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whitefield

whitefield

whitefield Sentence Examples

  • On New Year's Day, 1739, the Wesleys, Whitefield and other friends had a Love Feast at Fetter Lane.

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  • In February Whitefield went to Bristol, where his popularity was unbounded.

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  • The doctrine of election had led to a separation between Whitefield and the Wesleys in 1741.

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  • He had no sympathy with the Old Lutherans and their strict orthodoxy - on the contrary he was friendly with the Reformed congregations, and with George Whitefield and the Tennents.

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  • Friction was increased by a contest between Gilbert Tennent and his friends, who favoured Whitefield and his revival measures, and Robert Cross (1689-1766), pastor at Jamaica in 1723-1758, and his friends.

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  • During the separation the synod of Philadelphia decreased from twentysix to twenty-two ministers, but the synod of New York grew from twenty to seventy-two ministers, and the New Side reaped all the fruits of the Great Awakening under Whitefield and his successors.

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  • among the mendicant friars of the 13th century, among the Jansenists, the early Quakers, the converts of Wesley and Whitefield, the persecuted protestants of the Cevennes, the Irvingites.

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  • John Clayton, afterwards chaplain of the Collegiate Church of Manchester, who remained a strong High Churchman; James Hervey, author of Meditations among the Tombs, and Theron and Aspasio; Benjamin Ingham, who became the Yorkshire evangelist; and Thomas Broughton, afterwards secretary of the S.P.C.K., were members of the Holy Club, and George Whitefield joined it on the eve of the Wesleys' departure for Georgia.

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  • The Wesleys, George Whitefield, Henry Venn, Thomas Scott and Thomas Adam all express their deep obligation to the author.

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  • Among more recent preachers he had most affinity with George Whitefield, Richard Cecil and Joseph Irons.

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  • The district was one of the chief centres of the Methodist revival of the 18th century, the first synod of the Calvinistic Methodists being held in 1743 at Watford farm close to the town, from which place George Whitefield was married at Eglwysilan church two years previously.

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  • Whitefield was the greater orator, Wesley the better thinker; but, diverse in temperament as they were, they alike laid emphasis on openair preaching.

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  • Of Franklin's examination, in February 1766, by the House in Committee of the Whole, as to the effects of the Stamp Act, Burke said that the scene reminded him of a master examined by a parcel of schoolboys, and George Whitefield said: " Dr Franklin has gained immortal honour by his behaviour at the bar of the House.

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  • So was it in the long run with the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion, springing from Whitefield's Calvinistic wing of the Revival, not to mention the congregational strain in some minor Methodist churches.

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  • It was not until 1734 that a new outburst of zeal was aroused by the " revivalist " work of Jonathan Edwards, followed in 1740-1742 by George Whitefield.

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  • He was ordained deacon in the Church of England, 1740, but Whitefield recommended him to leave his curacies and go into the highways and hedges.

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  • George Whitefield was in the chair.

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  • Edwards personally reprimanded Whitefield for presuming to say of any one that he was unconverted, and in his Thoughts Concerning the Present Revival of Religion devoted much space to "showing what things are to be corrected, or avoided, in promoting this work."

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  • At its May session in 1742 the General Court of Massachusetts forbade itinerant preaching save with full consent from the resident pastor; in May 1743 the annual ministerial convention, by a small plurality, declared against "several errors in doctrine and disorders in practice which have of late obtained in various parts of the land," against lay preachers and disorderly revival meetings; in the same year Charles Chauncy, who disapproved of the revival, published Seasonable Thoughts on the State of Religion in New England; and in 1744-1745 Whitefield, upon his second tour in New England, found that the faculties of Harvard and Yale had officially "testified" and "declared" against him and that most pulpits were closed to him.

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  • Among the public buildings and institutions are the Marine Museum, the Public Library (founded in 1854 by Josiah Little and containing about 45,000 volumes), the old Tracy mansion (built in 1771 or 1772), which forms part of the Public Library building, the Anna Jacques and Homoeopathic hospitals, homes for aged women and men, a Home for Destitute Children, Old South Church, in which is the tomb of George Whitefield, and the Young Men's Christian Association building, which is a memorial to George Henry Corliss (1817-1888), the inventor, erected by his widow, a native of Newburyport.

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  • also a number of private charitable institutions, the oldest being the Bethesda orphan asylum, near Savannah, founded by George Whitefield in 1739.

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  • vi.; Luke Tyerman, Life of George Whitefield (1876); J.

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  • In the Evangelical Revival of the r8th century Arminianism was represented by Wesley, and Calvinism by Whitefield.

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  • The First Church, Providence, had long since become Arminian and held aloof from the evangelism of Edwards, Whitefield and their coadjutors.

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  • At the Evangelical Revival the old questions came up, as Wesley favoured Arminianism and George Whitefield Calvinism.

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  • Important events in the period of royal government were the preaching of George Whitefield in 1739 and the following years, and the chartering of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) in 1746, and of Queen's (now Rutgers) College in 1766.

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  • GEORGE WHITEFIELD (1714-1770), English religious leader, was born on the 16th of December 1714 at the Bell Inn, Gloucester, of which his father was landlord.

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  • In 1738 an account of Whitefield's voyage from Lcndon to Georgia was published without his knowledge.

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  • As his embarkation was further delayed for ten weeks he published A Continuation of the Rev. Mr Whitefield's Journal during the Time he was delayed in England by the Embargo.

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  • While there he published Three Letters from Mr Whitefield, in which he referred to the "mystery of iniquity" in Tillotson, and asserted that that divine knew no more of Christ than Mahomet did.

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  • During his absence from England Whitefield found that a divergence of doctrine from Calvinism had been introduced by Wesley; and notwithstanding Wesley's exhortations to brotherly kindness and forbearance he withdrew from the Wesleyan connexion.

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  • The remainder of Whitefield's life was spent chiefly in evangelizing tours in Great Britain, Ireland and America.

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  • Whitefield's printed works convey a totally inadequate idea of his oratorical powers, and are all in fact below mediocrity.

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  • The preaching of Wesley and Whitefield and appealed direct to the emotions, with its doctrine of White- conversion, and called upon each individual not field, to understand, or to admire, or to act, but vividly to realize the love and mercy of God.

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  • In the early 18th century Arminianism presented itself in New England, and sporadically elsewhere; this tendency was largely accelerated by the reaction from the excesses of the "Great Awakening" under Jonathan Edwards and George Whitefield.

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  • Wesley and Whitefield were accustomed to commend them to their followers.

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  • George Whitefield >>

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  • A woolen draper by trade, he had been involved with Whitefield's ministry in London since at least the 1760s.

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  • She sponsored Whitefield on his travels to America where he founded an orphanage.

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  • Whitefield left the orphanage to the Countess in his will.

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  • tempestuous life of sin, through George Whitefield's ministry in England.

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  • For a time Whitefield was leader, and we find a reference to the "Whitefieldian and Wesleyan Methodists" in the Supplement to the Gentleman's Magazine for 1747, p. 619.

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  • Friction was increased by a contest between Gilbert Tennent and his friends, who favoured Whitefield and his revival measures, and Robert Cross (1689-1766), pastor at Jamaica in 1723-1758, and his friends.

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  • During the separation the synod of Philadelphia decreased from twentysix to twenty-two ministers, but the synod of New York grew from twenty to seventy-two ministers, and the New Side reaped all the fruits of the Great Awakening under Whitefield and his successors.

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  • among the mendicant friars of the 13th century, among the Jansenists, the early Quakers, the converts of Wesley and Whitefield, the persecuted protestants of the Cevennes, the Irvingites.

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  • John Clayton, afterwards chaplain of the Collegiate Church of Manchester, who remained a strong High Churchman; James Hervey, author of Meditations among the Tombs, and Theron and Aspasio; Benjamin Ingham, who became the Yorkshire evangelist; and Thomas Broughton, afterwards secretary of the S.P.C.K., were members of the Holy Club, and George Whitefield joined it on the eve of the Wesleys' departure for Georgia.

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  • On New Year's Day, 1739, the Wesleys, Whitefield and other friends had a Love Feast at Fetter Lane.

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  • In February Whitefield went to Bristol, where his popularity was unbounded.

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  • having been all my life (till very lately) so tenacious of every point relating to decency and order, that I should have thought the saving of souls almost a sin, if it had not been done in a church."Next day Wesley followed Whitefield's example.

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  • The doctrine of election had led to a separation between Whitefield and the Wesleys in 1741.

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  • He had no sympathy with the Old Lutherans and their strict orthodoxy - on the contrary he was friendly with the Reformed congregations, and with George Whitefield and the Tennents.

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  • The Wesleys, George Whitefield, Henry Venn, Thomas Scott and Thomas Adam all express their deep obligation to the author.

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  • Among more recent preachers he had most affinity with George Whitefield, Richard Cecil and Joseph Irons.

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  • Thomas Boston's (1676-1732) memory has been revived by the praise of Stevenson, but his zeal was far exceeded by that of John Wesley (1703-1791), who preached 40,000 sermons, and by that of George Whitefield (1714-1770).

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  • The district was one of the chief centres of the Methodist revival of the 18th century, the first synod of the Calvinistic Methodists being held in 1743 at Watford farm close to the town, from which place George Whitefield was married at Eglwysilan church two years previously.

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  • Preaching once more was based on the Bible, which was expounded with force and earnestness, and though throughout the century there remained a good' many pulpiteers who produced nothing but solemn fudge, the example and stimulus given by Wesley and Whitefield were almost immeasurably productive.

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  • Whitefield was the greater orator, Wesley the better thinker; but, diverse in temperament as they were, they alike laid emphasis on openair preaching.

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  • Whitefield's visits raised a band of pioneer preachers, cultured and uncultured, men who knew their Bibles but often interpreted them awry.

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  • Of Franklin's examination, in February 1766, by the House in Committee of the Whole, as to the effects of the Stamp Act, Burke said that the scene reminded him of a master examined by a parcel of schoolboys, and George Whitefield said: " Dr Franklin has gained immortal honour by his behaviour at the bar of the House.

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  • So was it in the long run with the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion, springing from Whitefield's Calvinistic wing of the Revival, not to mention the congregational strain in some minor Methodist churches.

    0
    0
  • It was not until 1734 that a new outburst of zeal was aroused by the " revivalist " work of Jonathan Edwards, followed in 1740-1742 by George Whitefield.

    0
    0
  • He was ordained deacon in the Church of England, 1740, but Whitefield recommended him to leave his curacies and go into the highways and hedges.

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    0
  • George Whitefield was in the chair.

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  • Edwards personally reprimanded Whitefield for presuming to say of any one that he was unconverted, and in his Thoughts Concerning the Present Revival of Religion devoted much space to "showing what things are to be corrected, or avoided, in promoting this work."

    0
    0
  • At its May session in 1742 the General Court of Massachusetts forbade itinerant preaching save with full consent from the resident pastor; in May 1743 the annual ministerial convention, by a small plurality, declared against "several errors in doctrine and disorders in practice which have of late obtained in various parts of the land," against lay preachers and disorderly revival meetings; in the same year Charles Chauncy, who disapproved of the revival, published Seasonable Thoughts on the State of Religion in New England; and in 1744-1745 Whitefield, upon his second tour in New England, found that the faculties of Harvard and Yale had officially "testified" and "declared" against him and that most pulpits were closed to him.

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    0
  • Among the public buildings and institutions are the Marine Museum, the Public Library (founded in 1854 by Josiah Little and containing about 45,000 volumes), the old Tracy mansion (built in 1771 or 1772), which forms part of the Public Library building, the Anna Jacques and Homoeopathic hospitals, homes for aged women and men, a Home for Destitute Children, Old South Church, in which is the tomb of George Whitefield, and the Young Men's Christian Association building, which is a memorial to George Henry Corliss (1817-1888), the inventor, erected by his widow, a native of Newburyport.

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  • also a number of private charitable institutions, the oldest being the Bethesda orphan asylum, near Savannah, founded by George Whitefield in 1739.

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  • vi.; Luke Tyerman, Life of George Whitefield (1876); J.

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  • In the Evangelical Revival of the r8th century Arminianism was represented by Wesley, and Calvinism by Whitefield.

    0
    0
  • The First Church, Providence, had long since become Arminian and held aloof from the evangelism of Edwards, Whitefield and their coadjutors.

    0
    0
  • At the Evangelical Revival the old questions came up, as Wesley favoured Arminianism and George Whitefield Calvinism.

    0
    0
  • Important events in the period of royal government were the preaching of George Whitefield in 1739 and the following years, and the chartering of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) in 1746, and of Queen's (now Rutgers) College in 1766.

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    0
  • GEORGE WHITEFIELD (1714-1770), English religious leader, was born on the 16th of December 1714 at the Bell Inn, Gloucester, of which his father was landlord.

    0
    0
  • In 1738 an account of Whitefield's voyage from Lcndon to Georgia was published without his knowledge.

    0
    0
  • As his embarkation was further delayed for ten weeks he published A Continuation of the Rev. Mr Whitefield's Journal during the Time he was delayed in England by the Embargo.

    0
    0
  • While there he published Three Letters from Mr Whitefield, in which he referred to the "mystery of iniquity" in Tillotson, and asserted that that divine knew no more of Christ than Mahomet did.

    0
    0
  • During his absence from England Whitefield found that a divergence of doctrine from Calvinism had been introduced by Wesley; and notwithstanding Wesley's exhortations to brotherly kindness and forbearance he withdrew from the Wesleyan connexion.

    0
    0
  • The remainder of Whitefield's life was spent chiefly in evangelizing tours in Great Britain, Ireland and America.

    0
    0
  • Whitefield's printed works convey a totally inadequate idea of his oratorical powers, and are all in fact below mediocrity.

    0
    0
  • The preaching of Wesley and Whitefield and appealed direct to the emotions, with its doctrine of White- conversion, and called upon each individual not field, to understand, or to admire, or to act, but vividly to realize the love and mercy of God.

    0
    0
  • In the early 18th century Arminianism presented itself in New England, and sporadically elsewhere; this tendency was largely accelerated by the reaction from the excesses of the "Great Awakening" under Jonathan Edwards and George Whitefield.

    0
    0
  • Wesley and Whitefield were accustomed to commend them to their followers.

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  • George Whitefield >>

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  • Robert Robinson had been saved out of a tempestuous life of sin, through George Whitefield 's ministry in England.

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