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whitby

whitby

whitby Sentence Examples

  • ROBIN HOOD'S BAY, a seaside resort in the Whitby parliamentary division of the North Riding of Yorkshire, England, 61 m.

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  • As a thank-offering he dedicated his daughter ZElfled to the Church, and founded the monastery of Whitby.

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  • In 664 at the synod of Whitby, Oswio accepted the usages of the Roman Church, which led to the departure of Colman and the appointment of Wilfrid as bishop of York.

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  • From Hartlepool Hilda moved to Whitby, where in 657 she founded the famous double monastery which in the time of the first abbess included among its members five future bishops, Bosa, 'Etta, Oftfor, John and Wilfrid II.

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  • In 655 after the battle of Winwa d Oswio entrusted his daughter IElfled to Hilda, with whom she went to Whitby.

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  • At the synod of Whitby in 664 Hilda sided with Colman and Cedd against Wilfrid.

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  • This diversity of usage was ended, so far as the kingdom of Northumbria was concerned, by the council of Streaneshalch, or Whitby, in 654.

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  • In 1847 he entered the House of Commons as member for Whitby, retaining the seat till the end of his life.

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  • These properties are most highly developed in the substance known as jet, which is a variety of cannel found in the lower oolitic strata of Yorkshire, and is almost entirely used for ornamental purposes, the whole quantity produced near Whitby, together with a further supply from Spain, being manufactured into articles of jewellery at that town.

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  • He was probably already regarded as the leading exponent of the Roman discipline in England when his speech at the council of Whitby determined the overthrow of the Celtic party (664).

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  • Meanwhile Rome was too strong, and in 604, in a synod held at Whitby, St Wilfrid procured the acceptance of Roman as against Celtic doctrine in the questions th.en at issue.

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  • WHITBY, a seaport, watering-place and market town in the Whitby parliamentary division of the North Riding of Yorkshire, England, 245 m.

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  • Whitby is beautifully situated at the mouth and on both banks of the River Esk; the old town of narrow streets and picturesque houses standing on the steep slopes above the river, while the modern residential quarter is mainly on the summit of West Cliff.

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  • Adjoining the abbey is Whitby Hall, built by Sir Francis Cholmley about 1580 from the materials of the monastic buildings, and enlarged and fortified by Sir Hugh Cholmley about 1635.

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  • Whitby is a quiet resort, possessing none of the brilliance of Scarborough on the same coast.

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  • Whitby (Streanaeshalch c. 657-857; Prestebi c. 857-1080; Witeby, &c. c. 857 onwards) is first mentioned by Bede, who states that a religious house was established here about A.D.

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  • made a grant to the abbot and convent of Whitby of a burgage in the vill of Whitby, and Richard de Waterville, abbot 1175-1190, granted the town in free burgage to the burgesses.

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  • In 1200 King John, bribed by the burgesses, confirmed this charter, but in 1201, bribed by the successor of Richard de Waterville, quashed it as injurious to the dignity of the church of Whitby.

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  • In 1629 Whitby petitioned for incorporation on the ground that the town was in decay through want of good government and received letters patent giving them self-government..

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  • However, in1674-1675the crown, probably in gratitude for the part played by the Cholmleys in the Civil War, restored to the lords of the manor all the liberties ever enjoyed by the abbots of Whitby in Whitby and Whitby Strand.

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  • Whitby became a parliamentary borough under the Reform Act of 1832, returning one member until it was disfranchised under the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885.

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  • At the beginning of the 14th century Sir Alexander Percy claimed the hereditary right of buying and selling in Whitby without payment of toll.

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  • granted to the abbot of Whitby a fair at the feast of St Hilda and the king's firm peace to all coming to the fair.

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  • There was a port at Whitby in the 12th century and probably before, and though never important there have always since been traces of Whitby shipping and merchandise.

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  • C. Atkinson, Memorials of Old Whitby (London, 18 94); Lionel Charlton, History of Whitby (York, 1779); George Young, History of Whitby (Whitby, 1817); Victoria County History, Yorkshire, North Riding.

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  • He related his dream to the farm bailiff under whom he worked, and was conducted by him to the neighbouring monastery at Streanashalch (now called Whitby).

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  • Whitby; -dale (O.N.

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  • The question of the Roman or Celtic tonsure was one of the points in dispute in the early British Church, settled in favour of the Roman fashion at the Council of Whitby (664).

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  • These were dedicated to St Hilda, and with some lands were given by de Brus to the abbey of St Hilda at Whitby in 1130.

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  • king Oswio, at the synod of Whitby, declared his adhesion to the Roman connection, whether it was that he saw political advantage therein, or whether he realized the failings and weaknesses of the Celtic church, and preferred the more orderly methods of her rival.

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  • The parliamentary borough, falling within the Whitby division of the county, returned two members until 1885, one since that date.

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  • Nathorst has recently described specimens of Williamsonia from the Jurassic rocks of Whitby with microSporophylls like those of Wieland's species.

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  • The well-known Whitby jet of Upper Liassic age appears to have been formed to a large extent from Araucarian wood.

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  • The lias shales of Whitby contain blocks of semi-mineralized wood, or jet, which is black with a resinous lustre, and a fibrous structure.

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  • Whether there was ever any strong likeness to any building in or near Whitby seems doubtful.

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  • Whitby lies on the mouth of the river Esk, which flows through a narrow gully to reach the sea.

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  • hostelryg further east to Wapping Wall we come to the third of the trio of historic Wapping hostelries, the Prospect of Whitby.

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  • Choose from B&Bs to five-star hotels in Whitby, North Yorkshire.

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  • More about Scarborough The picturesque fishing port of Whitby is little changed since the days of its famous son, Captain Cook.

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  • progressed through to the 2nd Round of the FA Cup following an extraordinary 1st Round replay against Whitby Town.

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  • quayitby harbor - 1911 The Dock End area of Whitby harbor showing the old wooden key on the left of the picture.

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  • quiz devised by Whitby Civic Society is available from the Tourist Information Office in Whitby.

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  • We both started with seafood: I had the special Whitby crab and prawn spicy salad and my partner had the Shetland mussels.

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  • vampire lore as Whitby and its Dracula associations.

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  • The eerie drama of clifftop Whitby Abbey inspired the writing of " Dracula " .

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  • As a thank-offering he dedicated his daughter ZElfled to the Church, and founded the monastery of Whitby.

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  • In 664 at the synod of Whitby, Oswio accepted the usages of the Roman Church, which led to the departure of Colman and the appointment of Wilfrid as bishop of York.

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  • Mill's various readings, numbering about thirty thousand, were attacked by Daniel Whitby (1638-1726) in his Examen as destroying the validity of the text; Antony Collins also argued in the same sense though with a different object.

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  • From Hartlepool Hilda moved to Whitby, where in 657 she founded the famous double monastery which in the time of the first abbess included among its members five future bishops, Bosa, 'Etta, Oftfor, John and Wilfrid II.

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  • In 655 after the battle of Winwa d Oswio entrusted his daughter IElfled to Hilda, with whom she went to Whitby.

    0
    0
  • At the synod of Whitby in 664 Hilda sided with Colman and Cedd against Wilfrid.

    0
    0
  • This diversity of usage was ended, so far as the kingdom of Northumbria was concerned, by the council of Streaneshalch, or Whitby, in 654.

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  • In 1847 he entered the House of Commons as member for Whitby, retaining the seat till the end of his life.

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  • ROBIN HOOD'S BAY, a seaside resort in the Whitby parliamentary division of the North Riding of Yorkshire, England, 61 m.

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  • of Whitby by a branch of the North-Eastern railway.

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  • These properties are most highly developed in the substance known as jet, which is a variety of cannel found in the lower oolitic strata of Yorkshire, and is almost entirely used for ornamental purposes, the whole quantity produced near Whitby, together with a further supply from Spain, being manufactured into articles of jewellery at that town.

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  • A f'rm sandy beach extends westward to Redcar and the mouth of the Tees, while eastward towards Whitby the cliffs become very fine, Boulby Cliff (666 ft.) being the highest sea cliff in England.

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  • He was probably already regarded as the leading exponent of the Roman discipline in England when his speech at the council of Whitby determined the overthrow of the Celtic party (664).

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    0
  • Meanwhile Rome was too strong, and in 604, in a synod held at Whitby, St Wilfrid procured the acceptance of Roman as against Celtic doctrine in the questions th.en at issue.

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  • by St Hilda at Whitby in Yorkshire, and perhaps also by St Patrick in Ireland (see E.

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  • WHITBY, a seaport, watering-place and market town in the Whitby parliamentary division of the North Riding of Yorkshire, England, 245 m.

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  • Whitby is beautifully situated at the mouth and on both banks of the River Esk; the old town of narrow streets and picturesque houses standing on the steep slopes above the river, while the modern residential quarter is mainly on the summit of West Cliff.

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  • Adjoining the abbey is Whitby Hall, built by Sir Francis Cholmley about 1580 from the materials of the monastic buildings, and enlarged and fortified by Sir Hugh Cholmley about 1635.

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  • Whitby is a quiet resort, possessing none of the brilliance of Scarborough on the same coast.

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  • Whitby (Streanaeshalch c. 657-857; Prestebi c. 857-1080; Witeby, &c. c. 857 onwards) is first mentioned by Bede, who states that a religious house was established here about A.D.

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    0
  • made a grant to the abbot and convent of Whitby of a burgage in the vill of Whitby, and Richard de Waterville, abbot 1175-1190, granted the town in free burgage to the burgesses.

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    0
  • In 1200 King John, bribed by the burgesses, confirmed this charter, but in 1201, bribed by the successor of Richard de Waterville, quashed it as injurious to the dignity of the church of Whitby.

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    0
  • In 1629 Whitby petitioned for incorporation on the ground that the town was in decay through want of good government and received letters patent giving them self-government..

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  • However, in1674-1675the crown, probably in gratitude for the part played by the Cholmleys in the Civil War, restored to the lords of the manor all the liberties ever enjoyed by the abbots of Whitby in Whitby and Whitby Strand.

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    0
  • Whitby became a parliamentary borough under the Reform Act of 1832, returning one member until it was disfranchised under the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885.

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  • At the beginning of the 14th century Sir Alexander Percy claimed the hereditary right of buying and selling in Whitby without payment of toll.

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    0
  • granted to the abbot of Whitby a fair at the feast of St Hilda and the king's firm peace to all coming to the fair.

    0
    0
  • There was a port at Whitby in the 12th century and probably before, and though never important there have always since been traces of Whitby shipping and merchandise.

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    0
  • C. Atkinson, Memorials of Old Whitby (London, 18 94); Lionel Charlton, History of Whitby (York, 1779); George Young, History of Whitby (Whitby, 1817); Victoria County History, Yorkshire, North Riding.

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  • He related his dream to the farm bailiff under whom he worked, and was conducted by him to the neighbouring monastery at Streanashalch (now called Whitby).

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    0
  • Whitby; -dale (O.N.

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  • The question of the Roman or Celtic tonsure was one of the points in dispute in the early British Church, settled in favour of the Roman fashion at the Council of Whitby (664).

    0
    0
  • These were dedicated to St Hilda, and with some lands were given by de Brus to the abbey of St Hilda at Whitby in 1130.

    0
    0
  • king Oswio, at the synod of Whitby, declared his adhesion to the Roman connection, whether it was that he saw political advantage therein, or whether he realized the failings and weaknesses of the Celtic church, and preferred the more orderly methods of her rival.

    0
    0
  • The parliamentary borough, falling within the Whitby division of the county, returned two members until 1885, one since that date.

    0
    0
  • Nathorst has recently described specimens of Williamsonia from the Jurassic rocks of Whitby with microSporophylls like those of Wieland's species.

    0
    0
  • The well-known Whitby jet of Upper Liassic age appears to have been formed to a large extent from Araucarian wood.

    0
    0
  • The lias shales of Whitby contain blocks of semi-mineralized wood, or jet, which is black with a resinous lustre, and a fibrous structure.

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  • In England there was once a famous abbey, called Whitby.

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  • Whitby harbor - 1911 The Dock End area of Whitby harbor showing the old wooden key on the left of the picture.

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  • Whitby 's White Rabbit Trail, a walk and quiz devised by Whitby Civic Society is available from the Tourist Information Office in Whitby.

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  • We both started with seafood: I had the special Whitby crab and prawn spicy salad and my partner had the Shetland mussels.

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  • It is as famous in the annals of vampire lore as Whitby and its Dracula associations.

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  • The eerie drama of clifftop Whitby Abbey inspired the writing of " Dracula ".

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  • of Whitby by a branch of the North-Eastern railway.

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  • A f'rm sandy beach extends westward to Redcar and the mouth of the Tees, while eastward towards Whitby the cliffs become very fine, Boulby Cliff (666 ft.) being the highest sea cliff in England.

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