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wesley

wesley

wesley Sentence Examples

  • METHODISM, a term' denoting the religious organizations which trace their origin to the evangelistic teaching of John Wesley.

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  • The theological views of these teachers proved quite incompatible with the Arminianism of Wesley, and a definite breach between them and him took place in 1770.

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  • The Primitive Methodists in Ireland were a small body who in 1817 seceded because they wished to maintain that close connexion with the Church of England which existed at the time of Wesley's death, but in 1878 they rejoined the parent body.

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  • At the death of Wesley the figures were: 313 preachers, 119 circuits and mission stations, and members.

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  • The intention was to make American Methodism a facsimile of that in England, subject to Wesley and the British Conference-a society and not a Church.

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  • among the mendicant friars of the 13th century, among the Jansenists, the early Quakers, the converts of Wesley and Whitefield, the persecuted protestants of the Cevennes, the Irvingites.

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  • In reply to the very natural question why the Moravians began their work in England, the answer given by history is that John Wesley, on his voyage to Georgia (1735) met some Moravian emigrants; that on his return he met Peter Boehler, who was on his way to North Carolina; that through Boehler's influence both John and Charles Wesley were "converted" (1738).

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  • A new island rose from the sea, and was at once named " Wesley," but disappeared again.

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  • It seems probable that his parents were among the early converts of Wesley; at any rate, Francis became converted to Methodism in his thirteenth year, and at sixteen became a local preacher.

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  • He was a simple, fluent speaker, and was so successful that in 1767 he was enrolled, by John Wesley himself, as a regular itinerant minister.

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  • In 1772 he was appointed by Wesley "general assistant" in charge of the work in America, and although superseded by an older preacher, Thomas Rankin (1738-1810), in 1773, he remained practically in control.

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  • In 1784 John Wesley, in disregard of the authority of the Established Church, took the radical step of appointing the Rev. Thomas Coke (1747-1814) and Francis Asbury superintendents or "bishops" of the church in the United States.

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  • Dr Coke was ordained at Bristol, England, in September, and in the following December, in a conference of the churches in America at Baltimore, he ordained and consecrated Asbury, who refused to accept the position until Wesley's choice had been ratified by the conference.

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  • His open-air preaching was accompanied by prayer and singing, a departure from Wesley's practice and the forerunner of the well-known "Camp Meeting."

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  • The meeting was held and ten months later Bourne was expelled by the Burslem Quarterly Meeting, ostensibly for non-attendance at class (he had been away from home, evangelizing), really, as the Wesleyan superintendent told him "because you have a tendency to set up other than the ordinary worship" which was precisely the reason why, fifty years earlier, the Anglican Church had declined to sanction the methods of John Wesley.

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  • He was admitted by John Wesley in 1785 into the regular itinerant ministry.

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  • 2), Thomas Day (author of Sandford and Merton), Sterne, Warburton, Hutcheson, Beattie, John Wesley, Whitfield, Adam Smith, Millar, Robertson, Dr Johnson, Paley, Gregory, Gilbert Wakefield, Bishop Porteus, Dean Tucker.

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  • JOHN WESLEY (1703-1791), English divine, was born at Epworth Rectory on the 17th of June (O.S.) 1703.

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  • On the duke of Buckingham's nomination, Wesley was for six years a pupil at Charterhouse.

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  • A friend describes Wesley at this time as "a young fellow of the finest classical taste, and the most liberal and manly sentiments."

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  • The standard edition of Wesley's Journal (1909) has furnished much new material for this period of Wesley's life, the Rev. N.

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  • Curnock having unravelled the difficult cipher and shorthand in which Wesley's early diaries were kept.

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  • He reached the conclusion that the religious friend who directed Wesley's attention to the writings of Thomas a Kempis and Jeremy Taylor, in 1725, was Miss Betty Kirkham, whose father was rector of Stanton in Gloucestershire.

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  • Up to this time Wesley says he had no notion of inward holiness, but went on "habitually and for the most part very contentedly in some or other known sin, indeed with some intermission and short struggles especially before and after Holy Communion," which he was obliged to attend three times a year.

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  • Colman of Norwich, contain monthly reviews of Wesley's reading.

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  • It met at first on Sunday evenings, then every evening was passed in Wesley's room or that of some other member.

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  • Wesley s spirit at this time is seen from his sermon on "The Circumcision of the Heart," preached before the university on the 1st of January 1733.

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  • Wesley rose at four, lived on X28 a year and gave away the remainder of his income.

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  • William Law's books produced a great impression on Wesley, and on his advice the young tutor began to read mystic authors, but he saw that their tendency was to make good works appear mean and insipid, and he soon laid them aside.

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  • Wesley had not yet found the key to the heart and conscience of his hearers.

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  • Looking back on these days in 1777, Wesley felt "the Methodists at Oxford were all one body, and, as it were, one soul; zealous for the religion of the Bible, of the Primitive Church, and, in consequence, of the Church of England; as they believed it to come nearer the scriptural and primitive plan than any other national church upon earth."

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  • Wesley's father died on April 2 5, 1 735, and in the following October John and Charles took ship for Georgia, with Benjamin Ingham and Charles Delamotte.

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  • The calm confidence of their Moravian fellow-passengers amid the Atlantic storms convinced Wesley that he did not possess the faith which casts out fear.

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  • Wesley needed help, for he was beset by difficulties.

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  • Wesley's attachment to Miss Hopkey also led to much pain and disappointment.

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  • Wesley was a stiff High Churchman, who scrupulously followed every detail of the rubrics.

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  • The list of grievances presented by Wesley's enemies to the Grand Jury at Savannah gives abundant evidence of his unwearying labours for his flock.

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  • In April 1736 Wesley formed a little society of thirty or forty of the serious members of his congregation.

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  • Wesley put down many severe things against himself on the return voyage, and he saw afterwards that even then he had the faith of a servant though not.

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  • By Baler Wesley was convinced that he lacked" that faith whereby alone we are saved."

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  • Wesley spent some time during the summer of 1738 in visiting the Moravian settlement at Herrnhuth and returned to London on September 16, 1738, with his faith greatly strengthened.

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  • When the churches were closed against him he spoke to the Kingswood colliers in the open air, and after six memorable weeks wrote urging Wesley to come and take up the work.

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  • Wesley was in his friend's congregation on April 1, but says," I could scarcely reconcile myself to this strange way of preaching in the fields ...

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  • Wesley describes this as the third beginning of Methodism.

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  • They found all the world against them, and Wesley advised them to strengthen one another and talk together as often as they could.

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  • This meeting was held in the end of 1739 at the Foundery in Moorfields which Wesley had just secured as a preaching place.

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  • Grave disorders had arisen in the society at Fetter Lane, and on the 25th of July 1740 Wesley withdrew from it.

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  • Wesley's headquarters at Bristol were in the Horse Fair, where a room was built in May 1739 for two religious societies which had been accustomed to meet in Nicholas Street and Baldwin Street.

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  • Wesley saw that here was the very means he needed to watch over his flock.

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  • As the society increased Wesley found it needed "still greater care to separate the precious from the vile."

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  • Wesley issued the rules of the united societies in February 1743.

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  • Wesley had at first to take charge of the contributions, but as they grew larger he appointed stewards to receive the money, to pay debts, and to relieve the needy.

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  • The memorable arrangement in Bristol was made a few weeks before Wesley's field of labour was extended to the north of England in May 1742.

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  • Wesley believed that the grace of God could transform every life that received it.

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  • Up till 1742 Wesley's work was chiefly confined to London and Bristol, with the adjacent towns and villages or the places which lay between them.

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  • On his way to Newcastle that year Wesley visited Birstal, where John Nelson, the stone-mason, had already been working.

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  • In the summer Charles Wesley visited Wednesbury, Leeds and Newcastle.

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  • In 1743 Wesley secured a west-end centre at West Street, Seven Dials, which for fifty years had a wonderful history.

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  • In August 1747 Wesley paid his first visit to Ireland, where he had such success that he gave more than six years of his life to the country and crossed the Irish Channel forty-two times.

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  • Wesley's first visit to Scotland was in 1751.

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  • Such extension of his field would have been impossible had not Wesley been helped by a heroic band of preachers.

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  • Wesley says: "Joseph Humphreys was the first lay preacher that assisted me in England, in the year 1738."

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  • That was probably help in the Fetter Lane Society, for Wesley then had no preaching place of his own.

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  • Wesley hurried to London to check this irregularity, but his mother urged him to hear Maxwell for himself, and he soon saw that such assistance was of the highest value.

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  • As the work advanced Wesley held a conference at the Foundery in 1744.

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  • The conference became an annual gathering of Wesley's preachers.

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  • In February 1784 Wesley's deed of declaration gave the conference a legal constitution.

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  • In 1771, Francis Asbury, the Wesley of America, crossed the Atlantic. Methodism grew rapidly, and it became essential to provide its people with the sacraments.

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  • In September 1784 Wesley ordained his clerical helper, Dr Coke, superintendent (or bishop), and instructed him to ordain Asbury as his colleague.

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  • Richard Whatcoat and Thomas Vasey were ordained by Wesley, Coke and Creighton to administer the sacraments in America.

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  • The interests of his work stood first with Wesley.

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  • 1714-1800): "It is purely a modern notion that the Wesleyan movement ever was, or ever was intended to be, except by Wesley, a church movement."

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  • Despite his strong sayings, it was Wesley who broke the links to the church, for, as Lord Mansfield put it, "ordination is separation."

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  • Wesley's account of his itinerancy is given in his famous Journal, of which the first part appeared about 1739.

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  • It is certainly Wesley's most picturesque biography and the most vivid account of the evangelical revival that we possess.

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  • Wesley's writings did much to open the eyes of candid men to his motives and his methods.

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  • Sir Leslie Stephen pays high praise to Wesley's writings, which went "straight to the mark without one superfluous flourish."

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  • As a social reformer Wesley was far in advance of his time.

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  • Wesley's supreme gift was his genius for organization.

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  • Wesley's special power lay in his quickness to avail himself of circumstances and of the suggestions made by those about him.

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  • Wesley skilfully wove these into his system, and kept the whole machinery moving harmoniously.

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  • In 1751 Wesley married Mary Vazeille, a widow, but the union was unfortunate and she finally left him.

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  • John Fletcher, the vicar of Madeley, to whom Wesley had turned as a possible successor, died in 1785.

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  • He had gone to Wesley's help at West Street after his ordination at Whitehall in 1757 and had been one of his chief allies ever since.

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  • Charles Wesley died three years after Fletcher.

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  • During the last three years of his life John Wesley reaped the harvest he had sown.

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  • Robert Southey never forgot how Wesley kissed his little sister and put his hand on his head and blessed him.

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  • Wherever Wesley went, he diffused a portion of his own felicity."

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  • See also METHODISM, and the articles on the separate Methodist bodies; see also WESLEY FAMILY (J.

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  • Samuel Wesley >>

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  • The most eminent of these were the two brothers John and Charles Wesley, John Byrom the poet, George Cheyne the physician and Archibald Hutcheson, M.P. for Hastings.

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  • Law's mystic tendencies divorced him from the practical minded Wesley, but in spite of occasional wild fancies the books are worth reading.

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  • Wesley Bond, Minnesota and its Resources (New York, 1853); C. A.

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  • The union was completed on the 16th of September 1907 in Wesley's Chapel, City Road, London.

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  • The bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church, on the other hand, derive their orders from Thomas Coke, a presbyter of the Church of England, who in 1784 was ordained by John Wesley, assisted by two other presbyters, "superintendent" of the Methodist Society in America.

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  • He often preached with John Wesley and for him, and became known as a fervent supporter of the revival.

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  • Fletcher was one of the few parish clergy who understood Wesley and his work, yet he never wrote or said anything inconsistent with his own Anglican position.

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  • Wesley preached his funeral sermon from the words "Mark the perfect man."

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  • Wesley (1786); L.

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  • Charles Wesley's wife, Sarah Gwynne, was of Garth, an old residence just outside the parish.

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  • 1892); and Wesley's Chapel, City Road, in the graveyard of which is the tomb of John Wesley; his house, which adjoins the chapel, being open as a memorial museum.

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  • Richard Colley Wesley Wellesley >>

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  • After receiving a very limited education he was apprenticed to a linen manufacturer, but, finding the employment uncongenial, he resumed school-life at the institution founded by Wesley at Kingswood, near Bristol.

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  • In 1782 he entered on the duties of the ministry, being appointed by Wesley to the Bradford (Wiltshire)circuit.

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  • He also wrote Memoirs of the Wesley Family (1823), and edited a large number of religious works.

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  • Dunton was assisted by Richard Sault and Samuel Wesley.

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  • The Modern Period may be said to begin in 1738, the year in which John Wesley began his memorable work.

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  • Whitefield was the greater orator, Wesley the better thinker; but, diverse in temperament as they were, they alike laid emphasis on openair preaching.

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  • John Wesley made great use of it in compiling his Expository Notes upon the New Testament (1755) Besides the two works already described, Bengel was the editor or author of many others, classical, patristic, ecclesiastical and expository.

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  • Wesley (Family) >>

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  • In the park is the fine Colombo Museum, founded by Sir William Gregory l; and near the neighbouring Campbell Park are the handsome buildings of a number of institutions, such as Wesley College, and the General, Victoria Memorial Eye and other hospitals.

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  • The Methodist Episcopal Church maintains Wesley College near Grand Forks (formerly the Red River Valley University at Wahpeton), affiliated with the state university.

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  • This is known as the first Methodist Association - held eighteen months before John Wesley's first conference (June 25th, 1744).

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  • ARTHUR WELLESLEY WELLINGTON, 1ST Duke Of (1769-1852), was the fourth son of Garrett (1735-1781) Wellesley or Wesley, 2nd baron and 1st earl of Mornington, now remembered only as a musician.

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  • 1758), assumed the name of Wesley on succeeding to the estates of Garrett Wesley, a distant relative of the famous divine.

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  • In Wellington's early letters the family name is spelt Wesley; the change to Wellesley seems to have been made about 1790.

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  • In the central part of the city are the parliament building, governor's residence, barracks, law courts, university, Manitoba College and Wesley College buildings.

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  • The denomination arose in the agricultural districts and fishing villages of north Cornwall and Devon; a district only slightly influenced by John Wesley and the original Methodist movement.

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  • Several thousand copies of this work were sold within a few days; a cheap edition was soon issued; the pamphlet was extolled by one set of politicians and abused by another; amongst its critics were Dr Markham, archbishop of York, John Wesley, and Edmund Burke; and Price rapidly became one of the bestknown men in England.

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  • Our aged and honoured Father, Mr Wesley, is no more!

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  • The large proportion of Wesley's members had been gathered by the labours of himself and his helpers.

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  • A letter from Wesley (dated Chester, April 7, 1785) was read, beseeching the members of the Legal Conference not to use their powers for selfish ends but to be absolutely impartial in stationing the preachers, selecting boys for education at Kingswood School, and disposing of connexional funds.

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  • The conference at once resolved that all privileges conferred by Wesley's Poll Deed should be accorded to every preacher in full connexion.

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  • To supply the lack of Wesley's supervision the circuits were now grouped together in districts.

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  • As to the sacraments and the relations of Methodism to the Church of England the decision was: "We engage to follow strictly the plan which Mr Wesley left us."

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  • Some held that it forbade the administration of the sacraments except where they were already permitted; others maintained that it left Methodism free to follow the leadings of Providence as Wesley had always done.

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  • Wesley had given the sacrament to the societies when he visited them and this privilege was greatly missed.

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  • The preachers had agreed in 1793 that all distinction between those whom Wesley had ordained and their brethren should cease.

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  • Its work in the West Indies was firmly established in Wesley's lifetime.

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  • In his first conference in 1744 Wesley asked, "Can we have a seminary for labourers ?"

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  • The idea was not realized in his lifetime, but Wesley did everything in his power to train his preachers.

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  • John Wesley felt a lively interest in the Sunday schools which began to spring up all over England in the last years of his life.

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  • The Wesley Guild Movement, established in 1901, has its headquarters in Leeds and is doing a great work for the young people of Methodism.

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  • The centenary of Wesley's death was kept in 1891.

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  • Wesley's statue was placed in the forecourt.

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  • In 1898 the rooms in Wesley's house, where he studied and where he died, were set apart as a Methodist Museum.

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  • The Methodist Assembly which met in Wesley's Chapel, London, in 1909 brought the branches of British Methodism together with good results.

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  • A considerable extension of the three years' term has been secured in certain cases by a legal device for escaping the provisions of the eleventh clause of Wesley's Deed Poll, but some more satisfactory method of dealing with the subject is under consideration.

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  • - Lives of Wesley, Hampson (1791), Coke and Moore (1792), Whitehead (1793-1796), R.

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  • and C. Wesley; Wesley's Works (1 77 1 - 1 774, 1809-1813; ed.

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  • of Wesley's Journal (ed.

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  • Rigg, The Living Wesley, The Churchmanship of John Wesley; R.

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  • and C. Wesley; Wesley's Veterans; Lives of Early Methodist Preachers (Finsbury Library).

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  • It was on an island off Savannah that Spangenberg startled John Wesley with his questions and profoundly influenced his future career.

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  • The smouldering Filipino revolt then broke out afresh and an American army under General Wesley Merritt (1836-) was sent from San Francisco to assist in capturing the city.

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  • Although originally a follower of Wesley, he in 1758 adopted extreme Calvinist opinions.

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  • Some comments by Wesley upon Toplady's presentation of Calvinism led to a controversy which was carried on with much bitterness on both sides.

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  • Alleine, with John Wesley (grandfather of the celebrated John Wesley), also ejected, then travelled about, preaching wherever opportunity was found.

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  • "NEWTON WESLEY ROWELL (1867-), Canadian politician, was born Nov.

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  • Among eminent persons interred here are John Bunyan, Daniel Defoe, Susanna, mother of John and Charles Wesley, and George Fox, founder of the Society of Friends.

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  • A neighbouring chapel is intimately associated with the Wesleys, and the house of John Wesley is opened as a museum bearing his name.

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  • Reinforcements arrived, and on the 13th of August Manila was taken by the Americans, under General Wesley Merritt (b.

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  • In the Evangelical Revival of the r8th century Arminianism was represented by Wesley, and Calvinism by Whitefield.

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  • He even asked John Wesley, in 1739, to desist from preaching in his diocese of Bristol, and in a memorable interview with the great preacher remarked that any claim to the extraordinary gifts of the Holy Spirit was "a horrid thing, a very horrid thing, sir."

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  • Yet Butler was keenly interested in those very miners of Kingswood among whom Wesley preached, and left £50o towards building a church for them.

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  • At the Evangelical Revival the old questions came up, as Wesley favoured Arminianism and George Whitefield Calvinism.

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  • John Wesley Hales >>

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  • In 1736 he was invited by Wesley to go out as missionary to Georgia, and went to London to wait on the trustees.

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  • During his absence from England Whitefield found that a divergence of doctrine from Calvinism had been introduced by Wesley; and notwithstanding Wesley's exhortations to brotherly kindness and forbearance he withdrew from the Wesleyan connexion.

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  • Thereupon his friends built for him near Wesley's church a wooden structure, which was named the Moorfields Tabernacle.

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  • On his return from America to England for the last time the change in his appearance forcibly impressed Wesley, who wrote in his Journal: " He seemed to be an old man, being fairly worn out in his Master's service, though he had hardly seen fifty years."

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  • To come to England, Wesley provided for spiritual discipline through the class-meeting, whose leader has to advise, comfort or exhort as occasion may arise; and (2) through the ministers, who have to bear the chief responsibility in the reproof, suspension or expulsion from communion of erring brethren.

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  • Upon such a system as this human nature was certain to revenge Wesley itself.

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  • The preaching of Wesley and Whitefield and appealed direct to the emotions, with its doctrine of White- conversion, and called upon each individual not field, to understand, or to admire, or to act, but vividly to realize the love and mercy of God.

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  • What was new was that Wesley added an organization, Methodism (qi;), in which each of his followers unfolded to one another the secrets of their heart, and became accountable to his fellows.

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  • The double want of the age, the want of spiritual earnestness and the want of organized coherence, would find satisfaction in many ways which would have seemed strange to Wesley, but which were, nevertheless, a continuance of the work which he began.

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  • Pitt was, in some sort, to the political life of Englishmen what Wesley was to their religious life.

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  • The seed sown by Wesley had grown to be a great tree.

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  • Under John and Charles Wesley, a system known as Evangelical Arminianism was worked out in 18th-century England, strongly Augustinian in its doctrines of sin and atonement, modern Augustinian in its doctrine of conversion, strongly anti-Augustinian in its rejection of absolute predestination.

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  • The theologian of English Methodism, apart from John Wesley himself, is Richard Watson.

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  • The city is the seat of Wesley College (Methodist Episcopal, South), until 1909 the North Texas University School, and of the North Texas Hospital for the Insane (1885), and has a Carnegie library.

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  • Wesley and Whitefield were accustomed to commend them to their followers.

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  • Buffy goes onto fight Balthazar, Wesley tries to save his own life by giving the name of the person who has the amulet.

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  • He also published the earliest biography of Charles Wesley.

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  • General Slobodan Milosevic: Achieved fame by standing up to the notorious braggart and military buffoon Wesley Clark in Yugoslavia.

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  • No, the chief conspirator in our own ranks is young Wesley's father.

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  • Below is the oak drop leaf table on which John Wesley stood while preaching in Southernhay.

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  • Key reading for this course electromagnetism by G. L. Pollack and D. R. Stump, Addison Wesley, 2002.

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  • Wesley pronounces on him this high eulogium: " Mr.

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  • John Downes, one of Wesley's lay assistants, engraved the frontispiece.

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  • A rather scruffy looking Wesley Kerr then sniffed his was a location " far too grand to be on any Monopoly board.

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  • The public hustings will take place at the Wesley Memorial Church hall, New Inn Hall Street, Oxford.

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  • The elder Wesley gave his son the now immortal reply: " You ask me which is the best commentary on the Bible?

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  • He entered the Irish itinerancy in 1786 and was ordained by John Wesley the following year for the mission to the West Indies.

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  • It was originally set to Charles Wesley's hymn Thou God of glorious majesty.

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  • John Wesley, under the pastoral oversight of itinerant ministers who met at an annual conference.

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  • A rather scruffy looking Wesley Kerr then sniffed his was a location " far too grand to be on any Monopoly board.

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  • Whitehead also preached John Wesley's funeral sermon in City Road Chapel.

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  • A rather scruffy looking Wesley Kerr then sniffed his was a location " far too grand to be on any Monopoly board.

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  • subsidiary company called Wesley Estates.

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  • tercentenary of the birth of John Wesley.

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  • Already Wesley had begun to show a zeal for souls.

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  • METHODISM, a term' denoting the religious organizations which trace their origin to the evangelistic teaching of John Wesley.

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  • The name "Methodist" was given in derision to those Oxford students who in company with the Wesleys used to meet together for spiritual fellowship; and later on when John Wesley had organized his followers into "societies" the name was applied to them in the same spirit.

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  • The fact that standards of Methodist doctrine are laid down as consisting of "Mr Wesley's Notes on the New Testament and the 1st Series of his Sermons" (fiftythree in number), might seem to indicate a departure from existing systems, but it was not so.

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  • Wesley and his helpers, finding the Anglican churches closed against them, took to preaching in the open air; and this method is still followed, more or less, in the aggressive evangelistic work of all the Methodist Churches.

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  • The Wesleyan Methodists now represent the original body as founded by John Wesley in Great Britain and Ireland; but in America those who looked upon him as their founder adopted the episcopal mode of Church government after the War of Independence, and have since that time been known as Episcopal Methodists (see below).

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  • Their work received the sympathy of Wesley and liberal financial help from the Countess of Huntingdon (see Calvinistic Methodists).

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  • The theological views of these teachers proved quite incompatible with the Arminianism of Wesley, and a definite breach between them and him took place in 1770.

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  • The Primitive Methodists in Ireland were a small body who in 1817 seceded because they wished to maintain that close connexion with the Church of England which existed at the time of Wesley's death, but in 1878 they rejoined the parent body.

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  • At the death of Wesley the figures were: 313 preachers, 119 circuits and mission stations, and members.

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  • The intention was to make American Methodism a facsimile of that in England, subject to Wesley and the British Conference-a society and not a Church.

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  • among the mendicant friars of the 13th century, among the Jansenists, the early Quakers, the converts of Wesley and Whitefield, the persecuted protestants of the Cevennes, the Irvingites.

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  • But during the 18th century, though the strict observance of the Lenten fast was generally abandoned, it was still observed and inculcated by the more earnest of the clergy, such as William Law and John Wesley; and the custom of women wearing mourning in Lent, which had been followed by Queen Elizabeth and her court, survived until well into the 19th century.

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  • In reply to the very natural question why the Moravians began their work in England, the answer given by history is that John Wesley, on his voyage to Georgia (1735) met some Moravian emigrants; that on his return he met Peter Boehler, who was on his way to North Carolina; that through Boehler's influence both John and Charles Wesley were "converted" (1738).

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  • A new island rose from the sea, and was at once named " Wesley," but disappeared again.

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  • It seems probable that his parents were among the early converts of Wesley; at any rate, Francis became converted to Methodism in his thirteenth year, and at sixteen became a local preacher.

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  • He was a simple, fluent speaker, and was so successful that in 1767 he was enrolled, by John Wesley himself, as a regular itinerant minister.

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  • In 1772 he was appointed by Wesley "general assistant" in charge of the work in America, and although superseded by an older preacher, Thomas Rankin (1738-1810), in 1773, he remained practically in control.

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  • In 1784 John Wesley, in disregard of the authority of the Established Church, took the radical step of appointing the Rev. Thomas Coke (1747-1814) and Francis Asbury superintendents or "bishops" of the church in the United States.

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  • Dr Coke was ordained at Bristol, England, in September, and in the following December, in a conference of the churches in America at Baltimore, he ordained and consecrated Asbury, who refused to accept the position until Wesley's choice had been ratified by the conference.

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  • His open-air preaching was accompanied by prayer and singing, a departure from Wesley's practice and the forerunner of the well-known "Camp Meeting."

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  • The meeting was held and ten months later Bourne was expelled by the Burslem Quarterly Meeting, ostensibly for non-attendance at class (he had been away from home, evangelizing), really, as the Wesleyan superintendent told him "because you have a tendency to set up other than the ordinary worship" which was precisely the reason why, fifty years earlier, the Anglican Church had declined to sanction the methods of John Wesley.

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  • Grady; the Presbyterian hospital; the Baptist Tabernacle Infirmary; the Wesley Memorial hospital; St Joseph's infirmary; the Municipal hospital for contagious diseases; the Florence Crittenden home.

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  • He was admitted by John Wesley in 1785 into the regular itinerant ministry.

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  • 2), Thomas Day (author of Sandford and Merton), Sterne, Warburton, Hutcheson, Beattie, John Wesley, Whitfield, Adam Smith, Millar, Robertson, Dr Johnson, Paley, Gregory, Gilbert Wakefield, Bishop Porteus, Dean Tucker.

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  • JOHN WESLEY (1703-1791), English divine, was born at Epworth Rectory on the 17th of June (O.S.) 1703.

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  • He was the fifteenth child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley (see Wesley Family).

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  • On the duke of Buckingham's nomination, Wesley was for six years a pupil at Charterhouse.

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  • A friend describes Wesley at this time as "a young fellow of the finest classical taste, and the most liberal and manly sentiments."

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  • The standard edition of Wesley's Journal (1909) has furnished much new material for this period of Wesley's life, the Rev. N.

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  • Curnock having unravelled the difficult cipher and shorthand in which Wesley's early diaries were kept.

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  • He reached the conclusion that the religious friend who directed Wesley's attention to the writings of Thomas a Kempis and Jeremy Taylor, in 1725, was Miss Betty Kirkham, whose father was rector of Stanton in Gloucestershire.

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  • Up to this time Wesley says he had no notion of inward holiness, but went on "habitually and for the most part very contentedly in some or other known sin, indeed with some intermission and short struggles especially before and after Holy Communion," which he was obliged to attend three times a year.

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  • Colman of Norwich, contain monthly reviews of Wesley's reading.

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  • It met at first on Sunday evenings, then every evening was passed in Wesley's room or that of some other member.

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  • Wesley s spirit at this time is seen from his sermon on "The Circumcision of the Heart," preached before the university on the 1st of January 1733.

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  • Wesley rose at four, lived on X28 a year and gave away the remainder of his income.

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  • William Law's books produced a great impression on Wesley, and on his advice the young tutor began to read mystic authors, but he saw that their tendency was to make good works appear mean and insipid, and he soon laid them aside.

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  • Wesley had not yet found the key to the heart and conscience of his hearers.

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  • Looking back on these days in 1777, Wesley felt "the Methodists at Oxford were all one body, and, as it were, one soul; zealous for the religion of the Bible, of the Primitive Church, and, in consequence, of the Church of England; as they believed it to come nearer the scriptural and primitive plan than any other national church upon earth."

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  • Wesley's father died on April 2 5, 1 735, and in the following October John and Charles took ship for Georgia, with Benjamin Ingham and Charles Delamotte.

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  • The calm confidence of their Moravian fellow-passengers amid the Atlantic storms convinced Wesley that he did not possess the faith which casts out fear.

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  • Wesley needed help, for he was beset by difficulties.

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  • Wesley's attachment to Miss Hopkey also led to much pain and disappointment.

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  • Wesley was a stiff High Churchman, who scrupulously followed every detail of the rubrics.

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  • The list of grievances presented by Wesley's enemies to the Grand Jury at Savannah gives abundant evidence of his unwearying labours for his flock.

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  • In April 1736 Wesley formed a little society of thirty or forty of the serious members of his congregation.

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  • Wesley put down many severe things against himself on the return voyage, and he saw afterwards that even then he had the faith of a servant though not.

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  • By Baler Wesley was convinced that he lacked" that faith whereby alone we are saved."

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  • Wesley spent some time during the summer of 1738 in visiting the Moravian settlement at Herrnhuth and returned to London on September 16, 1738, with his faith greatly strengthened.

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  • When the churches were closed against him he spoke to the Kingswood colliers in the open air, and after six memorable weeks wrote urging Wesley to come and take up the work.

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  • Wesley was in his friend's congregation on April 1, but says," I could scarcely reconcile myself to this strange way of preaching in the fields ...

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  • having been all my life (till very lately) so tenacious of every point relating to decency and order, that I should have thought the saving of souls almost a sin, if it had not been done in a church."Next day Wesley followed Whitefield's example.

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  • Wesley describes this as the third beginning of Methodism.

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  • They found all the world against them, and Wesley advised them to strengthen one another and talk together as often as they could.

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  • This meeting was held in the end of 1739 at the Foundery in Moorfields which Wesley had just secured as a preaching place.

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  • Grave disorders had arisen in the society at Fetter Lane, and on the 25th of July 1740 Wesley withdrew from it.

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  • Wesley's headquarters at Bristol were in the Horse Fair, where a room was built in May 1739 for two religious societies which had been accustomed to meet in Nicholas Street and Baldwin Street.

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  • Wesley saw that here was the very means he needed to watch over his flock.

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  • As the society increased Wesley found it needed "still greater care to separate the precious from the vile."

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  • Wesley issued the rules of the united societies in February 1743.

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  • Wesley had at first to take charge of the contributions, but as they grew larger he appointed stewards to receive the money, to pay debts, and to relieve the needy.

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  • The memorable arrangement in Bristol was made a few weeks before Wesley's field of labour was extended to the north of England in May 1742.

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  • Wesley believed that the grace of God could transform every life that received it.

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  • Up till 1742 Wesley's work was chiefly confined to London and Bristol, with the adjacent towns and villages or the places which lay between them.

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  • On his way to Newcastle that year Wesley visited Birstal, where John Nelson, the stone-mason, had already been working.

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  • In the summer Charles Wesley visited Wednesbury, Leeds and Newcastle.

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  • In 1743 Wesley secured a west-end centre at West Street, Seven Dials, which for fifty years had a wonderful history.

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  • In August 1747 Wesley paid his first visit to Ireland, where he had such success that he gave more than six years of his life to the country and crossed the Irish Channel forty-two times.

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  • Wesley's first visit to Scotland was in 1751.

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  • Such extension of his field would have been impossible had not Wesley been helped by a heroic band of preachers.

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  • Wesley says: "Joseph Humphreys was the first lay preacher that assisted me in England, in the year 1738."

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  • That was probably help in the Fetter Lane Society, for Wesley then had no preaching place of his own.

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  • Wesley hurried to London to check this irregularity, but his mother urged him to hear Maxwell for himself, and he soon saw that such assistance was of the highest value.

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  • As the work advanced Wesley held a conference at the Foundery in 1744.

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  • The conference became an annual gathering of Wesley's preachers.

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  • In February 1784 Wesley's deed of declaration gave the conference a legal constitution.

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  • In 1771, Francis Asbury, the Wesley of America, crossed the Atlantic. Methodism grew rapidly, and it became essential to provide its people with the sacraments.

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  • In September 1784 Wesley ordained his clerical helper, Dr Coke, superintendent (or bishop), and instructed him to ordain Asbury as his colleague.

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  • Richard Whatcoat and Thomas Vasey were ordained by Wesley, Coke and Creighton to administer the sacraments in America.

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  • Wesley had reached the conclusion in 1746 that bishops and presbyters were essentially of one order (see Methodism, sect.

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  • The interests of his work stood first with Wesley.

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  • 1714-1800): "It is purely a modern notion that the Wesleyan movement ever was, or ever was intended to be, except by Wesley, a church movement."

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  • Despite his strong sayings, it was Wesley who broke the links to the church, for, as Lord Mansfield put it, "ordination is separation."

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  • Wesley's account of his itinerancy is given in his famous Journal, of which the first part appeared about 1739.

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  • It is certainly Wesley's most picturesque biography and the most vivid account of the evangelical revival that we possess.

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  • The rapid development of his work made a tremendous strain upon Wesley's powers.

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  • Wesley's writings did much to open the eyes of candid men to his motives and his methods.

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  • Sir Leslie Stephen pays high praise to Wesley's writings, which went "straight to the mark without one superfluous flourish."

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  • As a social reformer Wesley was far in advance of his time.

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  • Wesley's supreme gift was his genius for organization.

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  • Wesley's special power lay in his quickness to avail himself of circumstances and of the suggestions made by those about him.

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  • Wesley skilfully wove these into his system, and kept the whole machinery moving harmoniously.

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  • In 1751 Wesley married Mary Vazeille, a widow, but the union was unfortunate and she finally left him.

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  • John Fletcher, the vicar of Madeley, to whom Wesley had turned as a possible successor, died in 1785.

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  • He had gone to Wesley's help at West Street after his ordination at Whitehall in 1757 and had been one of his chief allies ever since.

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  • Charles Wesley died three years after Fletcher.

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  • During the last three years of his life John Wesley reaped the harvest he had sown.

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  • Robert Southey never forgot how Wesley kissed his little sister and put his hand on his head and blessed him.

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  • Wherever Wesley went, he diffused a portion of his own felicity."

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  • See also METHODISM, and the articles on the separate Methodist bodies; see also WESLEY FAMILY (J.

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  • Samuel Wesley >>

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  • The most eminent of these were the two brothers John and Charles Wesley, John Byrom the poet, George Cheyne the physician and Archibald Hutcheson, M.P. for Hastings.

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  • Law's mystic tendencies divorced him from the practical minded Wesley, but in spite of occasional wild fancies the books are worth reading.

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  • Wesley Bond, Minnesota and its Resources (New York, 1853); C. A.

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  • The union was completed on the 16th of September 1907 in Wesley's Chapel, City Road, London.

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  • Thomas Boston's (1676-1732) memory has been revived by the praise of Stevenson, but his zeal was far exceeded by that of John Wesley (1703-1791), who preached 40,000 sermons, and by that of George Whitefield (1714-1770).

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  • The bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church, on the other hand, derive their orders from Thomas Coke, a presbyter of the Church of England, who in 1784 was ordained by John Wesley, assisted by two other presbyters, "superintendent" of the Methodist Society in America.

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  • He often preached with John Wesley and for him, and became known as a fervent supporter of the revival.

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  • Fletcher was one of the few parish clergy who understood Wesley and his work, yet he never wrote or said anything inconsistent with his own Anglican position.

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  • Wesley preached his funeral sermon from the words "Mark the perfect man."

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  • Wesley (1786); L.

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  • Charles Wesley's wife, Sarah Gwynne, was of Garth, an old residence just outside the parish.

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  • 1892); and Wesley's Chapel, City Road, in the graveyard of which is the tomb of John Wesley; his house, which adjoins the chapel, being open as a memorial museum.

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  • Richard Colley Wesley Wellesley >>

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  • After receiving a very limited education he was apprenticed to a linen manufacturer, but, finding the employment uncongenial, he resumed school-life at the institution founded by Wesley at Kingswood, near Bristol.

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  • In 1782 he entered on the duties of the ministry, being appointed by Wesley to the Bradford (Wiltshire)circuit.

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  • He also wrote Memoirs of the Wesley Family (1823), and edited a large number of religious works.

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  • Dunton was assisted by Richard Sault and Samuel Wesley.

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  • The Modern Period may be said to begin in 1738, the year in which John Wesley began his memorable work.

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  • Preaching once more was based on the Bible, which was expounded with force and earnestness, and though throughout the century there remained a good' many pulpiteers who produced nothing but solemn fudge, the example and stimulus given by Wesley and Whitefield were almost immeasurably productive.

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  • Whitefield was the greater orator, Wesley the better thinker; but, diverse in temperament as they were, they alike laid emphasis on openair preaching.

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  • John Wesley made great use of it in compiling his Expository Notes upon the New Testament (1755) Besides the two works already described, Bengel was the editor or author of many others, classical, patristic, ecclesiastical and expository.

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  • Wesley (Family) >>

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  • In the park is the fine Colombo Museum, founded by Sir William Gregory l; and near the neighbouring Campbell Park are the handsome buildings of a number of institutions, such as Wesley College, and the General, Victoria Memorial Eye and other hospitals.

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  • The Methodist Episcopal Church maintains Wesley College near Grand Forks (formerly the Red River Valley University at Wahpeton), affiliated with the state university.

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  • This is known as the first Methodist Association - held eighteen months before John Wesley's first conference (June 25th, 1744).

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  • ARTHUR WELLESLEY WELLINGTON, 1ST Duke Of (1769-1852), was the fourth son of Garrett (1735-1781) Wellesley or Wesley, 2nd baron and 1st earl of Mornington, now remembered only as a musician.

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  • 1758), assumed the name of Wesley on succeeding to the estates of Garrett Wesley, a distant relative of the famous divine.

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  • In Wellington's early letters the family name is spelt Wesley; the change to Wellesley seems to have been made about 1790.

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  • In the central part of the city are the parliament building, governor's residence, barracks, law courts, university, Manitoba College and Wesley College buildings.

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  • The denomination arose in the agricultural districts and fishing villages of north Cornwall and Devon; a district only slightly influenced by John Wesley and the original Methodist movement.

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  • Several thousand copies of this work were sold within a few days; a cheap edition was soon issued; the pamphlet was extolled by one set of politicians and abused by another; amongst its critics were Dr Markham, archbishop of York, John Wesley, and Edmund Burke; and Price rapidly became one of the bestknown men in England.

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  • On the day of John Wesley's death the preachers in London sent a brief note to those stationed in the country: "Dear Brother, The melancholy period we have so long dreaded is now arrived.

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  • Our aged and honoured Father, Mr Wesley, is no more!

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  • The large proportion of Wesley's members had been gathered by the labours of himself and his helpers.

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  • A letter from Wesley (dated Chester, April 7, 1785) was read, beseeching the members of the Legal Conference not to use their powers for selfish ends but to be absolutely impartial in stationing the preachers, selecting boys for education at Kingswood School, and disposing of connexional funds.

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  • The conference at once resolved that all privileges conferred by Wesley's Poll Deed should be accorded to every preacher in full connexion.

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  • To supply the lack of Wesley's supervision the circuits were now grouped together in districts.

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  • As to the sacraments and the relations of Methodism to the Church of England the decision was: "We engage to follow strictly the plan which Mr Wesley left us."

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  • Some held that it forbade the administration of the sacraments except where they were already permitted; others maintained that it left Methodism free to follow the leadings of Providence as Wesley had always done.

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  • Wesley had given the sacrament to the societies when he visited them and this privilege was greatly missed.

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  • The preachers had agreed in 1793 that all distinction between those whom Wesley had ordained and their brethren should cease.

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  • Its work in the West Indies was firmly established in Wesley's lifetime.

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  • In his first conference in 1744 Wesley asked, "Can we have a seminary for labourers ?"

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  • The idea was not realized in his lifetime, but Wesley did everything in his power to train his preachers.

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  • John Wesley felt a lively interest in the Sunday schools which began to spring up all over England in the last years of his life.

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  • The Wesley Guild Movement, established in 1901, has its headquarters in Leeds and is doing a great work for the young people of Methodism.

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  • The centenary of Wesley's death was kept in 1891.

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  • Wesley's statue was placed in the forecourt.

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  • In 1898 the rooms in Wesley's house, where he studied and where he died, were set apart as a Methodist Museum.

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  • The Methodist Assembly which met in Wesley's Chapel, London, in 1909 brought the branches of British Methodism together with good results.

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  • A considerable extension of the three years' term has been secured in certain cases by a legal device for escaping the provisions of the eleventh clause of Wesley's Deed Poll, but some more satisfactory method of dealing with the subject is under consideration.

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  • - Lives of Wesley, Hampson (1791), Coke and Moore (1792), Whitehead (1793-1796), R.

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  • and C. Wesley; Wesley's Works (1 77 1 - 1 774, 1809-1813; ed.

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  • of Wesley's Journal (ed.

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  • Rigg, The Living Wesley, The Churchmanship of John Wesley; R.

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  • and C. Wesley; Wesley's Veterans; Lives of Early Methodist Preachers (Finsbury Library).

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  • It was on an island off Savannah that Spangenberg startled John Wesley with his questions and profoundly influenced his future career.

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  • The smouldering Filipino revolt then broke out afresh and an American army under General Wesley Merritt (1836-) was sent from San Francisco to assist in capturing the city.

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  • Although originally a follower of Wesley, he in 1758 adopted extreme Calvinist opinions.

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  • Some comments by Wesley upon Toplady's presentation of Calvinism led to a controversy which was carried on with much bitterness on both sides.

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  • Toplady wrote a venomous [[Letter]] to Mr Wesley (1770), and Wesley repeated his comments in The Consequence Proved (1771), whereupon Toplady replied with increased acridity in More Work for Mr Wesley (1772).

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  • Alleine, with John Wesley (grandfather of the celebrated John Wesley), also ejected, then travelled about, preaching wherever opportunity was found.

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  • "NEWTON WESLEY ROWELL (1867-), Canadian politician, was born Nov.

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  • Among eminent persons interred here are John Bunyan, Daniel Defoe, Susanna, mother of John and Charles Wesley, and George Fox, founder of the Society of Friends.

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  • A neighbouring chapel is intimately associated with the Wesleys, and the house of John Wesley is opened as a museum bearing his name.

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  • Reinforcements arrived, and on the 13th of August Manila was taken by the Americans, under General Wesley Merritt (b.

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  • In the Evangelical Revival of the r8th century Arminianism was represented by Wesley, and Calvinism by Whitefield.

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  • He even asked John Wesley, in 1739, to desist from preaching in his diocese of Bristol, and in a memorable interview with the great preacher remarked that any claim to the extraordinary gifts of the Holy Spirit was "a horrid thing, a very horrid thing, sir."

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  • Yet Butler was keenly interested in those very miners of Kingswood among whom Wesley preached, and left £50o towards building a church for them.

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  • At the Evangelical Revival the old questions came up, as Wesley favoured Arminianism and George Whitefield Calvinism.

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  • John Wesley Hales >>

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  • There he came under the influence of the Methodists (see Wesley), and entered so enthusiastically into their practices and habits that he was attacked by a severe illness, which compelled him to return to his native town.

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  • In 1736 he was invited by Wesley to go out as missionary to Georgia, and went to London to wait on the trustees.

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  • During his absence from England Whitefield found that a divergence of doctrine from Calvinism had been introduced by Wesley; and notwithstanding Wesley's exhortations to brotherly kindness and forbearance he withdrew from the Wesleyan connexion.

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  • Thereupon his friends built for him near Wesley's church a wooden structure, which was named the Moorfields Tabernacle.

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  • On his return from America to England for the last time the change in his appearance forcibly impressed Wesley, who wrote in his Journal: " He seemed to be an old man, being fairly worn out in his Master's service, though he had hardly seen fifty years."

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  • To come to England, Wesley provided for spiritual discipline through the class-meeting, whose leader has to advise, comfort or exhort as occasion may arise; and (2) through the ministers, who have to bear the chief responsibility in the reproof, suspension or expulsion from communion of erring brethren.

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  • Upon such a system as this human nature was certain to revenge Wesley itself.

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  • The preaching of Wesley and Whitefield and appealed direct to the emotions, with its doctrine of White- conversion, and called upon each individual not field, to understand, or to admire, or to act, but vividly to realize the love and mercy of God.

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  • What was new was that Wesley added an organization, Methodism (qi;), in which each of his followers unfolded to one another the secrets of their heart, and became accountable to his fellows.

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  • The double want of the age, the want of spiritual earnestness and the want of organized coherence, would find satisfaction in many ways which would have seemed strange to Wesley, but which were, nevertheless, a continuance of the work which he began.

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  • Pitt was, in some sort, to the political life of Englishmen what Wesley was to their religious life.

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  • The seed sown by Wesley had grown to be a great tree.

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  • Under John and Charles Wesley, a system known as Evangelical Arminianism was worked out in 18th-century England, strongly Augustinian in its doctrines of sin and atonement, modern Augustinian in its doctrine of conversion, strongly anti-Augustinian in its rejection of absolute predestination.

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  • The theologian of English Methodism, apart from John Wesley himself, is Richard Watson.

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  • The city is the seat of Wesley College (Methodist Episcopal, South), until 1909 the North Texas University School, and of the North Texas Hospital for the Insane (1885), and has a Carnegie library.

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  • Wesley and Whitefield were accustomed to commend them to their followers.

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  • Whitehead also preached John Wesley 's funeral sermon in City Road Chapel.

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  • Part of the land was used for company housing, built by a subsidiary company called Wesley Estates.

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  • This year the Conference welcomed guests from 61 partner churches following a World Church consultation marking the tercentenary of the birth of John Wesley.

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  • Today, in Wesley 's tercentenary year, his Methodist following numbers 33 million throughout.

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  • Already Wesley had begun to show a zeal for souls.

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  • In 1993, Bullock gained media and fan attention with her role in the movie Demolition Man, which starred Wesley Snipes and Sylvester Stallone.

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  • Becky Wesley is the director of association relations for the National Senior Games.

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  • Providing affordable housing for senior citizens, the Wesley Woods retirement communities are located in North Georgia.

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  • Listen to The Savvy Traveler's Wesley Weissberg interview former Rockette, Illene Collins.

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  • About a century prior to that, Charles Wesley, brother of the founder of the Methodist Church, John Wesley, wrote about the glory of heaven under Christ.

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  • Cummings created the song in 1855 after Wesley and Mendelssohn had long passed on.

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  • Wesley had left specific instructions that his words be set to slow, reverent music; Mendelssohn was adamant that his music be for secular use only.

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  • In 9, there's also Wesley, the high school bully that is killed early on in the film and Laurie, who is stalked for much of the movie.

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  • Pushed to the edge, he murders the town bully named Wesley, his sister and several others.

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  • Park City was also the location where producers shot the party scene in which Amy Abbott (played by Emily VanCamp) found out that Tommy Callahan (played by Paul Wesley) was dealing drugs.

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  • Stefan (Paul Wesley) returns to Mystic Falls where he lives with a descendant Zach who he refers to as his 'uncle'.

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  • The Vampire Diaries stars Ian Somerhalder, Nina Dobrev and Paul Wesley and airs on Thursdays at 8 p.m. Eastern on The CW.

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  • In addition to Elena, Dobrev also portrays Katherine Pierce, a five hundred year old vampire and maker of Elena's suitors Damon (Somerhalder) and Stefan (Paul Wesley).

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  • Tara Thornton (Rutina Wesley) has been Sookie Stackhouse's (Anna Paquin) best friend since childhood.

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  • Tara's multifaceted character is brought to life by the acting skills of Rutina Wesley.

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  • Born in 1979, Rutina Wesley's father was a professional tap dancer and her mother was a showgirl.

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  • Wesley's education included a degree at the University of Evansville and later the Julliard School where she met future co-star Nelsan Ellis and the two became close friends.

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  • Cast as Tara in 2007, Wesley has also appeared on How She Move, The Cleveland Show and Numb3rs.

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  • In an interview leading up to season four of True Blood, Rutina Wesley described what was in store for Tara.

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  • Wesley Wyndham-Price (Alexis Denisof): Wesley, the bumbling junior Watcher from Buffy, tried to repurpose himself as a "rogue demon slayer."

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  • Wesley mourned the loss of Fred, Cordelia came out of her coma long enough to say goodbye before she too died and Lorne disappeared into the night, disillusioned by following Angel's orders and killing Lindsay.

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  • The rest of the team: Angel, Wesley and Gunn prepared for a final battle against Wolfram and Hart's senior partners, an army of demons and one dragon.

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  • Young lovers, Buttercup, a simple peasant girl and Wesley, a poor farm hand, separate so that Wesley may earn his fortune then return to marry his true love.

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  • Disaster strikes; however, when Buttercup receives word that her beloved Wesley has met his demise by the hand of the Dread Pirate Roberts.

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  • Although grounded in modern reality, most of this movie takes place in the imagined fantasy world of Buttercup and Wesley.

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  • Wesley Crusher is widely believed to be Gene Roddenberry's avatar in the Star Trek franchise.

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  • This was most evident in the introduction of Wesley Crusher, teenaged son of the ship's doctor, Beverly Crusher.

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  • The fans, to be kind, didn't take to young Wesley, for a number of reasons.

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  • This is the very definition of a Mary Sue in male form (see A Fanfiction Glossary) and Wesley was widely believed to be Gene Roddenberry's 'Mary Sue', the character that most represented what Gene would want to be on a starship.

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  • Wesley was the son of Jack Crusher, a friend of Captain Picard's, now deceased, and Picard took a fatherly interest in him for his old friend's sake.

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  • The Captain also appeared, from time to time, to take more than a friendly interest in Wesley's mother, Dr. Beverly Crusher, a lukewarm affair that never seemed to get anywhere.

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  • She lives with her son Wesley Crusher, a young prodigy who serves, first unofficially and then officially, as a crewman as well.

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  • Married to Jack Crusher, Captain Picard's closest friend, who died under his command, she is mother to Wesley Crusher, Picard's young acolyte.

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  • As mom to the wunderkind Wesley, Beverly has her biggest challenge, but their relationship remained strong throughout the angsty-years.

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  • Giles is briefly replaced by Wesley Wyndham-Price(Alexis Denisof) when the Watcher's Council decides that Giles is too personally involved with his Slayer.

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  • Wesley tries, but eventually he leaves the Watchers altogether and becomes a demon-hunter.

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  • Wesley Crusher - Starts out the show as a promising young man with a future in Starfleet, but as the show developed, Wesley met a character known as the Traveler and taking him on a transdimensional journey.

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  • Wil Wheaton, who played the gifted but young Wesley Crusher on Star Trek the Next Generation also decided to leave the show early in the seventh season.

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  • She took a year off from serving the Enterprise to head up Starfleet Medical, but soon returned to the vessel and to her son Wesley.

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  • Some FFA jackets have a special story, such as the one worn by Sharon Wesley Jackson, which is now shown in the Kansas State Historical Society in a place of honor for his accomplishments.

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  • Wesley and his helpers, finding the Anglican churches closed against them, took to preaching in the open air; and this method is still followed, more or less, in the aggressive evangelistic work of all the Methodist Churches.

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