking the deities to whom oblations are made, or uttered in response to the.
    0
    0
  • But he is immortal as the man against whom Kant directed his tremendous battery 1 Human attributes magnified, or their weak points thought away.
    0
    0
  • The God whom all our thinking feels after is the all-inclusive system of reality.
    0
    0
  • The distinguished after writers, whom we have to regard as repeating in essence pre-Kantian theories, generally know Kant, and frequently show traces of him in detail.
    0
    0
  • The preamble states that the king has granted the charter on the advice of various prelates and barons, some of whom, including the archbishop of Canterbury, the papal legate Pandulf, and William Marshal, earl of Pembroke, are mentioned by name.
    0
    0
  • The budding of this medusa has been worked out in detail by Chun (Hydrozoa, [1]), to whom the reader must be referred for the interesting laws of budding regulating the sequence and order of formation of the buds.
    0
    0
  • The Treveri or Treviri, from whom the city derived its name, were one of the most powerful tribes among the Belgae, and according to Julius Caesar, who conquered them in 56 B.C., possessed the best cavalry.
    0
    0
  • In the doctrines of the Neoplatonists, of whom Plotinus is the most important, we have the worldprocess represented after the example of Plato as a series of descending steps, each being less perfect than its predecessors, since it is further removed from the first cause.'
    0
    0
  • Buffon's opinion is, in fact, a sort of combination of views, essentially similar to those of Bonnet, with others, somewhat similar to those of the " Medici " whom Harvey condemns.
    0
    0
  • In 655 after the battle of Winwa d Oswio entrusted his daughter IElfled to Hilda, with whom she went to Whitby.
    0
    0
  • In August he was sent to Spain, where he remained a prisoner for two years; in November i 506 he made his escape, and fled to the court of his brother-in-law, the king of Navarre, under whom he took service.
    0
    0
  • He was liberal to the papacy, and was greatly influenced by the eminent clerics with whom he eagerly associated.
    0
    0
  • The latter was treated as a mere delegate, from whom an appeal could be made to the bishop. The former had one consistory with the bishop, so that appeals from him had to be made to the court of the metropolitan.
    0
    0
  • There was an alleged original jurisdiction of the pope, which he exercised sometimes by permanent legates, whom Gregory VII.
    0
    0
  • In the absence of such consent, the bishop may hear the cause with three assessors, of whom one shall be a barrister of seven years' standing and another the dean of the cathedral, or one of the archdeacons, or the chancellor.
    0
    0
  • Throughout the United States, whatever may have been the position in some of them before their independence, the Church has now no position recognized by the State, but is just a body of believers whose relations are governed by contract and with whom ecclesiastical jurisdiction is consensual.
    0
    0
  • The nearest enemy was Bohemia, to whom Poland had lately been compelled to pay tribute for her oldest possession, Silesia.
    0
    0
  • In the first year of his reign Faustina gave birth to twins, one of whom became the emperor Commodus.
    0
    0
  • When, therefore, we remember that Aurelius knew little of the Christians, that the only mention of them in the Meditations is a contemptuous reference to certain fanatics of their number whom even Clement of Alexandria compares for their thirst for martyrdom to the Indian gymnosophists, and finally that the least worthy of them were doubtless the most prominent, we cannot doubt that Aurelius was acting unquestionably in the best interests of a perfectly intelligible ideal.
    0
    0
  • The abuses connected with nocturnal vigils 1 led to their being attacked, especially by Vigilentius of Barcelona (c. 400), against whom Jerome fulminated in this as in other matters.
    0
    0
  • The drugs used by the physicians and apothecaries were purchased from the grossarii or sellers in gross, who were subsequently called 'grocers, some of whom specialized as druggists and others as chymists or chemists.
    0
    0
  • More soberly true is the statement that he went on long walks with enthusiastic disciples, whom he taught without books.
    0
    0
  • It was revived by several German workers, prominent among whom were Treviranus and Link, and later Moldenhawer, as well as by the Frenchmen Mirbel, at the beginning of the j9th century.
    0
    0
  • Many writers in recent years, among whom may be named especially Heliriegel and Wilfarth, Lawes and Gilbert, and Schlcesing and Laurent, have shown that the Leguminosae as a group form conspicuous exceptions to this rule.
    0
    0
  • Rawlinson supposed, the fifty-three years of his reign are exchanged by mistake with the twenty-two years of his son Phraortes, under whom the Median conquests began.
    0
    0
  • Caesar pardoned him for having sided with Pompey, ordered him to resume his royal attire, and hastened against Pharnaces, whom he defeated at Zela.
    0
    0
  • In these African campaigns Sulla showed that he knew how to win the confidence of his soldiers, and throughout his career the secret of his success seems to have been the enthusiastic devotion of his troops, whom he continued to hold well in hand, while allowing them to indulge in plundering and all kinds of excess.
    0
    0
  • He resigned this post in 1820, upon the death of his wife, to whom he was fondly attached, and, though making some efforts to connect himself with journalism, spent the years immediately succeeding in idleness, residing for the most part in Paris.
    0
    0
  • Pop. (1904), 2406, of whom 1139 were white.
    0
    0
  • He was a favourite of the gods, and an intimate friend of Achilles, to whom he was commissioned to announce the death of Patroclus.
    0
    0
  • It was not, however, till late in the 12th century (1172-1176) that the city was surrounded with walls by order of the emperor Frederick I., to whom (in 1166) and to his grandson Frederick II.
    0
    0
  • By his first wife, Margaret, daughter and heir of Sir John Plays, Sir John Howard had a son who died before him, leaving a daughter through whom descended to her issue, the Veres, earls of Oxford, the ancient Norfolk estates of the Howards at East Winch and elsewhere, with the lands of the houses of Scales, Plays and Walton, brought in by the brides of her forefathers.
    0
    0
  • This royal bride died of consumption, leaving no living child, and her husband took in 1513, as his second wife, Elizabeth Stafford, daughter of that duke of Buckingham upon whom the old duke of Norfolk, the tears upon his cheeks, was forced to pass sentence of death.
    0
    0
  • She survived her marriage but a few months and her husband then obtained the wardship of her Dacre offspring, a son who died young, and three daughters whom the duke, with the true Howard eye for a rich inheritance, gave as brides to three of his sons.
    0
    0
  • At his death in 1786 he was succeeded by his son Charles, the notorious "Jockey of Norfolk," the big, coarse, generous, slovenly, hard-drinking Whig of whom all the memoirwriters of his age have their anecdotes.
    0
    0
  • 13.3, 6), quoting from Nearchus, seems to include the Susians under the Elymaeans, whom he associates with the Uxii, and places on the frontiers of Persia and Susa; but Pliny more correctly makes the Eulaeus the boundary between Susiana and Elymais (N.H.
    0
    0
  • The Elamite king was dethroned and imprisoned in 700 B.C. by his brother Khallusu, who six years later marched into Babylonia, captured the son of Sennacherib, whom his father had placed there as king, and raised a nominee of his own, Nergal-yusezib, to the throne.
    0
    0
  • The new king endeavoured to gain Assyrian favour by putting to death the son of Merodach-baladan, but was himself murdered by his brothers Urtaki and Teumman (681 B.C.), the first of whom seized the crown.
    0
    0
  • Inda-bigas was himself overthrown and slain by a new pretender, Khumba-Khaldas III., who was opposed, however, by three other rivals, two of whom maintained themselves in the mountains until the Assyrian conquest of the country, when Tammaritu was first restored and then imprisoned, Elam being utterly devastated.
    0
    0
  • Public opinion was now keenly excited; he received an ovation from the Munich students, and the king, to whom he owed his appointment, supported him warmly.
    0
    0
  • In a few weeks he collected thousands of so-called Kuruczok (a corruption of Cruciati), consisting for the most part of small yeomen, peasants, wandering students, friars and parish priests, the humblest and most oppressed portion of the community, to whom alone a crusade against the Turk could have the slightest attraction.
    0
    0
  • Pop. (1900) 2752; (1905, state census) 533 2, of whom 2975 were foreign-born, including 1145 Finns, 676 Austrians and 325 Swedes.
    0
    0
  • ' Abul Hassan Ali, al Reza, commonly known as Imam Reza, the eighth imam of the Shiites, a son of Musa al Kazim, the seventh imam, was the leader from whom the party of the Alids (Shiites) had such hopes under the caliphate of Mamun.
    0
    0
  • The reader to whom the study is new will gain some idea of the bulk of the extant patristic literature, if we add that in Migne's collection ninety-six large volumes are occupied with the Greek fathers from Clement of Rome to John of Damascus, and seventysix with the Latin fathers from Tertullian to Gregory the Great.2 For a discussion of the more important fathers the student is referred to the articles which deal with them separately.
    0
    0
  • Ibrahim, emperor of Delhi, had made himself detested, even by his Afghan nobles, several of whom called upon Baber for assistance.
    0
    0
  • He was the son of William and Martha Arnold, the former of whom occupied the situation of collector of customs at Cowes.
    0
    0
  • Successful and admired though he was in Padua, Mantegna left his native city at an early age, and never afterwards resettled 1 His' fellow-workers were Bono of Ferrara, Ansuino of Forli, and Niccolo Pizzolo, to whom considerable sections of the frescopaintings are to be assigned.
    0
    0
  • In the first half of the 14th century lived the two translators Qalonymos ben David and Qalonymos ben Qalonymos, the latter of whom translated many works of Galen and Averroes, and various scientific treatises, besides writing original works, e.g.
    0
    0
  • The introduction of printing (first dated Hebrew printed book, Rashi, Reggio, 1475) gave occasion for a number of scholarly compositors and proof-readers, some of whom were also authors, such as Jacob ben Ilayyim of Tunis Later waters.
    0
    0
  • He approached St Faro, the bishop of Meaux, to whom he made known his desire to live a life of solitude in the forest.
    0
    0
  • Dholahtaf, but is now known as the Cherra-Saadeh, and is in the popular tradition said to have been excavated by a man from Basra at the behest of a woman of Hit whom he desired to make his wife.
    0
    0
  • The work contains nothing that cannot be learned from Ptolemy, whom he follows in calling the promontory of the Novantae (Mull of Galloway) the most northern point of Britain.
    0
    0
  • He first engaged himself to a country wine merchant, for whom he travelled in Germany, Russia and the Netherlands.
    0
    0
  • The new creed, the new speech, the new social system, had taken such deep root that the descendants of the Scandinavian settlers were better fitted to be the armed missionaries of all these things than the neighbours from whom they had borrowed their new possessions.
    0
    0
  • The Norman power in England was founded on full and speedy union with the one nation among whom they found themselves.
    0
    0
  • His disappearance in both cases is an illustration of one of the features which we have spoken of in the Norman character, the tendency which in fact made Normans out of Northmen, the tendency to adopt the language and manners of the people among whom they found themselves.
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  • Moreover, every Norman to whom he granted lands and offices held them by English law in a much truer sense than the king held his; he was deemed to step into the exact position of his English predecessor, whatever that might be.
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  • They were almost as little entitled to be called pure Scandinavians as the Saracens whom they found in the island were entitled to be called pure Arabs.
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  • When Count Roger at last found himself lord of the whole island, he found himself lord of men of various creeds and tongues, of whom his own Norman followers were but one class out of several.
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  • There were the conquerors themselves; there were the Italians, in Sicily known as Lombards, who followed in their wake; there were also the Jews, whom they may have found in the island, or who may have followed the Norman into Sicily, as they certainly followed him into England.
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  • In Scotland he was not a conqueror, but a mere visitor, and oddly enough he came as a visitor along with those whom he had himself overcome in England.
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  • Uruguay at that time was inhabited by Indians, of whom the dominant tribe was called Charrua, a people described as physically strong and well-formed, and endowed with a natural nobility of character.
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  • Taylor (Republican), each of whom claimed the election, Goebel was assassinated at Frankfort.
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  • When the Crimean War broke out he offered his services to the emperor Nicholas, by whom he was appointed general of the VI.
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  • They were the true populus Romanus, alongside of whom grew up a secondary Roman people, the plebs or commons.
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  • This was the growth of the new nobility of Rome, that body, partly patrician, partly plebeian, to whom the name nobilitas strictly belongs in Roman history.
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  • He accordingly commenced the study of metallurgy at Marburg; he also began to write poetry, imitating German authors, among whom he is said to have especially admired Gunther.
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  • In 779 he was at war with Cynewulf of Wessex from whom he wrested Bensington.
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  • As he is thus lamenting, a woman appears to him of dignified mien, whom he recognizes as his guardian, Philosophy.
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  • Antisthenes was a pupil of Socrates, from whom he imbibed the fundamental ethical precept that virtue, not pleasure, is the end of existence.
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  • Zeno was a pupil of Crates, from whom he learned the moral worth of self-control and indifference to sensual indulgence.
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  • Pop. (1890) 5919; (1900) 7100, of whom 144 were foreign-born.
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  • It is fallen man whom he pursues with his fierce scorn; his view of man's nature - intellect as well as character - is to be read in the light of his unflinching Augustinianism.
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  • The God of Nature, whom deists confess, does punish in time, if they will but look at the facts; why not in eternity ?
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  • Finally, in the system of Basilides, the (seven ?) powers from whom this world originates are accepted as the lowest emanations of the supreme God.
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  • The oldest tradition they possess refers to a time shortly after the overthrow of the Majapahit dynasty in Java, about the middle of the 15th century; but it has been supposed that there must have been Indian settlers here before the middle of the 1st century, by whom the present name, probably cognate with the Sanskrit balin, strong, was in all likelihood imposed.
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  • Pop. (1910), about 30,000, of whom nearly one-half were foreign-born or of foreign parentage.
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  • Bede states that Radwald was the son of Tytili, the son of Wuffa, from whom the East Anglian royal family derived their name Wuffingas.
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  • It is now used as a depot for the Naval Reserve, for whom a large drill hall was added.
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  • Supposing Dekker to be chiefly responsible for the scenes dealing with the unfortunate old woman whom persecution as a witch actually drives to become one, and Ford for the domestic tragedy of the bigamist murderer, it cannot be denied that both divisions of the subject are effectively treated, while the more important part of the task fell to the share of Ford.
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  • Furthermore, he was a man of great ambition, persuasive eloquence and wide generosity; qualities which especially appealed at that time to the classes from whom he was to draw his support.
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  • Further it is suggested that Peisistratus was unwilling to have children by one on whom lay the curse of the Cylonian outrage.
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  • He came finally to Eretria, and, with the help of the Thebans and Lygdamis of Naxos, whom he afterwards made ruler of that island, he passed over to Attica and defeated the Athenian forces at the battle of Pallenis or Pellene.
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  • Finally, he did not allow his friendliness with Argos to involve him in war with Sparta, towards whom he pursued a policy of moderation.
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  • He was succeeded by his sons Hippias and Hipparchus, by whom the tyranny was in various ways brought into disrepute.
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  • During the years 1900-4 inclusive the total emigrants from Russia numbered 2,358,539, of whom 1,144,246 were Russians; while the immigrants numbered 2,333,053, of whom 1,432,057 were foreigners.
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  • The Council of the Empire, or Imperial Council (Gosudarstvenniy Sovyet), as reconstituted for this purpose, consists of 196 members, of whom 98 are nominated by the emperor, The while 98 are elective.
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  • Protected as they were by the right of self-government, exempted from military service, and endowed with considerable allotments of good land, these colonies are much wealthier than the neighbouring Russian peasants, from whom they have adopted the slowly modified village community.
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