Weymouth sentence example

weymouth
  • He was also appointed governor of Weymouth, sheriff of Dorsetshire for the king and president of the king's council of war in the county.
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  • Mr Kennedy lost his life in 1848, being killed by the natives while attempting to explore the peninsula of Cape York, from Rockingham Bay to Weymouth Bay.
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  • He was in parliament for many years, representing Plympton from 1685, Windsor from 1689, and Weymouth from 1700.
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  • Or to take the small but welldefined group of five-leaved pines, all the species of which may be seen growing side by side at Kew under identical conditions: we have the Weymouth pine (Pinus Strobus) in eastern North America, P. monlicola and the sugar pine (P. Lambertiana) in California, P. Ayacahwite in Mexico, the Arolla pine (P. Cembra) in Switzerland and Siberia, P. Peuce in Greece, the Bhotan pine (P. excelsa) in the Himalayas, and two other species in Japan.
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  • The French government had issued a manifesto preparatory to a declaration of war, and Gibbon was solicited by Chancellor Thurlow and Lord Weymouth, secretary of state, to answer it.
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  • On the 17th of October 1710 he married at Longleat Lady Frances Worsley, grand-daughter of the first Viscount Weymouth.
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  • In 1764 Adams had married Miss Abigail Smith (1744-1818), the daughter of a Congregational minister at Weymouth, Massachusetts.
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  • In 1812 he purchased a seat in parliament for Weymouth and voted as a Tory.
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  • WEYMOUTH and Melcombe Regis, a seaport, wateringplace, market town and municipal borough in the Southern parliamentary division of Dorsetshire, England, 142 m.
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  • It is formed of Weymouth, a fishing town and seaport on the southwest of the Wey, and Melcombe Regis on the north-east of the river, the two towns being contiguous The situation on Weymouth Bay, which is enclosed to the south by the Isle of Portland, and north by the eastward trend of the coast, is picturesque.
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  • The principal buildings are the old town-hall, the market house, the guildhall, the Royal Dorset Yacht Clubhouse, the theatre, the Royal Victoria Jubilee Hall, the Weymouth and Dorset eye infirmary, the Weymouth royal hospital and dispensary and the barracks.
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  • of Weymouth is Sandsfoot Castle, a fort erected by Henry VIII.
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  • Although its convenient harbour was probably used before Saxon times, and bronze weapons and Roman interments have been found, there is no evidence that Weymouth (Waimue, Waymuth) was a place of early settlement.
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  • The first mention of "that place called Weymouth" occurs in a charter of King Ethelred (866-871), while it is again spoken of in a charter of King ZEthelstan (895-940).
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  • The first charter was that granted by the prior and convent in 1252, by which Weymouth was made a free borough and port for all merchants, the burgesses holding their burgages by the same customs as those of Portsmouth and Southampton.
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  • It is probable that the town suffered considerably at the hands of the French at the beginning of the 15th century, though in 1404 the men of Weymouth were victorious over a party which landed in the Isle of Portland.
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  • Early in the 16th century the commercial rivalry between Weymouth and the neighbouring borough of Melcombe came to a height.
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  • Melcombe Regis first returned two members to parliament in 1307, and Weymouth in 1319, four members being returned by the united boroughs until 1832, when the representation was reduced to two and ceased in 1885.
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  • As early as 1293 trade was carried on with Bayonne, and six years later a receiver of customs on wool and wool-fells is mentioned at Weymouth, while wine was imported from Aquitaine.
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  • and the royal family in 1789 paid Weymouth the first of a series of visits which further ensured its popularity.
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  • Moule, Descriptive Catalogue of the Charters, Minute Books, and other Documents of the Borough of Weymouth and Melcome Regis, A.D.
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  • 1250 to 1860 (Weymouth, 1883); John Hutchins, History and Antiquities of the County of Dorset (3rd ed., Westminster, 1860).
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  • From this time he lived mostly in retirement, finding a congenial home with Lord Weymouth, his friend from college days, at Longleat in Wiltshire; and though pressed to resume his diocese in 1703, upon the death of Bishop Kidder, he declined, partly on the ground of growing weakness, but partly no doubt from his love for the quiet life of devotion which he was able to lead at Longleat.
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  • ALFRED GILPIN JONES (1824-1906), Canadian politician, was born at Weymouth, Nova Scotia, in September 1824, the son of Guy C. Jones of Yarmouth, and grandson of a United Empire Loyalist.
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  • WEYMOUTH, a township of Norfolk (disambiguation)|Norfolk county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., on Weymouth harbour, a part of Boston Bay, 9 m.
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  • Weymouth is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and is connected with Boston, Quincy, Braintree, Hingham, Nantasket and Rockland by electric lines.
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  • In the township there are several villages, including Weymouth, North Weymouth, East Weymouth and South Weymouth, and the smaller villages of Weymouth Centre, Weymouth Heights, Lovell's Corner, Nash's Corner and Old Spain, and there are also four islands, Round, Grape, Slate and Sheep. The mainland itself is largely a peninsula lying between the Weymouth Fore river and the Weymouth Back river, to the west and east respectively.
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  • In the township are the Fogg Library (1898, in South Weymouth) founded by a bequest of John S.
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  • Fogg; and the Tufts Library (1879, in Weymouth village), endowed by Quincy Tufts and his sister Susan Tufts.
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  • The township owns and operates its water works; the water supply is obtained from Weymouth Great Pond in the village of South Weymouth.
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  • Weymouth was first settled in 1623 by Robert Gorges.
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  • It was known first as the Plantation of Wessaguscus or Wessagusset; was incorporated as a township in 1635, and its boundaries have been practically unchanged since 1637, when Round and Grape islands were granted to Weymouth.
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  • See C. F Adams, Jr., "Wessagusset and Weymouth" in No.
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  • 3 (1905) of the Publications of the Weymouth Historical Society (organized in 1879 and incorporated in 1886), and D.
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  • Weymouth, England >>
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  • Other names for this timber are "yellow pine" and "Weymouth pine," the last name originating in the fact that the earl of Weymouth first introduced it into England.
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  • It was made favourably known to the English by the explorations of Bartholomew Gosnold in 1602, of Martin Pring in 1603 and of George Weymouth in 1605, and was at this time called North Virginia.
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  • Weymouth Pine (Pinus Strobus).
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  • In England where it is generally known as the " Weymouth pine," it succeeds well on deep light soils when well-drained; trees have attained occasionally a height of zoo ft.
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  • In 1782 he entered parliament for Lord Weymouth's close borough of Weobley, which Lord Thurlow obtained for him without solicitation.
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  • He was chosen by the General Court to represent the colony's interests in England, eluded officers sent to arrest him, 3 and in disguise boarded a ship on which he reached Weymouth on the 6th of May 1688.
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  • It was now decided that Prince, Starkey (whose sister Prince had married as his second wife) and the Rev. Lewis Prince should leave the Church of England and preach their own gospel; Prince opened Adullam Chapel, Brighton, and Starkey established himself at Weymouth.
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  • So it was only on the very day of Warwick's defeat at Barnet (14th of April) that Margaret and Edward landed at Weymouth.
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  • Numerous additional main lines - Reading to Newbury, Weymouth and the west, a new line opened in 1906 between Castle Cary and Langport effecting a great reduction in mileage between London and Exeter and places beyond; Didcot, Oxford, Birmingham, Shrewsbury, Chester with connexions northward, and to North Wales; Oxford to Worcester, and Swindon to Gloucester and the west of England; South Welsh system (through route from London via Wootton Bassett or via Bristol, and the Severn tunnel), Newport, Cardiff, Swansea, Milford.
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  • Steamship services to the Channel Islands from Weymouth to Waterford, Ireland from Milford, and to Rosslare, Ireland, from Fishguard, the route last named being opened in 1906.
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  • During the 16th century and the early part of the 17th, the coast of Maine attracted various explorers, among them Giovanni da Verrazano (1524), Esteban Gomez (1525), Bartholomew Gosnold (1602), Martin Pring (1603), Pierre du Guast, Sieur De Monts (1604), George Weymouth (1605), and John Smith (1614), who explored and mapped the coast and gave to the country the name New England; but no permanent English settlement was established within what are now the borders of the state until some time between 1623 and 1629.
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  • In the same year George Weymouth explored the southwest coast, kidnapped five Indians, and carried them to England, where three of them lived for a time in the family of Sir Ferdinando Gorges, who soon became the leader in founding Maine.
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  • A joint railway of the Great Western and London & South Western companies runs south from Weymouth to Portland (44 m.) and Easton (82 m.) on the isle.
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  • The harbourrthus made was open on the north to Weymouth and the Channel, but the necessity for greater protection from torpedo attack made it advisable to complete the enclosure.
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  • long - between the end of the outer breakwater and the Bincleaves rocks near Weymouth, by two new breakwaters.
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  • In the North American area Picea alba, P. nigra, Larix americana, Abies balsamea (balsam fir), Thuja canadensis (hemlock spruce), Pinus Strobus (Weymouth pine), Thuja occidentalis (white cedar), Taxus canadensis are characteristic species.
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  • Though it first spread from the ports of Bristol and Weymouth in the summer of 1348, it had not finished its destruction in northern England till 1350, and only spread into Scotland in the summer of that year.
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  • On that same day Queen Margaret and her son landed at Weymouth, only to hear that the earl was dead and Battle of his army scattered.
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  • There is more than one meaning of Weymouth discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.
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  • In February 1650 he was brought to London from Weymouth under a strong guard for having spread false reports of the Parliament and of Cromwell.
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  • and from Weymouth by Fore river on the S.
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  • Fans of Weymouth Speedway are being urged to back the club's planning application to continue racing at the Wessex Stadium.
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  • electrifyt, the section between Bournemouth and Weymouth was not electrified, so that a diesel locomotive took the trains on to Weymouth.
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  • Local vessels took part and captured galleons were towed across the bay to Weymouth.
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  • Three miles of superb golden sands, a sheltered bay and a fine Georgian seafront make Weymouth the perfect location for beach handball.
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  • In contrast, a double low tide occurs in Weymouth Bay.
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  • lunge older calmer heads did little to help with both Kemp and Burns booked for awful lunging challenges deep in the Weymouth half.
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  • merlin rocket for the student nationals at Weymouth on the 4th and 5th november.
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  • Thus the infants school in Weymouth House in Abbey Green was used as the emergency mortuary.
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  • remnant of ancient woodland in the Weymouth area.
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  • stonemason trained at Weymouth College, he went on to study conservation in Italy.
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  • typifyany ways, Weymouth typifies what is going on in small towns across Britain.
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  • Of deciduous trees the sycamore, wych-elm, horse-chestnut, beech, lime, plane and poplar may be used, - the abele or white poplar, Populus alba, being one of the most rapidgrowing of all trees, and, like other poplars, well suited for nursing other choicer subjects; while of evergreens, the holm oak, holly, laurel (both common and Portugal), and such conifers as the Scotch, Weymouth and Austrian pines, with spruce and (South.) silver firs and yews, are suitable.
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  • Two Mile Coppice contains the last remnant of ancient woodland in the Weymouth area.
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  • A City & Guilds stonemason trained at Weymouth College, he went on to study conservation in Italy.
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  • In many ways, Weymouth typifies what is going on in small towns across Britain.
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  • Tom Tom Club was a side project made up of Talking Head members (and spouses) Tina Weymouth and Chris Frantz.
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