Westminster sentence examples

westminster
  • In 1749, in his twelfth year, he was sent to Westminster, still.

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  • The manor belonged at an early date to the abbot of Westminster.

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  • MARGARET (1489-1541), queen of Scotland, eldest daughter of Henry VII., king of England, by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Edward IV., was born at Westminster on the 29th of November 1 4 89.

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  • Many Anglican bishops (amongst them the archbishop of York and most of his suffragans) felt so doubtful as to the wisdom of such an assembly that they refused to attend it, and Dean Stanley declined to allow Westminster Abbey to be used for the closing service, giving as his reasons the partial character of the assembly, uncertainty as to the effect of its measures and "the presence of prelates not belonging to our Church."

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  • Judged by the objects for which it was summoned the Westminster Assembly was a failure, a remarkable failure.

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  • William Murray was educated at Perth grammar school and Westminster School, of which he was a king's scholar.

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  • An early form of the name is Patricsey or Peter's Island; the manor at the time of the Domesday survey, and until the suppression of the monasteries, belonging to the abbey of St Peter, Westminster.

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  • The law was ably and justly administered, and Irish trade was admitted to the same privileges as English, enjoying the same rights in foreign and colonial trade; and no attempt was made to subordinate the interests of the former to the latter, which was the policy adopted both before and after Cromwell's time, while the union of Irish and English interests was further recognized by the Irish representation at Westminster in the parliaments of 1654, 1656 and 16J9.

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  • Large steps were made towards the union of the two kingdoms by the representation of Scotland in the parliament at Westminster; free trade between the two countries was established, the administration of justice greatly improved, vassalage and heritable jurisdictions abolished, and security and good order maintained by the council of nine appointed by the Protector.

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  • The treaty of Westminster (24th of October 1655) dealt chiefly with commercial subjects, and contained a clause promising the expulsion from France of political exiles.

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  • in Westminster Abbey, the public funeral taking place on the 23rd of November, with great ceremony and on the same scale as that of Philip II.

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  • There it was hanged on a gallows, and in the evening taken down, when the head was cut off and set up upon Westminster Hall, where it remained till as late as 1684, the trunk being thrown into a pit underneath the gallows.

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  • According to various legends Cromwell's last burial place is stated to be Westminster Abbey, Naseby Field or Newburgh Abbey; but there appears to be no evidence to support them, or to create any reasonable doubt that the great Protector's dust lies now where it was buried, in the neighbourhood of the present Connaught Square.

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  • An attempt to hold a public procession of the Host in connexion with the Eucharistic Congress at Westminster in 1908, however, was the signal for the outburst of a considerable amount of opposition, and was eventually abandoned owing to the personal intervention of the prime minister.

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  • Francis Osborne, 5th duke of Leeds (1751-1799), was born on the 29th of January 1751 and was educated at Westminster school and at Christ Church, Oxford.

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  • Bradley (Ethical Studies, p. 2) quotes an even plainer attack on the conceptions as well as the terminology of ethics in a Westminster Review article (Oct.

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  • He became rector of St James's, Westminster, in 1733, and bishop of Bristol in 1735.

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  • Thus Westminster Abbey is sometimes styled the British "Pantheon," and the rotunda in the Escorial where the kings of Spain are buried also bears the name.

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  • The western towers of Westminster Abbey are usually attributed to Wren, but they were not carried out till 1735-1745, many years after Wren's death, and there is no reason to think that his design was used.

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  • Wakefield was for a short time at Westminster School, and was brought up to his father's profession, which he relinquished on occasion of his elopement at the age of twenty with Miss Pattle, the orphan daughter of an Indian civil servant.

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  • It stands in relation to Danish history somewhat as Westminster Abbey does to English, containing the tombs of most of the Danish kings from Harold I.

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  • Chaucer translated it into English prose before the year 1382; and this translation was published by Caxton at Westminster, 1480.

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  • - At the last General Synod (1909) they repeated their old fundamental principle that "the Holy Scriptures are our only rule of faith and practice"; but at the same time they declared that their interpretation of Scripture agreed substantially with the Nicene Creed, the Westminster and Augsburg Confessions, and the Thirty-nine Articles.

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  • On the 20th of March 1413, whilst praying in Westminster Abbey he was seized with a fainting fit, and died that same evening in the Jerusalem Chamber.

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  • He was soon promoted to be one of Edward VI.'s chaplains and prebendary of Westminster, and in October 1552 was one of the six divines to whom the Forty-two articles were submitted for examination before being sanctioned by the Privy Council.

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  • He returned to England in J anuary 1559, was appointed one of the committee to revise the liturgy, and one of the Protestant representatives at the Westminster conference.

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  • Subsequently, on the 23rd of May, their marriage was declared valid and that with Catherine null, and in June Anne was crowned with great state in Westminster Abbey.

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  • This son (by name Edward) was educated at Westminster' and Cambridge, but never took a degree, travelled, became member of parliament, first for Petersfield (1734), then for Southampton (1741), joined the party against Sir Robert Walpole, and (as his son confesses, not much to his father's honour) was animated in so doing by " private revenge " against the supposed " oppressor " of his family in the South Sea affair.

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  • house for Westminster school.

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  • On the 10th of March 1751 the prince died in London, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

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  • Unlike the " National Covenant " of 1638, which applied to Scotland only, this document was common to the two kingdoms. Henderson, Baillie, Rutherford and others were sent up to London to represent Scotland in the Assembly at Westminster.

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  • The " Solemn League and Covenant," which pledged both countries to the extirpation of prelacy, leaving further decision as to church government to be decided by the " example of the best reformed churches," after undergoing some slight alterations, passed the two Houses of Parliament and the Westminster Assembly, and thus became law for the two kingdoms. By means of it Henderson has had considerable influence on the history of Great Britain.

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  • As " Scottish commissioner to the Westminster Assembly, he was in England from August 1643 till August 1646; his principal work was the drafting of the directory for public worship. Early in 1645 Henderson was sent to Uxbridge to aid the commissioners of the two parliaments in negotiating with the king; but nothing came of the conference.

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  • long; and at Westminster in 1558 it weighed no less than 3 cwt.

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  • One authority says of the crowd which gathered there: "They had the hair of their heads very few of them longer than their ears, whereupon it came to pass that those who usually with their cries attended at Westminster were by a nickname called Roundheads."

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  • Such a mitre appears on a seal of Archbisho p Thomas Becket (Father Thurston, The ?P allium, London, 1892, p. 17), The custom was, however, .already growing up of setting the horns over the front and back of the head instead of the sides (the mitre said to have belonged to St Thomas Becket, now at Westminster Cathedral, is of this type), 1 and with this the essential character of the mitre, as it persisted through the middle ages, was established.

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  • A bust of him by Matthew Noble is in Westminster Abbey, and his portrait was painted by Sir Thomas Lawrence.

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  • by the City of Westminster and St Marylebone.

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  • Matthew Paris is often confused with " Matthew of Westminster," the reputed author of the Flores historiarum edited by H.

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  • Matthew Of Westminster >>

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  • In 1642 he was appointed lecturer at St Margaret's, Westminster, and delivered a series of addresses to the Commons in which he advocated episcopal and liturgical reform.

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  • He had a share in writing Smectymnuus, was appointed chaplain to the earl of Essex's regiment in 1642, and a member of the Westminster Assembly in 1643.

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  • He died in November 1655 and was buried in Westminster Abbey, but his body was exhumed and maltreated at the Restoration.

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  • At Westminster school he obtained a reputation for Greek and Latin verse writing; and he was only thirteen when he was matriculated at Queen's College, Oxford, where his most important acquisition seems to have been a thorough acquaintance with Sanderson's logic. He became a B.A.

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  • In 182 3 he established the Westminster Review.

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  • Another outlet was opened up for him (April 1824) by the starting of the Westminster Review, and still another in the following year in the Parliamentary History and Review.

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  • He had become convinced that his comrades in the Utilitarian Society, never more than ten, had not the stuff in them for a world-shaking propaganda; the society itself was dissolved; the Parliamentary Review was a failure; the Westminster did not pay its expenses; Bentham's Judicial Evidence produced little effect on the reviewers.

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  • In his Westminster review of Whately's Logic in 1828 (invaluable to all students of the genesis of Mill's logic) he appears, curiously enough, as an ardent and brilliant champion of the syllogistic logic against highfliers such as the Scottish philosophers who talk of "superseding" it by "a supposed system of inductive logic."

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  • He had ceased to write for the Westminster in 1828; but during the years 1832 and 1833 he contributed many essays to Tait's Magazine, the Jurist, and the Monthly Repository.

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  • In 1835 Sir William Molesworth founded the London Review with Mill as editor; it was amalgamated with the Wesminster (as the London and Westminster Review) in 1836, and Mill continued editor (latterly proprietor also) till 1840.

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  • In 1865 he agreed to stand as parliamentary candidate for Westminster, on conditions strictly in accordance with his principles.

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  • His historical research was exemplified in his De antiquitate ecclesiae, and his editions of Asser, Matthew Paris, Walsingham, and the compiler known as Matthew of Westminster; his liturgical skill was shown in his version of the psalter and in the occasional prayers and thanksgivings which he was called upon to compose; and he left a priceless collection of manuscripts to his college at Cambridge.

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  • John Carteret was educated at Westminster, and at Christ Church, Oxford.

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  • In the Westminster Assembly a party holding this view included Selden, Lightfoot, Coleman and Whitelocke, whose speech (1645) is appended to Lee's version of the Theses; but the opposite view, after much controversy, was carried, Lightfoot alone dissenting.

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  • The consequent chapter of the Westminster Confession (" Of Church Censures ") was, however, not ratified by the English.

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  • After working for a short time with Sir Peter Lely, he went to Westminster school; and in 1653 he entered Christ Church, Oxford, as servitor.

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  • It is said that he expired in a sudden transport of joy upon hearing the news of the vote at Westminster for the restoration of Charles II.

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  • In June 1906 he was preferred to a canonry at Westminster, and when in December he resigned the wardenship of Toynbee Hall the position of president was created so that he might retain his connexion with the institution.

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  • Milo drew largely upon the Vita Herluini, composed by Gilbert Crispin, abbot of Westminster.

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  • WESTMINSTER Under this heading are included certain of the more important ecclesiastical councils held within the present bounds of London.

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  • Though the precise locality is occasionally uncertain, the majority of the medieval synods assembled in the chapter-house of old St Paul's, or the former chapel of St Catherine within the precincts of Westminster Abbey or at Lambeth.

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  • In 1102 a national synod at Westminster under Anselm adopted canons against simony, clerical marriages and slavery.

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  • During the next two centuries the councils devoted much attention to heresy: eight propositions concerning the body of Christ after his death were rejected at St Mary-le-Bow in 1286; the expulsion of the Jews from England was sanctioned by a legatine synod of Westminster in 1291; ten theses of Wiclif's were condemned at the Dominican friary in 1382, and eighteen articles drawn from his Trialogus met the same fate at.

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  • In 1852 there was held the first of a series of synods of the newly organized Roman Catholic archdiocese of Westminster.

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  • P. Stanley, Historical Memorials of Westminster Abbey (4th and revised ed., London, 1876), 4 11 -4 1 3, 495-504; H.

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  • RICHARD BUSBY (1606-1695), English clergyman, and head master of Westminster school, was born at Lutton in Lincolnshire in 1606.

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  • He was educated at the school which he afterwards superintended for so long a period, and first signalized himself by gaining a king's scholarship. From Westminster Busby proceeded to Christ Church, Oxford, where he graduated in 1628.

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  • Next year he became head master of Westminster, where his reputation as a teacher soon became great.

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  • No school in England has on the whole produced so many eminent men as Westminster did under the regime of Busby.

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  • Busby died in 1695, in his ninetieth year, and was buried in Westminster Abbey, where his effigy is still to be seen.

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  • The body of Queen Eleanor rested here for a night on its journey to Westminster, and a cross, of which there is now no trace, was subsequently erected in the market-place.

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  • Pollard's Fifteenth Century Prose and Verse, Westminster, 1903).1903).

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  • On the 8th of February 1662 she removed to Leicester House in Leicester Fields, and died shortly afterwards on the 13th of the same month being buried in Westminster Abbey.

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  • The cardinal was brought to trial at Westminster (17th of June 1535) on the charge that he did "openly declare in English that the king, our sovereign lord, is not supreme head on earth of the Church of England," and was condemned to a traitor's death at Tyburn, a sentence afterwards changed.

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  • All these varieties were represented at the annual show of the Kennel Club in the autumn of 1905, and at the representative exhibition of America held under the management of the Westminster Kennel Club in the following spring the classification was substantially the same, additional breeds, however, being Boston terriers - practically unknown in England, - Chesapeake Bay dogs, Chihuahuas, Papillons and Roseneath terriers.

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  • In 1906, however, no fewer than 1956 dogs were entered at the show of the Westminster Kennel Club, held in Madison Square.

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  • Having crossed to England with Henry, the queen was crowned in Westminster Abbey on the 23rd of February 1421, and in the following December gave birth to a son, afterwards King Henry VI.

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  • Her body was buried in the Lady chapel of Westminster Abbey, and when the chapel was pulled down during the reign of Henry VII., was placed in Henry V.'s tomb.

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  • On this question, see Driver, Genesis (Westminster Comm., London, 1904), p. 80 seq.; A.

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  • Of his life before 1086, when he was solemnly knighted by his father at Westminster, we know little.

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  • the cappa of the Lateran basilica worn by the canons of Westminster cathedral, or the almuce worn, by concession of Pope Pius IX., by the members of the Sistine choir.

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  • Elizabeth rightly regarded the treaty of Westminster (January 16, 1756, whereby Great Britain and Prussia agreed to unite their forces to oppose the entry into, or the passage through, Germany of the troops of every foreign power) as utterly subversive of the previous conventions between Great Britain and Russia.

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  • FREDERICK MARRYAT (1792-1848), English sailor and novelist, was born at Westminster on the 10th of July 1792.

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  • He had joined his efforts to those of Francis Place, of Westminster, and other philanthropists, to relieve and improve the condition of the working classes, labouring especially to establish schools for them on the Lancasterian system, and promoting the formation of savings banks.

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  • GEORGE MORLEY (1597-1684), English bishop, was born in London and educated at Westminster and Oxford.

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  • 1250 to 1860 (Weymouth, 1883); John Hutchins, History and Antiquities of the County of Dorset (3rd ed., Westminster, 1860).

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  • He was one of the clerks at the Westminster Assembly, one of Cromwell's chaplains and a "trier," and held livings at Stoke Newington (1645) and St Paul's, Covent Garden (1656).

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  • the Westminster, a decided judgment is passed on them, that, they are not " to be any otherwise approved or made use of than other human writings," a milder verdict is expressed regarding them in many other quarters, e.g.

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  • Kenneth is alleged to have brought the Stone of Destiny, on which the Celtic kings were crowned, from Dunstaffnage Castle on Loch Etive, and to have deposited it in Scone, whence it was conveyed to Westminster Abbey (where it lies beneath the Coronation Chair) by Edward I.

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  • 15 (Westminster, October 1903).

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  • On the 14th of October a crushing defeat was inflicted on Harold at the battle of Senlac or Hastings; .and on Christmas Day William was crowned at Westminster.

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  • JOHN HORNE TOOKE (1736-1812), English politician and philologist, third son of John Horne, a poulterer in Newport Market, whose business the boy when at Eton happily veiled under the title of a " Turkey merchant," was born in Newport Street, Long Acre, Westminster, on the 25th of June 1736.

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  • After passing some time at school in Soho Square, and at a Kentish village, he went from 1744 to 1746 to Westminster School and for the next five or six years was at Eton.

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  • Between 1782 and 1790 Tooke gave his support to Pitt, and in the election for Westminster, in 1784, threw all his energies into opposition to Fox.

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  • It was after the election of Westminster in 1788 that Tooke depicted the rival statesmen (Lord Chatham and Lord Holland, William Pitt and C. J.

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  • ANTE-CHOIR, the term given to the space enclosed in a church between the outer gate or railing of the rood screen and the door of the screen; sometimes there is only one rail, gate or door, but in Westminster Abbey it is equal in depth to one bay of the nave.

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  • Chiswick Hall, no longer extant, was formerly a country seat for the masters and sanatorium for the scholars of Westminster school.

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  • by the City .of Westminster, and W.

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  • Lord Fitzroy Somerset was educated at Westminster school, and entered the army in 1804.

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  • Among the sculptor's principal statues are " The Bishop of Carlisle " (1895; Carlisle Cathedral), " General Charles Gordon " (Trafalgar Square, London), " Oliver Cromwell " (Westminster), " Dean Colet " (a bronze group - early Italianate in feeling - outside St Paul's School, Hammersmith), " King Alfred " (a colossal memorial for Winchester), the " Gladstone Monument " (in the Strand, London) and " Dr Mandell Creighton, Bishop of London " (bronze, erected in St Paul's Cathedral).

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  • During the peace he entered parliament as member for Westminster in the fiercely contested election of 1784, was promoted vice-admiral in 1787, and in July of 1788 was appointed to the Board of Admiralty under the second earl of Chatham.

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  • RICHARD NEILE (1562-1640), English divine, was educated at Westminster school and at St John's College, Cambridge.

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  • His first important preferment was as dean of Westminster (1605); afterwards he held successively the bishoprics of Rochester (1608),(1608), Lichfield (161o), Lincoln (1614),(1614), Durham (1617) and Winchester (1628),(1628), and the archbishopric of York (1631).

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  • Of the same character is the use of incense carried in a perfuming pan before the sovereign at his coronation in the procession from Westminster Hall to the Abbey.

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  • Bounded by the Thames - Fulham, Chelsea, the City of Westminster (here the City of London intervenes), Stepney, Poplar.

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  • Between Westminster, the City and Stepney, and the northern boroughs - St Marylebone (commonly Marylebone), Holborn, Finsbury, Shoreditch, Bethnal Green.

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  • On the north there is a flat tract between Chelsea and Westminster, covering Pimlico, but from Westminster down to the Tower there is a marked slope directly up from the river bank.

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  • Continuing westward, the most important stream was Tyburn, which rose at Hampstead, and joined the Thames through branches on either side of Thorney Island, on which grew up the great ecclesiastical foundation of St Peter, Westminster, better known as Westminster Abbey.

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  • The main deposits of alluvium occur below Lambeth and Westminster, and in the valley of the Wandle, which joins the Thames from the south near Putney.

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  • From the western boundary of the City proper, an area covering the greater part of the city of Westminster, and extending into Chelsea, Kensington, Paddington and Marylebone, is exclusively associated with the higher-class life of London.

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  • Within the bounds of Westminster are the royal palaces, the government offices and many other of the finest public buildings, and the wider area specified includes the majority of the residences of the wealthier classes, the most beautiful parks and the most fashionable places of recreation.

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  • But even in the midst of the richest quarters, in Westminster and elsewhere, small but well-defined areas of the poorest dwellings occur.

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  • wide, the towers of Westminster, on the one hand and the dome of St Paul's on the other, make up a fine prospect.

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  • Below London Bridge the river is embanked for a short distance in front of the Tower of London, and above Westminster Bridge the Albert Embankment extends for nearly 1 m.

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  • The bridges in order above London Bridge are as follows, railway-bridges being bracketed - Southwark, (Cannon Street), (Blackfriars), Blackfriars, Waterloo, (Hungerford - with a footway), Westminster, Lambeth, Vauxhall, (Grosvenor), Victoria, Albert, Battersea, (Battersea), Wandsworth, (Putney), Putney and Hammersmith.

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  • The present Westminster Bridge, of iron on granite piers, was opened in 1862, but another preceded it, dating from 1750; the view from which was appreciated by Wordsworth in his sonnet beginning " Earth has not anything to show more fair."

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  • 65,661 410 Waterloo Bridge 552,867 1102 Westminster Bridge.

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  • between Whitehall (Westminster) and Kensington.

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  • Hyde Park, to the west, belonged originally to the manor of Hyde, which was attached to Westminster Abbey, but was taken by Henry VIII.

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  • in length, from the bridge over which one of the finest prospects in London is seen, extending to the distant towers of Westminster.

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  • While stone is the material used in the construction of the majority of great buildings of London, some modern examples (notably the Westminster Roman Catholic cathedral) are of red brick with stone dressings; and brick is in commonest use for general domestic building.

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  • Owing to the by-laws of the County Council, the method of raising commercial or residential buildings to an extreme height is not practised in London; the block known as Queen Anne's Mansions, Westminster, is an exception, though it cannot be called high in comparison with American high buildings.

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  • In the survey of London (1598) by John Stow, 125 churches, including St Paul's and Westminster Abbey, are named; of these 89 were destroyed by the great fire.

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  • Other ancient churches outside the City are few; but there may be noted St Margaret's, under the shadow of Westminster Abbey; and the beautiful Ely Chapel in Holborn (q.v.), the only remnant of a palace of the bishops of Ely, now used by the Roman Catholics.

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  • It is the scene from time to time of splendid ceremonies, and contains the tombs of many great men; but in this respect it cannot compete with the peculiar associations of Westminster Abbey.

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  • A Gothic style has been most commonly adopted in building modern churches; but of these the most notable, the Roman Catholic Westminster Cathedral (see Westminster), is Byzantine, and built principally of brick, with a lofty campanile.

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  • The Houses of Parliament, with Westminster Abbey and St Margaret's Church, complete the finest group of buildings which London possesses; a group essentially Gothic, for the Houses of Parliament, completed in 1867 from the designs m .

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  • In 1906 the London County Council obtained parliamentary sanction for the erection of a county hall on the south bank of the Thames, immediately east of Westminster Bridge, and in 1908 a design submitted by Mr Ralph Knott was accepted in competition.

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  • The former royal palaces of Westminster and of Whitehall, of which the fine Jacobean banqueting hall remains, are described under Westminster.

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  • The only other public buildings, beyond those at Westminster, which fall into a great group are the modern museums, the Imperial Institute, London University and other institutions, and Albert Hall, which lie between Kensington Gore and Brompton and Cromwell Roads, and these, together with the National Gallery (in Trafalgar Square) and other art galleries, and the principal scientific, educational and recreative institutions, are considered in Section V.

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  • The Westminster Column, outside the entrance to Dean's Yard, was erected to the memory of the old pupils of Westminster School who died in the Russian and Indian wars of 1854-1859.

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  • Apart from the City an interesting ecclesiastical survival is the name Broad Sanctuary, Westminster, recalling the place of sanctuary which long survived the monastery under the protection of which it originally existed.

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  • Covent Garden, again, took its name from a convent garden belonging to Westminster.

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  • The surface tramway system of London cannot be complete, as, within an area roughly represented by the boroughs of Chelsea, Kensington and Fulham, the city of Westminster and a considerable district north thereof, and the city of London, the ' Charing Cross station was the scene of a remarkable catastrophe on the 5th of December 1905, when a large part of the roof collapsed, and the falling debris did very serious damage to the Avenue theatre, which stands close to the station at a lower level.

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  • The London, Westminster and Vauxhall Steamboat Company established in 1840 a service of seven steamboats between London Bridge and Vauxhall.

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  • German residents are found mainly in the western and west central districts; French mainly in the City of Westminster (especially the district of Soho), St Pancras and St Marylebone; Italians in Holborn (Saffron Hill), Soho and Finsbury; and Russians and Poles in Stepney and Bethnal Green.

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  • Westminster, facing the Abbey.

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  • appointed by the London County Council 1 pp y y (4), the City of London and the City of Westminster (2 each), the other Metropolitan boroughs (1 each), the county councils of Middlesex, Hertfordshire, Essex, Kent and Surrey (1 each), borough of West Ham (2), various groups of other boroughs and urban districts, and the Thames and the Lea Conservancies.

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  • Gas-lighting was introduced on one side of Pall Mall in 1807, and in 1810 the Gas Light & Coke Company received a charter, and developed gas-lighting in Westminster.

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  • Those at St Peter's, Westminster, and St Paul's, attained a fame which has survived, while other similar foundations lapsed, such as St Anthony's (Threadneedle Street, City), at which Sir Thomas More, Archbishop Whitgift and many other men of eminence received education.

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  • St Peter's College or Westminster School (see Westminster) is unique among English public schools of the highest rank in maintaining its original situation in London.

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  • The Royal Horticultural Society maintains gardens at Wisley, Surrey, and has an exhibition hall in Vincent Square, Westminster.

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  • The wealthier metropolitan parishes became discontented with the form of local government to which they remained subject, and in 1897 Kensington and Westminster petitioned to be created boroughs by the grant of charters under the Municipal Corporation Acts.

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  • For judicial purposes Westminster was merged with the county of London in 1889, and the Liberty of the Tower was abolished in 1894.

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  • The Metropolitan police courts are fourteen in number, namely - Bow Street, Covent Garden; Clerkenwell; Great Marlborough Street (Westminster); Greenwich and Woolwich; Lambeth; Marylebone; North London, Stoke Newington Road; Southwark; South Western, Lavender Hill (Battersea); Thames, Arbour Street East (Stepney); West Ham; West London, Vernon Street (Fulham); Westminster, Vincent Square; Worship Street (Shoreditch).

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  • (19) Westminster.

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  • in St Anne's, Westminster, to Hs.

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  • For many centuries this district between London and Westminster was a kind of " no man's land " having certain archaic customs. Gomme in his Governance of London (1907) gives an account of the connexion of this with the old village of Aldwich, a name that survived in Wych Street, and has been revived by the London County Council in Aldwych, the crescent which leads to Kingsway.

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  • The great Benedictine monastery of Black Monks was situated away from the city at Westminster, and it was the only monastic house subject to the rule of St Benedict in the neigh roofing tenements.

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  • Braun and Hogenberg's map was published in 1572-1573, and the so-called Agas's map was probably produced soon afterwards, and was doubtless influenced by the publication of Braun and Hogenberg's excellent engraving; Norden's maps of London and Westminster are dated 1593.

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    0
  • did little to connect his name with the history of London, although the erection of the exquisite specimen of florid Gothic at Westminster Abbey has carried his memory down in its popular name of Henry VII.'s chapel.

    0
    0
  • The preparations for the coronation of King James were interrupted by a severe visitation of the plague, which killed off as many as 30,578 persons, and it was not till March 25, 1604, that the king, the queen and Prince Henry passed triumphantly from the Tower to Westminster.

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    0
  • The same topographer published in his Middlesex a map of Westminster as well as this one of the City of London.

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    0
  • A strong earthen rampart, flanked with bastions and redoubts, surrounded the City, its liberties, Westminster and Southwark, making an immense enclosure.

    0
    0
  • Pitt was buried on the 22nd of February, and Fox on the 10th of October, both in Westminster Abbey.

    0
    0
  • These figures include (1) the City of London within and (2) without the walls, (3) the City and Liberties of Westminster, (4) the outparishes within the bills of mortality and (5) the parishes not within the bills of mortality.

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  • 69,000 57,300 As the increase in Westminster is not great (130,000 in 1700 and 152,000 in 1750) and there is little difference in the totals it will be seen that the amount is chiefly made up by the increase in the parishes without the bills of mortality.

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    0
  • Stow, Remarks on London and Westminster (1722); Robert Seymour (John Mottley), Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster (1 734, another edition 1753); William Maitland, History of London (1 739, other editions 1756, 1760, 1769, continued by John Entick 1775); John Entick, A New and Accurate History of London, Westminster, Southwark (1766); The City Remembrancer, Narratives of the Plague 1665, Fire 1666 and Great Storm 1703 (1769); A New and Compleat History and Survey, by a Society of Gentlemen (1770, revised by H.

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    0
  • by Edward Walford (1873-1878); Walter Besant, London, Westminster, South London, East London (1891-1902); East London Antiquities, edited by Walter A.

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    0
  • About 1350 considerable quantities of colourless flat glass were supplied by John Alemayn of Chiddingfold for glazing the windows in St George's chapel, Windsor, and in the chapel of St Stephen, Westminster.

    0
    0
  • He died in London on the 12th of October 1859, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

    0
    0
  • In 1543 he was appointed master of Westminster school, and in December 1551 prebendary of Westminster.

    0
    0
  • He was elected in September 1553 member of parliament for Looe in Cornwall in Queen Mary's first parliament, but in October 1553 a committee of the house reported that, having as prebendary of Westminster a seat in convocation, he could not sit in the House of.

    0
    0
  • His activity and fearlessness in attacking those in power during this eventful year were remarkable, and an ironical petition was circulated in Westminster Hall and the London streets complaining of his indefatigable scribbling.

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    0
  • 2 -4 (Westminster, 1897).

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    0
  • Falkenstein's gorilla, exhibited at the Westminster aquarium under the name of pongo, and afterwards at the Berlin aquarium, survived for eighteen months.

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    0
  • aane-Poole, The Mahommedan Dynasties, pp. 87-103 (Westminster, 1894).

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    0
  • Respect for his character and abilities attracted pupils irrespective of religious connexion, among them Newton Ogle, afterwards dean of Westminster.

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    0
  • Cymbeline, the play he had been reading on the last afternoon, was laid in his coffin, and on the 12th he was publicly buried with great solemnity in Westminster Abbey.

    0
    0
  • In March 1897 he recapitulated the hideous history in an open letter to the duke of Westminster.

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    0
  • During the night of the 25th of May his body was conveyed from Hawarden to London and the coffin was placed on a bier in Westminster Hall.

    0
    0
  • On the 28th of May the coffin, preceded by the two Houses of Parliament and escorted by the chief magnates of the realm, was carried from Westminster Hall to Westminster Abbey.

    0
    0
  • In 1693 he was appointed rector of St James's, Westminster.

    0
    0
  • At first his literary activity was limited to sectional publications, and he addressed his public, now as editor and now as leading contributor, in the Monthly Repository, the Christian Reformer, the Prospective, the Westminster and the National Review.

    0
    0
  • From about this time to 1860 he contributed a large number of articles to the Westminster Review, which contain the first sketches of his philosophic doctrines.

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    0
  • 1858, Essays (containing most of his contributions to the Westminster Review; 1863, vol.

    0
    0
  • The Westminster Review (1824), established by the followers of Jeremy Bentham, advocated radical reforms in church, state and legislation.

    0
    0
  • In 1836 it was joined to the London Review (1829), founded by Sir William Molesworth, and then bore the name of the London and Westminster Review till 1851, when it returned to the original title.

    0
    0
  • Contemporary magazines are the Canadian Magazine (1893), the Westminster, both produced at Toronto, La Nouvelle-France (Quebec), the Canada Monthly (London, Ontario), and the University Magazine, edited by Professor Macphail, of the McGill University.

    0
    0
  • He was born at 9 Conduit Street, Westminster, on the 24th of January 1749.

    0
    0
  • Fox himself was elected for Westminster with fewer votes than Admiral Lord Hood, but with a majority over the ministerial candidate, Sir Cecil Wray.

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    0
  • Fox is buried in Westminster Abbey by the side of Pitt.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at Westminster school and at Christ Church, Oxford.

    0
    0
  • In March 1663 he was made prebendary of Westminster, and shortly afterwards he received from his university the degree of D.D.

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    0
  • He declined the see of Rochester and the deanery of Westminster in 1713.

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    0
  • He died on the 8th of July 1716, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

    0
    0
  • Among other works with which Britton was associated either as author or editor are Historical Account of Redcliffe Church, Bristol (1813); Illustrations of Fonthill Abbey (1823); Architectural Antiquities of Normandy, with illustrations by Pugin (1825-1827); Picturesque Antiquities of English Cities (1830); and History of the Palace and Houses of Parliament at Westminster (1834-1836), the joint work of Britton and Brayley.

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    0
  • Sacheverell was one of the managers on behalf of the Commons at the trial of Lord Stafford in Westminster Hall; but took no further part in public affairs till after the elections of March 1681, when he was returned unopposed for Derbyshire.

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    0
  • In Westminster Abbey a public memorial to Wolfe was unveiled on the 4th of October 1773.

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  • In 18J7 the pope, proprio motu, appointed him provost (or head of the chapter) of Westminster, and the same year he took up his residence in Bayswater as superior of a community known as the "Oblates of St Charles," an association of secular priests on the same lines as the institute of the Oratory, but with this difference, that they are by their constitution at the beck and call of the bishop in whose diocese they live.

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  • Such a consummation not being desired by the Westminster chapter, they submitted to the pope three names, and Manning's was not one of them.

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    0
  • He brought to Rome a petition in its favour from his chapter at Westminster, and during the progress of the council he laboured incessantly to overcome the opposition of the "inopportunists."

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    0
  • The Roman Catholic Cathedral at Westminster is his joint memorial with his predecessor, Cardinal Wiseman.

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    0
  • Between this and the Westminster Confession must be noted the first Baptist confession, published in Amsterdam in 1611.

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    0
  • The Westminster Confession (1648), with its two catechisms, is perhaps the ablest of the reformed confessions from the stand point of Calvinism.

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    0
  • When Cromwell before his death in 1658 allowed a conference to prepare a new confession of faith for the whole commonwealth, the Westminster Confession was accepted as a whole with an added statement on church order and discipline.

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    0
  • We must note, however, that the Baptist divines who were excluded from the Westminster Assembly issued a declaration of their principles under the title, " A Confession of Faith of seven Congregations or Churches in London which are commonly but unjustly called Anabaptists, for the Vindication of the Truth and Information of the Ignorant."

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  • Two articles in the Westminster Review, one on the Italian question, which procured him the special thanks of Cavour, the other on Essays and Reviews, which had the probably undesigned effect of stimulating the attack on the book, attracted especial notice.

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    0
  • He left the army in 1887, married Sibell Mary, daughter of the gth Earl of Scarbrough, widow of Earl Grosvenor, mother of the 2nd Duke of Westminster, and became private secretary to Mr. Balfour, at the time Irish Secretary, a position which he held till 1892.

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    0
  • The pulpit was formerly used in the nave of Westminster Abbey, being presented to Belfast cathedral by the dean and chapter of that foundation.

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    0
  • He also perjured himself when putting before Elizabeth's commission of inquiry at Westminster (December 1568) a copy of the confession of Hepburn of Bowton (Cotton MSS.

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    0
  • This is attested as a "true copy," but Moray, who had been present when Bowton was examined (December 8, 1567), knew that the copy presented at Westminster (December 1568) had been mutilated because the excised passages were damning to Lethington and the earl of Morton, accomplices in the crime of Darnley's murder, and accomplices of Moray in his prosecution of his sister.

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  • Henderson prefers the hypothesis that Lennox had lost Crawford's notes; and that the identities are explained by the "remarkably good memories of Crawford and Mary, or by the more likely supposition that Crawford, before preparing his declaration for the conference" (at Westminster, December 1568) "refreshed his memory by the letter."

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  • His body lay in state at Greenwich and after a public funeral was buried in Henry VII.'s chapel at Westminster Abbey, to be disinterred at the Restoration.

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    0
  • He was a spectator of the riot of St Giles's, Edinburgh, on the 23rd of July 1637, endeavoured in vain to avoid disaster by concessions, and on the taking of the Covenant perceived that "now all that we have been doing these thirty years past is thrown down at once."' He escaped to Newcastle, was deposed by the assembly on the 4th of December on a variety of ridiculous charges, and died in London on the 26th of November 1639, receiving burial in Westminster Abbey.

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    0
  • Anne died after a long illness on the 2nd of March 1619, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

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    0
  • For a brief interval, in 1673-1674, the Dutch were again in control, but in the latter year, by the treaty of Westminster, the " three counties on the Delaware " again became part of the English possessions in America held by the duke of York, later James II.

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  • by his wife Elizabeth Woodville, and was born, during his father's temporary exile, in the sanctuary of Westminster Abbey on the 2nd of November 1470.

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  • He was buried in Westminster Abbey at the foot of Shakespeare's statue with imposing solemnities.

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    0
  • Educated privately until 1605, he was then sent to Westminster School, and in 1609 he became a scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge, where he was made B.A.

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  • at Westminster had a beaded row below the circlet, which is narrow and plain, and from it rises a series of plain trefoils with slightly raised points between them.

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  • on his effigy in Westminster Abbey shows a circlet surmounted by four crosses and four fleurs-de-lys alternately, and has two arches rising from it.

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  • There were, in fact, two sets of regalia, the one used for the coronations and kept at Westminster, FIG.

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  • However, in 1625-1626 it is definitely recorded that the viscounts carried their coronets in their hands in the coronation procession from Westminster Hall to the Abbey church.

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    0
  • Calamy was an active member in the Westminster assembly of divines, and, refusing to advance to Congregationalism, found in Presbyterianism the middle course which best suited his views of theology and church government.

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    0
  • Towards the end of his arts course he became a contributor to the Westminster Review (first article "Electrotype and Daguerreotype," September 1840).

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    0
  • This post he occupied for three successive sessions, during which he continued writing for the Westminster, and also in 1842 helped Mill with the revision of the MS. of his System of Logic. In 1843 he contributed the first review of the book to the London and Westminster.

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    0
  • In Mary's reign some of the surviving monks were brought together, and Westminster Abbey was restored.

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    0
  • Of the monks professed there during this momentary revival, one, Sigebert Buckley, lived on into the reign of James I.; and being the only survivor of the Benedictines of England, he in 1607 invested with the English habit and affiliated to Westminster Abbey and to the English congregation two English priests, already Benedictines in the Italian congregation.

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  • On the 4th of July 1601 he was appointed dean of Westminster and gave much attention to the school there.

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    0
  • Many of Pell's manuscripts fell into the hands of Dr Busby, master of Westminster School, and afterwards came into the possession of the Royal Society; they are still preserved in something like forty folio volumes, which contain, not only Pell's own memoirs, but much of his correspondence with the mathematicians of his time.

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    0
  • Thomas Turton, the regius professor of divinity (afterwards dean of Westminster and bishop of Ely), had written a pamphlet objecting to the admission, on the ground of the apprehended unsettlement of the religious opinions of young churchmen.

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  • He lies in Westminster Abbey in the same grave as Grote.

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  • to be summoned to Westminster to take part in the trials of the pyx.

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  • 12, 1658), agreed on by representatives - the majority non-ministerial - from 120 churches, is one tempered by experience gained in Holland and New England, as well as in the Westminster Assembly.

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    0
  • But by the treaty of Westminster, February 1674, the Dutch title to the province was finally extinguished, and in November the English again took possession.

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    0
  • In 1617 he became chaplain to the king, in 1619 dean of Salisbury, and in the following year dean of Westminster.

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    0
  • On the fall of Bacon in 1621 Williams, who had meantime ingratiated himself with the duke of Buckingham, was appointed lord keeper, and was at the same time made bishop of Lincoln, retaining also the deanery of Westminster.

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    0
  • In 1841 he resigned his living to become curate to Samuel Wilberforce, then rector of Alverstoke, and upon Wilberforce's promotion to the deanery of Westminster in 1845 he was presented to the rectory of Itchenstoke.

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    0
  • In 1856 Trench was raised to the deanery of Westminster, probably the position which suited him best.

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    0
  • The actual framing of the British North America Act, into which the resolutions of these two conferences were consolidated, was carried out at the Westminster Palace Hotel in London, during December 1866 and January 1867, by delegates from all the provinces working in co-operation with the law officers of the Crown, under the presidency of Lord Carnarvon, then secretary of state for the colonies.

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    0
  • In Westminster Abbey the space east of the transept is the presbytery, and the same arrangement is found in Canterbury Cathedral.

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  • He was educated at Westminster School and the universities of Edinburgh and Bonn.

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  • Stow (Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster) describes was destroyed for military reasons by Carmagnola in 1416.

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  • In Milwaukee are St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral and All Saints Protestant Episcopal Cathedral - the city is the see of a Roman Catholic archbishopric (established in 1892) and of a Protestant Episcopal bishopric. Among other church structures are Plymouth Congregational, Westminster Presbyterian, Church of Gesu (Roman Catholic) and Trinity Lutheran.

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  • No more touching ceremony of the kind had ever been performed in Westminster Abbey.

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  • The: traditional banquet in Westminster Hall, with the throwing down of the glove by the king's champion in armour, had been dispensed with at the coronation of William IV., and it was resolved not to revive it.

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  • In London the day itself was kept by a solemn service in Westminster Abbey, to which the queen went in state, surrounded by the most brilliant, royal, and princely escort that had ever accompanied a British sovereign, and cheered on her way by the applause of hundreds of thousands of her subjects.

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    0
  • From 1883 to 1901 he was headmaster of Westminster school; and his death, on the 19th of July 1907, deprived classical scholarship in England of one of its most brilliant modern representatives.

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    0
  • The Westminster Confession declares: " The Lord Jesus Christ, by His perfect obedience and sacrifice of Himself, which He through the Eternal Spirit once offered up to God, bath 12 Mark 45; Matt.

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    0
  • He was educated at Westminster and Oriel College, Oxford, then the centre of the ecclesiastical revival.

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    0
  • On the demand of the college he resigned his fellowship at Oxford, and mainly at least supported himself by writing, contributing largely to Fraser's Magazine and the Westminster Review.

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    0
  • He was deeply interested in politics, was a follower of Mr Gladstone, and approved the Home Rule Bill of 1886, but objected to the later proposal to retain the Irish members at Westminster.

    0
    0
  • A new war between Great Britain and Holland broke out in 1672 and was terminated by the Treaty of Westminster (February 17, 1674), by which the points at issue between the two companies were referred first to commissioners and finally to an arbitrator.

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  • With this office he combined those of first secretary to his father, the lord-lieutenant of Ireland, and Irish secretary of war, and a seat in each of the two Houses of Commons at Westminster and Dublin, winning at the same time the repute of being "the gayest man in Ireland except his father."

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    0
  • In the following year Bancroft was made a prebendary of St Paul's; he had been canon of Westminster since 1587.

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    0
  • In 1643 he was elected one of the Assembly of Divines at Westminster, but his sympathies with the king and with the Anglican Church were so strong that he declined to sit.

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    0
  • He was at once appointed dean of Westminster, and in 1661 was one of the commissioners for revising the liturgy.

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    0
  • In 1823, the Confession of Faith was published; it is based on the Westminster Confession as Calvinistically construed," and contains 44 articles.

    0
    0
  • Churchyard lived right through Elizabeth's reign, and was buried in St Margaret's church, Westminster, on the 4th of April 1604.

    0
    0
  • But the projected march on Westminster fizzled out when the preparations made to receive it became known.

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  • The influence of the revival extended to many other schools, such as Christ's Hospital (1552), Westminster (1560), and Merchant Taylors' (1561); Repton (1 557), Rugby (1567) and Harrow (1571).

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    0
  • The Westminster Greek Grammar presented Latin verses to Queen Elizabeth.

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  • During the rest of the century the leading landmarks are the three royal commissions known by the names of their chairmen: (1) Lord Clarendon's on nine public schools, Eton, Winchester, Westminster, Charterhouse, Harrow, Rugby, Shrewsbury, St Paul's and Merchant Taylors' (1861-1864), resulting in the Public Schools Act of 1868; (2) Lord Taunton's on 782 endowed schools (1864-1867), followed by the act of 1869; and (3) Mr Bryce's on secondary education (1894-1895).

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  • In November 1903 a syndicate was of Grant (1575) was succeeded by that of Camden (1 595), founded mainly on a Paduan text-book, and apparently adopted in 1596 by Sir Henry Savile at Eton, where it long remained in use as the Eton Greek Grammar, while at Westminster itself it was superseded by that of Busby (1663).

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    0
  • In 1644 he was appointed one of the scribes or secretaries of the Assembly of Divines at Westminster.

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    0
  • He died in London of typhoid fever on the 27th of June 1883, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

    0
    0
  • Unfortunately for himself he secured his return fo parliament as member for Honiton in 1806 and for Westminster in 1807.

    0
    0
  • He was, however, almost immediately re-elected member for Westminster, but he had to serve his term (one year) of imprisonment, and, after escaping and being recaptured, he regained his liberty in 1815 on payment of the fine of r000 to which he had been sentenced.

    0
    0
  • Lord Dundonald died in London on the 30th of October 1860, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

    0
    0
  • Verified " Parliamentary Copies " of the imperial standard are placed at the Royal Mint, with the Royal Society, at the Royal Observatory, and in the Westminster Palace.

    0
    0
  • and of Queen Elizabeth, this standard is deposited in the Jewel Tower at Westminster.

    0
    0
  • They are probably of the Norman period, and were kept in the Pyx Chapel at Westminster, now in the custody of the Commissioners of Works.

    0
    0
  • 950 and copies were legally compared and stamped; the Normans removed them to Westminster to the custody of the king's chamberlains at the exchequer; and they were preserved in the crypt of Edward the Confessor, while remaining royal property (9).

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    0
  • Since 1648 the standard Presbyterian catechisms have been those compiled by the Westminster Assembly, presented to parliament in 1647, and then authorized by the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland (July 1648) and by the Scottish parliament (January 1649).

    0
    0
  • Even when (as in the Shorter Westminster Catechism and the School Catechism) the Creed is simply printed as an appendix, or where (as in the Free Church Catechism) it is not mentioned at all, its substance is dealt with.

    0
    0
  • The Heidelberg and Westminster Catechisms are of a more logical and independent character.

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    0
  • Beveridge, A Short History of the Westminster Assembly (1904), ch.

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    0
  • Dr Lancelot Andrewes, dean of Westminster.

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    0
  • translation in hand, and to move and charge as many as being skilful in the tongues and having taken pains in that kind, to send his particular observations to the company either at Westminster, Cambridge or Oxford.

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  • (13) The directors in each company to the deans of Westminster and Chester for that place; and the king's professors in the Hebrew or Greek in either university.

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    0
  • Ellicott, bishop of Gloucester and Bristol; and George Moberly, bishop of Salisbury; Dr Edward Bickersteth (1814-1892), prolocutor of the lower house of convocation; Henry Alford, dean of Canterbury, and Arthur Penrhyn Stanley, dean of Westminster; Joseph Williams Blakesley (1808-1885), canon of Canterbury, and (1872) dean of Lincoln.

    0
    0
  • Troutbeck, minor canon of Westminster, acted as secretary.

    0
    0
  • On the completion of its work the New Testament company divided itself into three committees, working at London, Westminster and Cambridge, for the purpose of revising the Apocrypha.

    0
    0
  • In Canterbury cathedral and Westminster Abbey it has definitely displaced the older Version.

    0
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  • Westminster cathedral (see Plate I.

    0
    0
  • Westminster Abbey is another example of a great Benedictine abbey, identical in its general arrangements, so far as they can be traced, with those described above.

    0
    0
  • Considerable portions of this remain, including the abbot's parlour, celebrated as "the Jerusalem Chamber," his hall, now used for the Westminster King's Scholars, and the kitchen and butteries beyond.

    0
    0
  • Like the hall in the castle at Winchester, and Westminster Hall, as originally built, it was divided by 18 pillars and arches, with 3 aisles.

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  • by Paddington, and the city of Westminster, S.E.

    0
    0
  • The greater part of the gardens, however, with the Albert Memorial, erected by Queen Victoria in memory of Albert, prince consort, the Albert Hall, opposite to it, one of the principal concert-halls in London, and the Imperial Institute to the south, are actually within the city of Westminster, though commonly connected with Kensington.

    0
    0
  • On the accession of Edward III., Henry, earl of Lancaster, as president of the council, had superintended the coronation of the infant king; John of Gaunt did the same for the infant Richard II.; and, as part of the duties involved, sat in the White Hall of Westminster to hear and determine the claims to perform coronation services.

    0
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  • Scott, afterwards headmaster of Westminster.

    0
    0
  • Shortly afterwards, having previously resigned his canonry at Peterborough, he was appointed by the crown to a canonry at Westminster, and accepted the position of examining chaplain to Archbishop Benson.

    0
    0
  • He held his canonry at Westminster in conjunction with the regius professorship. The strain of the joint work was very heavy, and the intensity of the interest and study which he brought to bear upon his share in the labours of the Ecclesiastical Courts Commission, of which he had been appointed a member, added to his burden.

    0
    0
  • He was consecrated on the 1st of May at Westminster Abbey by Archbishop Thompson (of York), Hort being the preacher, and enthroned at Durham cathedral on the 15th of May.

    0
    0
  • There are many handsome churches, including St Joseph's (Roman Catholic) and St Paul's (Protestant Episcopal) cathedrals, and Trinity (Protestant Episcopal), the Westminster Presbyterian, the Delaware Avenue Baptist, and the First Presbyterian churches.

    0
    0
  • Street in 1860, is remarkable; the richness of the work within increases from west to east, culminating in a choir arcade decorated with work among the finest of its period extant; the period is that of the choir of Westminster Abbey, and from a comparison of building materials, choir arcades and sculpture of foliage, a common architect has been suggested.

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    0
  • Hewas buried in Coniston churchyard by his own express wish, the family refusing.the offer of a grave in Westminster Abbey.

    0
    0
  • Glas dissented from the Westminster Confession only in his views as to the spiritual nature of the church and the functions of the civil magistrate.

    0
    0
  • He attended Queen Mary during her last illness and preached her funeral sermon in Westminster Abbey.

    0
    0
  • JOHN FECKENHAM (c. 1515-1584), English ecclesiastic, last abbot of Westminster, was born at Feckenham, Worcestershire, of ancestors who, by their wills, seem to have been substantial yeomen.

    0
    0
  • He was one of the disputants selected to confute the Romanists at the conference of Westminster after Easter 1J59; he was select preacher at St Paul's cross on the 15th of June; and in the autumn was engaged as one of the royal visitors of the western counties.

    0
    0
  • Section II of the act ordered, inter alia, that the trial of every election petition shall be conducted before a puisne judge of one of the common law courts at Westminster and Dublin; that the said courts shall each select a judge to be placed on the rota for the trial of election petitions; that the said judges shall try petitions standing for trial according to seniority or otherwise, as they may agree; that the trial shall take place in the county or borough to which the petition refers, unless the court should think it desirable to hold it elsewhere.

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    0
  • Thereupon he was given in charge to the abbot of Westminster, and, persisting in his refusal, was four days afterwards committed to the Tower.

    0
    0
  • He was knighted by his uncle Bedford at Leicester in May 1426, and on the 6th of November 1429 was crowned at Westminster.

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    0
  • St Peter's at Rome or the Roman Catholic cathedral at Westminster.

    0
    0
  • The name, Hamstede, is synonymous with "homestead," and the manor is first named in a charter of Edgar (957-975), and was granted to the abbey of Westminster by Ethelred in 986.

    0
    0
  • At the same time the government's tenure of office was obviously drawing to its close; the usual interpretation of the Septennial Act involved a dissolution either in 1905 or 1906, and the government whips found increased difficulty in keeping a majority at Westminster, since neither the pronounced Chamberlainites nor the convinced free-trade Unionists showed any zeal, and a large number of the uncertain Unionists did not intend to stand again for parliament.

    0
    0
  • In 1849 the Normal Training College for the education of dayschool teachers was opened in Westminster, and in 1872 a second college was opened in Battersea for school-mistresses.

    0
    0
  • Westminster provides for 120 and Southlands for 110 students.

    0
    0
  • The department has its monthly organ and has its offices in Westminster.

    0
    0
  • Kap..cipa, an arched chamber), in law, a word applied at one time to the English judges' chambers in Serjeants' Inn, as distinct from their bench in Westminster Hall.

    0
    0
  • Shortly after the accession of Mary in 1553 a summons was sent to Latimer to appear before the council at Westminster.

    0
    0
  • His mind was cultivated; he was a discriminating patron of literature, and Westminster Abbey is an abiding memorial of his artistic taste.

    0
    0
  • Henry died at Westminster on the 16th of November 1272; his widow, Eleanor, took the veil in 1276 and died at Amesbury on the 25th of June 1291.

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  • He was made prebendary of Worcester (1601) and of Westminster (5 July 1601).

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  • In 1170 he was crowned at Westminster by Roger of York.

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  • WILLIAM DOWDESWELL (1721-1775), English politician, was a son of William Dowdeswell of Pull Court, Bushley, Worcestershire, and was educated at Westminster school, at Christ Church, Oxford, and at the university of Leiden.

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  • The last case was that of Sir Francis Michell in 1621, whose spurs were hacked from his heels, his sword-belt cut, and his sword broken over his head by the heralds in Westminster Hall.8 Roughly speaking, the age of chivalry properly so called may be said to have extended from the beginning of the crusades to the end of the Wars of the Roses.

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  • The officers of the order are the dean (the dean of Westminster), Bath King of Arms, the registrar, and the usher of the Scarlet Rod.

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  • Among wellknown natives of the town were Adam Smith, Henry Balnaves of Halhill, the Scottish reformer and lord of session in the time of Queen Mary; George Gillespie, the theologian and a leading member of the Westminster Assembly, and his younger brother Patrick (1617-1675), a friend of Cromwell and principal of Glasgow University; John Ritchie (1778-1870), one of the founders of the Scotsman; General Sir John Oswald (1771-1840), who had a command at San Sebastian and Vittoria.

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  • He frequently preached before the Long Parliament, and was a member of the Westminster Assembly in 1643.

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  • Africa (Basutoland, Natal, Transvaal, Orange River Colony), the " Great North-West " of Canada (Athabasca-Mackenzie, Saskatchewan, St Boniface, New Westminster).

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  • STATUTES OF WESTMINSTER, two English statutes passed during the reign of Edward I, Parliament having met at Westminster on the 22nd of April 1275, its main work was the consideration of the statute of Westminster I.

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  • The second statute of Westminster was passed in the parliament of 1285.

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  • The statute Quia Emptores of 1290 is sometimes called the statute of Westminster III.

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  • Synods Of Westminster >>

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  • He died on the 4th of May 1677, and was interred in Westminster Abbey, where a monument, surmounted by his bust, was soon after erected by the contributions of his friends.

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  • The treaty of Westminster, which provided that all conquests should be restored, was signed on the r4th of February 1674.

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  • But the losses to Dutch trade were so serious that negotiations for peace were set on foot by the burgher party of Holland, and Cromwell being not unwilling, an agreement was reached in the Treaty of Westminster, signed on Provinces with a view to the settlement of the Dano Swedish question, which ended in securing a northern peace in 1660, and in keeping the Baltic open for Dutch trade.

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  • He reached London on the 22nd of August, and next day was taken to Westminster Hall, where he was impeached as a traitor by Sir Peter Mallorie, the king's justice.

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  • See John Hutchins, The History and Antiquities of the County of Dorset (3rd edition, Westminster, 1861); Anon., History of Wimborne Minster (London, 1860).

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  • CHURCH ARMY, an English religious organization, founded in 1882 by the Rev. Wilson Carlile (afterwards prebendary of St Paul's), who banded together in an orderly army of "soldiers" and "officers" a few working men and women, whom he and others trained to act as "Church of England evangelists" among the outcasts and criminals of the Westminster slums. Previous experience had convinced him that the moral condition of the lowest classes of the people called for new and aggressive action on the part of the Church, and that this work was most effectively done by laymen and women of the same class as those whom it was desired to touch.

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  • It was subscribed by many in both kingdoms and also in Ireland, and was approved by the English parliament, and with some slight modifications by the Westminster Assembly of Divines.

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  • The Nassak, 788 carats, the property of the duke of Westminster.

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  • Its numbers gradually increased to a marvellous extent, as may be seen by the following figures: - See an article in the Albemarle of January 1892, written by Miss Meresia Nevill; and the Primrose League Manual, published at the offices at Westminster.

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  • In 1873 this was exchanged for a canonry at Westminster.

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  • The following is a list of Kingsley's writings: - Saint's Tragedy, a drama (1848); Alton Locke, a novel (1849); Yeast, a novel (1849) Twenty-five Village Sermons (1849); Phaeton, or Loose Thoughts for Loose Thinkers (1852); Sermons on National Subjects (1st series,1852); Hypatia, a novel (1853); Glaucus, or the Wonders of the Shore (1855); Sermons on National Subjects (2nd series, 1854); Alexandria and her Schools (1854); Westward Ho I a novel (1855); Sermons for the Times (1855); The Heroes, Greek fairy tales (1856); Two Years Ago, a novel (1857); Andromeda and other Poems (1858); The Good News of God, sermons (1859); Miscellanies (1859); Limits of Exact Science applied to History (Inaugural Lectures, 1860); Town and Country Sermons 0860; Sermons on the Pentateuch (1863); Water-babies (1863); The Roman and the Teuton (1864); David and other Sermons (1866); Hereward the Wake, a novel (1866); The Ancient Regime (Lectures at the Royal Institution, 1867); Water of Life and other Sermons (1867); The Hermits (1869); Madam How and Lady Why (1869); At last (1871); Town Geology (1872); Discipline and other Sermons 1872); Prose Idylls (1873); Plays and Puritans (1873); Health and Education (1874); Westminster Sermons (1874); Lectures delivered in America (1875).

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  • He had one long dispute with the monks of Worcester, another with the abbot of Westminster, and was vigilant in guarding his material interests.

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  • To add to this misfortune, during his absence some of his supporters violated the sanctuary at Westminster.

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  • Hay was an excellent public speaker; some of his best addresses are In Praise of Omar; On the Unveiling of the Bust of Sir Walter Scott in Westminster Abbey, May 21, 1897; and a memorial address in honour of President McKinley.

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  • His first speech was on the Catholic question, and though some doubt had been felt lest Grattan, like Flood, should belie at Westminster the reputation made in Dublin, all agreed with the description of his speech by the Annual Register as "one of the most brilliant and eloquent ever pronounced within the walls of parliament."

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  • He died on the 6th of June 1820, and was buried in Westminster Abbey close to the tombs of Pitt and Fox.

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  • His statue is in the outer lobby of the Houses of Parliament at Westminster.

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  • AUGUSTUS MONTAGUE TOPLADY (1740-1778), Anglican divine, was born at Farnham, Surrey, and educated at Westminster and Trinity College, Dublin.

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  • It was here that the: "Stone of Destiny," now contained in the base of the coronation chair at Westminster Abbey, was kept before its removal to Scone.

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  • The manor was granted by Edward the Confessor to Westminster Abbey, and passed in the 13th century to the see of London and in the 16th to the Crown; but was not so held later than 1603.

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  • Four road-bridges cross the Thames within the limits of the borough, namely Waterloo, Westminster, Lambeth and Vauxhall, of which the first, a fine stone structure, dates from 1817, and is the oldest Thames bridge standing within the county of London.

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  • from Westminster Bridge Road as Kennington Road, continuing as Brixton Road and Brixton Hill, Clapham Road branching S.W.

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  • Several thoroughfares also converge upon Vauxhall Bridge, and from a point near this down to Westminster Bridge the river is bordered by the fine Albert Embankment.

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  • In the present Westminster Bridge Road was a circus, well known in the later 18th and early 19th centuries as Astley's, and near Vauxhall Bridge were the celebrated Vauxhall Gardens.

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  • He was laid, a week later, in Westminster Abbey, among the eminent men of whom he had been the historian - Cowley and Denham, Dryden and Congreve, Gay, Prior and Addison.

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  • A member for Fowey and Looe was summoned to a council at Westminster in 1340, but from that date until 1571, when it was entrusted with the privilege of returning two members, it had no parliamentary representation.

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  • The service which formerly took place in the Chapel Royal, Whitehall, is now held in Westminster Abbey.

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  • The full ritual is gone through by the Roman Catholic archbishop of Westminster, and abroad it survives in all Catholic countries, a notable example being that of the Austrian emperor.

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  • From 1824 to 1826 Mill contributed to the Westminster Review, started as the organ of his party, a number of articles in which he attacked the Edinburgh and Quarterly Reviews and ecclesiastical establishments.

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  • Educated at Westminster school and at Trinity College, Cambridge, he began his literary career by some satirical verses on Bath society published in 1777, and Poetical Tales, by "Sir Gregory Gander," in 1778.

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  • McNeile, The Book of Exodus (Westminster Commentaries) (1908); also the articles on "Exodus" by G.

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  • Born at Bristol on the 27th of June 1786, he was educated at Westminster school and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated in 1808.

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  • In February 1819 Hobhouse was the Radical candidate at a by-election for the representation of the city of Westminster, but he failed to secure election.

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  • But this proceeding only increased his popularity, and at the general election of 1820 he was returned for Westminster.

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  • As the result of negotiations and preparations extending over five years, 250 bishops, together with delegates, clerical and lay, from every diocese in the Anglican communion, met in London, the opening service of intercession being held in Westminster Abbey.

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  • Both of them were at Westminster and Oxford and were called to the bar, and for a time they studied in France at the Royal Military College at Caen.

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  • That it was the founder's intention to establish a great public school upon the model of Westminster and St Paul's, with provision for university training, is shown by the statutes; but for more than two centuries the educational benefits of God's Gift College were restricted to the twelve poor scholars.

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  • Reproduced by kind permission of the Archbishop of Westminster.

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  • - Mitra pretiosa of the late Cardinal Vaughan, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Westminster.

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  • As a Puritan controversialist he was remarkably active; in 1580 the bishop of Ely appointed him to defend puritanism against the Roman Catholics, Thomas Watson, ex-bishop of Lincoln (1513-1584), and John Feckenham, formerly abbot of Westminster, and in 1581 he was one of the disputants with the Jesuit, Edmund Campion, while in 1582 he was among the clergy selected by the privy council to argue against any papist.

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  • He was elected member for Armagh in the first united parliament, and was a well-known character at Westminster till he died on the 11th of April 1816.

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  • At the same time he was cultured, with a taste for literature, art and music. Henry lies buried in Westminster Abbey.

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  • Following the example, as he declared, of Oliver Cromwell (for whom he showed an admiration in other respects - culminating in 1900 in the erection of a statue outside Westminster Hall, which was not appreciated either by the Irish Nationalist party or by others among his political associates), he took a pride in owning racehorses, and afterwards won the Derby three times, in 1894, 1895 and 1905.

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  • 1882), who in 1909 married a daughter of Lord Henry Grosvenor, 3rd son of the 1st duke of Westminster, entered parliament in 1906 as Liberal member for Mid Lothian, but retired in 1910; he was well known as a cricketer, captaining the Surrey eleven in 1905 and 1906.

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  • It was reviewed by Mill in the Westminster and by Thackeray in The Times, and Carlyle, after a heroic struggle, was at last touching land.

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  • A place in Westminster Abbey was offered, but he was buried, according to his own desire, by the side of his parents at Ecclefechan.

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  • He entered Westminster school, and in 1759 was elected to a scholarship at Trinity College, Cambridge.

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  • Neither they nor the lesser chiefs who flourished on the lack of common law and order could be reduced by ordinary methods, and the Councils of Wales and of the North were given summary powers derived from the Roman civil law similiar to those exercised by the Star Chamber at Westminster and the court of Castle Chamber at Dublin.

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  • at Westminster, salvo jure suo, and through the lips of Bruce, earl of Carrick.

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  • From Ardtornish castle, John, lord of the Isles, sent ambassadors to Westminster, where (1462) a treaty was made for an English alliance and the partition of Scotland between Douglas and the Celts.

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  • In January 1644, a Scottish army crossed Tweed, to aid the parliament, with preachers to attend the synod of Westminster.

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  • While the rival bands of preachers squabbled, Cromwell, like Edward I., arranged that Scottish members should sit in Westminster, and, commercially, as in the administration of fair justice, and the peace of the country, Scotland prospered under English rule.

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  • Scotland was to have forty-five members and sixteen elected peers at Westminster; the holders of Darien stock were compensated; as a balance to equality of taxation a pecuniary equivalent was to be paid, the kirk and Scottish courts of justice were safeguarded (final appeal being to the British House of Lords), and Scots shared English facilities and privileges of trade, in name, for many years passed before Scotland really began to enjoy the benefits.

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  • ARTHUR PENRHYN STANLEY (1815-1881), English divine, dean of Westminster, was born on the 13th of December 1815, at Alderley in Cheshire, where his father, afterwards bishop of Norwich, was then rector.

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  • Towards the close of 1863 he was appointed by the Crown to the deanery of Westminster.

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  • His tenure of the deanery of Westminster was memorable in many ways.

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  • In 1865 he published his Memorials of Westminster Abbey, a work which, despite occasional inaccuracies, is a mine of information.

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  • In the summer he was preparing a paper on the Westminster Confession, and preaching in the abbey a course of Saturday Lectures on the Beatitudes.

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  • Professor Beesly stood unsuccessfully as Liberal candidate for Westminster in 1885 and for Marylebone in 1886, and is the author of numerous review articles on social and political topics, treated from the positivist standpoint, especially on the Irish question.

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  • Owen was probably born about 1359, studied law at Westminster, was squire to the earl of Arundel, and a witness for Grosvenor in the famous Scrope and Grosvenor lawsuit in 1386.

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  • JOHN KIDD (1775-1851), English physician, chemist and geologist, born at Westminster on the 10th of September 1775, was the son of a naval officer, Captain John Kidd.

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  • He was educated at Bury St Edmunds and Westminster, and afterwards at Christ Church, Oxford, where he graduated B.A.

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  • But on his arrival there he ascertained that a part of the pope's plan for restoring a diocesan hierarchy in England was that he himself should return to England as cardinal and archbishop of Westminster.

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  • Wiseman displayed calmness and courage, and immediately penned an admirable Appeal to the English People (a pamphlet of over 30 pages), in which he explained the nature of the pope's action, and argued that the admitted principle of toleration included leave to establish a diocesan hierarchy; and in his concluding paragraphs he effectively contrasted that dominion over Westminster, which he was taunted with claiming, with his duties towards the poor Catholics resident there, with which alone he was really concerned.

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  • In July 1852 he presided at Oscott over the first provincial synod of Westminster, at which Newman preached his sermon on the " Second Spring "; and at this date Wiseman's dream of the rapid conversion of England to the ancient faith seemed not incapable of realization.

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  • Two years later Manning was appointed provost of Westminster and he established in Bayswater his community of the " Oblates of St Charles."

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  • But in other respects his last years were cheered by marks of general regard and admiration, in which non-Catholics joined; and after his death (16th February 1865) there was an extraordinary demonstration of popular respect as his body was taken from St Mary's, Moorfields, to the cemetery at Kensal Green, where it was intended that it should rest only until a more fitting place could be found in a Roman Catholic cathedral church of Westminster.

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  • George's Chapel, Windsor, are the stalls of the Knights of the Garter, in Henry VII.'s Chapel in Westminster Abbey are those of the Knights of the Bath, adorned with the stall plates emblazoned with the arms of the knight occupying the stall, above which is suspended his banner.

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  • was born in Westminster, Massachusetts, on the 8th of August 1839.

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  • The screen by Henry V.'s tomb at Westminster is a good early specimen of this kind of work.

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  • and Queen Eleanor at Westminster, cast in bronze by the "cire perdue" process, and thickly gilt, are equal, if not superior, in artistic beauty to any sculptor's work of the same period (end of the 13th century) that was produced in Italy or elsewhere.

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  • The gates to Henry VII.'s chapel, and the screen round his tomb at Westminster (see fig.

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  • The beauty of these effigies led to their being imported into England; most are now destroyed, but a fine specimen still exists at Westminster on the tomb of William de Valence (1296).

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  • At Fulton are the Westminster College (Presbyterian, founded in 1853), the Synodical College for Young Women (Pres., founded in 1871), the William Woods College for Girls (Christian Church, 1890), and the Missouri 'school for the deaf (1851).

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  • 1376), archbishop of Canterbury and cardinal, was born at Langham in Rutland, becoming a monk in the abbey of St Peter at Westminster, and later prior and then abbot of this house.

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  • Langham's tomb is the oldest monument to an ecclesiastic in Westminster Abbey; he left the residue of his estate - a large sum of money - to the abbey, and has been called its second founder.

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  • Stephen's Church of England school, Westminster, where he was trained as an elementary schoolmaster; but at the age of 20 he preferred to emigrate to Australia and to make his living as he could until he succeeded in entering political life as a member of the Labour party.

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  • At a trial in Westminster Hall about the patent rights granted t o John Dollond (Watkin v.

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  • He died on the 29th of March 1830, and was buried in the nave of Westminster Abbey.

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  • In 1894 he became canon of Westminster.

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  • Before the Norman period the manor of Hanwell belonged to Westminster Abbey.

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  • Soon afterwards Queen Anne appointed him one of her chaplains in ordinary, and in 170 9 presented him to the rectory of St James's, Westminster.

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  • His father, also George, married (1793) Selina, daughter of Henry Peckwell (1747-1787), minister of the countess of Huntingdon's chapel in Westminster (descended from a Huguenot family, the de Blossets, who had left Touraine on the revocation of the Edict of Nantes), and had one daughter and ten sons, of whom the historian was the eldest.

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  • In 1826 Grote published in the Westminster Review (April) a criticism of Mitford's History of Greece, which shows that his ideas were already in order.

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  • He had finished the Organon and was about to deal with the metaphysical and physical treatises when he died on the 18th of June 1871, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

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  • It falls within the bounds of the city of Westminster.

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  • Of the former of these records two copies were preserved in the chapterhouse at Westminster (now in the Record Office, London), and it has been printed by Rymer (Foedera, ii.

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  • When the treasury was removed to Westminster (probably under Henry II.) the book went with it.

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  • He was a member of the convocation of 1640, and was nominated one of the Westminster Assembly of divines.

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  • Instead of sitting at Westminster he took part in the unsuccessful rising at Tunbridge in favour of King Charles I., and was obliged to flee in disguise to Oxford, then the royal headquarters.

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  • She was buried on the south side of Henry VII.'s chapel in Westminster Abbey, in the same tomb as her husband and children.

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  • 2) a few isolated cases were observed in the parishes of St Giles and St Martin's, Westminster, and a few occurred in the following winter, which was very severe.

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  • He died at Westminster on the 28th of March 1699, and was buried at Worcester.

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  • In 1850 came the " restoration of the hierarchy " by Pope Pius IX., when England was mapped out into an archbishopric of Westminster 4 and twelve suffragan sees, since increased to fifteen (sixteen including the Welsh see of Menevia).

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  • 4 Cardinal Wiseman (q.v.) was the first archbishop of Westminster.

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  • HERBERT VAUGHAN (1832-1903), cardinal and archbishop of Westminster, was born at Gloucester on the 15th of April 1832, the eldest son of lieutenant-colonel John Francis Vaughan, head of an old Roman Catholic family, the Vaughans of Courtfield, Herefordshire.

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  • In 1872 he was consecrated bishop of Salford, and in 1892 succeeded Manning as archbishop of Westminster, receiving the cardinal's hat in 1893.

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  • It was his most cherished ambition to see before he died an adequate Roman Catholic cathedral in Westminster, and he laboured untiringly to secure subscriptions, with the result that its foundation stone was laid in 1895, and that when he died, on the r9th of June 1903, the building was so far complete that a Requiem Mass was said there over his body before it was removed to its resting-place at Mill Hill Park.

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  • On reaching Westminster, York took up his residence in the royal palace, and formally asserted his claim to the throne in parliament.

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  • This chest was formerly kept in the Chapel of the Pyx in Westminster Abbey.

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  • In the Westminster Standards also, which were the fruit of the Scottish desire for a religious uniformity, Scotland did not obtain by any means all it desired in its church documents.

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  • The Scottish divines in the Westminster Assembly were only five in number, while the assembly contained effective parties of Erastians and Independents.

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  • In accepting in 1645 the Westminster Directory of Public Worship she tacitly gave up her own liturgy which had been in use till recently, and committed herself to a bald and uninviting order of worship, in which no forms of prayer were allowed to be used.

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  • The metrical psalms also, which are still sung in Scottish churches, were adopted at this time; they are based mainly on the version, which had been approved by the Westminster Assembly, of Francis Rouse (1579-1659), a member of the English House of Commons.

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  • Effect was given to this; and in April 1690 the act was passed on which the establishment of the Church of Scotland rests, the Westminster Confession being recognized, the laws in favour of Episcopacy repealed, though the Rescissory Act remained on the statute book, and the assembly appointed to meet.

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  • - For the earlier history of the kirk the outstanding authorities are the histories of Knox, Calderwood, Baillie's Letters, and Wodrow's History: Knox's liturgy has been edited by Dr Sprott, and on the Westminster Standards the reader may consult Dr Mitchell's Minutes of the Westminster Assembly, and Baird lectures on the same subject.

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  • Upon very doubtful authority he is stated to have been also at Westminster school before going to the university.

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  • On the 26th of June 1680, upon Oates's testimony, the duke of York was presented as a recusant at Westminster.

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  • West Ham and appeared at Westminster as the first Labour member.

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  • After leaving Westminster school, he was apprenticed, in 1802, to his brother, an apothecary, with the view of adopting the profession of medicine, but his bent was towards chemistry, a sound knowledge of which he acquired in his spare time.

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  • Finally, in 1203, Gerald was compelled to make complete submission to the king and archbishop at Westminster, and henceforth Canterbury remained in undisputed possession of the Welsh sees, a circumstance that undoubtedly tended towards the later union of the two countries.

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