Whole Sentence Examples

whole
  • I wish the whole world were like that!

    873
    258
  • You'd have to know the whole story.

    629
    212
  • This whole thing is crazy.

    391
    138
  • The whole truth didn't sound nearly as bad as part of the conversation.

    368
    178
  • I have eaten food pretty much my whole life.

    216
    105
    Advertisement
  • Her whole body trembled.

    105
    39
  • I've been afraid of losing him my whole life.

    92
    54
  • He sighed and rubbed his head as though the whole idea gave him a headache.

    68
    31
  • I called Mary to see if you were there and she filled me in on the whole thing.

    56
    25
  • I'll stop the whole thing before I'll do that.

    62
    33
    Advertisement
  • They haven't defeated us yet, and Jim is worth a whole army.

    41
    25
  • A long time ago, there was a battle so horrible it threatened to destroy the whole universe.

    43
    28
  • My whole name is Zebediah; but folks just call me 'Zeb.'

    60
    47
  • He spent the whole evening trying to save my soul.

    29
    17
  • You are staying the whole evening, I hope?

    34
    22
    Advertisement
  • I read the whole account online.

    16
    5
  • The whole thing only lasted a minute before the damn phone rang.

    23
    13
  • I can vouch for myself but going out on the limb for someone else is a whole different ball game.

    22
    12
  • The paper cancelled the whole thing the next week.

    23
    13
  • Her whole body deflated at his mocking tone.

    31
    22
    Advertisement
  • She was going to say that the bitter note in her tone was for someone who had betrayed her, but the whole world didn't need to know about their shame.

    24
    16
  • She looked down, both thrilled by the idea of an eternity with the man who made her feel whole and horrified at what her father told her.

    20
    12
  • This was an electrifying discovery to the whole world.

    17
    9
  • He'd been on thin ice with this whole subject since the beginning.

    30
    23
  • Certainly, you don't want the whole world to know where you were last night.

    17
    10
    Advertisement
  • Next morning it was I who waked the whole family with my first "Merry Christmas!"

    18
    12
  • After that Princess Mary did not see her father for a whole week.

    11
    5
  • If there wasn't so much else happening, I'd think the whole business was funny.

    13
    8
  • You lied to me the whole time.

    7
    2
  • The city was far away, and the slaves must walk the whole distance.

    8
    3
  • Smolensk was abandoned contrary to the wishes of the Emperor and of the whole people.

    9
    4
  • And God kept multiplying and multiplying 'em and feeding this whole field of people, like at a rock concert.

    10
    6
  • He.s kinda got a whole bunch of people to worry about.

    6
    2
  • Of course, this whole day is a secret.

    4
    0
  • The Roman Catholic landowners lost their estates, all or part according to their degree of guilt, and these were distributed among Cromwell's soldiers and the creditors of the government; Cromwell also invited new settlers from home and from New England, two-thirds of the whole land of Ireland being thus transferred to new proprietors.

    6
    2
  • The whole of the Andamans and the outlying islands were completely surveyed topographically by the Indian Survey Department under Colonel Hobday in 1883-1886, and the surrounding seas were charted by Commander Carpenter in 1888-1889.

    5
    2
  • The whole top of the building --where the hostel was housed --was on fire.

    2
    0
  • I'm so sick of this whole better-than-thou attitude you all have! she snapped, facing him with her hands on her hips.

    2
    0
  • You aren't surviving day-to-day anymore as you have your whole life, and for the first time, you're fighting for something other than you.

    2
    0
  • It doesn't make a whole lot of sense.

    2
    0
  • In a way, this whole business started with Annie Quincy.

    2
    0
  • She hated it and bitched at him the whole time she dug into his body.

    2
    0
  • I have to drink a real lot to get a hangover, so, with no downsides and a whole lot of up, why wouldn't I drink to my heart's content, plus it tastes awesome and warms my soul.

    2
    0
  • It played through the whole house and the studio.

    2
    0
  • The healer's soft hands took away her headache, then the throbbing in her neck, and worked on the other parts of her body until she felt whole again.

    2
    1
  • He stood in front of the glass French doors of the balcony, taking up the whole space with his massive frame and heavy trench coat.

    1
    0
  • His revenge was all that would make him whole again.

    1
    0
  • His whole body shaking, he tried to calm himself and withdrew, wanting to wipe away the taint of Sasha.s blood from his clothing and skin.

    1
    0
  • She led them into Kris.s room again and slammed the door, vaguely pissed at the Ancient for having the only door that locked in the whole castle.

    1
    0
  • His whole face had changed upon seeing his nishani and children, had gone from tired to hopeful.

    1
    0
  • You want me … to walk away from everything I know, my family … I knew it was possible, but I didn't think I'd have a chance to go home at all … but still, I couldn't leave a whole planet to die!

    1
    0
  • You could stick the junk in a box and mail it a whole lot cheaper than having them fly out here.

    1
    0
  • You write a whole series of 'A's" and 'B's" and so forth.

    1
    0
  • Then he added, I don't know a whole lot about her.

    1
    0
  • Then, as soon as it was quite a while, she'd start the whole business over again!

    1
    0
  • After listening to her this morning, I'm beginning to wonder if we're getting the whole story about Jerome Shipton.

    1
    0
  • This one has a whole list of junk, chairs, tables, clothes.

    1
    0
  • But I talked her into giving me the whole day with him at Telluride tomorrow.

    1
    0
  • The whole family thinks I'm dog-shit—always has.

    1
    0
  • Like I said, the whole situation is a real mess.

    1
    0
  • Ice seems a whole lot less permanent.

    1
    0
  • There's a whole notebook left to decipher.

    1
    0
  • His whole life on the brink of destruction if it were recognized what he was doing.

    1
    0
  • Our whole life together is too perfect to let anything as insignificant as him interfere with it.

    1
    0
  • I been trying to find out some poop about that guy on the Internet but it's a whole lot easier checking out hundred year old folks than living ones.

    1
    0
  • If Shipton let her know he knew all the dirt on Annie's past, that might throw a kibosh on the whole business.

    1
    0
  • It's just the primary but that's the whole ball of wax 'cause this is pretty much a one party county.

    1
    0
  • Gives a whole new dimension to poetic license, don't it?

    1
    0
  • The paper didn't give a whole lot of details but the boys got in trouble and Edith saved the youngest one, Donnie.

    1
    0
  • So the whole business about Shipton lugging a dead body back to civilization was a total fabrication.

    1
    0
  • You have the whole rest of your life to live.

    1
    0
  • I feel like a shit about the whole business.

    1
    0
  • This whole business is getting curiouser and curiouser.

    1
    0
  • He said the whole song and dance about his wife acting like that other woman gave him the willies.

    2
    1
  • That whole business is too depressing.

    1
    0
  • And Penny's final observation about a second climber opened a whole new perspective.

    1
    0
  • You've got a whole life ahead of you.

    1
    0
  • The whole business with Annie Quincy leads up to a similar suicide.

    1
    0
  • Now I'm just kicking myself for not figuring out the whole business earlier.

    1
    0
  • I just wanted to put the whole business out of my mind, behind me.

    1
    0
  • Fred added, Then Shipton had to set the whole scene up before he knocked over the chair.

    1
    0
  • I'll grant you, it is confusing and there's a whole lot more about their relationship we don't know and probably never will know.

    1
    0
  • The whole fable about how her stepson died was a fabrication.

    1
    0
  • Doesn't it make more sense that the whole bit about the cut rope was Shipton's sole doing?

    1
    0
  • The whole gang would end up jumping him and he would beat up each and every one, always careful to hold back enough so as not to kill anyone.

    1
    0
  • You'll have to create a whole new identity again.

    1
    0
  • Jackson began to recount the whole story and with all the "Oh my Gods!" and "You're kiddings!"

    1
    0
  • And I have a million questions, you can't hold anything back, I want the whole truth, no more lying, ever.

    1
    0
  • Elisabeth slowly stood, leaned into him with her whole body, put her lips to his ear, and nibbled softly on his earlobe.

    1
    0
  • The whole time, Jackson admired her.

    1
    0
  • I stood the whole evening.

    1
    0
  • Tomorrow we could spend the whole day together doing whatever you like.

    1
    0
  • She is blaming this whole thing on herself.

    1
    0
  • There's enough stuff there to start a whole new studio.

    1
    0
  • I'm pretty grossed out by the whole thing myself.

    1
    0
  • The whole concept is ridiculous.

    1
    0
  • Well, I have a whole year to figure that one out.

    1
    0
  • Elisabeth seemed amused by the whole scene.

    1
    0
  • Sarah related whole story, ending with, "Never thought I'd see the day that man would have a moral compass, let alone be one."

    1
    0
  • He held her the whole time she slept.

    1
    0
  • I must have slept through the whole night.

    1
    0
  • A whole lot better than she had imagined.... yet still a blow.

    1
    0
  • He'd known Tim his whole life and knew all of Tim's consorts and children by name, if not by sight.

    1
    0
  • Aside from the whole mountain coming down and the Peak being overrun by God-knows-who?

    1
    0
  • I'll get it, Dan said, crossing to the kitchen, where one whole cabinet was filled with medical supplies.

    1
    0
  • Dan searched the whole area, for ten kilometers out in every direction he could.

    1
    0
  • For all we know, the reports we hear are false and the whole country is like this.

    1
    0
  • Your family must've saved their whole lives to send you.

    1
    0
  • He flung open his arms, giving her his whole body as a target.

    1
    0
  • She pushed herself up, reaching into a pocket for a food and water cube.  Gabriel took her arm and pulled her to her feet.  She nearly choked on the cubes and swallowed them whole, struggling to keep up with the death-dealer as he darted into the forest.

    1
    0
  • Kris, I think the era of the Council as a whole is over.

    1
    0
  • The whole team was pretty sharp, but he was far and away the standout.

    1
    0
  • I ain't had a whole cigarette in days.

    1
    0
  • Hearing the whole truth makes me falter a bit when I think about what happened.

    1
    0
  • That opens up a whole new list of sub-topics, like was it just a random mugger or someone he knew?

    1
    0
  • I see a whole bunch in one area.

    1
    0
  • The independent plant which is generally attached to the soil by hair-like structures is the sexual generation, the sporophyte is a stalked or sessile capsule which remains always attached to the gametophyte from which it derives the whole or part of its nourishment.

    1
    0
  • This may have a radial stem-like organization, a central cell-thread giving off from every side a number of short sometimes unicellular branches, which together form a cortex round the central thread, the whole structure having a cylindrical form which only branches when one of the short cell-branches from the central thread grows out beyond the general surface and forms in its turn a new central thread, from whose cells arise new short branches.

    1
    0
  • The whole structure, consisting of the two pits and the wall between is known as a genetic pit.

    1
    0
  • The whole of the tissue of the plant is formed by the division of this apical cell.

    1
    0
  • In addition to the cell types described, it is a very common occurrence in these bulky forms for rhizoid-like branches of the cells to grow out, mostly from the cells at the periphery of the medulla, and grow down between the cells, strengthening the whole tissue, as in the Rhodophyceae.

    1
    0
  • The formation of a massive body naturally involves the localization of the absorptive region, and the function of absorption (which in the simpler forms is carried out by the whole of the vegetative part of the mycelium penetrating a solid or immersed in a liquid substratum) is subserved by the outgrowth of the hyphae of the surface-layer of that region into rhizoids, which, like those of the Algae living on soil, resemble the root-hairs of the higher plants.

    1
    0
  • The whole of the cortex, stereom and parenchyma alike, is commonly living, and its cells often contain starch.

    1
    0
  • In the aquatic, semi-aquatic, and xerophilous types, where the whole surface of the plant absorbs water, perpetually in the first two cases and during rain in the last, the hydrom strand is either much reduced or altogether absent.

    1
    0
  • The whole cavity of the cell is sometimes stuffed with proteid contents.

    1
    0
  • The surface layer of the rhizome bears rhizoids, and its whole structure strikingly resembles that of the typical root of a vascular plant.

    1
    0
  • This surface layer in the typically subaerial shoot of the sporophyte in Pteridophytes and Phanerogams is known as the epidermis, though the name is restricted by some writers, on account of developmental differences, to the surface layer of the shoot of Angiosperms, and by others extended to the surface layer of the whole plant in both these groups.

    1
    0
  • The whole tissue system is known as the stelar system (from the way in which in primitive forms it runs through the whole axis of the plant in the form of a column).

    1
    0
  • The whole of the middle lamella or originally formed cell-wall separating one from another disappears before the adult state is reached, so that the walls of the hydroids consist of a framework of lignified bars, with open communication between the cell cavities.

    1
    0
  • The xylem and phloem are nearly always found in close association in strands of various shapes in all the three main organs of the sporophyteroot, stem and leafand form a connected tissue-system running through the whole body.

    1
    0
  • The whole cylinder is enclosed by the peculiarly differentiated innermost cell-layer of the cortex, known as the endodermis.

    1
    0
  • To this type of steIn having a ground-tissue pith, whether with or without internal phloem, is given the name siphonostele to distinguish it from the solid haplostele characteristic of the root, the first-formed portion of the stem, and in the more primitive Pteridophytes, of the whole of the axis.

    1
    0
  • In this use the term loses, of course, its morphoI logical value, and it is better to call such a segment of a broken-up I stele a meristele, the whole solenostele with overlapping leaf-gaps being called a dictyostele.

    1
    0
  • The whole stele may be surrounded by a common external endodermis; sometimes there is an internal endodermis in addition, separating the bundles from the pith; while in other cases each bundle possesses a separate endodermis surrounding it.

    1
    0
  • The median bundles of the trace are typically the largest, and at any given level of the stem the bundles destined for the next leaf above are as a whole larger than the others which are destined to supply higher leaves.

    1
    0
  • It is possible to suppose that this condition is derived from the astelic condition already referred to, but the evidence on the whole leads to the conclusion that it has ansen byan increase in the number of the bundles within the stele, the individuality of the bundle asserting itself after its escape from the original bundle-ring of the primitive cylinder.

    1
    0
  • On germination of the seed the radicle first grows out, increasing in size as a whole, and soon adding to its tissues by cell division at its apical growing-point.

    1
    0
  • In a good many cases, sometimes in isolated genera or species, sometimes characteristic of whole families, so-called anomalous cambial layers are formed in the stem, either as an extension of, or in addition to, the original cambial cylinder.

    1
    0
  • Sometimes in lianes the whole stem breaks up into separate woody strands, often twisted like the strands of a rope, and running into one another at intervals.

    1
    0
  • This may take various forms and may cover the whole of the organ or be localized in special regions; but its cells are always living and are separated by very large intercellular spaces containing air.

    1
    0
  • The whole of the writings of this time are dominated by a preoccupation with the functions of the different tissues, in itself an excellent standpoint for investigation, but frequently leading in the case of these early investigators to one-sided and distorted views of the facts of structure.

    1
    0
  • Secondly, the histology of fossil plants, particularly woody plants of the carboniferous period, has been placed on a sound basis, assimilated with general histological doctrine, and has considerably enlarged our conceptions of plant anatomy as a whole, though again.

    1
    0
  • The pursuit of this study has not only thrown valuable light on the economy of the plant as a whole, but forms an indispensable condition of the advance of morphological anatomy.

    1
    0
  • It is only comparatively recently that the methods of histological investigation used by animal physiologists have been carefully and systematically applied to the study of the vegetable organisms. They have, however, been attended with wonderful results, and have revolutionized the whole study of vegetable structure.

    1
    0
  • The difficulty is solved by the provision of a complete system of minute intercellular spaces which form a continuous series of delicate canals between the cells, extending throughout the whole substance of the plant.

    1
    0
  • A study of the whole vegetable kingdom, however, negatives the theory that the compounds absorbed are in the strict sense to be called food.

    1
    0
  • The whole story of the different sugars existing in the planttheir relations and their several functionsrequires renewed investigation.

    1
    0
  • The outcome of the whole round of changes, however, is the fixation of a certain part of the radiant energy absorbed by the chlorophyll.

    1
    0
  • A plant may be diseased as a whole, because nearly all its tissues are in a morbid or pathological condition, owing to some Fungus pervading the wholee.g.

    1
    0
  • Plcotrachelus causes the invaded Pilobolus to swell up, and changes the whole course of its cell metabolism, and similarly with Plasmodiophora in the roots of turnips, and many other cases.

    1
    0
  • If the attack of a parasite is met by the formation of some substance in the protoplasm which is chemo- tactically repulsive to the invader, it may be totally incapable of penetrating the cell, even though equipped with a whole armoury of cytases, diastatic and other enzymes, and poisons which would easily overcome the more passive resistances offered by mere cell-walls and cell-contents of other plants, the protoplasm of which forms bodies chemotactically attractive to the Fungus.

    1
    0
  • The terrible losses sustained by whole communities of farmers, planters, foresters, &c., from plant diseases have naturally stimulated the search for remedies, but even now the search is too often conducted in the spirit of the believer in quack medicines, although the agricultural world is awakening to the fact that before any measures likely to be successful can be attempted, the whole chain of causation of the disease must be investigated.

    1
    0
  • The cortical tissues gradually shrink and dry up, turning brown and black in patches or all over, and when at length the cambium and medullary ray tissues dry up the whole twig dies off.

    1
    0
  • Assimilation goes on during the whole year, except during periods of frost or when the plants are buried by snow.

    1
    0
  • This conception of,the plant as an aggregate or colony of independent vital units governing the nutrition, growth and reproduction of the whole cannot, however, be maintained.

    1
    0
  • It is an integral part of an individual organization and as such the exercise of its functions must be governed by the organism as a whole.

    1
    0
  • The Structure of the Nucleus.In the living condition the resting nucleus appears to consist of a homogeneous ground substance containing a large number of small chromatin granules and one or more large spherical granulesnucleolithe whole being surrounded by a limiting membrane which separates it from the cytoplasm.

    1
    0
  • It seems to be fairly well established that in the meiotic phase there is a truequalitative division brought about by the pairing of the chromosomes during synapsis, and the subsequent separation of whole chromosomes to the daughter nuclei.

    1
    0
  • Rhyn gazed at her, and her whole body responded despite her fear.

    0
    0
  • I know the whole business isn't our concern, but the poor woman is staying with us and God knows she looks as if she can use all the help she can get.

    0
    0
  • Elisabeth sighed, "Samantha thinks you may be right about the whole protection thing."

    0
    0
  • Her whole body resonated in pain at the thought.

    0
    0
  • In fact, the whole conversation seemed … off.

    0
    0
  • It has nothing to do with living in Andre's shadow your whole life and now having the chance to prove yourself, she said with a faint smile.

    0
    0
  • In fact, the whole idea of the skip doesn't fit any better than murder or suicide.

    0
    0
  • No argument here but no dice on our dumping the whole business in their laps.

    0
    0
  • The whole distribution system broke down.

    0
    0
  • I'll explain how we found out when I see you, but there was only one person in the room the whole time.

    0
    0
  • The whole damn thing is a mistake.

    0
    0
  • It gives you a hint why the whole crowd wants to carve up Mr. Baratto a piece at a time.

    0
    0
  • His arm was about her waist, supporting her whole body.

    0
    0
  • Too bad she can't put the whole business to rest.

    0
    0
  • Dean ate a chick­en salad on whole wheat with a piece of cherry pie and ice cream.

    0
    0
  • They sat is silence through one whole Count Basie take before Dean finally spoke.

    0
    0
  • Then you can forget the whole business.

    0
    0
  • I'm get­ting a whole new identity!

    0
    0
  • And the whole damn thing was a big mistake.

    0
    0
  • Or maybe he'll find Cleary, learn he isn't Byrne, and put this whole business to rest.

    0
    0
  • But the whole thing didn't make sense.

    0
    0
  • Besides, what was the point to the whole thing?

    0
    0
  • The whole maneuver took less than a minute and Dean was out the door.

    0
    0
  • This must put you on a whole different ground with the lady.

    0
    0
  • I'm truly sorry but I'm not sure how it could have played out a whole lot better.

    0
    0
  • She's totally upset about the whole business.

    0
    0
  • Physically, he was feeling a whole lot better than he had in years.

    0
    0
  • One moment, he was a speck of nothing in this vastness that defined his insignificance; another, this whole world was his.

    0
    0
  • But I've got to say, this whole gig would have gone a lot smoother if you and the old man hadn't been so nosy.

    0
    0
  • Mr. Winston says you know the whole business— how the dough fell out of the sky.

    0
    0
  • If you had admitted your suspicions early on that Jeff's death might not have been an accident, perhaps we could have worked together and gotten to the bottom of the whole business before you almost got us both killed.

    0
    0
  • It was his suggestion about the newspaper subscription that started the whole business rolling— even if it was blind luck.

    0
    0
  • Carmen throws herself whole heart into everything she does.

    0
    0
  • You might as well accept the fact that I'm a whole lot easier to lead than I am to push.

    0
    0
  • He wouldn't be home for two whole weeks.

    0
    0
  • Their marriage was whole again — or at least should have been.

    0
    0
  • Her whole life, no one had made her feel as Darian did.

    0
    0
  • Her whole body hurt at the idea of leaving the little girl.

    0
    0
  • Then you'll become what you were, what you would have been had you been in that world your whole life.

    0
    0
  • I will become as if I'd lived here my whole life, isn't that right?

    0
    0
  • Jenn's whole body went rigid.

    0
    0
  • The moon is a fickle lover, like a beautiful woman…she gives her whole heart but once a month and leaves you before dawn…why fear you the night?

    0
    0
  • It has taken my whole life to stop the senseless wars.

    0
    0
  • I've known war my whole life!

    0
    0
  • He was the whole package, for sure.

    0
    0
  • The whole idea of this vacation was so you could think things over.

    0
    0
  • They were all making a joke out of the whole thing.

    0
    0
  • What would it be like, if the whole world was so soft?

    0
    0
  • His whole body felt alive for the first time.

    0
    0
  • She'd worn it his whole life.

    0
    0
  • The bedroom was the only room that had been personalized in the whole condo.

    0
    0
  • His presence warmed the whole room.

    0
    0
  • The way he looked at her made her whole body feel warm.

    0
    0
  • It's like a whole different country.

    0
    0
  • You contribute nothing, yet the whole world revolves around you.

    0
    0
  • In a matter of twenty minutes, her whole world imploded.

    0
    0
  • So … do you have a plan or are you just winging this whole thing?

    0
    0
  • It pervades almost the whole of Europe, and in Asia reaches the river Ob.

    0
    0
  • After having preached the gospel in Wiirzburg, the whole party were put to death by the orders of an unjust judge named Gozbert.

    0
    0
  • Upper margin of the end of the proboscis developed into a distinct finger-like process, much longer than the lower margins, and the whole trunk uniformly tapering and smooth.

    0
    0
  • The law of multiple proportions asserts that if two elements form more than' one compound, then the weights of the one element Law of which are found combined with unit weight of the other multiple in the different compounds, must be in the ratio of two propor or more whole numbers.

    0
    0
  • Fortunately, the compounds at first examined by the chemists engaged in verifying these laws were comparatively simple, so that the whole numbers referred to above were small.

    0
    0
  • In each of a number of experiments he found that the weight of the silver iodide did not differ by one twenty-thousandth of the whole from the sum of the weights of the silver and the iodine used.

    0
    0
  • Berzelius took 8 grams of copper, converted it into the coloured chloride, and sealed up the whole of this in solution, together with a weighed strip of copper.

    0
    0
  • The whole of the lead and sulphur of the sulphide was found to be present in the sulphate; in other words, the combining ratio of the lead and sulphur was not altered by the addition of the oxygen.

    0
    0
  • He frequently declares that this discovery was the result of the literary labours of his whole life.

    0
    0
  • With marvellous energy he kept in his own hands the direction of the whole government.

    0
    0
  • He died in Turin on the 20th of March 1894; his body was taken to Pesth, where he was buried amid the mourning of the whole.

    0
    0
  • The same day King Michael died and Sobieski, determined to secure the throne for himself, hastened to the capital, though Tatar bands were swarming over the frontier and the whole situation was acutely perilous.

    0
    0
  • But during the whole of this active life, many details of which are very interesting as illustrative of the life and manners of the time, he never lost sight of a design which he had formed at a very early period, of writing the history of those civil wars in France in which he had borne a part, and during which he had had so many opportunities of closely observing the leading personages and events.

    0
    0
  • He declared the whole legend was fictitious.

    0
    0
  • Both these kings were slain by .Ceadwalla in the following year, but shortly afterwards the Welsh king was overthrown by Oswald, brother of Eanfrith, who reunited the whole of Northumbria under his sway and acquired a supremacy analogous to that previously held by Edwin.

    0
    0
  • About two years later, however, both these kings were expelled by Edmund, and the whole of Northumbria was brought under his power.

    0
    0
  • Further persecutions of a whole batch of Lollards took place in 1428.

    0
    0
  • The only alien priories granted were Abberbury in Oxfordshire, Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, Romney in Kent, and St Clare and Llangenith in Wales, all very small affairs, single manors and rectories, and these did not form a quarter of the whole endowment.

    0
    0
  • In the early days of the Republican party, when the shameful scenes of the Kansas struggle were exciting the whole country, and during the campaigns of 1857 and 1858, he became known as an effective speaker and ardent anti-slavery man.

    0
    0
  • The "Mediterranean region," as a geographical unit, includes all this area; the Black Sea and the Sea of Marmora are within its submerged portion, and the climate of the whole is controlled by the oceanic influences of the Mediterranean Sea.

    0
    0
  • Evnitzki states that the saltest water of the whole basin occurs in the Aegean Sea.

    0
    0
  • From the date when Mr Hart took up his duties at Peking, in 1863, he unceasingly devoted the whole of his energies to the work of the department, with the result that the revenue grew from upwards of eight million taels to nearly twenty-seven million, collected at the thirty-two treaty ports, and the customs staff, which in 1864 numbered 200, reached in 1901 a total of 57 0 4.

    0
    0
  • The retreat of the British force gave Chauncey time to complete this vessel, the "General Pike," which was so far superior to anything under Yeo's command that she was said to be equal in effective strength to the whole of the British flotilla.

    0
    0
  • George Sand, who was a firm believer in the doctrine of heredity, devotes a whole volume of her autobiography (Histoire de ma vie, 1857 seq.) to the elaboration of this strange pedigree.

    0
    0
  • All at once a sudden shock passed through my whole being, my eyes swam, and I seemed wrapped in a dazzling white mist.

    0
    0
  • He on his part was more and more repelled by a superior woman determined to live her own intellectual life, and she on hers discovered that she was mated, if not to a clown, at least to a hobereau whose whole heart was in his cattle and his turnips.

    0
    0
  • She at once quitted Nohant, taking with her Solange, and in 1831 an amicable separation was agreed upon, by which her whole estate was surrendered to the husband with the stipulation that she should receive an allowance of £120 a year.

    0
    0
  • To many critics it seemed that she had said her whole say and that nothing but replicas could follow.

    0
    0
  • On account of the smallness of the particles, the forces acting throughout the volume of any individual particle are all of the same intensity and direction, and may be considered as a whole.

    0
    0
  • Since there is no waste of energy upon the whole, this represents the loss of energy in the primary wave.

    0
    0
  • The façade, flanked by two towers with cupolas, is decorated with arcades filled in with statuary and sculpture, the whole representing the Last Judgment.

    0
    0
  • With Three Hours' Exposure He Found The Thorium Emanation Only From 3 To 5% Of The Whole, But With 12 Hours' Exposure The Percentage Of Thorium Emanation Rose To About 15.

    0
    0
  • With the exception of a narrow strip along the Canadian frontier, thunderstorm frequency is fairly high over the whole of the United States to the east of the tooth meridian.

    0
    0
  • He pushed out from Moguntiacum, extended the Roman territory east of it and enclosed the whole within a systematically delimited and defended frontier with numerous blockhouses along it and larger forts in the rear.

    0
    0
  • We do not, however, know its date, save that, if not Domitian's work, it was carried out soon after his death, and the whole frontier thus constituted was reorganized, probably by Hadrian, with a continuous wooden palisade reaching from Rhine to Danube.

    0
    0
  • But we know that the pressure of the barbarians began to be felt seriously in the later part of the 2nd century, and after long struggles the whole or almost the whole district east of Rhine and north of Danube was lost - seemingly all within one short period - about A.D.

    0
    0
  • A layer of fine earth is then placed over the whole, and well beaten down, and the surface is covered with a thick coat of straw.

    0
    0
  • Along the flood-plains of the larger rivers are fertile " bottomlands," but the ruggedness of the plateau country as a whole has retarded the development of the state, much of which is still sparsely populated.

    0
    0
  • If there is no issue she takes the whole of the personal estate, while the real estate, subject to her dower, goes first to her husband's father and then to his mother, brothers and sisters.

    0
    0
  • If the wife dies intestate the husband has a right to the use of her real estate for life, and to one-third of the personal estate if there is issue; otherwise to the whole.

    0
    0
  • Watch-towers with wooden clappers and the beacons which flashed the alarm along the whole frontier in a few hours are still features in the landscape.

    0
    0
  • These at first encircled the whole border; but soon it became customary to substitute for them square patches of embroidery or precious fabrics.

    0
    0
  • The whole subject is exhaustively treated by Father Joseph Braun in Die liturgische Gewandung (Freiburg im Breisgau, 1907).

    0
    0
  • On some of these points the codes differ, and the whole is to be regarded as the ideal qualification, built up theoretically by the canonists.

    0
    0
  • The whole effect of the grim castle, the silvery stream and the verdant woods makes one of the most striking scenes in Belgium.

    0
    0
  • The whole of this large series of reforms was conducted under his own personal supervision, and upon no part of his multifarious labours did he dwell in his letters home with greater pride.

    0
    0
  • The whole tendency of the Regulating Act was to establish for the first time the influence of the crown, or rather of parliament, in Indian affairs.

    0
    0
  • Hastings did not hesitate to take upon his own shoulders the whole responsibility of military affairs.

    0
    0
  • Rouvier was able to make a statement of the whole proceedings in the chamber, which received the assent of all parties.

    0
    0
  • The whole arrangement is elegant and ingenious.

    0
    0
  • Two other screws, o, p, the heads of which are not graduated, give motions to the whole micrometer box through t 1 mm.

    0
    0
  • The chief drawback to type A is that the errors of the screw are liable to change by wear, otherwise the apparatus, as made and used at Potsdam, is, on the whole, a convenient and accurate one.

    0
    0
  • The remedy proposed by Repsold for this proved fault is to cause the whole slide to tilt instead of the microscope only; this should prove a complete remedy.

    0
    0
  • In the latter years of his reign Harsha's sway over the whole basin of the Ganges from the Himalayas to the Nerbudda was undisputed.

    0
    0
  • The pope when teaching ex cathedra acts as head of the whole episcopal body and of the whole Church.

    0
    0
  • There were, therefore, two principal epochs of folding in the island, one at the close of the Palaeozoic era which affected the whole of the island, and one at the close of the Mesozoic which was felt only in the western region.

    0
    0
  • Granite and Archean schists form nearly the whole of the eastern hills from the Strait of Bonifacio southwards to the Flumendosa river, culminating in Monti del Gennargentu.

    0
    0
  • The Tertiary deposits cover the whole of the central depression, where they are associated with extensive flows of lava and beds of volcanic ash.

    0
    0
  • Anthropologists, indeed, have recently observed a large proportion of individuals of exceptionally small stature, not found in Sardinia only, but elsewhere in south Italy also; though in Sardinia they are distributed over the whole island, and especially in the southern half.

    0
    0
  • In 1902 the total production of wheat in the island was 2,946,070 bushels, but in 1903 it rose to 4,823,800 bushels, in 1904 it fell to 4,015,020, and in 1905 rose again to 4,351,987 bushels, 81 of the whole production of Italy.

    0
    0
  • Still, the percentage of those unable to read and write is 72.8, while for the whole of Italy it is 56 o.

    0
    0
  • They are distributed over the whole island, but are perhaps most frequent towards the centre and in the Nurra.

    0
    0
  • In 1164 Barisone, giudice of Arborea, was given the title of king of the whole island by Frederick Barbarossa, but his supremacy was never effective.

    0
    0
  • His ambition was insatiable; he is said to have exclaimed when looking at a map that the whole world did not form a sovereignty vast enough for one monarch.

    0
    0
  • For a time the whole left united in forcing the resignation of the ministers.

    0
    0
  • Finally, in the trial of the king he demanded, with the Girondists, that the sentence should be pronounced by a vote of the whole people, and not simply by the Convention.

    0
    0
  • During the whole session he organized and directed the opposition in their attacks on the king's ministers.

    0
    0
  • Much of Shaftesbury's career, increasingly so as it came near its close, is incapable of defence; but it has escaped most of his critics that his life up to the Restoration, apparently full of inconsistencies, was evidently guided by one leading principle, the determination to uphold the supremacy of parliament, a principle which, however obscured by self-interest, appears also to have underlain his whole political career.

    0
    0
  • The Golden Temple is so called on account of its copper dome, covered with gold foil, which shines brilliantly in the rays of the Indian sun, and is reflected back from the waters of the lake; but the building as a whole is too squat to have much architectural merit apart from its ornamentation.

    0
    0
  • The whole genus is parasitical, and contains about twenty species, widely distributed in the warmer parts of the old world; but only the mistletoe proper is a native of Europe.

    0
    0
  • The time thus spent seems to have been on the whole happy, even allowing for warm discussions with the mathematicians and metaphysicians of France, and for harassing controversies in the Netherlands.

    0
    0
  • The best account of Descartes's mental history during his life in Holland is contained in his letters, which extend over the whole period, and are particularly frequent in the latter half.

    0
    0
  • The Discourse of Method and the Meditations apply what the Rules for the Direction of the Mind had regarded in particular instances to our conceptions of the world as a whole.

    0
    0
  • The remedy proposed by Descartes is (while not neglecting our duties to others, ourselves and God) to let doubt range unchecked through the whole fabric of our customary convictions.

    0
    0
  • The whole conception of force may disappear from a theory of the universe; and we can adopt a geometrical definition of motion as the shifting of one body from the neighbourhood of those bodies which immediately touch it, and which are assumed to be at rest, to the neighbourhood of other bodies.

    0
    0
  • The tree has a remarkable appearance, due to shedding its primary branches for about five-sixths of its height and replacing them by a small bushy growth, the whole resembling a tall column crowned with foliage, suggesting to its discoverer, Captain Cook, a tall column of basalt.

    0
    0
  • The subject is man, treated as Aristotle does, according to his TE¦os, and so Aquinas discusses all the ethical, psychological and theological questions which arise; but any theological discussion upon man must be mainly ethical, and so a great proportion of the first part, and almost the whole of the second, has to do with ethical questions.

    0
    0
  • In the course of 1551 one of the factions of Kazan offered the whole khanate to the young tsar, and on the 20th of August 1552 he stood before its walls with an army of 150,000 men and 50 guns.

    0
    0
  • On the 3rd of December 1564 he quitted Moscow with his whole family.

    0
    0
  • In his foreign policy Pericles differs from those statesmen of previous generations who sought above all the welfare of Greece as a whole.

    0
    0
  • The whole is still enclosed by the Byzantine walls, which follow the line of the cliffs and are carried along the sea-face; and the upper part of the level, which is separated from the lower by an inner cross wall, forms the castle; while at the highest point, where a sort of neck is formed between the two valleys, is the keep which crowns the whole.

    0
    0
  • The railway by Batoum to Baku by way of Tiflis has tended greatly to turn the channel of commerce from Trebizond into Russian territory, since it helps to open the route to Erivan, Tabriz and the whole of Persia.

    0
    0
  • For the scientific construction of a green, the whole ground must be excavated to a depth of 18 in.

    0
    0
  • At its close the green must be carefully examined, weeds uprooted, worn patches re-turfed, and the whole laid under a winter blanket of silver-sand.

    0
    0
  • The aureola, when enveloping the whole body, is generally oval or elliptical in form, but is occasionally circular or quatrefoil.

    0
    0
  • The whole apparatus of "forensic" ideas (law, punishment, satisfaction, &c.) is summarily rejected as foreign to God's purpose of love.

    0
    0
  • Rulers of this name are found at Rhodes as late as the 1st century B.C. The Prytaneum was regarded as the religious and political centre of the community and was thus the nucleus of all government, and the official "home" of the whole people.

    0
    0
  • If he mastered the whole coast-line of the Levant, the enemy's fleet would find itself left in the air.

    0
    0
  • Alexander refused the bargain and definitely claimed the whole.

    0
    0
  • That he aimed at conquering the whole world and demanded to be worshipped as a god is the traditional view.

    0
    0
  • His system, while preserving the democratic theory by recognizing the congregation as holding the church power, was in practice strictly aristocratic inasmuch as the congregation is never allowed any direct use of power, which is invested in the whole body of elders.

    0
    0
  • For reasons above indicated the whole subject is in its infancy.

    0
    0
  • The Mesozoic begins with a Triassic land period in the mainland of Australia; while the islands of the Australasian festoon contain the Triassic marine limestones, which fringe the whole of the Pacific. The Triassic beds are best known in New South Wales, where round Sydney they include a series of sandstones and shales.

    0
    0
  • The census of 1901 showed that about 83% of the whole population and more than 91% of the population over five years of age could read and write.

    0
    0
  • At the close of 1905 the area devoted to tillage was 9,365,000 acres, the area utilized for the production of breadstuffs being 6,270,000 acres or over two-thirds of the whole extent of cultivation.

    0
    0
  • Almost the whole of the railway lines in Australia are the property of the state governments, and have been constructed and equipped wholly by borrowed capital.

    0
    0
  • The hair is long, black or very dark auburn, wavy and sometimes curly, but never woolly, and the men have luxuriant beards and whiskers, often of an auburn tint, while the whole body inclines to hairiness.

    0
    0
  • By 1665 the Dutch possessed rough charts of almost the whole of the western littoral, while to the mainland itself they had given the name of New Holland.

    0
    0
  • The two most striking political events in the modern history of Australia, as a whole, apart from the readiness it has shown to remain a part of the British empire, and to in Australia.

    0
    0
  • Taking the states as a whole, agrarian legislation has been the most important subject that has engrossed the attention of their parliaments, and every state has been more or less engaged in tinkering with its land laws.

    0
    0
  • During the whole period from 1873 onwards, prices, other than of labour, were steadily tending downwards, so that the cost of living in 1890 was much below that of 1873.

    0
    0
  • Towards the en._ cf October 20,000 shearers were called out, and many other trades, principally concerned with the handling or shipping of wool, joined the ranks of the strikers, with the result that the maritime and pastoral industries throughout the whole of Australia were most injuriously disturbed.

    0
    0
  • The caucus, which is the natural corollary of the detachment, determines by majority the vote of the whole of the members of the party, independence of action being allowed on minor questions only.

    0
    0
  • The surface on the whole is hilly and is partly occupied by offshoots of the Thuringian Forest; the highest summits are found in the eastern half, where the Kieferle reaches 2849 ft.

    0
    0
  • He found Sweden in ruins, and devoted his whole life to laying the solid foundations of a new order of things which, in its essential features, has endured to the present day.

    0
    0
  • The whole island is mountainous, and is remarkable for its beautiful scenery and its fertility.

    0
    0
  • Thus, if x= horned and y = sheep, then the successive acts of election represented by x and y, if performed on unity, give the whole of the class horned sheep. Boole showed that elective symbols of this kind obey the same primary laws of combination as algebraical symbols, whence it followed that they could be added, subtracted, multiplied and even divided, almost exactly in the same manner as numbers.

    0
    0
  • In the days of their great king Hlodwig or Clovis (481-511) they were in possession of the whole of the southern and central Netherlands.

    0
    0
  • This middle kingdom formed a long strip stretching across Europe from the North Sea to Naples, and embraced the whole of the later Netherlands with the exception of the portion on the left bank of the Scheldt, which river was made the boundary of West Francia.

    0
    0
  • In 879 East Francia acquired the whole; from 912 to 924 it formed part of West Francia.

    0
    0
  • Two distinctive nationalities, Belgian and Dutch, were tactful and conciliatory policy of the most consummate statesman of his time could unite those whom the whole trend of events was year by year putting farther asunder.

    0
    0
  • During the whole of the middle ages Tournai was styled the "seigneurie de Tournaisis," and possessed a charter and special privileges of its own.

    0
    0
  • If, for example, the porta hepatis was long on the right side and short on the left side, it was a good sign for the king's army, but if short on the right side and long on the left, it was unfavourable; and similarly for a whole series of phenomena connected with any one of the various subdivisions of the liver.

    0
    0
  • The west coast throughout its whole length is covered to a depth of some miles with mangrove swamps, with only a few isolated stretches of sandy beach, the dim foliage of the mangroves and the hideous mud flats presenting a depressing spectacle.

    0
    0
  • As a whole, the Malays are, however, a remarkably healthy people, and deformity and hereditary diseases are rare among them.

    0
    0
  • Johor is the only Malay state in the southern portion of the peninsula, the whole of which is within the British sphere, which has been suffered to remain under native rule.

    0
    0
  • He supported the claims of Bohemia to a full autonomy; he strongly attacked both the February constitution and the Ausgleich with Hungary; what he desired was a common parliament for the whole empire based on a settlement with each one of the territories.

    0
    0
  • Nantwich retains not a few old timbered houses of the 16th and 17th centuries, but the town as a whole is modern in appearance.

    0
    0
  • It stands in a large park, the whole property being acquired by the corporation of Birmingham in 1864, when the mansion became a museum and art gallery.

    0
    0
  • But its effect is to make whole the mind, and, so far as it is expedient, the body as well."

    0
    0
  • Thirty-five years later John of Eltham granted to the burgesses the whole town of Grauntpount.

    0
    0
  • The whole residency is mountainous, but there are two main parallel ranges of peaks along the northern boundary and through the middle.

    0
    0
  • It seemed