Whewell sentence examples

  • Thompson proved a worthy successor to Whewell; the twenty years of his mastership were years of progress, and he himself took an active part in the abolition of tests and the reform of university studies and of the college statutes.

  • It was in 1837, on reading Whewell's Inductive Sciences and re-reading Herschel, that Mill at last saw his way clear both to formulating the methods of scientific investigation and joining on the new logic as a supplement to the old.

  • It has been called by Whewell at once the Encyclopaedia and the Organum of the 13th century.

  • The Anglican casuists are discussed in Whewell, Lectures on Moral Philosophy (London, 1862).

  • Whewell, Hist.

  • Whewell's History of Moral Philosophy in England, Jouffroy's Introduction to Ethics (Channing's translation), Sir Leslie Stephen's English Thought in the Eighteenth Century, Martineau's Types of Ethical Theory, Windelband's History of Philosophy (Eng.

  • Todhunter also published keys to the problems in his textbooks on algebra and trigonometry; and a biographical work, William Whewell, account of his writings and correspondence (1876), in addition to many original papers in scientific journals.

  • Ten years later considerations of a somewhat similar kind led to his election to succeed Sir William Harcourt as Whewell professor of international law at Cambridge.

  • FREDERIC WILLIAM MAITLAND (1850-1906), English jurist and historian, son of John Gorham Maitland, was born on the 28th of May 1850, and educated at Eton and Trinity, Cambridge, being bracketed at the head of the moral sciences tripos of 1872, and winning a Whewell scholarship for international law.

  • Notices of Price's ethical system occur in Mackintosh's Progress of Ethical Philosophy, Jouffroy's Introduction to Ethics, Whewell's History of Moral Philosophy in England; Bain's Mental and Moral Sciences.

  • The De jure belli was translated into English by Whewell (3 vols., 8vo, Cambridge, 1853); into French by Barbeyrac (2 vols.

  • See Ward, Lives of the Gresham Professors, and Whewell's biography prefixed to the 9th volume of Napier's edition of Barrow's Sermons.

  • Botanik; also Whewell, Hist.

  • Whewell of more modern times, that he seemed to have made it a subject of particular study.

  • Todhunter, Conflict of Studies (1873) William Whewell, Of a Liberal Education (London, 1845); Christopher Wordsworth, Scholae academicae (Cambridge, 1877); Etienne Zi (or Siu or Seu), Pratique des examens litteraires en Chine (Shanghai, 1894).

  • Thus Whewell mistook Kepler's inference that Mars moves in an ellipse for an induction, though it required the combination of Tycho's and Kepler's observations, as a minor, with the laws of conic sections discovered by the Greeks, as a major, premise.

  • 2 Whewell, Phil.

  • We do not think, indeed, that the notiones of which he speaks in any way correspond to what Whewell and Ellis would call " conceptions or ideas furnished by the mind of the thinker "; nor do we imagine that Bacon would have admitted these as necessary elements in the inductive process.

  • Jevons's general theory of induction was a revival of the theory laid down by Whewell and criticized by Mill; but it was put in a new form, and was free from -some of the non-essential adjuncts which rendered Whewell's exposition open to attack.

  • Whewell published an edition of the Three Sermons, with Introduction.

  • Whewell's History of the Inductive Sciences (1837); S.

  • WILLIAM WHEWELL (1794-1866), British philosopher and historian of science, was born on the 24th of May 1794 at Lancaster.

  • Whewell was prominent not only in scientific research and philosophy, but also in university and college administration.

  • In 1826 and 1828, Whewell was engaged with Airy in conducting experiments in Dolcoath mine, Cornwall, in order to determine the density of the earth.

  • Their united labours were unsuccessful, and Whewell did little more in the way of experimental science.

  • Whewell's wide, if superficial, acquaintance with various branches of science enabled him to write a comprehensive account of their development, which is still of the greatest value.

  • In the Philosophy, Whewell endeavours to follow Bacon's plan for discovery of an effectual art of discovery.

  • Between 1835 and 1861 Whewell was the author of various works on the philosophy of morals and politics, the chief of which, Elements of Morality, including Polity, was published in 1845.

  • Whewell: an Account of his Writings (2 vols., 1876).

  • Whewell, by Mrs Stair Douglas (1881).

  • Whewell vindicated his character in Flamsteed and Newton (1836).

  • Whewell's Hist.

  • A more ambitious attempt in the same direction was made by Whewell in his Elements of Morality (1846).

  • Whewell's general moral view differs from that of his Scottish predecessors chiefly in a point where we may trace the influence of Kant - viz.

  • Whewell, indeed, explains that this latter formula must be practically interpreted by positive law, though he inconsistently speaks as if it supplied a standard for judging laws to be right or wrong.

  • We find, however, distinct traces of Kantian influence in Whewell and other writers of the intuitional school, and at a later date it became so strong that its importance on subsequent ethical thought can scarcely be over-estimated.

  • (3) Whewell's theorem: if a point R be taken at a distance from the sun equal to the major axis of the orbit of a planet and, therefore, at double the mean distance of the planet, the speed of the latter at any point is equal to the speed which a body would acquire by falling from the point R to the actual position of the planet.

  • The expressions designated by Dr Whewell, Laplace's coefficients (see Spherical Harmonics) were definitely introduced in the memoir of 1785 on attractions above referred to.

  • Here, as in his ethical doctrine (see Ethics), Whewell was moved by opposition to contemporary English empiricism.

  • Thus, in short, if we ask for a clear and definite fundamental intuition, distinct from regard for happiness, we find really nothing in Whewell's doctrine except the single rule of veracity (including fidelity to promises); and even of this the axiomatic character becomes evanescent on closer inspection, since it is not maintained that the rule is practically unqualified, but only that it is practically undesirable to formulate its qualifications.

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