Whig sentence example

whig
  • In1853-1857he was a Whig representative in Congress.
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  • At first a Whig, he joined the Republican party at its formation, and was a Republican representative in Congress from 1859 to 1863.
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  • His brother, Peter Van Brugh Livingston (1710-1792), was a prominent merchant and a Whig political leader in New York.
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  • In 1854-1855, when it became evident that the Whig party in the North was moribund, Seward helped to lead its scattered remnants into the Republican fold.
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  • The heterogeneous elements of the new organization could not be made to unite on a man who for so many years had devoted his energies to purely Whig measures, and he was considered less "available" than Fremont in 1856 and than Lincoln in 1860.
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  • It is said that the terms Whig and Tory were first applied to English political parties in consequence of this dispute.
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  • In 1834 he received the Whig nomination for governor, but was defeated by William L.
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  • The state has always been Democratic in national politics, except in the presidential elections of 1840 (Whig) and 1872 (Republican).
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  • Ministers and people with few exceptions - the most notable being the Scotch Highlanders who had settled in the valley of the Mohawk in New York and on Cape Fear river in North Carolina - sided with the patriot or Whig party: John Witherspoon was the only clergyman in the Continental Congress of 1776, and was otherwise a prominent leader; John Murray of the Presbytery of the Eastward was an eloquent leader in New England; and in the South the Scotch-Irish were the backbone of the American partisan forces, two of whose leaders, Daniel Morgan and Andrew Pickens, were Presbyterian elders.
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  • In presidential campaigns the state has been Federalist, 1792-1800; Democratic-Republican, 1804-1820; Adams-Republican, 1824-1828; Anti-Masonic, 1832; Whig, 1836-1852; and Republican since 1856.
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  • In presidential campaigns the state has been Federalist, 1792-1800; Democratic Republican, 1804; Federalist, 1808-1812; Democratic Republican, 1816-1820; Adams (Republican), 1824-1828; National Republican, 1832; Democratic, 1836; Whig, 1840-1848; Democratic, 1852; and Republican since 1856.
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  • Hoppin, Whig and American Elisha Dyer, Republican.
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  • 1 Jackson was a Liberation Whig - favouring the liberation of Dorr from prison - but he was elected on the Democratic ticket.
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  • But his great achievement was a speech against the Whig Reform Bill.
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  • From 1768 to 1775 he represented Albany in the New York Assembly, and he was closely associated with the Livingston family in the leadership of the Presbyterian or Whig party.
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  • It was Whig in politics and Nonconformist in theology.
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  • The same year he offended the court by a Whig sermon, but in 1779 became archdeacon of Ely.
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  • At his death in 1786 he was succeeded by his son Charles, the notorious "Jockey of Norfolk," the big, coarse, generous, slovenly, hard-drinking Whig of whom all the memoirwriters of his age have their anecdotes.
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  • He was a member of the New York Assembly again in 1832 and in 1840, was a Whig representative in Congress in 1849-1851, and in1857-1859was governor of New York State.
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  • It may be regarded as, in various important respects, the lineal predecessor of the American Whig and Republican parties.
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  • Shattuck, Whig, representing the anti-repudiators.
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  • He was a Whig member of the United States senate in 1831-1837, and as such took a prominent part in the legislative struggle over the United States Bank, whose rechartering he favoured and which he resolutely defended against President Jackson's attack, opposing in able speeches the withdrawal of deposits and Secretary Woodbury's " Specie Circular of 1836.
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  • When, however, after President Tyler's accession, the relations between the President and the Whig Party became strained, he retired (September 1841) and was succeeded by Walter Forward (1786-1852).
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  • After a period of work in Holland he betook himself to England, where his treatise on lettres de cachet had been much admired, being translated into English in 1787, and where he was soon admitted into the best Whig literary and political society of London, through his old schoolfellow Gilbert Elliot, who had now inherited his father's baronetcy and estates, and become a leading Whig member of parliament.
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  • He was annually re-elected until 1841; in 1842 he was elected to the state Senate, and in the following year, on the Whig ticket, to the National House of Representatives.
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  • He was denounced as a traitor to his party because of his support of annexation, but he later became the leader of the Whig opposition to the war with Mexico.
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  • From 1821 to 1825 he was a state senator; from 1825 to 1845 he devoted himself to his practice; from 1845 to 1849, as a Whig, he was a member of the United States Senate; and from March 1849 to July 1850 he was attorney-general of the United States.
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  • In politics he did much to influence Irish and Scotch-Irish Presbyterians to support the Whig party.
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  • He courteously declined the offer of Perceval to resume political life under the auspices of the dominant Tory party, though tempting prospects of office in connexion with India were opened up. He entered parliament in the Whig interest as member for Nairn.
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  • Already a privy councillor, Mackintosh was appointed commissioner for the affairs of India under the Whig administration of 1830.
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  • Resigning the secretaryship in 1848, he was elected to the national House of Representatives as an anti-slavery Whig to succeed John Quincy Adams, and was re-elected in 1849, and, as an independent candidate, in 1850, serving until March 1853.
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  • The revolt against Democratic rule was undoubtedly serious, but a study of the popular vote shows that the election of Harrison, the Whig candidate, was less of a revolution than many affected to think.
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  • C. Norton brought against the Whig premier for criminal conversation with his wife.
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  • Next year, as the Melbourne administration was near its close, Plunkett, the venerable chancellor of Ireland, was forced by discreditable pressure to resign, and the Whig attorney-general, who had never practised in equity, became chancellor of Ireland, and was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Campbell of St Andrews, in the county of Fife.
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  • With Fox he was never on terms of friendship, and Samuel Rogers, in his Table Talk, asserts that their antipathy was so pronounced that at a dinner party given by a prominent Whig not the slightest notice was taken by Fox of the presence of Horne Tooke.
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  • His Whig connexions combined with his transatlantic experiences to predispose Lord Edward to sympathize with the doctrines of the French Revolution, which he embraced with ardour when he visited Paris in October 1792.
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  • He served in the lower house of the state legislature in 1826-1828, and from December 1838 until March 1859 was a member of the national House of Representatives, first as a Whig, then as a Free-soiler, and finally as a Republican.
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  • The Evening Journal, founded in 1830 as an anti-Masonic organ, and for thirty-five years edited by Thurlow Weed, was equally influential as an organ of the Whig and later of the Republican party.
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  • Throughout the preRevolutionary disturbances in Massachusetts he was the representative of the British ministry, and though he disapproved of some of the ministerial measures he felt impelled to enforce them and necessarily incurred the hostility of the Whig or Patriot element.
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  • Creevey was a Whig and a follower of Fox, and his active intellect and social qualities procured him a considerable intimacy with the leaders of this political circle.
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  • President Lincoln in his second electoral campaign (1864), and the Tories in allusion to the Whig remnant who joined C. J.
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  • With ardent anti-slavery principles, he entered political life as a "Young Whig" opposed to the Mexican War; he became an active Free-Soiler in 1848, and in 1854 took part in the organization in Massachusetts of the new Republican party.
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  • The Whig party on this occasion unanimously followed Burke's lead.
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  • By 1833 the Anti-Masonic movement had run its course, and Seward allied himself with the other opponents of the Jackson Democrats, becoming a Whig.
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  • Vindiciae Gallicae was the verdict of a philosophic Liberal on the development of the French Revolution up to the spring of 1791, and though the excesses of the revolutionists compelled him a few years after to express his entire agreement with the opinions of Burke, its defence of the "rights of man" is a valuable statement of the cultured Whig's point of view at the time.
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  • Roman, Whig.
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  • White, Whig.
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  • In that year he became attorney-general and was returned by Edinburgh, for which he sat till 1841.2 His political creed declared upon the hustings there was that of a moderate Whig.
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  • Francis, Democrat and Anti-Masonic William Sprague, Whig .
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  • King, Whig .
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  • Charles Jackson,' Democrat Byron Diman, Whig.
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  • Elisha Harris, Whig.
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  • Anthony, Whig .
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  • Its buff and blue cover was adopted from the colours of the Whig party whose political principles it advocated.
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  • These two were followed by the Democratic Review (1838-1852), the American Review (1845-1849), afterwards the American Whig Review (1850-1852), the Massachusetts Quarterly Review (1847-1850), and a few more.
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  • The election was marked by an amazing outflow of caricatures and squibs, by weeks of rioting in which Lord Hood's sailors fought pitched battles in St James's Street with Fox's hackney coachmen, and by the intrepid canvassing of Whig ladies.
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  • In 1797 he withdrew from parliament, and only came forward in 1798 to reaffirm the doctrine of the sovereignty of the people at a great Whig dinner.
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  • The great Whig writers leave him unnoticed.
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  • In his view the best way to govern was to have both parties represented in the ministry, so that, as Whig and Tory fell out, the king came by his own.
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  • GEORGE TIERNEY (1761-1830), English Whig politician, was born at Gibraltar on the 10th of March 1761, being the son of a wealthy Irish merchant of London, who was living there as prize agent.
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  • His grandfather, Frederick Frelinghuysen (1753-1804), was an eminent lawyer, one of the framers of the first New Jersey constitution, a soldier in the War of Independence, and a member (1778-1779 and 1782-1783) of the Continental Congress from New Jersey, and in 1793-1796 of the United States senate; and his uncle, Theodore (1787-1862), was attorney-general of New Jersey from 1817 to 1829, was a United States senator from New Jersey in 1829-1835, was the Whig candidate for vice-president on the Clay ticket in 1844, and was chancellor of the university of New York in 1839-1850 and president of Rutgers College in 1850-1862.
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  • In May he had charge of the bill for securing the Protestant succession; he took part in the impeachment of the Whig lords for their conduct concerning the Partition treaties, and opposed the oath abjuring the Pretender.
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  • His great object was doubtless to gain supreme power and to keep it by any means, and by any betrayal that the circumstances demanded; and it is not without significance perhaps that on the very day of Oxford's dismissal he gave a dinner to the Whig leaders, and on the day preceding the queen's death ordered overtures to be made to the elector.5 On the accession of George I.
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  • Barillon mentions Sacheverell among the Whig leaders who accepted bribes from Louis XIV., but the evidence against him is not conclusive.
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  • See also Sir George Sitwell, The First Whig (Scarborough, 1894); Gilbert Burnet, History of my own Time (6 vols., Oxford, 1833); Sir John Reresby, Memoirs, 1634-1689, edited by J.
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  • In 1845 he established the St Joseph Valley Register, which he published for eighteen years and made an influential Whig and later Republican journal.
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  • But, though a Whig, alike by descent, by education and by conviction, Ashley could by no means be depended on to give a party vote; he was always ready to support any propositions, from whatever quarter they came, that appeared to him to promote the liberty of the subject and the independence of parliament.
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  • He took an active part, on the Whig side, in the general election of 1700-1701, and again, with more success, in that of the autumn of 1701.
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  • He had early become connected with the brilliant band of authors and politicians who then led the Whig party, a connexion to which he owed his appointment to the well-paid and easy post of commissioner of stamps; but in practical politics, for which he was by nature unsuited, he took no active share.
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  • Hallam's earliest literary work was undertaken in connexion with the great organ of the Whig party, the Edinburgh Review, where his review of Scott's Dryden attracted much notice.
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  • Hallam, like Macaulay, ultimately referred all political questions to the standard of Whig constitutionalism.
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  • From then until 1850 it was controlled by the Federalist or Whig parties.
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  • 1789-1796Federalist 1796-1797 -1797-1799 1799-1801 -1801-1802 1802-1805 Federalist 1805-1808 1808- 1811-1811 -1814 1814-1817 1820 1820- 1821-1821 -1822Democratic-Republican 1822- 1822-1823 Democratic-Republican 1823-1824 ?1824-1827Federalist 1827-1830 „ 1830-1833 American-Republican 1833-1836 Democrat 1836-1837 -1837-1841 Whig 1841-1845 -1845-1846 1846- 1846-1847 1847-1851 Democrat 1851-1855 -1855-1859 Whig-Know-Nothing 1859-1863 Democrat 1863-1865 Republican 1865-1871 Democrat 1871-1875 -1875-1879 1879-1883 -1883-1887 1887-1891 -1891-1895 1895 Republican 1895-1897 Democrat1897-1901 1901-1905 Republican 1905-1909 „ 1909 „ Bibliog Ra Phy.
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  • He was once more successful, however, in 1802, when he sat for Appleby, and it seemed as if the great ambitions of his life were about to be realized when the Whig party came into power in 1806.
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  • He served in this body from 1835 until 1843, and here the marked inconsistency which characterized his public life became manifest; for when John Tyler had become president, had been "read out" of the Whig party, and had vetoed Whig measures (including a tariff bill), for which Cushing had voted, Cushing first defended the vetoes and then voted again for the bills.
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  • 2 William Franklin served on the Canadian frontier with Pennsylvania troops, becoming captain in 1750; was in the post-office in 1 7541 75 6; went to England with his father in 1758; was admitted to legal practice in 1758; in 1763, recommended by Lord Fairfax, became governor of New Jersey; he left the Whig for the Tory party; and in the War of Independence was a faithful loyalist, much to the pain and regret of his father, who, however, was reconciled to him in part in 1784.
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  • and Bute immediately proceeded to accomplish their long-projected plans, the conclusion of the peace with France, the break-up of the Whig monopoly of power, and the supremacy of the monarchy over parliament and parties.
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  • Great care was shown not to alienate the Whig leaders in a body, which would have raised up under Pitt's leadership a formidable .party of resistance, but advantage was taken of disagreements between the ministers concerning the war, of personal jealousies, and of the strong reluctance of the old statesmen who had served the crown for generations to identify themselves with active opposition to the king's wishes.
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  • The Federalist domination had been succeeded by Whig rule in the state; but after the death of the great Whig, Daniel Webster, in 1852, all parties disintegrated, re-aligning themselves gradually in an aggressive anti-slavery party and the temporizing Democratic party.
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  • First, for many years the Free-Soilers gained strength; then in 1855 in an extraordinary party upheaval the Know-Nothings quite broke up Democratic, Free-Soil and Whig organizations; the FreeSoilers however captured the Know-Nothing organization and directed it to their own ends; and by their junction with the anti-slavery Whigs there was formed the Republican party.
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  • Whig 1844-1851.
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  • From 1837 to 1843, when he declined further service, he again represented his district in the House, this time as a member of the Whig party.
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  • In 1844 he was the Whig candidate for the governorship of New York, but was defeated.
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  • In the autumn of 1852 he was an unsuccessful candidate for nomination for the presidency by the Whig National Convention, and he went out of office on the 4th of March 1853.
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  • As the anti-Masonic wave subsided its leaders and most of its adherents found a place in the newly organized Whig party, which was powerful enough in New York to elect William H.
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  • Politically, the anti-rent associations which were formed often held the balance of power between the Whigs and the Democrats, and in this position they secured the election of Governor John Young (Whig) as well as of several members of the legislature favourable to their cause, and promoted the passage of the bill calling the constitutional convention of 1846.
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  • In 1854 the newly organized Republican party, formed largely from the remnants of the Whig party and including most of the Free Soil Democrats, with the aid of the temperance issue elected Myron Holley Clark (1806-1892) governor.
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  • During the publication of The New Yorker he added to the scanty income which the job printing brought him by supplying editorials to the short-lived Daily Whig and various other publications.
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  • Seward, and other leaders of the Whig Party, for the editorship of a campaign paper entitled The Jeffersonian, published at Albany.
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  • When, on the 2nd of May 1840, some time after the nomination by the Whig party of William Henry Harrison for the Presidency, Greeley began the publication of a new weekly campaign paper, The Log Cabin, it sprang at once into a great circulation; 40,000 copies of the first number were sold, and it finally rose to 80,000.
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  • Greeley's political activity, first as a Whig, and then as one of the founders of the Republican party, was incessant; but he held few offices.
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  • Cleveland, in editing A Political Text-book (1860), and supervised for many years the annual issues of The Whig Almanac and The Tribune Almanac, comprising extensive political statistics.
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  • Many suits were thereupon entered against Hancock, which, if successful, would have caused the confiscation of his estate, but which undoubtedly enhanced his popularity with the Whig element and increased his resentment against the British government.
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  • The Whig ministry had introduced a bill suspending the Constitution of Jamaica because the Assembly in that colony had refused to adopt the Prisons Act passed by the Imperial Legislature.
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  • Sir Robert was ready to form a cabinet in which the duke of Wellington, Lords Lyndhurst, Aberdeen and Stanley, and Sir James Graham would have served; but he stipulated that the mistress of the robes and the ladies of the bedchamber appointed by the Whig administration should be removed, and to this the queen would not consent.
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  • BENJAMIN HELM BRISTOW (1832-1896), American lawyer and politician, was born in Elkton, Kentucky, on the 10th of June 1832, the son of Francis Marion Bristow (1804-1864), a Whig member of Congress in 1854-1855 and 1859-1861.
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  • He returned to Accomack county, Va., in 1830, and served in the National House of Representatives in 1833-1837 as an anti-nullification Democrat, but broke with the party on the withdrawal of the deposits from the United States Bank, and was re-elected to Congress in 1837, 1839 and 1841 as a Whig, and in 1843 as a Tyler Democrat.
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  • This paper was very influential in shaping public opinion in the years preceding the War of Independence; after the war it was successively Federalist, Whig and Republican.
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  • He was admitted to the Scotch bar in December 1794, but, having abandoned the Tory principles in which he had been educated, he found that his Whig politics seriously prejudiced his legal prospects.
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  • It constituted itself the accredited organ of moderate Whig public opinion.
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  • Kentucky voted the Whig ticket in every presidential election from 1832 until the party made its last campaign in 1852.
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  • His efforts to induce the Whig government to assist in this effort were unsuccessful.
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  • But where these troubles were removed the population increased rapidly, and at the outbreak of the War of Independence the province had about 80,000 inhabitants, the great majority of whom were with the patriot or Whig party during that struggle.
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  • Accordingly, his denunciation of President Andrew Jackson's bank policy added strength to the Jacksonian Democracy, and, later, his Whig connexions were the greatest source of the Whig party's weakness in New Hampshire.
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  • Conscious, nevertheless, that a struggle impended, they instantly sent word to all the other colonies, whose whig elements sympathetically responded to the alarm.
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  • He also took a leading part in opposition to the projected establishment of an Anglican Episcopate in America, and before and during the American War of Independence he ardently supported the Whig Party.
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  • Pierce received °2 J4 electoral votes, and General Winfield Scott, his Whig opponent, only 42.
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  • As a member of the Pennsylvania house of representatives in 1772-1775, he was an ardent Whig, and in 1774 was a member of the first Continental Congress.
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  • In 1848 he left the Whig party and became one of the chief leaders of the Free Soil party, serving as presiding officer of that party's national convention in 1852, acting as chairman of the Free Soil national committee and editing from 1848 to 1851 the Boston Republican, which he made the chief Free Soil organ.
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  • In politics he was at first an anti-slavery Whig and then from the time of its organization in 1854 until his death was a member of the Republican party.
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  • Until 1832 there was only one party in the state, the Democratic, but the question of nullification caused a division that year into the (Jackson) Democratic party and the State's Rights (Calhoun Democratic) party; about the same time, also, there arose, chiefly in those counties where the proportion of slaves to freemen was greater and the freemen were most aristocratic, the Whig party.
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  • On account, however, of its opposition to President Jackson's attitude toward nullification, the States Rights party affiliated with thenew Whig party, which represented the national feeling in the South, while the Union party was merged into the Democratic party, which emphasized the sovereignty of the states.
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  • The reaction was followed for a short interval by a return to approximately the former party alignment, but in 1854 the rank and file of the Whigs joined the American or Know-Nothing party while most of the Whig leaders went over to the Democrats.
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  • unexpectedly dismissed the Whig ministry and requested Wellington to form a cabinet.
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  • During 18 371839 and 1841-1843 he was a Whig member of the Ohio State Senate.
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  • From 1847 until 1851 he was a state district judge, and from 1851 until 1869 was a member of the United States Senate, first as an anti-slavery Whig and later as a Republican.
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  • Early becoming imbued with strong anti-slavery views, though by inheritance he was himself a slave holder, he began political life as a Whig, but when the Whig party disintegrated, he became an "American" or "Know-Nothing," and as such served in the national House of Representatives from 1855 to 1861.
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  • For some time after that ministry's fall he was considered the leader of the Whig party in the House of Lords, and, had the illness of the king brought about the return of the Whigs to power, the great seal would have been placed in his hands.
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  • But the Whig party under the lead of John Dickinson, Thomas Mifflin and Joseph Reed was successful in the state, and Pennsylvania contributed greatly to the success of the War of Independence, by the important services rendered by her statesmen, by providing troops and by the financial aid given by Robert Morris.
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  • In 1838 as the result of a disputed election to the state house of representatives two houses were organized, one Whig and the other Democratic, and there was open violence in Harrisburg.
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  • The Whig House of Representatives gradually broke up, many members going over to the Democratic house, which had possession of the records and the chamber and was recognized by the state Senate.
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  • The growth of the protectionist movement and the development of anti-slavery sentiment, however, drew it in the opposite direction, and it voted the Whig national ticket in 1840 and in 1848, and the Republican ticket for Lincoln in 1860.
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  • At this time also he abandoned the Whig party.
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  • The vigorous course of the president towards South Carolina, however, led him, after 1833, to act more and more with the opposition which presently became the Whig party; but he was never at heart a Whig, at least as Whig principles came later to be defined, and his place is with the Democrats of the Calhoun school.
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  • He was by this time reckoned a Whig, and his refusal to favour the Van Buren administration lent colour to that view.
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  • He stood, however, as it were, midway between the two great parties, without the leadership or support of either; Van Buren, whose influence in the practical working of politics was still great, refused to recognize him as a Democrat, and the Whigs repudiated him as a Whig; while with Clay leading the majority in Congress, harmony between that body and the executive was from the first impossible.
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  • He served in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, first as an Anti-Mason and later as a Whig, in 1833-1835,1838-1839and 1841-1842.
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  • Harrison, and in the campaign of 1844 Stevens again rendered marked services to the Whig ticket.
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  • He was a Whig representative in Congress in 1849-1853, and was leader of the radical Whigs and Free-Soilers, strongly opposing the Compromise Measures of 1850,1850, and being especially bitter in his denunciations of the Fugitive Slave Law.
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  • They received no electoral votes, all these being divided between the Whig candidate, Zachary Taylor, who was elected, and the Democratic candidate, Lewis Cass.
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  • ANDREW HULL FOOTE (1806-1863), American admiral, was born at New Haven, Connecticut, on the 12th of September 1806, his father, Samuel Augustus Foote (1780-1846), being a prominent lawyer and Whig politician, who as U.S. senator moved in 1829 Foote's resolutions " on public lands, in the discussion of which Daniel Webster made his " reply to Hayne."
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  • The numerous editions of the various portions - for, despite Hume's wrath and grumblings, the book was a great literary success - gave him an opportunity of careful revision, which he employed to remove from it all the ' villainous seditious Whig strokes," and " plaguy prejudices of Whiggism " that he could detect.
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  • In the ensuing election Johnson received most of the Democratic electoral votes, but was defeated by the Whig candidate, John Tyler.
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  • But Johnson long afterwards owned that, though he had saved appearances, he had taken care that the Whig dogs should not have the best of it; and, in fact, every passage which has lived, every passage which bears the marks of his higher faculties, is put into the mouth of some member of the opposition.
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  • Even in his massy and elaborate Dictionary he had, with a strange want of taste and judgment, inserted bitter and contumelious reflexions on the Whig party.
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  • The excise, which was a favourite resource of Whig financiers, he had designated as a hateful tax.
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  • Lincoln was the only Whig member of Congress elected in Illinois in 1846.
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  • During the presidential campaign he made speeches in Illinois, and in Massachusetts he spoke before the Whig State Convention at Worcester on the 12th of September, and in the next ten days at Lowell, Dedham, Roxbury, Chelsea, Cambridge and Boston.
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  • He had become an eloquent and influential public speaker, and in 1840 and 1844 was a candidate on the Whig ticket for presidential elector.
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  • The campaign was unusually animated - only the Whig campaign for William Henry Harrison in 1840 is comparable to it: there were great torchlight processions of "wide-awake" clubs, which did "railfence," or zigzag, marches, and carried rails in honour of their candidate, the "rail-splitter."
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  • In 1841 he abandoned the Whig party, with which he had previously been affiliated, and for seven years was the undisputed leader of the Liberty party in Ohio; he was remarkably skilful in drafting platforms and addresses, and it was he who prepared the national Liberty platform of 1843 and the Liberty address of 1845.
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  • Although, with the exception of Seward, he was the most prominent Republican in the country, and had done more against slavery than any other Republican, he failed to secure the nomination for the presidency in 1860, partly because his views on the question of protection were not orthodox from a Republican point of view, and partly because the old line Whig element could not forgive his coalition with the Democrats in the senatorial campaign of 1849; his uncompromising and conspicuous anti-slavery record, too, was against him from the point of view of "availability."
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  • The Rye House plot gave an excuse for arresting the Whig leaders; Russell and Sidney were judicially murdered; Monmouth retired to Toddington, in Bedfordshire, and was left untouched.
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  • At Cambridge he founded the "Whig Club," and the "Amicable Society," and became very intimate with Byron, who accompanied him on a tour in Spain, Greece and Turkey in 1809.
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  • Charles Grey, Queen Victoria's private secretary, and grandson of the 2nd Earl, the Whig Prime Minister who passed the Reform bill of 1832.
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  • The Scottish earldom was first conferred in 1703 upon the 4th earl's great-grandfather, Archibald Primrose of Dalmeny (1664-1723), a staunch Whig and a commissioner for the Union.
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  • Entering politics as a Whig, he was chairman of the Whig state central committee in 1854, and from 1855 to 1858 was secretary of the commonwealth.
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  • Many of his noble supporters escaped, he did his best to provide them with ships, others were executed, while the great Whig, Forbes of Culloden, protested against the bad policy of the repressive measures.
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  • At Perth Charles was joined by a skilled soldier, Lord George Murray, brother of the Whig duke of Atholl, a pardoned veteran who had been out in 1715 and 1719.
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  • In 1842 the moral issue had become political, and the Liberty Party was organized, which in 1848 united with the Free Soil Party; but as the Whig Party approved the policy of non-extension of slavery, these parties did not succeed so well united as under separate existence.
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  • He was elected to the national house of representatives as an antislavery Whig in 1854, soon afterwards joining the new Republican party, and served in the house from 1855 until 1867.
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  • Whig And Tory >>
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  • Unlike his Randolph connexions, Peter Jefferson was a whig and a thorough democrat; from him, and probably, too, from the Albemarle environment, his son came naturally by democratic inclinations.
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  • Believing,"he wrote," that (excepting the ardent monarchists) all our citizens agreed in ancient whig principles "- or, as he elsewhere expressed it, in" republican forms "-" I thought it advisable to define and declare them, and let them see the ground on which we can rally."This he did in his inaugural, which, though somewhat rhetorical, is a splendid and famous statement of democracy.'
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  • Some of these reforms were distasteful to the covenanted service and to the officers of the army, but Lord William was always staunchly supported by the court of directors and by the Whig ministry at home.
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  • Like many other able young lawyers, Jay took an active part in the proceedings that resulted in the independence of the United States, identifying himself with the conservative element in the Whig or patriot party.
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  • He became influential in Pennsylvania politics, and in1845-1849served in the United States Senate, being elected by a combination of Democratic, Whig and "American" votes to succeed James Buchanan.
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  • In 1769 the son entered the college of New Jersey (nor Princeton University), where, in the same year, he founded the well-known literary club, "The American Whig Society."
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  • He took a vigorous share in the debates of a local Whig club, and in 1772, he wrote a pamphlet embodying the grievances of excisemen and supporting their demands for an increase of pay.
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  • From the beginning the state has been unswervingly Democratic, save in the Reconstruction years, though often with heavy Whig or Republican minorities.
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  • Until the Civil War the division between the Whig and Democratic parties, whose organization in California preceded statehood, was essentially based on slavery.
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  • In 1835, as a Whig, he was again elected to the United States Senate, and was re-elected in 1841, but resigned to enter the cabinet of President W.
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  • Next year she supported the election of the Whig speaker, John Smith, but long resisted the influence and claims of the Junto, as the Whig leaders, Somers, Halifax, Orford, Wharton and Sunderland, were named.
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  • In October she was obliged to appoint Cowper, a Whig, lord chancellor, with all the ecclesiastical patronage belonging to the office.
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  • 4 Next year Anne's desire to give a regiment to Hill, Mrs Masham's brother, led to another ineffectual attempt in retaliation to displace the new favourite, and the queen showed her antagonism to the Whig administration on the occasion of the prosecution of Sacheverell.
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  • During a last moment of returning consciousness, and by the advice of the whole council, who had been joined on their own initiative by the Whig dukes Argyll and Somerset, she placed the lord treasurer's staff in the hands of the Whig duke of Shrewsbury, and measures were immediately taken for assuring the succession of the elector.
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  • David Campbell, Whig .
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  • Gilmer, Whig.
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  • John Munford Gregory (acting), Whig.
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  • His administration (1839-1841) was successful, but he was unable to overcome the popular Whig movement of that period, and was defeated in 1841 and again in 1843.
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  • He graduated at Yale in 1856, entered politics as a Whig - his father had been a Democrat - was admitted to the bar in 1858, was a member of the New York Assembly in 1861-1862, and was secretary of state of New York state in 1864-1865.
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  • In 1839 he was a candidate for the Whig nomination, but by a secret ballot his enemies defeated him in the party convention, held in December of that year, and nominated William Henry, Harrison.
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  • In 1848, Zachary Taylor, a Mexican War hero, and hardly even a convert to the Whig party, defeated Clay for the nomination, Kentucky herself deserting her "favourite son."
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  • The Church, which had so long played a prominent and valuable part in the moral and literary education of the Welsh people, was now gradually forced out of touch with the nation through the action of alien and unsympathetic Whig prelates in Wales itself, which still remained mainly High Church and Jacobite in feeling.
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  • In1851-1853he was superintendent of schools at Warren, Ohio; in 1853 was admitted to the Ohio bar, being at that time an anti-slavery Whig; and in 1859 was elected to the state senate, in which with Garfield and James Monroe (1821-1898) he formed the "Radical Triumvirate," Cox himself presenting a petition for a personal liberty law and urging woman's rights, especially larger property rights to married women.
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  • He early allied himself with the Patriot or Whig element in Virginia, and in the years immediately preceding the War of Independence was conspicuous as an opponent of the arbitrary measures of the British ministry.
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  • First as a Whig, and then, after 1856, as a Republican, he was prominent for many years in state and national politics.
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  • In 1831 he was a member of the Delaware constitutional convention, and in 1835 he was returned to the Senate as a Whig, but resigned in the following year.
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  • KIT-CAT CLUB, a club of Whig wits, painters, politicians and men of letters, founded in London about 1703.
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  • Even more important was the change effected when the Whig ministry of Great Britain sent John Methuen to Lisbon to negotiate a commercial agreement.
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  • In 1830 a Whig ministry came into office in Great Britain; the " July revolution " placed Louis Philippe on the throne of France; Carlota Joaquina, the power behind D.
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  • In 1832 and in 1840 Fessenden was a representative in the Maine legislature, and in1841-1843was a Whig member of the national House of Representatives.
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  • In the election of the following year he attracted a large part of the "Whig and Anti-Masonic vote of the Middle and Western states and led among the candidates opposing Van Buren, but received only 73 electoral votes while Van Buren received 170.
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  • largely to his clear, if non-committal, political record, rendered him the most " available " candidate for the Whig party for the campaign of 1840, and he was nominated by the Whig convention at Harrisburg, Pa., in December 1839, his most formidable opponent being Henry Clay, who, though generally regarded as the real leader of his party, was less " available " because as a mason he would alienate former members of the old Anti-Masonic party, and as an advocate of a protective tariff would repel many Southern voters.
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  • Largely to attract the votes of Democratic malcontents the Whig convention nominated for the vice-presidencyJohn Tyler, who had previously been identified with the Democratic party.
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  • Harrison's canvass was conspicuous for the immense Whig processions and mass meetings, the numerous " stump " speeches (Harrison himself addressing meetings at Dayton, Chillicothe, Columbus and other places), and the use of campaign songs, of party insignia, and of campaign cries (such as " Tippecanoe and Tyler too "); and in the election he won by an overwhelming majority of 234 electoral votes to 60 cast for Van Buren.
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  • President Polk distrusted Taylor because of his supposed Whig views, and now began to express his dissatisfaction with the general's failure to take full advantage of his victories and his hesitancy to suggest a plan for the future conduct of the war.
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  • Within a month after his victory over Santa Anna a Whig convention in Iowa nominated him for the presidency, and public meetings in Kentucky, Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania and elsewhere quickly took similar action, in many cases without regard to party lines.
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  • Taylor first adopted a course of discouraging these suggestions and emphasized his non-partisan attitude, but later gave way to the pressure, and issued a statement that proved satisfactory to the majority of the Whig politicians.
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  • He entered the faculty of advocates in 1800, and attached himself, not to the party of his relatives, who could have afforded him most valuable patronage, but to the Whig or Liberal party, and that at a time when it.
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  • After a closely contested election in which six members of Congress were chosen on a general ticket, although there was an apparent Democratic majority of about one hundred votes (in a total of 57,000), two county clerks rejected as irregular sufficient returns from townships to elect five Whig candidates to whom the state board of canvassers (mostly Whigs and headed by the Whig governor, William Pennington) gave commissions under the broad seal of the state.
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  • Whigs, so that the choice of a Whig speaker could be secured only by the seating of the five Whigs from New Jersey rather than their Democratic rivals.
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  • 1836-18371837-18431843-18441845-18481848-18511851-18541854-18571857-18601860-18631863-18661866-18691869-18721872-18751875-18781878-18811881-18841884-18871887-18901890-18931893-18961896-1898 18981898-18991899-19021902-19051905-19081908-19111911 Federalist Dem crat Whig D)emocrat Whig h?
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  • Democrat Whig Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat1776-17901790-1793 1 7931801 „1801-1802Dem.-Repub.1802-18031803-1812 „1812-1813Federalist1813-1815Dem.-Repub.1815-18171817-1829 18291832-183318331833-1836England) Missionary Society was founded, chiefly to provide preachers for the smaller churches in its area; in 1857 a National Missionary Institution was founded and endowed, to which most of the local ones have been affiliated.
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  • Some of the most humorous poetical pieces in the New Whig Guide were from his pen, and he was entirely devoted, like his friends Peel and Croker, to the Tory party of that day.
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  • Lord Palmerston never was a Whig, still less a Radical; he was a statesman of the old English aristocratic type, liberal in his sentiments, favourable to the march of progress, but entirely opposed to the claims of democratic government.
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  • An attempt was made by the duke of Wellington in September 1830 to induce Palmerston to re-enter the cabinet,which he refused to do without Lord Lansdowne and Lord Grey, and from that time forward he may be said to have associated his political fortunes with those of the Whig party.
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  • It was the Democratic majority in the district of Maine that effected the separation from Massachusetts, and from the date of that separation until 1853 Maine was classed as a Democratic state, although it elected a Whig governor in 1838 and in 1840, and cast its electoral vote for John Quincy Adams in 1824 and 1828 and for W.
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  • Samuel Emerson Smith Robert Pinckney Dunlap „ Edward Kent Whig John Fairfield.
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  • Whig John Fairfield Democrat Edward Kavanagh (acting) „ Hugh J.
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  • Whig and " Free Soil Republican 1820 1821 1821 1822 1827 1829 1830 1831 1838 8 1841 1842 1843 1844 1 847 1850 1853 1 855 1856 1857 1857 1858 1861 1863 Samuel Cony.
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  • The favour shown him by Marlborough did not deter Rivers from paying court to the Tories when it became evident that the Whig ascendancy was waning, and his appointment as constable of the Tower in 1710 on the recommendation of Harley and without Marlborough's knowledge was the first unmistakable intimation to the Whigs of their impending fall.
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  • In the year 1848 he was a Whig member of the state senate, an d from 1849 to 1853 was United States marshal for Massachusetts, in which capacity he was called upon in 1851 to remand the fugitive slave, Thomas Sims, to slavery.
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  • Keppel was by family connexion and personal preference a strong supporter of the Whig connexion, led by the Marquess of Rockingham and the Duke of Richmond.
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  • Though he praised Sir Hugh in his public despatch he attacked him in private, and the Whig press, with the unquestionable aid of Keppel's friends, began a campaign of calumny to which the ministerial papers answered in the same style, each side accusing the other of deliberate treason.
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  • Canning had the glaring examples of Burke and Sheridan himself to show him that the great "revolution families" - Cavendishes, Russells, Bentincks - who controlled the Whig party, would never allow any man, however able, who did not belong to their connexion, to rise to the first rank.
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  • He engaged in politics, first as a Whig and then as a Republican.
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  • The success of his pamphlet gained him ready access to all Whig circles; but already his confidence in that party was shaken, and he was beginning to meditate that change of sides which has drawn down upon him so much but such unjustifiable obloquy.
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  • The queen's demise was evidently at hand, and the same instinctive good sense which had ranged the nation on the side of the Tories, when Tories alone could terminate a fatiguing war, rendered it Whig when Tories manifestly could not be trusted to maintain the Protestant succession.
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  • 1, 1833 to Dec. 31, 1838), but was defeated in 1838 by the Whig candidate, William H.
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  • Becoming convinced that a peaceful settlement was impracticable, he returned to Charleston at the close of 1774, and there allied himself with the conservative element of the Whig party.
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  • A future was open for him among the Protectionists, who formed the Whig party, and doubtless soon would have carried him to the United States Congress.
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  • He was warmly supported by the residents, but being a Whig in politics he was opposed by the non-residents, and beaten by a large majority.
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  • This work, valuable at a time when the study of Greek history was in its infancy, and translated into French and German, was written from a strong Whig bias, and is now entirely superseded (see Greece: Ancient History, " Authorities").
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  • Woodburn, Higher Education in Indiana (Washington, 1891), U.S.:Documents, Bureau of Education, Circulars1816-182218221822-182518251825-1831-1831-18371837-1840-1840-18431843-1848-1848-18491849-1857-1857-18601860-186118611861-1865-1865-18671867-1869-1869-18731873-1877-1877-18801880-1881-1881-18851885-1889-1889-18911891-1893-1893-18971897-1901-1901-19051905-190919091787-1800-1800-18011801-1812-1812-18131813-1816DemocraticRepublican, , Whig " Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat of Information, No.
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  • The struggle in Kansas, the first physical national struggle over slavery, was of paramount importance in the breaking up of the Whig party, the firm establishment of an uncompromisingly anti-slavery party, the sectionalization of the Democracy, and the general preparation of the country for the Civil War.
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  • An Occasional Conformity Bill, imposing penalties on those who adopted this practice, twice passed the Commons (1702, 1703), but was rejected by the House of Lords, in which the Whig element predominated.
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  • His intention was doubtless to conciliate both parties by admitting them both to a share of power; but the Whigs were determined to have all or none, and in 1708 a purely Whig ministry was formed to support the war as the first purely Whig ministry had supported it in the reign of William.
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  • The Whig leaders unwisely took up the challenge and impeached Sacheverell.
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  • The landing of the Pretender in Scotland (1715), and the defeat of a portion of his army which had advanced to Prestona defeat which was the consequence of the apathy of his English supporters, and which was followed by the complete suppression of the rebelliongave increased strength to the Whig government.
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  • The great Whig families rallied under Ministry Newcastle and drove Pitt from office (1757).
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  • He was driven from his post by the kings resolve no longer to submit to his insolence, and a new ministry was formed under the marquess of Rockingham, composed of some of those leaders of the Whig aristocracy who had not followed the Grenville ministry.
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  • shaken themselves loose from any of the different Whig cliques.
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  • The king detested it, and the assumption by the Whig houses of a right to nominate the head of the government BIll without reference to the national interests, could never be popular.
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  • Such a change in the national mind could not but affect the constitution of the Whig party.
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  • In appearance the great Whig landowners gave their support to Pitt, and in 1794 some of their leaders, the duke of Portland, Lord Fitzwilliam, and Windham, entered the cabinet to serve under him.
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  • It had to face the same Whig opposition, led by Fox, who scoffed at the French peril, and reinforced by Addington and his friends; and the whole burden of meeting this opposition fell upon Pitt; for Castlereagh, the only other member of the cabinet in the House of Commons, was of little use in debate.
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  • The prince ~ had been on intimate terms with the Whig leaders, and it was assumed that his accession to power would mean a change of government.
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  • The Wellington ministry, hated by the Liberals, denounced even by the Tories as traitorous for the few concessions made, resigned on the 16th of November; and the Whigs at last came into office under Lord whig Grey, the ministry also including a few of the more ministry Liberal Tories.
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  • To the Whig leaders the church was all but as sacrosanct as to the Tories, the very foundation of the constitution, not to be touched save at imminent risk to the state; the most they would adventure was to remedy a few of the more glaring abuses of an establishment imposed on an unwilling population.
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  • But the institution which derived most immediate benefit from the new sovereign was the old Whig ministry.
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  • The bill introduced for this purpose placed the Whig ministry in a position of some embarrassment.
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  • In the course of the negotiations, however, he stated that it would be necessary to make certain changes in the household, which contained some great ladies closely connected d with the leaders of the Whig party.
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  • The closing years of the Whig administration were largely occupied with the financial difficulties of the country.
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  • She was, therefore, no longer dependent on the Whig ladies, to whose presence in her court she had attached so much importance in 1839.
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  • The closing years of the Whig government were marked by external complications.
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  • The Irish, under OConnell, had constantly supported the Whig ministry of Lord Melbourne.
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  • The two great Whig measures, dealing with the church and the municipalities, had only been passed after years of controversy, and in a shape which deprived them of many expected advantages.
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  • This agitation, which smouldered during the reign of the Whig ministry, was~ rapidly revived when Sir Robert Peel entered upon office.
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  • The removal of Lord Palmerston led almost directly to the fall of the Whig government.
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  • The sympathies of the Whigs, and especially of the Whig prime minister, Lord John Russell, were with the people; and Lord John displayed his dislike to the Romanizing tendencies of the Tractarians by appointing Renn Dickson Hampdenwhose views had been formally condemned by the Hebdomadal Board at Oxfordto the bishopric of Hereford.
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  • On the resignation of Lord Derby, the queen, anxious to terminate a period of weak governments, decided on endeavourGoaiition ing to combine in one cabinet the chiefs of the Whig party and the followers of Sir Robert Peel.
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  • Hallam deliberately aimed at impartiality, but he could not escape his Whig atmosphere.
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  • For the space of a quarter of a century, from this time down to 1790, Burke was one of the chief guides and inspirers of a revived Whig party.
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  • The old sage who held that the first Whig was the Devil, was yet compelled to forgive Burke's politics for the sake of his magnificent gifts.
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  • These two points made the rallying ground of the new Whig opposition.
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  • The immediate object of this excellent piece was to hold up the court scheme of weak, divided and dependent administrations in the light of its real purpose and design; to describe the distempers which had been engendered in parliament by the growth of royal influence and the faction of the king's friends; to show that the newly formed Whig party had combined for truly public ends, and was no mere family knot like the Grenvilles and the Bedfords; and, finally, to press for the hearty concurrence both of public men and of the nation at large in combining against "a faction ruling by the private instructions of a court against the general sense of the people."
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  • The policy of George III., and the support which it found among men who were weary of Whig factions, disturbed this scheme, and therefore Burke denounced both the court policy and the court party with all his heart and all his strength.
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  • The accession of Charles James Fox to the Whig arty, which took place at this time, and was so important an event in its history, was mainly due to the teaching and influe ce of Burke.
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  • Fox, Grey, Windham, Sheridan, Francis, Lord Fitzwilliam, and most of the other Whig leaders, welcomed the Revolution in France.
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  • Fox still held to his old opinions as stoutly as he could, and condemned and opposed the war which England had declared against the French republic. Burke, who was profoundly incapable of the meanness of letting personal estrangement blind his eyes to what was best for the commonwealth, kept hoping against hope that each new trait of excess in France would at length bring the great Whig leader to a better mind.
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  • On the approach of the War of Independence he identified himself with the patriot or whig element in the colony, and in 1776 and 1777 he was a delegate to the Continental Congress.
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  • In 1843-1845 he was a Whig representative in Congress.
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  • He was the Whig candidate for lieutenant-governor of New York in 1846, and was defeated by Addison Gardner (Democrat); but when in 1847 Gardner was appointed a judge of the state court of appeals, Fish was elected (November 1847) to complete the term (to January 1849).
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  • All these books tended to increase the ill-feeling between author and public; the Whig press was virulent and scandalous in its comments, and Cooper plunged into a series of actions for libel.
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  • In 1830 he was elected to Congress as a Whig from the Salem district, defeating the Jacksonian candidate for re-election, B.
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  • He was a faithful supporter of Webster's policy as declared in the latter's famous "Seventh of March Speech" (1850) and laboured to secure for him the presidential nomination at the Whig national convention in 1852.
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  • In 1856 he refused to follow most of his former Whig associates into the Republican party and gave his support to James Buchanan, whom he considered the representative of a national instead of a sectional party.
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  • He soon found another constituency at Oxford, and upon the formation of Lord Aberdeen's coalition ministry became president of the Board of Trade, although debarred by the jealousy of his Whig colleagues from a seat in the cabinet.
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  • He became a member of the Whig club founded by Grattan; and he actively co-operated with Theobald Wolfe Tone in founding the Society of the United Irishmen in 1791, of which he became the first secretary.
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  • 82 formed the regular opposition, of whom 30 were the nominees of Whig potentates and 52 were really elected.
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  • A test act requiring members of the assembly to conform to the Church of England and to take the sacrament of the Eucharist according to the rites and usages of that Church (1704) was defeated only through the intervention of the Whig House of Lords in England.
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  • His famous sermons on the church in danger from the neglect of the Whig ministry to keep guard over its interests were preached, the one at.
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  • They were immediately reprinted, the latter being dedicated to the lord mayor and the former to the author's kinsman, George Sacheverell, high sheriff of Derby for the year; and, as the passions of the whole British population were at this period keenly exercised between the rival factions of Whig and Tory, the vehement invectives of this furious divine on behalf of an ecclesiastical institution which supplied the bulk of the adherents of the Tories made him their idol.
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  • The Whig ministry, then slowly but surely losing the support of the country, were divided in opinion as to the propriety of prosecuting this zealous parson.
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  • had begun his policy of dividing the great Whig families, those Whig noblemen and gentlemen who did not choose to join the sections headed by the Grenvilles, the duke of Bedford, or any other great noblemen, selected as their chief the young marquess of Rockingham.
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  • But Grenville's section of the Whig party was not strong enough to maintain him in power long, and in July 1765 Lord Rockingham formed his first administration with General Conway and the duke of Grafton as secretaries of state.
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  • He was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in1834-1840- for the last three years as speaker, - and in 1840 was elected to the national House of Representatives as a Whig, serving from December 1840 to 1850 (with a short intermission, April-December 1842).
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  • With the breaking up of the Whig party he became an independent and supported Millard Fillmore in 1856, John Bell in 1860, and General G.
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  • He was elected to Congress in 1852, where, first as a Whig and afterwards as a Republican, he represented his district continuously until 1869, taking a prominent part in debate, and earning the name "watch-dog of the Treasury" by his consistent and vigorous opposition to extravagant and unwise appropriations.
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  • In his earliest pamphlets (1774-1775) he started out with the ordinary pre-Revolutionary Whig doctrines of natural rights and liberty; but the first experience of semi-anarchic states'-rights and individualism ended his fervour for ideas so essentially alien to his practical, logical mind, and they have no place in his later writings.
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  • From 1830 until 1855 there was close rivalry between the Democratic and Whig parties for control of the state administration.
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  • For law and administration, consult the last two chapters on 1648-1649 1 649 - 1 6 50 1650-1651 -1651-1652 1652-1653 -1653-1654 1654-1655.1655-1656 -1656-1657 1657-1658 -1658-1659 1659-1676 -1676-1683 1683-1687 -1687-1689 1689-1698 -1698-1708 -1 1725- 1708-1742 725 1-1 175 7421-1754 175 1754- 1766-1766 -1769 1769-1776 -1639-1657 1658-1660 -1661-1665Governors 1776-1784 -1784-1786 1786-1796 -1796-1797 1797-1809 -1809-1811 1811- 1812-1812 -1817 1817-1827 -1827-1831 1831-1833 -1833-1834 1834-1835 -1835-1838 1838-1842 -1842-1844 1844-1846 -1846-1847 1847-1849 -1849-1850 1850-1853 -1853-1854 1854-1855 -1855-1857 1857-1858 -1858-1866 1866-1867 -1867-1869 1869-1870 -1870-1871 1871-1873 -1873-1877 1877-1879 -1879-1881 1881-1883 -1883-1885 1885-1887 -1887-1889 1889-1893 -1893-1895 1895-1897 -1897-1899 1899-1901 -1901-1903 1903-1905 -1905-1907-1907-1909 1909 1909 Federalist Democrat Federalist Whig Democrat Whig Democrat Whig Democrat Whig Democrat Whig Democrat Whig Know-Nothing Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Democrat Republican Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Republican The Constitution and Laws of Connecticut " in New England States (vol.
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  • White's followers called themselves AntiVan Buren Democrats, but the proscription which they suffered drove most of them into the Whig party, which carried the state in presidential elections until 1856, when the vote was cast for James Buchanan, the Democratic candidate.
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  • The Whig party was so strong that James K.
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  • With the disintegration of the Whig party, the state again became nominally Democratic, though Union sentiment was strong, particularly in East Tennessee.
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  • alarmist Whig tone of his almanacs.
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  • Precisely the same kind of men; obedient formerly to Tory traditions, obedient now to Whig ditto and popular clamors.
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  • Whig politicians out of favor also showed no disinclination to join them.
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  • doyen of the Whig historians, Butterfield did not cite him explicitly.
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  • How secure was the Whig oligarchy that came to power at the death of Queen Anne in 1714?
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  • In opposition to the efforts of the Anglicans to procure the establishment of an American episcopate, he wrote an open Letter to the Right Reverend Father in God, John Lord, Bishop of Llandaf (1768), and edited and in large measure wrote the "American Whig" columns in the New York Gazette (1768-1769).
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  • It was soon adopted (as a title of honour) by the king's party, who in return applied Roundhead to their opponents, and at the Restoration the court party preserved the name, which survived till the rise of the term Tory (see Whig And Tor y).
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  • He vetoed in 1854 a bill prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors (which was declared unconstitutional almost immediately after its reenactment in 1855), and in consequence he was defeated in 1854 for re-election as governor by Myron Holley Clark (1806-1892), the Whig and temperance candidate.
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  • In the same year (1833) the Whig party began to take definite form under the leadership of Clay, in opposition, chiefly, to President Jackson's bank policy, and Webster joined the ranks behind Clay with an aspiration for the presidency.
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  • He was a friend of the Whig leaders Stanhope and Sunderland, took a share in defeating the Jacobite conspiracy of Bolingbroke on the death of Queen Anne, and supported the passing of the Septennial Act.
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  • As an advocate he was at once successful, but after 1831 he devoted his attention chiefly to politics, identifying himself first with the Whig and after 1858 with the Republican party.
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  • members gradually united with other opponents of Jacksonian Democracy in forming the Whig party.
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  • Democrat Whig Democrat Whig Democrat Whig " Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat present Marietta, to a point nearly opposite the site of the present Huntington, Kentucky; the other was for an option to buy all the land between the Ohio and the Scioto rivers and the western boundary line of the Ohio Company's tract, extending north of the tenth township from the Ohio, this tract being pre-empted by " Manasseh Cutler and Winthrop Sargent for themselves and others " - actually for the Scioto Company (see Gallipolis).
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  • The British advance had been marked by more than the usual destruction of war; the Loyalists rose to arms; the whig population scattered and without much organization formed groups of riflemen and mounted troopers to harass the enemy.
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  • Pierce received °2 J4 electoral votes, and General Winfield Scott, his Whig opponent, only 42.
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  • It is from the publication of the History that we date his virulent hatred of everything English, towards society in London, Whig principles, Whig ministers and the public generally (see Burton's Life, ii.
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  • In 1848 he received the Demo ratic nomination for the presidency, but owing to the defection of the so-called " Barnburners (see Free-Soil Party) he did not receive the united support of his party, and was defeated by the Whig candidate, Zachary Taylor.
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  • As a minister of the Church he felt his duty and his interest equally concerned in the support of her cause; nor could he fail to discover the inevitable tendency of Whig doctrines, whatever caresses individual Whigs might bestow on individual clergymen, to abase the Establishment as a corporation.
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  • Though in politics habitually Democratic, Missouri has generally had a strong opposition party - Whig in antebellum days, and since the war, Republican - which in recent years has made political conditions increasingly unstable.
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  • But Pitt's prodigious egoism, stimulated by the mischievous counsels of men of the stamp of Lord Shelburne, prevented the fusion of the only two sections of the Whig party that were at once able, enlightened and disinterested enough to carry on the government efficiently, to check the arbitrary temper of the king, and to command the confidence of the nation.
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  • He took a prominent part as a Whig in politics (serving as mayor in 1851), and, impelled by his strong anti-slavery views, actively furthered the work of the "Underground Railroad," of which Detroit was one of the principal "transfer" points.
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  • In the case of the Continental Army, the colors chosen were the colors of the Whig party in England.
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  • Marcy in 1833-1839, was a member of the New York Assembly in 1842, in 1844 and in 1845, being speaker in 1845; mayor of Utica in 1843, and in 1852 was elected governor of the state over Washington Hunt (1811-1867), the Whig candidate, who had defeated him in 1850.
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  • Democrat Whig Democrat Provisional Democrat Republican Democrat Bibliography.
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  • In February 1852 the Whig government was defeated on a Militia Bill, and Lord John Russell was succeeded by Lord Derby, formerly Lord Stanley, with Mr Disraeli, who now his constant companions were Homer and Dante, and entered office for the first time, as chancellor of the exchequer and leader of the House of Commons.
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