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whaling

whaling

whaling Sentence Examples

  • Fish-curing and whaling are lucrative industries.

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  • Fish-curing and whaling are lucrative industries.

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  • It is the headquarters of a sealing and whaling fleet.

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  • It is the headquarters of a sealing and whaling fleet.

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  • An interesting collection of antiquities and whaling implements is preserved in the Slotstaarn on Castle Hill.

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  • An interesting collection of antiquities and whaling implements is preserved in the Slotstaarn on Castle Hill.

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  • Trout may now be taken in many of the mountain streams. At one time whaling was an important industry on the coasts of New South Wales and Tasmania, and afterwards on the Western Australian coasts.

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  • Of late years whaling has again attracted attention, and a small number of vessels prosecute the industry during the season.

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  • Nantucket was long famous as a whaling port.

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  • The whaling industry was formerly prolific off the west coast but decayed when the right whale nearly disappeared.

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  • In the north inspectorate the centres are: Egedesminde, on an islet at the mouth of Disco Bay; Christianshaab, one of the pleasantest settlements in the north, and Jacobshavn, on the inner shores of the same bay; Godhavn (or Lievely) on the south coast of Disco Island, formerly an important seat of the whaling industry; Ritenbenk, Umanak, and, most northerly of all, Upernivik.

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  • It was formerly frequented by whaling vessels (hence its name).

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  • Here there are large summer hotels, old residences built in the prosperous days of whaling, old lean-to houses, old graveyards and an octagonal towered windmill built in 1746.

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  • In 1757 whaling was the only livelihood of the people of Nantucket; and in 1750-1775, although whaling fleets were in repeated danger from French and Spanish privateers, the business, with the allied coopers and other trades, steadily increased.

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  • Whaling was an established in- dustry in Rhode Island as Eearly as 1723, and in 1731 the colonial assembly provided a bounty of five shillings a barrel for whale oil, and a penny a pound for whalebone.

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  • In 1846 about 50 whaling vessels sailed from Rhode Island ports; but by the close of the century the industry had become practically extinct.

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  • Nantucket and New Bedford were the centres of the whaling trade, which, for the ' In 1905 Massachusetts produced 60'7% of the writing paper manufactured in the country.

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  • Various sorts of whale are found, and the whaling industry reached the height of its importance about the middle of the 19th century.

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  • In the last part of the, 9th century its decline was rapid, not only because of the increasing scarcity of whales, but because of the introduction of the mineral oils, and by the end of the century whaling had ceased to be of any economic importance.

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  • The whaling and cod and mackerel fisheries were of earlier colonial origin.

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  • At that time fishing, whaling and shipbuilding were its principal industries, the clipper ships built here being among the fastest and best known on the seas.

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  • The round and painted shields of the warriors hung outside along the bulwarks: the vessel was steered by an oar at the right side (as whaling boats are to-day), the steerboard or starboard side.

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  • Santa Catharina was formerly one of the well-known whaling stations of the South Atlantic, and is now a secondary military and naval station.

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  • They were granted to the Messrs Enderby by the British government as a whaling station, but the establishment was abandoned in 1852.

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  • Whaling retains a remnant of its old importance, and there are also mackerel and shore fisheries, oil-works, cold storage establishments for preserving fish for food and bait, and canning works for herring.

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  • Bananas, yams, &c., were also largely cultivated, and there was considerable trade in coco-nut oil, timber, fish and fish oil and tortoise-shell, whaling being carried on, chiefly by Americans and French, in the neighbouring seas.

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  • The whaling industry came into importance towards the close of the 19th century, and stations for the extraction of the oil and whalebone have been established at several points, under careful regulations designed to mitigate the pollution of water, the danger to livestock from eating the blubber, &c. The finner whale is the species most commonly taken.

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  • The produce of the whaling and fishing industries, woollen goods, lamb skins and feathers, are the chief exports, while in Thorshavn the preserving of fish and the manufacture of carpets are carried on to some extent.

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  • During Green's " reign " the economic condition of Tristan was considerably affected by the desertion of the neighbouring seas by the whalers; this was largely due to the depredations of the Confederate cruisers " Alabama " and " Shenandoah " during the American Civil War, many whaling boats being captured and burnt by them.

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  • by melting the blubber over a free fire, the process of rendering is fast becoming obsolete, the modern practice being to deliver the blubber in as fresh a state as possible to the "whaling establishments," where the oil is rendered by methods closely resembling those worked in the enormous rendering establishments (for tallow, lard, bone fat) in the United States and in South America.

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  • barqueing took on a new lease of life in the mid-19th century, with the typical whaling bark being fitted with an auxiliary engine.

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  • Its deputy whaling commissioner Joji Morishita certainly thinks it is possible.

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  • Today, Dundee captains and the city's whaling fleet have a permanent place in the geography of the world.

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  • The Museum in Docklands holds objects related to the whaling industry, including a giant pair of whale jawbones set up as an arch.

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  • moratorium on all commercial whaling, to take effect from 1986.

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  • Wilsonâs storm petrels and black-bellied storm petrels nest in the ruins of the whaling station in Whalers Bay.

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  • resumed commercial whaling.

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  • resumption of coastal whaling.

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  • subsistence whaling.

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  • According to The Macmillan Encyclopedia 2001 ' it campaigns primarily against nuclear power, dumping nuclear waste, and commercial whaling.

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  • The peak of northern hemisphere whaling was in 1842 - at that time there were 594 American whalers.

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  • And by 1870s Dundee was the main British whaling port, being home to 10 steam whalers.

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  • Norway resumed commercial whaling in 1993 under formal objection to the IWC moratorium which was introduced in 1986.

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  • The Tay ferries are featured, as of course is Dundee's more general maritime history, including whaling.

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  • The purpose of the IWC is to regulate whaling in accordance with the principles of sustainable use.

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  • Article VIII of the IWC Convention allows unlimited whaling for research purposes.

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  • Even today Icelanders commonly support whaling, and visits by Greenpeace are greeted with people barbecuing whale meat.

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  • An international moratorium was introduced by the IWC in 1986 banning commercial whaling.

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  • Help ensure that commercial whaling remains a thing of the past.

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  • The issues related to Japan's " scientific whaling ", long the subject of criticism within the Commission.

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  • modern whaling in the Antarctic is big business, carried out with scientific equipment.

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  • At issue was Japan's perennial request to start up " small type " coastal whaling in its home waters.

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  • This includes all whaling, so called scientific whaling and any whaling conducted under the cover-all of ' aboriginal subsistence whaling ' .

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  • Scotland had long been involved in both Arctic and antarctic whaling.

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  • Nevertheless, the whaling fleet in Peterhead continued to grow, from 11 whaling fleet in Peterhead continued to grow, from 11 whaling boats in 1836 to 27 in 1855.

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  • whaling ships to be launched by the yard.

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  • whaling stations on Mainland, with many of the ruined fishing lodges still standing on the shores.

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  • whaling captain.

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  • whaling vessels.

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  • whaling ports.

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  • Norway defies the ban while some indigenous peoples in Greenland, Siberia and the US state of Alaska are allowed traditional subsistence whaling.

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  • Abundance has been much reduced in the north Atlantic by late 19th and 20th century whaling.

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  • Trout may now be taken in many of the mountain streams. At one time whaling was an important industry on the coasts of New South Wales and Tasmania, and afterwards on the Western Australian coasts.

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  • Of late years whaling has again attracted attention, and a small number of vessels prosecute the industry during the season.

    0
    0
  • The whaling industry was formerly prolific off the west coast but decayed when the right whale nearly disappeared.

    0
    0
  • In the north inspectorate the centres are: Egedesminde, on an islet at the mouth of Disco Bay; Christianshaab, one of the pleasantest settlements in the north, and Jacobshavn, on the inner shores of the same bay; Godhavn (or Lievely) on the south coast of Disco Island, formerly an important seat of the whaling industry; Ritenbenk, Umanak, and, most northerly of all, Upernivik.

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  • It was formerly frequented by whaling vessels (hence its name).

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  • Here there are large summer hotels, old residences built in the prosperous days of whaling, old lean-to houses, old graveyards and an octagonal towered windmill built in 1746.

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  • Nantucket was long famous as a whaling port.

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  • In 1757 whaling was the only livelihood of the people of Nantucket; and in 1750-1775, although whaling fleets were in repeated danger from French and Spanish privateers, the business, with the allied coopers and other trades, steadily increased.

    0
    0
  • Whaling was an established in- dustry in Rhode Island as Eearly as 1723, and in 1731 the colonial assembly provided a bounty of five shillings a barrel for whale oil, and a penny a pound for whalebone.

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    0
  • In 1846 about 50 whaling vessels sailed from Rhode Island ports; but by the close of the century the industry had become practically extinct.

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  • Nantucket and New Bedford were the centres of the whaling trade, which, for the ' In 1905 Massachusetts produced 60'7% of the writing paper manufactured in the country.

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  • Shipbuilding and whaling are extinct.

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  • Various sorts of whale are found, and the whaling industry reached the height of its importance about the middle of the 19th century.

    0
    0
  • In the last part of the, 9th century its decline was rapid, not only because of the increasing scarcity of whales, but because of the introduction of the mineral oils, and by the end of the century whaling had ceased to be of any economic importance.

    0
    0
  • The whaling and cod and mackerel fisheries were of earlier colonial origin.

    0
    0
  • At that time fishing, whaling and shipbuilding were its principal industries, the clipper ships built here being among the fastest and best known on the seas.

    0
    0
  • The round and painted shields of the warriors hung outside along the bulwarks: the vessel was steered by an oar at the right side (as whaling boats are to-day), the steerboard or starboard side.

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  • Worsley, and the island was reached in 16 days on May zo after a voyage of over Boo m., but on the side farthest from the whaling stations.

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  • Santa Catharina was formerly one of the well-known whaling stations of the South Atlantic, and is now a secondary military and naval station.

    0
    0
  • They were granted to the Messrs Enderby by the British government as a whaling station, but the establishment was abandoned in 1852.

    0
    0
  • Whaling retains a remnant of its old importance, and there are also mackerel and shore fisheries, oil-works, cold storage establishments for preserving fish for food and bait, and canning works for herring.

    0
    0
  • Bananas, yams, &c., were also largely cultivated, and there was considerable trade in coco-nut oil, timber, fish and fish oil and tortoise-shell, whaling being carried on, chiefly by Americans and French, in the neighbouring seas.

    0
    0
  • The whaling industry came into importance towards the close of the 19th century, and stations for the extraction of the oil and whalebone have been established at several points, under careful regulations designed to mitigate the pollution of water, the danger to livestock from eating the blubber, &c. The finner whale is the species most commonly taken.

    0
    0
  • The produce of the whaling and fishing industries, woollen goods, lamb skins and feathers, are the chief exports, while in Thorshavn the preserving of fish and the manufacture of carpets are carried on to some extent.

    0
    0
  • During Green's " reign " the economic condition of Tristan was considerably affected by the desertion of the neighbouring seas by the whalers; this was largely due to the depredations of the Confederate cruisers " Alabama " and " Shenandoah " during the American Civil War, many whaling boats being captured and burnt by them.

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  • Even on whaling vessels, where up to recently whale oil, seal oil and sperm oil (see Waxes, below) were obtained exclusively by "trying," i.e.

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  • by melting the blubber over a free fire, the process of rendering is fast becoming obsolete, the modern practice being to deliver the blubber in as fresh a state as possible to the "whaling establishments," where the oil is rendered by methods closely resembling those worked in the enormous rendering establishments (for tallow, lard, bone fat) in the United States and in South America.

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  • Norway complied with the moratorium until 1993, when it resumed commercial whaling.

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  • The speech was followed by an impassioned plea by Japan for the resumption of coastal whaling.

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  • Norway defies the ban while some indigenous peoples in Greenland, Siberia and the US state of Alaska are allowed traditional subsistence whaling.

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  • For the most part, Cold Fear is set aboard a whaling vessel in the middle of a violent storm.

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  • According to The Macmillan Encyclopedia 2001 ' it campaigns primarily against nuclear power, dumping nuclear waste, and commercial whaling.

    0
    0
  • The peak of northern hemisphere whaling was in 1842 - at that time there were 594 American whalers.

    0
    0
  • And by 1870s Dundee was the main British whaling port, being home to 10 steam whalers.

    0
    0
  • Norway resumed commercial whaling in 1993 under formal objection to the IWC moratorium which was introduced in 1986.

    0
    0
  • The Tay ferries are featured, as of course is Dundee 's more general maritime history, including whaling.

    0
    0
  • The purpose of the IWC is to regulate whaling in accordance with the principles of sustainable use.

    0
    0
  • Article VIII of the IWC Convention allows unlimited whaling for research purposes.

    0
    0
  • Even today Icelanders commonly support whaling, and visits by Greenpeace are greeted with people barbecuing whale meat.

    0
    0
  • An international moratorium was introduced by the IWC in 1986 banning commercial whaling.

    0
    0
  • Help ensure that commercial whaling remains a thing of the past.

    0
    0
  • The issues related to Japan 's " scientific whaling ", long the subject of criticism within the Commission.

    0
    0
  • Modern whaling in the Antarctic is big business, carried out with scientific equipment.

    0
    0
  • At issue was Japan 's perennial request to start up " small type " coastal whaling in its home waters.

    0
    0
  • This includes all whaling, so called scientific whaling and any whaling conducted under the cover-all of ' aboriginal subsistence whaling '.

    0
    0
  • Scotland had long been involved in both Arctic and Antarctic whaling.

    0
    0
  • Nevertheless, the whaling fleet in Peterhead continued to grow, from 11 whaling boats in 1836 to 27 in 1855.

    0
    0
  • She was the first of a series of the new breed of arctic whaling ships to be launched by the yard.

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  • Cycle to: the old whaling stations on Mainland, with many of the ruined fishing lodges still standing on the shores.

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  • Captain Alexander Fairweather 's younger brother, James, was also a whaling captain.

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  • These would be added to the catches of the whaling vessels.

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  • Dundee was once among the world 's leading whaling ports.

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  • Abundance has been much reduced in the north Atlantic by late 19th and 20th century whaling.

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  • Fishing: Over fishing of certain species, bottom trawling, illegal whaling and net fishing have depleted large supplies of fish and mammals.

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  • The trip also includes daylong stops in the city of Hilo on the Big Island of Hawaii, the whaling village of Lahaina of the island of Maui, the state capital, Honolulu, and the culturally diverse island of Kauai.

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  • According to Sunglasses Internationale, these sunglasses were given their name in honor of the whalers and the whaling period in Lahaina, Hawaii, which spanned the period of time from 1825 to 1860.

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  • In the 1700s, the whaling industry took off in the waters around the colonies.

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  • Shipbuilding and whaling are extinct.

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