West-indies sentence examples

west-indies
  • His mother died a few days after giving him birth; his father, Pynaston Hastings, drifted away to perish obscurely in the West Indies.

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  • At length one of the midshipmen suggested the device of " fothering," which he had seen practised in the West Indies.

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  • In December 1654 Penn and Venables sailed for the West Indies with orders to attack the Spanish colonies and the French shipping; and for the first time since the Plantagenets an English fleet appeared in the Mediterranean, where Blake upheld the supremacy of the English flag, made a treaty with the dey of Algiers, destroyed the castles and ships of the dey of Tunis at Porto Farina on the 4th of April 1655, and liberated the English prisoners captured by the pirates.

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  • The highlands of Central America and the West Indies have preserved a number of Chino-Japanese typesBocconia, Deutzia, A belie, &c.not met with elsewhere in the New Woild.

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  • The voyages of Columbus (1492-1498) resulted in the discovery of the West Indies and North America which barred the way to the Far East.

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  • One important object of English maritime adventurers of those days was to discover a route to Cathay by the north-west, a second was to settle Virginia, and a third was to raid the Spanish settlements in the West Indies.

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  • " The West Indies " (Oxford, 1890); Colonial Reports Annual; MSSloane, 3295.

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  • Howe next served in the West Indies in the "Burford," and was present in her when she was very severely damaged in the unsuccessful attack on La Guayra on the 18th of February 1742.

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  • He was made acting-lieutenant in the West Indies in the same year, and the rank was confirmed in 1744 During the Jacobite rising of 1745 he commanded the "Baltimore" sloop in the North Sea, and was dangerously wounded in the head while co-operating with a frigate in an engagement with two strong French privateers.

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  • In 1746 he became post-captain, and commanded the "Triton" (24) in the West Indies.

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  • It is served by the Tampa Northern, the Atlantic Coast Line and the Seaboard Air Line railways, and by lines of steamers to the West Indies and to the Gulf and Atlantic ports of the United States.

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  • Tampa is the principal gateway for trade and travel between the United States and the West Indies.

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  • After the Spanish-American War (1898)(1898) a large trade with the West Indies developed.

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  • The Alligator or Avocado Pear is Persea gratissima, a member of the natural order Lauraceae, and a native of the West Indies and other parts of tropical America.

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  • The pulp is much esteemed in the West Indies and is eaten as a salad, usually with the addition of pepper, salt and vinegar.

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  • It built ships as cheaply as any place in the world, it carried goods for other colonies, it traded-often evading British laws-with Europe, Guinea, Madagascar and above all with the West Indies.

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  • The period of greatest material prosperity of New Haven in the colonial period began about 1750, when a thriving commerce with other American ports and the West Indies developed.

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  • This plant, known only in cultivation, is usually regarded as native to the West Indies.

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  • vitifolium, and considers the modern stock a hybrid, and probably not indigenous to the West Indies.

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  • By careful selection (the methods of which are described below) in the United States, the quality of the product was much improved, and on the recent revival of the cotton industry in the West Indies American " Sea Island " seed was introduced back again to the original home of the species.

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  • Careful attention is now given to the employment of the seed in new cotton countries, and oil expression is practised in the West Indies.

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  • It has not yet been reported as a cotton pest in the West Indies.

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  • It is the most serious pest of cotton in the West Indies.

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  • Attention has been paid in the West Indies to seed selection, by the officers of the imperial Department of Agriculture, with the object of retaining for West Indian Sea Island cotton its place as the most valuable cotton on the British market.

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  • " During the period from 1786 to 1790 the West Indies furnished about 70% of the British supply, the Mediterranean countries 20%, and Brazil 8%; whilst the quantity contributed by the United States and India was less than 1% and Egypt contributed none.

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  • British West Indies.-Cotton was cultivated as a minor crop in parts of the West Indies as long ago as the 17th century, and at the opening of the 18th century the islands supplied about 70% of all the cotton used in Great Britain.

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  • In 1902 the total area under cotton cultivation in the British West Indies was Soo acres.

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  • 50 „ At the end of the 18th century the bulk of British cotton was obtained from the West Indies.

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  • Approximately the supplies were as follows in million lb: British West Indies.

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  • In the West Indies results are most favourable, both as regards quantity and quality of the crops.

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  • With the increase of trade between the United States and the West Indies following the SpanishAmerican War (1898), the business of the principal ports, notably of Fernandina, Tampa and Pensacola, greatly increased.

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  • The climate is somewhat more healthy than that of the other West Indies.

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  • The buccaneers or filibusters, who during the 17th century were drawn to the West Indies by the prospect of plundering the possessions of decadent Spain, often invaded Porto Rico, but that island escaped the conquest which Haiti experienced.

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  • The Helicinidae are exotic, ranging from the West Indies to the Philippines.

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  • BARBUDA, an island in the British West Indies.

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  • Bryan Edwards estimated the total import into all the British colonies of America and the West Indies from 1680 to 1786 at 2,130,000, being an annual average of 20,095.

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  • The question of the legal existence of slavery in Great Britain and Ireland was raised in consequence of an opinion given in 1729 by Yorke and Talbot, attorney-general and solicitor-general at the time, to the effect that a slave by coming into those countries from the West Indies did not become free, and might be compelled by his master to return to the plantations.

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  • At length, on the 18th of April of the latter year, a motion was made for the introduction of a bill to prevent the further importation of slaves into the British colonies in the West Indies.

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  • In 1807 there were in the West Indies 800,000; in 1830 they were reduced to 700,000.

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  • On the Colonial Slave Trade and Slavery: Washington Irving, Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus (1828), several times reprinted; Arthur Helps, Life of Las Casas (1868); Bryan Edwards, History, Civil and Commercial, of the British West Indies (1793; 5th ed.

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  • The trade of the United States with the island was as great in 1900-1907 as with Mexico and all the other West Indies combined; as great as its trade with Spain, Portugal and Italy combined; and almost as great as its trade with China and Japan.

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  • Hill, Cuba and Porto Rico with the other West Indies (New York, 1898).

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  • BAHAMAS (Lucayos), an archipelago of the British West Indies.

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  • Missiessy carried out a successful voyage of commerce-destroying, and returned safely to Rochefort on the 10th of May, from the West Indies.

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  • On the 1st of June he was joined by a frigate and two line-of-battle ships sent with orders from Rochefort, and was told to remain in the West Indies till the 5th of July, and if not joined by Ganteaume to steer for Ferrol, pick up the French and Spanish ships in the port, and come on to the Channel.

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  • An action in the West Indies would have ruined the emperor's plan of concentration, and Villeneuve decided to sail at once for Ferrol.

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  • Nelson, misled by false information, ranged the West Indies as far south as the Gulf of Paria, in search of his opponent whom he supposed to be engaged in attacks on British possessions.

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  • The Castilloa tree has been experimentally planted in Ceylon, the West Indies and other countries (Plate II.

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  • Before the general peace of 1815 he had served in North America and the West Indies and gained a wide knowledge of conditions of life on board ship under various commanders.

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  • In January 1859 he suffered a violent haemorrhage of the lungs, and sought relief by retreating first to the West Indies and afterwards to Europe.

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  • At Vizeu, Para, connexion is made with a French cable to the West Indies and the United States, and at Pernambuco with two cable lines to Europe.

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  • Successive civil wars prevented their recovery, and these great plains which ought to be one of the chief sources of meat supply for the world are comparatively destitute of stock, and the only source of revenue from this industry is the small number of animals shipped to the West Indies.

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  • The Admiralty was naturally anxious to secure the services of trustworthy flag officers, and having confidence in Hood promoted him rear-admiral out of the usual course on the 26th of September 1780, and sent him to the West Indies to act as second in command under Rodney, to whom he was personally known.

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  • He joined Rodney in January 1781, and remained in the West Indies or on the coast of North America till the close of the War of American Independence.

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  • When, however, he returned to the West Indies he was for a time in independent command owing to Rodney's absence !in England for the sake of his health.

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  • (August 2, 1571) to the bishops of the West Indies permitting the substitution of balsam of Peru for the balsam of the East in the preparation of the chrism to be used by the Catholic Church in America.

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  • He was the first "endenizened" Jew in England, and by his extensive trade with the West Indies rendered considerable services to the Commonwealth.

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  • Before beetroot had been brought to its present state of perfection, and while the factories for its manipulation were worked with hydraulic presses for squeezing the juice out of the pulp produced in the raperies, the cane sugar planter in the West Indies could easily hold his own, notwithstanding the artificial competition created and maintained by sugar bounties.

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  • The total saving effected is stated to be equivalent to 3 francs per ton of beetroot worked up. This system is also being tried on a small scale with sugar-cane juice in the West Indies.

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  • In the age of discovery the Portuguese and Spaniards became the great disseminators of the cultivation of sugar; the cane was planted in Madeira in 1420; it was carried to San Domingo in 1494; and it spread over the occupied portions of the West Indies and South America early in the 16th century.

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  • Mr Chamberlain concluded by asking whether the treasury would consent to sending a royal commission to the West Indies to inquire into the effect of the foreign sugar bounties on their principal industry.

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  • The treasury accepted the proposal, and a royal commission proceeded to the West Indies in December 1896, and reported a few months later in 1897.

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  • In the West Indies tobacco is grown on a small scale in many of the British colonies, but only in Jamaica is there a definite industry.

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  • Juglandaceae), natives of the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere, extending into Mexico, the West Indies and tropical South America.

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  • BARBADOS, or Barbadoes, an island in the British West Indies.

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  • The European wars of the 18th century caused much suffering, as the West Indies were the scene of numerous battles between the British and the French.

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  • In 1801 a new edition of both these works with certain additions was published in three volumes under the title of History of the British Colonies in the West Indies.

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  • Edwards also wrote some poems and some other works relating to the history of the West Indies.

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  • The largest known species is the drummer of the West Indies (Blabera gigantea), so called from the tapping noise it makes on wood, sufficient, when joined in by several individuals, as usually happens, to break the slumbers of a household.

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  • His next service was in the James river flotilla, but after reaching the rank of commodore, on the 16th of July 1862, he was assigned to duty against blockade runners in the West Indies.

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  • The name Shaddock is asserted to be that of a captain who introduced the tree to the West Indies.

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  • Yuca (Manihot utilissima), known as cassava in the West Indies and mandioca in Brazil, is also widely cultivated for food and for the manufacture of starch.

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  • Cargoes of rum, manufactured from West Indian sugar and molasses, were exported to Africa and exchanged for slaves to be sold in the southern colonies and the West Indies.

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  • On the first night of the debate Lord Howick, afterwards Lord Grey, who had been undersecretary for the Colonies, and who opposed the resolutions as proceeding too gradually towards abolition, cited certain occurrences on Sir John Gladstone's plantation in Demerara to illustrate his contention that the system of slave-labour in the West Indies was attended by great mortality among the slaves.

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  • Its former extensive trade with the West Indies has lately suffered owing to the enormous development of the North Sea ports, but it is still largely engaged in the Greenland whale and the oyster fisheries.

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  • In the 18th century Derby was the centre of a thriving commerce with the West Indies.

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  • Brothers' Club, a society of Tory politicians and men of letters, and the same year witnessed the failure of the two expeditions to the West Indies and to Canada promoted by him.

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  • The fruit, which has an agreeably acid flavour, is frequently eaten in the West Indies.

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  • It comprises about loo species, largely Mexican but scattered through South America and the West Indies.

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  • During the last months of the war Sir John Harman had fought a successful campaign in the West Indies against the French on whom he inflicted a severe defeat at Martinique on the 24th of June.

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  • is only from 3 2.2° to 32.7° F., and the same low temperature continues throughout the Brazil Basin to the equator; but in the North American Basin from the West Indies to the Telegraph Plateau no satisfactory bottom temperature lower than 35.6° F.

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  • The principal passenger steamers sailing from the port are those of the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company for the West Indies and the Pacific (via Panama) and for Brazil and the River Plate, &c., and the Union-Castle line for the Cape of Good Hope, Natal, East Africa, &c., both of which companies have their headquarters here.

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  • Meanwhile French corsairs from St Malo and Dieppe had been active in infesting the West Indies and the trade route followed by the Spanish convoys.

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  • They surrendered Louisiana to Spain, which had suffered much in an attempt to help them, and their possessions in America were reduced to their islands in the West Indies and French Guiana.

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  • He began his medical career as apprentice to John Paisley, a Glasgow surgeon, and after completing his apprenticeship he became surgeon to a merchant vessel trading between London and the West Indies.

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  • In the West Indies from Venezuela to the Bahamas and in the Caribbean Sea many islands yield supplies of leached guanos; the following are important in this respect: Sombrero, Navassa, A y es, Aruba, Curacoa.

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  • Trinidad, West Indies >>

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  • Kingston, West Indies >>

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  • In the West Indies Palaemon jamaicensis, and in the East Indies Pal.

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  • He entered the army in 1789, and served in Flanders, the West Indies and the Peninsula.

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  • TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS, a group in the British West Indies.

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  • MARIE GALANTE, an island in the French West Indies.

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  • He entered the army of Henry IV., and served in Brittany under Jean d'Aumont, Francois de St Luc and Charles de Brissac. When the army of the League was disbanded he accompanied his uncle, who had charge of the ships in which the Spanish allies were conveyed home, and on reaching Cadiz secured (1599) the command of one of the vessels about to make an expedition to the West Indies.

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  • 1794), the widow of a British army officer who had died in the West Indies during the War of Independence.

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  • He studied at Franeker, entered the military service in the West Indies about 1625, and was director of the West India Company's colony of Curacao from 1634 to 1644.

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  • On the 28th of April 1789 a mutiny broke out on board the "Bounty," then employed by the British government in conveying young bread-fruit trees from Tahiti to the West Indies.

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  • The smallest lizards of this family belong to the genus Anolis, extremely numerous as regards species (more than ioo) and individuals on bushes and trees of tropical America, and especially of the West Indies.

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  • (2) During the second period the successive interventions of France, Spain and Holland extended the naval war till it ranged from the West Indies to the Bay of Bengal.

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  • The French government, which by the fault of the British administration was allowed to take the offensive, had three objects in view - to help the Americans, to expel the British from the West Indies and to occupy the main strength of the naval forces of Great Britain in the Channel.

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  • On the 6th of January 1779 Admiral Byron reached the West Indies.

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  • During the early part of this year the naval forces in the West Indies were mainly employed in watching one another.

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  • The war now died down in the West Indies.

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  • The only real success achieved by this numerically imposing force was the capture on the 8th and 9th of August of a large British convoy of ships bound for the East and West Indies carrying troops.

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  • But on the American coast and in the West Indies more vigour was displayed.

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  • On the French side the count de Guichen was sent with reinforcements to the West Indies to take command of the ships left in the previous year by d'Estaing.

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  • The West Indies was again the scene of the most important operations of the year.

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  • Rodney was to go on to the West Indies with part of the fleet.

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  • He sailed on the 29th of December 1779 with the trade for the West Indies under his protection, captured a Spanish convoy on his way off Finisterre on the 8th of January, defeated a smaller Spanish force near Cape St Vincent on the 16th, relieved Gibraltar on the 19th, and left for the West Indies on the 13th of February.

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  • But a vigorous policy was carried out by France in the West Indies and America, while she began a most resolute attack on the British position in the East Indies.

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  • In the West Indies Rodney, having received news of the breach with Holland early in the year, took the island of St Eustatius, which had been a great depot of contraband of war, on the 3rd of February.

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  • (See Saints, Battle Of.) No further operations of note occurred in the West Indies.

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  • Commerce, Foreign and Domestic.The English colonies that became the United States carried on during the colonial period a commerce with the mother country, and also, both so far as the legislative trammels of the British colonial system permitted it and illicitly, a fairly active commerce with the West Indies.

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  • Although relatively unsuccessful in securing access to the British islands, the importance of the United States as a supplier of the other West Indies continually grew, and when the communication of the French and Spanish islands with their metropolises was practically cut off by the British during the Napoleonic wars, the dependence of these colonies upon the American carrying trade became absolute.

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  • As general carriers American ships gained no importance until the Napoleonic wars; and this interest was greater in the West Indies than in Europe.

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  • In 1664 a new " Company of the West Indies " (Compagnie des Indes Occidentales) was organized to control French trade and colonization not only in Canada but also in West Africa, South America and the West Indies.

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  • He was next sent to the West Indies in charge of a squadron destined for the conquest of Barbadoes and the other islands still under royalist control.

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  • During the period of the slave trade it was a leading mart for slaves in the West Indies.

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  • At the time of his death (1713) he was governorgeneral in the West Indies.

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  • Its work in the West Indies was firmly established in Wesley's lifetime.

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  • Island after island fell to him, and soon, outside Martinique, the French had scarcely a foothold in the West Indies.

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  • In the West Indies "the only horned cattle fit for work are those which have a good deal of black in them; the white are terribly tormented by the insects and they are weak and sluggish in proportion to the black."

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  • Christian Faith Society for the West Indies.

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  • For the education of medical practitioners, civil and military, the more important institutions are the National Obstetrical College at Amsterdam, the National Veterinary School at Utrecht, the National College for Military Physicians at Amsterdam and the establishment at Utrecht for the training of military apothecaries for the East and West Indies.

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  • The United Provinces were recognized as free and independent, and Spain dropped all her claims; the uti possidetis basis was adopted in respect to all conquests; the Scheldt was declared entirely closed - a clause which meant the ruin of Antwerp for the profit of Amsterdam; the right to trade in the East and West Indies was granted, and all the conquests made by the Dutch from the Portuguese were ceded to them; the two contracting parties agreed to respect and keep clear of each other's trading grounds; each was to pay in the ports of the other only such tolls as natives paid.

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  • CURACAO, or Curacoa, an island in the Dutch West Indies.

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  • The island of Curacao has a population of 30,119; and altogether the Dutch West Indies have a population of 51,693.

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  • The West Indies >>

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  • At a town meeting on the 11th of July 1774 it was resolved that "a firm and inviolable union of our colonies is absolutely necessary for the defence of our civil rights," and that "the most effectual measures to defeat the machinations of the enemies of His Majesty's government and the liberties of America is to break off all commercial intercourse with Great Britain and the West Indies until these oppressive acts for raising a revenue in America are repealed."

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  • The struggle for emancipation in the West Indies was then at the point of culmination; the leaders of the cause, from all parts of the kingdom, were assembled in London, and Garrison was at once admitted to their councils and treated with distinguished consideration.

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  • The revenue and expenditure of the Faeroes are included in the budget for Denmark proper, but Iceland and the West Indies have their separate budgets.

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  • Various attempts were also made to improve trade and industry by abolishing the still remaining privileges of the Hanseatic towns, by promoting a wholesale immigration of skilful and well-to-do Dutch traders and handicraftsmen into Denmark under most favourable conditions, by opening up the rich fisheries of the Arctic seas, and by establishing joint-stock chartered companies both in the East and the West Indies.

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  • Various reforms were carried, but the proposal to sell the Danish islands in the West Indies to the United States fell through.

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  • The church of the West Indies was disestablished and disendowed in 1868.

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  • Wade drove his military roads through the highlands, and, poor as the country still was, the city of Glasgow throve on the tobacco and sugar trade with America and the West Indies.

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  • The Virginian red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) grows in the United States, Canada and the West Indies.

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  • Mahogany (Swietenia mahogan y) is a native of the West Indies and Central America, the best-known varieties being Cuban or Spanish and Honduras.

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  • Nutmeg and mace are almost exclusively obtained from the Banda Islands, although the cultivation has been attempted with varying success in Singapore, Penang, Bengal, Reunion, Brazil, French Guiana and the West Indies.

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  • Telegraphs radiate to all parts of the island; a submarine cable to Key West forms part of the line of communication between Colon and New York, and by other cables the island has connexion with various parts of the West Indies and with South America.

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  • If the West Indies belonged to Spain by priority of discovery, Portugal might claim the East Indies by the same right.

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  • One result of the introduction of free labour has been to reduce the descendants of the slave population to a small and unimportant class - Mauritius in this respect offering a striking contrast to the British colonies in the West Indies.

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  • In 1905 the value of factory products was $4,254,024 (an increase of 37.7% over the value in 1900); the exports in 1907 were valued at $852,457; the imports were valued at $994,47 2, the excess over the exports being due to the fact that the food supply of the city is derived from other Florida ports and from the West Indies.

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  • They have still extensive colonies in the East Indian Archipelago, as well as possessions in the West Indies.

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  • The treaty transferring the Danish West Indies to the United States (1917) contained a clause recognizing Denmark's right to extend her economic and pojitical sphere over the whole of Greenland.

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  • The lesser patriarchates are those of Babylon (Chaldaic), Cilicia (Armenian), the East Indies (Latin), Lisbon (Latin), Venice (Latin) and the West Indies (Latin).

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  • JUDAH PHILIP BENJAMIN (1811-1884), Anglo-American lawyer, of Jewish descent, was born a British subject at St Thomas in the West Indies on the 11th of August 1811, and was successively an American lawyer, a leading Confederate politician and a distinguished English barrister.

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  • He then sailed for the West Indies on the 4th of November.

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  • He adduced the example of vines taken to the West Indies from Madeira, which have been found to succeed better than those taken directly from France.

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  • Conversely, French wheat taken to the West Indies produced only barren spikes, while native wheat by its side yielded an enormous harvest.

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  • americana is the source of Pita fibre, and is used as a fibre plant in Mexico, the West Indies and southern Europe.

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  • In 1905 there were imported 7,941,920 lb from Chile (only 195,328 in 1909); 6,033,104 lb from Canada (this also fluctuates greatly; 1,801,072 in 1909); 1,241,408 lb from British West Africa (4,985,232 in 1909); 1,126,720 lb from the British West Indies and Guiana (3,022,208 in 1908).

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  • He entered the navy in 1759, and obtained his commission as lieutenant in June 1770, when he was appointed to the "Princess Royal," the flagship of Admiral Byron, in which he sailed to the West Indies.

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  • Early in 1799 he was raised to the rank of rear-admiral, and sent to the West Indies to succeed Lord Hugh Seymour.

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  • The tall columnar trunk furnishes the most valued pine timber of the states; close-grained and resinous, it is very durable and polishes well; it is largely employed in American shipyards, and immense quantities are exported, especially to Britain and the West Indies.

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  • WINDWARD ISLANDS, a group and colony in the West Indies.

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  • Trade, the prevailing wind throughout the West Indies.

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  • After 1492 the discovery of the West Indies by Columbus rendered desirable a delimitation of the Spanish and Portuguese spheres of exploration.

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  • There is a society at Mauritius, and correspondents in various parts of South and West Africa, India, Japan, the West Indies and South America.

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  • Its commercial prosperity received an enormous impetus from the Treaty of Union (1707), under which trade with America and the West Indies rapidly developed.

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  • The foreign trade, especially that with the West Indies and with Great Britain, decreased after 1875, and yet much trade from the West that goes to Montreal during the warmer months passes through Portland during the winter season.

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  • This succulent berry is in some cases highly perfumed, and affords a delicate fruit for the dessert-table, as in the case of the "granadilla" (P. quadrangularis), P. edulis, P. macrocarpa, and various species of Tacsonia known as "curubas" in Spanish South America; P. laurifolia is the water-lemon, and P. maliformis the sweet calabash of the West Indies.

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  • 4 1916 he signed a treaty for the purchase by America of the Danish West Indies for $25,000,000.

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  • In modern zoology it is the name given to the main genus of a family of worm-shaped lizards, most of which inhabit the tropical parts of America, the West Indies and Africa.

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  • gigantea (the only two surviving species of this generic type are now confined to a few localities in California, but were formerly widely spread in Europe and elsewhere), Pinus Coulteri, P. Lambertiana, &c. Farther south, a few representatives of such genera as Abies, Cupressus, Pinus and juniper are found in the Mexican Highlands, tropical America and the West Indies.

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  • Export duties, it may be observed, are not important in systems of taxation generally, as there are few articles where the charge will not really fall on the wages of labour and profits of capital within the country imposing them; but opium grown in India is a well-known exception, and in the West Indies export duties on principal articles of production, in spite of their incidence, have been found a convenient source of revenue.

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  • The island of Santo Domingo was one of several in the West Indies which had early in the 16th century been almost depopulated by the oppressive colonial policy of Spain.

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  • Townley had hardly joined the French buccaneers remaining in the South Sea ere he died, and the Frenchmen with their companions crossed New Spain to the West Indies.

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  • The West Indies had by this time become hot enough even for the banded pirates.

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  • The Calendar of State Papers, Colonial Series (London, 1860 et seq.), contains much evidence for the history of the buccaneers in the West Indies.

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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington (the Pennsylvania system), the Baltimore & Annapolis Short Line, the Baltimore, Chesapeake & Atlantic; the Northern Central; the Western Maryland and the Maryland & Pennsylvania railways; and by steamship lines running directly to all the more important ports on the Atlantic coast of the United States, to ports in the West Indies and Brazil, to London, Liverpool, Southampton, Bristol, Leith, Glasgow, Dublin, Belfast, Havre, Antwerp, Rotterdam, Bremen, Hamburg and other European ports.

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  • Of all English colonies, the Amcriea n were the mo~t nor,i,1n,~.;ind imnnrt~,nt, Their nio~iniilv to the ~nanish colonies in the West Indies had naturally led to a contraband trade.

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  • The colonial state papers now become important and extensive, those relating to America and the West Indies being most numerous (18 vols.

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  • The occurrence of one aberrant group (Solenodon) in the West Indies is, however, noteworthy.

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  • Elliot, Synopsis of the Mammals of North America (Chicago, 1901) and The Mammals of Middle America and the West Indies (Chicago, 1904); W.

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  • St John (pop. about 10,000), the capital, situated on the north-west, is an exceedingly picturesque town, built on an eminence overlooking one of the most beautiful harbours in the West Indies.

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  • CAYMAN ISLANDS, a group of three low-lying islands in the West Indies.

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  • GRENADINES, a chain of islets in the Windward Islands, West Indies.

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  • For no other reason did the minister for the colonies, Seor Maura, in 1894 fail to convince the Cortes, and even the Liberal party, that his very moderate Cuban Home Rule Bill was an indispensable and wise, though tardy, attempt to avert a conflict which many plain symptoms showed to be imminent in the West Indies.

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  • All through the winter of1897-1898the Madrid giuernment took steps to propitiate the president and his government, even offering them a treaty of commerce which would have allowed American commerce to compete on equal terms with Spanish imports in the West Indies and defeat all European competition.

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  • 'GRENADA, the southernmost of the Windward Islands, British West Indies.

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  • Grenada, with cocoa as its staple, has not experienced similar depression to that which overtook the sugar-growing islands of the West Indies.

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  • ALEXANDER HAMILTON (1757-1804), American statesman and economist, was born, as a British subject, on the island of Nevis in the West Indies on the 11th of January 1757.

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  • Such unions as hers with James Hamilton were long not uncommon in the West Indies.

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  • Canovas resumed office in March 1895 immediately after the outbreak of the Cuban insurrection, and devoted most of his time and efforts, with characteristic determination, to the preparation of ways and means for sending 200,000 men to the West Indies to carry out his stern and unflinching policy of no surrender, no concessions and no reforms. He was making up his mind for another effort to enable General Weyler to enforce the reforms that had been wrung from the Madrid government, more by American diplomacy than from a sense of the inevitable, when the bullet of an anarchist, in August 1897, at the baths of Santa Agueda, cut short his career.

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  • Coco-nut oil and copra, both for edible and technical purposes, are largely shipped to Great Britain from the East Indies and Ceylon, Java and the West Indies.

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  • Till 1628 he continued to serve the Company, both on the coast of Brazil, and in the West Indies.

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  • The last ship carrying returning emigrants left the West Indies for India in 1954.

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  • Then it was our annual hols to the West Indies.

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  • He traveled with them from the West Indies and toward the end had given them a little homily.

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  • He entered the Irish itinerancy in 1786 and was ordained by John Wesley the following year for the mission to the West Indies.

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  • privateering expedition to the West Indies in company with Hawkins.

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  • Lyon (25) got recs off to a good start against the bowling of former West Indies Test fast bowler Reon King.

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  • Due to its dramatic silhouette, Union is also called by some the Tahiti of the West Indies.

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  • Cabot had urged the feasibility of opening an easier channel for trade with the interior of Peru through the river Plate and its tributaries, than that by way of the West Indies and Panama; and now that his views were able to be realized, the interests of the merchants of Seville and of Lima, who had secured a monopoly of the trade by the route of the isthmus, were allowed to destroy the threatened rivalry of that by the river Plate.

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  • Cromwell sent powerful English fleets to watch the coast of Spain and to prevent communications with the West Indies and America; on the 8th of September 1656 a fleet of treasure ships was destroyed off Cadiz by Stayner, and on the 10th of April 1657 Blake performed his last exploit in the destruction of the whole Spanish fleet of sixteen treasure ships in the harbour of Santa Cruz in Teneriffe.

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  • His master, Captain William Bligh, was sent in the " Bounty" to convey breadfruit plants from Tahiti to the West Indies.

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  • is only from 3 2.2° to 32.7° F., and the same low temperature continues throughout the Brazil Basin to the equator; but in the North American Basin from the West Indies to the Telegraph Plateau no satisfactory bottom temperature lower than 35.6° F.

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  • His Life of Caesar (1879), a glorification of imperialism, betrays an imperfect acquaintance with Roman politics and the life of Cicero; and of his two pleasant books of travel, The English in the West Indies (1888) shows that he made little effort to master his subject, and Oceana (1886), the record of a tour in Australia and New Zealand, among a multitude of other blunders, notes the prosperity of the working-classes in Adelaide at the date of his visit, when, in fact, owing to a failure in the wheatcrop, hundreds were then living on charity.

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  • Lyon (25) got Recs off to a good start against the bowling of former West Indies Test fast bowler Reon King.

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