Wells sentence examples

wells
  • It was the first of the deep artesian wells of the continent.

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  • Earth-oil wells exist in several places in the district.

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  • There are many streams, but water is chiefly obtained from wells 15 to 40 ft.

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  • BUILTH, or Builth Wells, a market town of Brecknockshire, Wales.

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  • Wells in Pennsylvania now range in depth from 300 ft.

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  • He owns a large Spanish land grant – oil wells and such.

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  • The roads were muddy, and the first of several wells she saw teemed with dirty water.

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  • On account of the small Drilling in depth of the wells, and the tenacious nature of the Canada.

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  • Place it in the wells.

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  • After the war, wells were drilled at Burning Springs, Oil Rock, California House, Volcano, Sandhill and Horseneck, and in the years1865-18763,000,000 bbls.

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  • Brine wells have been mentioned above; the salt industry is still carried on in Mason county, and in 1908 145,157 bbls.

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  • There was, however, another William Waynflete, who was instituted rector of Wroxhall, Somerset, on the r7th of May 1433 (Wells, Ep. Reg.

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  • There are seven other similar structures in the group. Inishmore also bears the name of Aran-na-naomh, Aran-of-the-Saints, from the number of religious recluses who took up their abode in it, and gave a celebrity to the holy wells, altars and shrines, to which many are still attracted.

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  • To the south and west of the city a large district is laid out as a park, where there is a statue to the memory of John Maurice of Nassau-Siegen (1604-1679), who governed Cleves from 1650 to 1679, and in the western part there are mineral wells with a pump room and bathing establishment.

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  • below the surface; while towards the Ravi wells are less than 20 ft.

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  • East Orange has a fine water-works system, which it owns and operates; the water supply is obtained from artesian wells at White Oaks Ridge, in the township of Milburn (about 10 m.

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  • Ten shafts lined with slabs of tufa which were there found may have been the approaches to tombs or may have served as wells.

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  • The first of these wells was opened at Kallara in the west of New South Wales in 1880.

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  • In Queensland to the 30th of June 1904, 973 wells had been sunk, of which 596 were flowing wells, and the total flow was 62,635,722 cub.

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  • deep. In New South Wales by the 30th of June 1903, the government had put down 101 bores producing 66 flowing wells and 22 sub-artesian wells, with a total discharge of 54,000,000 gallons a day; and there were also 144 successful private wells.

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  • The wells were first called artesian in the belief that the ascent of the water in them was due to the hydrostatic pressure of water at a higher level in the Queensland hills.

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  • The difference in level between the outcrop of the assumed eastern intake and of the wells is often so small, in comparison with their distance apart, that the friction would completely sop up the whole of the available hydrostatic head.

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  • The chemical characters of the well-waters, the irregular distribution of the water-pressure, the distribution of the underground thermal gradients, and the occurrence in some of the wells of a tidal rise and fall of a varying period, are facts which are not explained on the simple hydrostatic theory.

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  • Amongst the more important explorations may be ranked those of Tietkins in 1889, of Lindsay in 1891, of Wells in 1896, of Hiibbe in 1896, and of the Hon.

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  • Wells's expedition started from a base about 122° 20' E.

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  • David Carnegie, which started in July 1896, and travelled north-easterly until it reached Alexander Spring; then turning northward, it traversed the country between Wells's track of 1896 and the South Australian border.

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  • Minerals remained for the most part unworked, though the profitable coal fields and oil wells in Ferghana were used when disturbances in Trans-Caspia cut Turkestan off from the Baku oil, on which it relies entirely for its industrial life.

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  • In 1283 a three-days' fair to be held at the feast of St Bartholomew was granted to Robert Burnell, bishop of Bath and Wells (then holder of a share of the barony of Nantwich).

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  • Slate-quarrying and cutting is carried on in the south-western part of the state, in Rutland county; there are important quarries at Fair Haven, Poultney, Castleton, Wells and Pawlet.

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  • Glasgow opened its exchange in March 1901, Tunbridge Wells in May 1901, Portsmouth in March 1903, Brighton in October 1903, Swansea in November 1903 and Hull in October 1904.

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  • The Tunbridge Wells and Swansea municipal undertakings were subsequently sold to the National Telephone Company, and the Glasgow and Brighton undertakings to the Post Office.

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  • The theory of natural selection, or survival of the fittest, was suggested by William Charles Wells in 1813, and further elaborated by Patrick Matthew in 1831.

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  • The city is lighted by gas and electricity, - it was one of the first cities in the United States to adopt electric lighting, - and has a good watersupply system, owned by a private corporation, with a 41 acre filter plant of 18,000,000 gallons per diem capacity and an additional supply of water pumped from deep wells outside the city.

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  • wells at Daliki, near Bushire, but several attempts to tap the oil have been unsuccessful.

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  • Thomas Cornish, suffragan bishop in the diocese of Bath and Wells, and provost of Oriel College, Oxford, from 1493 to 1507, appointed him chaplain of the college of St Mary Ottery, Devonshire.

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  • Pop. (1901), 4135 It is in the midst of the oil region of Canada, and numerous wells in the vicinity have an aggregate output of about 30,000,000 gallons of crude oil per annum, much of which is refined in the town.

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  • The water supply of the city is derived from eight deep wells.

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  • There are about 150 privately owned artesian wells.

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  • For himself he obtained, in addition to his archbishopric and lord chancellorship, the abbey of St Albans, reputed to be the richest in England, and the bishopric first of Bath and Wells, then of Durham, and finally that of Winchester.

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  • Many of the oil wells at Baku were burned, and massacres took place at that town, at Shusha, at Erivan, at Tiflis, at Batum, at Jebrail and at other places.

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  • On the Thursday before Easter a special church service is celebrated, and the wells are beautifully ornamented with flowers, prayers being offered at each.

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  • During his absence from England he was made (1333) dean of Wells.

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  • The famous Venetian pozzi, or wells for storing rain-water from the roofs and streets, consisted of a closed basin with a water-tight stratum of clay at the bottom, upon which a slab of stone was laid; a brick shaft of radiating bricks laid in a permeable jointing material of clay and sand was then built.

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  • The present water supply, introduced in 1884, is brought from the commune of Trebaseleghe, where it is collected from 120 artesian wells.

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  • Oil and gas are often met with in drilled wells under great pressure, which is highest as a rule in the deepest wells.

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  • in., although a much higher pressure has been registered in many wells.

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  • The gas wells of Pennsylvania indicate about double the pressure of those drilled in the Trenton limestone, 600-800 lb.

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  • The extremely high pressure under which oil is met with in wells drilled in some parts of the Russian oil fields is a matter of common knowledge, and a fountain or spouting well resulting therefrom is one of the " sights" of the country.

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  • That it is due to water-pressure, as in artesian wells (" hydrostatic " or " artesian " theory).

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  • certain wells in Ohio), the second has held good, the third appears to be the most widely applicable.

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  • It is said that at Echigo in Japan, old wells, supposed to have been dug several hundred years ago, are existent, and that a Japanese history - called Kokushiriyaku, states that " burning water " was obtained in Echigo about A.D.

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  • The drilling of petroleum wells is carried on by individuals or companies, either on lands owned by them, or on properties whose owners grant leases, usually on condition that a certain number of wells shall be sunk within a stated period, and that a portion of the oil obtained (usually from one-tenth to one-fourth) shall be appropriated as royalty to the lessor.

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  • The " wild-cat " wells, sunk by speculators on untested territory or on lands which had not previously proved productive, played an important part in the earlier mapping out of the petroleum fields.

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  • To discourage the sinking of wells on land immediately adjoining productive territory, it has been usual to drill along the borders of the land as far as practicable, in order to first obtain the oil which might otherwise be raised by others; and on account of the small area often controlled by the operator, the number of wells drilled has frequently been far in excess of the number which might reasonably be sunk.

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  • For drilling the deeper wells, the derrick, on account of the length of the " string " of drilling tools, is usually at least 7 o ft.

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  • A large boiler frequently supplies the engines of several wells.

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  • The earlier wells in Pennsylvania consisted of three sections, the first formed of surface clays and gravels, the second of stratified rocks containing water, and the third of stratified rocks, including the oil-sands, usually free from water.

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  • In later wells the conductor has been replaced with an 8-in.

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  • The drill is thus allowed to fall freely, instead of being partly upheld by the buoyancy of the water, as in earlier wells.

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  • Contractors will often undertake to drill wells of moderate depth at 90 cents to $1 per foot, but the cost of a deep well may amount to as much as $7000.

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  • The yield of petroleum wells varies within very wide limits, and the relative importance of the different producing districts is also Yield of constantly changing.

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  • C. White, state geologist of Wells.

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  • Torpedoing The explosive employed is generally nitroglycerin, Wells.

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  • It must be borne in mind that although the explosion may increase the production for a time, it is by no means certain that the actual output of a well is increased in all such cases, though from some wells there would be no production without the use of the torpedo.

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  • Although petroleum wells in Russia have not the depth of many of those in the United States, the disturbed character of the strata, with consequent liability to caving, and the occurrence of hard concretions, render drilling a lengthy and expensive Drilling in operation.

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  • The drilling of wells of large size requires the use of heavy tools and of very strong appliances generally.

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  • A form of the rod system is used in the Russian oil-fields, but owing to the large diameter of the wells the appliances differ from those employed elsewhere.

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  • The wells from which the supplies of natural gas are obtained in the United States are drilled and cased in the same manner as the oil wells.

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  • Thus, in Upper Burma, it was conveyed in earthenware vessels from the wells to the river bank, where it was poured into the holds of boats.

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  • It is interesting to find that a rude pipe-line formerly existed in this field for conveying the crude oil from the wells to the river; this was made of bamboos, but it is said that the loss by leakage was so great as to lead to its immediate abandonment on completion.

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  • Hutchinson of New York, laid a short line from the Tarr Farm wells to the refinery, which passed over a hill, the oil being moved on the syphon principle, and a year later constructed another three miles long to the railway.

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  • Tanks of various types are employed in storing the oil, those at the wells being circular and usually made of wood, with a content of 250 barrels and upwards.

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  • The gas is distributed to the consumer from the wells in wrought-iron pipes, ranging in diameter from 20 in.

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  • At this period the supply of the raw material was insufficient to admit of any important development in the industry, and before the drilling of artesian wells for petroleum was initiated by Drake the " coal-oil " or shale-oil industry had assumed considerable proportions in the United States.

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  • The municipality owns and operates its waterworks; the water supply is obtained from artesian wells.

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  • The sacred cakes of Astarte and old holy wells associated with her cult were later even transferred to the worship of the Virgin (Ency.

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  • A great number of wells were also sunk and rain-water was stored in cisterns.

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  • In 1275 Burnell was elected bishop of Bath and Wells, and three years later Edward repeated the attempt which he had made in 1270 to secure the archbishopric of Canterbury for his favourite.

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  • from the Lahadu Wells, near Jibuti, in the west, to Bandar Ziyada in 49° E., 180 m.

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  • The wells at Galadi were occupied by the British early in April without opposition.

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  • The most notable gas discovery is that at Medicine Hat, which has wells with unlimited quantities.

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  • Before the opening of this canal in 1863 water had to be brought from " the Wells of Moses," a small oasis 3 m.

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  • Evidences of petroleum were discovered long ago, in the very field where in recent years the Beaumont and Vinton wells were bored.

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  • The depth of the wells is from 840 to 2150 ft.; two wells completed in 1907 had a daily capacity estimated at 35,000,000 to 50,000,000 ft.

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  • In 1902 nearly one-eighth of the acreage irrigated was by systems supplied from wells.

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  • Wells, Democrat (acting) .

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  • Water is very scarce, and is raised from wells of from 250 to 340 ft.

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  • It is a remarkable fact that, except in the island of Andros, no streams of running water are to be found in the whole group. The inhabitants derive their water supply from wells.

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  • As a result of the porosity of the rock, many of the wells feel the influence of the sea and exhibit an ebb and flow.

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  • Much of the soil of the desert appears to be alluvial; there are numerous traces of streams having formerly passed over it, and still, where irrigation is at all practicable, fertility in the clayey tract follows; but the rains are scanty, the wells few and generally 100 ft.

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  • TUNBRIDGE WELLS, a municipal borough and inland watering-place of England, chiefly in the Tonbridge parliamentary division of Kent, but extending into the eastern division of Sussex, 341 m.

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  • The wells are situated by the Parade (or Pantiles), a walk associated with fashion since the time of their discovery.

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  • The Tunbridge Wells sanatorium is situated in grounds sixty acres in extent.

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  • Five miles south-east of Tunbridge Wells is Bayham Abbey, founded in 1200, where ruins of a church, a gateway, and dependent buildings adjoin the modern Tudor mansion.

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  • The vicinity of Tunbridge Wells is largely residential.

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  • Henrietta Maria, wife of Charles I., retired to drink the waters at Tunbridge Wells after the birth of her eldest son Charles.

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  • The Tunbridge Wells of that period is sketched with much graphic humour in Thackeray's Virginians.

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  • It is the terminus of steamer navigation on the Brahmaputra, and also of a railway running to important coal-mines and petroleum wells, which connects with the Assam-Bengal system.

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  • 1 Thus it was taught that " if a lodestone be anointed with garlic, or if a diamond be near, it does not attract iron," and that " if pickled in the salt of a sucking fish, there is power to pick up gold which has fallen into the deepest wells."

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  • They contain scarcely any water except in the rainy season, when they are very full and rapid, and discharge themselves into the Runn, all along the coast of which the wells and springs are more or less impregnated with common salt and other saline ingredients.

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  • He had been nominated bishop of St Asaph in 1536, translated to St David's in the same year, and to Bath and Wells in 1547.

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  • The state came under British management, and the administration was improved, the revenue increased, a system of irrigation developed, new tanks and wells constructed and an excellent system of roads and public buildings organized.

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  • in 1758, as last but one of the senior optimes, Richard Beadon, his lifelong friend, afterwards bishop of Bath and Wells, being a wrangler in the same year.

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  • In this march he was much harassed by the nomads, with whom he could not come to close quarters, but no mention is made of his having any difficulty with the rivers (he gets his water from wells), and no reason for his proceedings is advanced except a desire to avenge legendary attacks of Scyths upon Asia.

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  • LLANWRTYD WELLS, an urban district of Breconshire, south Wales, with a station on the central Wales section of the London & North Western railway, 231 m.

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  • Saline water is obtained daily in the season from Builth Wells.

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  • The ancient parish of Llangammarch consists of the townships of Penbuallt and Treflis, the wells being in the former, which comprises 11,152 acres and had in 1901 a population of only 433.

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  • SAMUEL HOOD HOOD, VISCOUNT (1724-1816), British admiral, was the son of Samuel Hood, vicar of Butleigh in Somerset, and prebendary of Wells.

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  • Scavengers were employed in early times, and sewage was received into wells and pumped into the kennels of the streets.

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  • When the rocks are concealed by detrital material he looks for outcroppings on steep hillsides, on the crests of hills or ridges, in the beds of streams, in landslides, in the roots of overturned trees, and in wells, quarries, roadcuttings and other excavations.

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  • Elaborate arrangements had been made for water supply to the troops ashore, as the whereabouts and the capacity of wells were doubtful.

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  • The wells have been worked for a little over a century by the natives of the country.

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  • The Burma Oil Company since 1889 has worked by drilled wells on the American or cable system, and the amount produced is yearly becoming more and more important.

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  • The site is one of great strength, and is now occupied by a fort, in the construction of which traces of the outer walls and of huts, and several wells and a cistern, all belonging to the primitive village, were discovered, and also the remains of a villa of the end of the Republic.

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  • The fleet returned in April 1684, and a few months after, upon a vacancy occurring in the see of Bath and Wells, Ken, now Dr Ken, was appointed bishop. It is said that, upon the occurrence of the vacancy, Charles, mindful of the spirit he had shown at Winchester, exclaimed, "Where is the good little man that refused his lodging to poor Nell?"

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  • Lavicount Anderdon (The Life of Thomas Ken, Bishop of Bath and Wells, by a Layman, 1851; 2nd ed., 1854) and of Dean Plumptre (2 vols., 1888; revised, 1890).

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  • To secure this marvellous return, with an annual rainfall of 26 in., as much as 52,000,000 gallons of water are pumped per 24 hours from artesian wells on one estate alone.

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  • While in England he was appointed (1503), by Henry VII., to the see of Hereford, and in the following year to the more lucrative diocese of Bath and Wells, but he never resided in either.

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  • The central zone includes Hejaz (or Hijaz), Nejd and El Hasa; much of it is a dry, stony or sandy steppe, with few wells or watering-places, and only occupied by nomad tribes; but the great wadis which intersect it contain many fertile stretches of alluvial soil, where cultivation is possible and which support a considerable settled population, with several large towns and numerous villages.

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  • From the wells of Shakik he crossed the waterless Nafud in four days to Jubba, and after a halt there in the nomad camps, he moved on to Hail, already a thriving town, and the capital of the Shammar state whose limits included all northern Arabia from Kasim to the Syrian border.

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  • Sirhan is continuous with the depression known as the Jauf, situated on the northern edge of the Nefud or Nafud, and the halfway station between Damascus and Hail; and it is possible that this depression continues eastward towards the Euphrates along a line a little north of the thirtieth parallel, where wells and pasturages are known to exist.

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  • A few wells exist actually in the Nafud in the district called El Hajra, near its north-eastern border, and along its southern border, between J.

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  • Shammar and Tema, there are numerous wells and artificial as well as natural reservoirs resorted to by the nomad tribes.

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  • Other peaks cropping out of the Nafud are Jebel Tawil, near the wells of Shakik, and J.

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  • Another important route is that taken by the Persian or Shia pilgrims from Bagdad and Kerbela across the desert, by the wells of aina, to Bureda in Kasim; thence across the steppes of western Nejd till it crosses the Hejaz border at the Ria Mecca, 50 m.

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  • All over the country wells are to be found, and the masonry of some of them is undoubtedly ancient.

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  • Few are still in situ, the majority having been taken from their original positions and built into houses, mosques or wells of more recent date.

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  • The town walls were strengthened, new wells dug, gardens planted, mosques and schools built.

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  • Ahmad Feizi Pasha, in command of the Basra column, 4200 strong, crossed the desert and reached the wells of aina, 200 m.

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  • The eastern half consists for the most part of a rich upland plain, abundantly irrigated by wells, rivers and canals, while the western portion, though rich in mythological association and antiquarian remains, is comparatively unfavoured by nature.

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  • The company formed to execute his project became simply an agricultural concern and by the sinking of artesian wells created an oasis of olive and palm trees.

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  • Wells are dug in their beds, and the fertility of the valleys is thus maintained.

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  • The most productive of the Piura wells are at Talara and Zorritos, where refineries have been established.

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  • The water is very bad, and that fit for drinking requires to be brought from wells distant 1 to 3 m.

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  • In 1840 the Tennysons moved to Tunbridge Wells, and a year later to Boxley, near Maidstone, to be close to Edmund Lushington, who had now married Cecilia Tennyson.

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  • There are two holy wells in the town.

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  • 2 English churchman, is said to have been a monk of Glastonbury before his elevation in 909 to the see of Wells, of which he was the first occupant.

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  • It is the centre of a large and productive wheatand cotton-growing region, which has also numerous oil wells (with a total production in 1907 of 2 26,311 barrels).

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  • It is served by the Central Vermont and the Montpelier & Wells River railways, and is connected by electric street railways with Montpelier.

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  • Numerous artesian wells furnish the city with an ample supply of water of unusual excellence.

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  • Oil wells in the vicinity also furnish an important product for export, and there are iron and salt mines near.

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  • In the political troubles which preceded the outbreak of the Civil War, Hopton, as member of parliament successively for Bath, Somerset and Wells, at first opposed the royal policy, but after Strafford's attainder (for which he voted) he gradually became an ardent supporter of Charles, and at the beginning of the Great Rebellion he was made lieutenant-general under the marquess of Hertford in the west.

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  • At this stage the rain-water is intercepted by wells, and by galleries hewn for miles in the water-bearing rock.

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  • Vegetables of all sorts are easily grown, and a rotation of these is raised on land irrigated from wells and springs.

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  • The fosse is laid out in vegetable gardens; public gardens have been constructed outside the walls; and artesian wells have been bored by the government.

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  • Wells, Adams's great-grandson - a valuable biography, containing a mass of information, but noticeably biassed; J.

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  • Wells in the Journal of Hellenic Studies, xxix.

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  • Wells in Journ.

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  • Sanitation, however, is improving and much good has resulted from the boring of numerous artesian wells which yield good water.

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  • Acton Wells, of saline waters, had considerable reputation in the 18th century.

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  • Wells and S.

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  • The wells of the town are strongly impregnated with salt and alum, and in the vicinity there are several hot springs.

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  • Thousands of artesian wells have been bored, the region between Los Angeles, Santa Clara and San Bernardino being one of the most important artesian well regions of the world.

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  • of the city and wells throughout the city; petroleum is largely employed as fuel in factories.

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  • The central field, the Second Street Park field in the city, was developed between 1892 and 1895 and wells were drilled farther E.

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  • until in 1896 the eastern field was tapped with wells at Adobe and College streets; the wells within the city are gradually being abandoned.

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  • Besides these there are II public and 1375 private artesian wells in the city.

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  • There is a total want of streams and wells of fresh water, and the inhabitants are dependent on the rain, which they collect and preserve in tanks.

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  • After the accession of Edward VI., Ferrar was, probably through the influence of Bishop Barlow, appointed chaplain to Protector Somerset, a royal visitor, and bishop of St David's on Barlow's translation to Bath and Wells in 1548.

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  • On Herodotus' debt to Hecataeus see Wells, in Journ.

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  • Small streams originate in the Ergenis, but are lost as soon as they reach the lowlands, where water can only be obtained from wells.

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  • More than thirty mineral substances are obtained in commercial quantities from the mines, quarries and wells of New York, but of the total value of the mineral products in 1908 ($45,6 6 9, 861), nearly six-sevenths was' represented by clay products ($8,929,224), pig iron ($15,879,000), stone ($6,157,279), cement ($ 2, 2 54,759), salt ($2,136,738), petroleum ($2,071,533), and sand and gravel ($1,349,163).

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  • From 1880 to 1885 the first brines were obtained in Wyoming and Genesee counties by boring deep wells into beds of rock salt, and in 1885 the mining of the extensive deposits of rock salt in Livingston county was begun.

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  • But in the absence of evidence to show that the fees charged by arbitrators or umpire are extortionate, or unfair and unreasonable, the courts will not interfere with them (Llandrindod Wells Water Co.

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  • or wells were adopted for founda tions.

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  • In the case of the Empress bridge over the Sutlej each pier consisted of three brick wells, 19 ft.

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  • The plains, except in the south-east corner, are underlaid by sheets of water-bearing sandstone, which carry a volume of water under such pressure that in the valleys of the James river and the Missouri river and its western tributaries a strong surface flow may be obtained from artesian wells.

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  • In 1905 over a thousand wells had been sunk east of the Missouri, and the flow was estimated at 7,000,000 gallons per day.

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  • Of the total, 38,457 acres were irrigated by streams and 25,223 acres by wells.

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  • The artesian basin of the east part of the state is fairly well developed, several wells having a flow of from 2000 to 435 0 gallons per minute and a pressure of 150 lb to the square inch.

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  • The chamber of commerce, and the Pabst, Mitchell, North-Western Life Insurance, Germania Sentinel and Wells buildings, are among the principal business structures.

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  • Tunbridge Wells is a favourite inland watering-place.

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  • The municipal boroughs are Bromley (pop. 27,354), Canterbury, a city and county borough (24,889), Chatham (37,057), Deal (10,581), Dover (4 1, 794), Faversham (11,290), Folkestone (30,650), Gillingham (42,530), Gravesend (27,196), Hythe (5557), Lydd (2675), Maidstone (33,516), Margate (23,118), New Romney (1328), Queenborough (1544), Ramsgate (2 7,733), Rochester, a city (30,590), Sandwich (3170), Tenterden (324.3), Tunbridge Wells (33,373) The urban districts are Ashford (12,808), Beckenham (26,331), Bexley (12,918), Broadstairs and St Peter's (6466), Cheriton (7091), Chislehurst (7429), Dartford (18,644), Erith (25,296), Foots Cray (5817), Herne Bay (6726), Milton (7086), Northfleet (12,906), Penge (22,465), Sandgate (2294), Sevenoaks (8106), Sheerness (18,179), Sittingbourne (8943), Southborough (6977), Tonbridge (12,736), Walmer (5614), Whitstable (7086), Wrotham (3571).

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  • The boroughs having separate commissions of the peace and courts of quarter sessions are Canterbury, Deal, Dover, Faversham, Folkestone, Gravesend, Hythe, Maidstone, Margate, Rochester, Sandwich and Tenterden; while those of Lydd, New Romney, Ramsgate and Tunbridge Wells have separate commissions of the peace.

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  • Water for irrigation purposes is often derived from artesian wells, which are very numerous in the S.

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  • After some changes of residence he bought a house called Somerleaze, near Wells, Somerset, and settled there in 1860.

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  • The fields and places of entertainment in Islington were favourite places of resort for the citizens of London in the 17th century and later; the modern Ball's Pond Road recalls the sport of duck-hunting practised here and on other ponds in the parish, and the popularity of the place was increased by the discovery of chalybeate wells.

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  • There are no permanent rivers; but during the rainy season, from August to October, heavy floods convert the water-courses in the hollows of the mountains into broad and rapid streams. Numerous wells supply the wants of the people and their cattle.

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  • Naphtha wells are working with favourable results at Gbely in Slovakia, and researches in progress at other points (Russinia) promise results that would make Czechoslovakia independent of foreign sources in respect of petroleum, even if no surplus were produced for export.

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  • It contains neither rivers nor springs, but is supplied with water by wells and cisterns.

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  • In 1626 he was nominated bishop of Bath and Wells, and in July 1628 bishop of London.

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  • C. Wells (Journ.

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  • Bartlett, of Dr Horace Wells (1815-1848), the discoverer of anaesthesia; and one, by E.

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  • The Times (semi-weekly 1817; daily 1841) was one of the most powerful Democratic organs in the period before the middle of the, 9th century, and had Gideon Wells for editor 1826-1836.

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  • Under French rule its productive ' ness has been largely increased by the sinking of artesian wells in districts which only required water to make them fertile.

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  • Wells, A Study of Mexico (New York, 1887); W.

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  • 1894), bishop of Bath and Wells; Archdeacon H.

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  • Perowne, afterwards bishop of Worcester; the Rev. Edward Hayes Plumtre (1821-1891), professor of exegesis at King's College, London, afterwards dean of Wells; Canon E.

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  • Water can usually be obtained all the year round by sinking wells from 20 to 30 ft.

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  • From the scarcity of water on the main routes through the Kalahari these roads are known as " the thirsts "; along some of them wells have been sunk by the administration.

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  • is the ecclesiastical parish (one of three) of Woodford Wells, where there is a mineral spring.

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  • The water supply is scanty, and most of the irrigation is by water drawn from wells.

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  • There is only one line of railway, over which several companies, however, have running powers, so that the town may be reached by the Brecon & Merthyr railway from Merthyr, Cardiff and Newport, by the Cambrian from Builth Wells, or by the Midland from Hereford and Swansea respectively.

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  • He became a prebendary of Sarum in 1841 and of Wells in 1849.

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  • In 1853 he resigned his position as examining chaplain to the bishop of Bath and Wells owing to his pronounced eucharistic views.

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  • The overlords were the bishops of Bath and Wells, who had a palace and park here.

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  • A weekly market on Tuesdays, granted to the bishop of Bath and Wells in 1284, is still held.

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  • The Greek sirens of Homer are clearly a form of these deadly fairies, as the Nereids and Oreads and Naiads are fairies of wells, mountains and the sea.

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  • There are several artesian wells.

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  • The state sank wells and built and maintained tanks from which brine was delivered to lessees.

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  • Founded in 1770 to provide accommodation for the visitors to the mineral wells of Pannanich, 12 m.

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  • Near one of these wells is the South-western (State) Hospital for the Insane (1892).

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  • The city water supply, owned by a private corporation, is obtained from artesian wells with a capacity of 40,000,000 gallons a day.

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  • At this time Beckington was acting as secretary to Henry VI., and soon after his return in 1 443 he was appointed lord privy seal and bishop of Bath and Wells.

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  • The bishop erected many buildings in Wells, and died there on the 14th of January 1465.

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  • About 20% of the cultivated area is irrigated by canals, 2% by wells and 3% by perennial streams. Throughout the province the area in which well-cultivation is possible is extremely limited, and the field has already been covered.

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  • Although the Sarum Use prevailed far the most widely, yet there were separate Uses of York and Hereford, and also to a less degree of Lincoln, Bangor, Exeter, Wells, St Paul's, and probably of other dioceses and cathedral churches as well.

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  • The Apsheron peninsula is dry and bare of vegetation; but within it are situated the famous petroleum wells of Baku.

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  • The cultivation of the cane was greatly encouraged by the Reciprocity Treaty of 1875, which established practically free trade between the islands and the United States, and since 1879 it has been widely extended by means of irrigation, the water being obtained both by pumping from numerous artesian wells and by conducting surface water through canals and ditches.

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  • He lived at Falmouth (now Portland, Maine) until the Indians destroyed it in 1690, when he removed to Wells.

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  • 19 a the interior was held by a system of roads and forts not yet well understood but discernible at such points as Caer-gai on Bala Lake, Castle Collen near Llandrindod Wells, the Gaer near Brecon, Merthyr and Gellygaer.

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  • No traces of meat-market, theatre or aqueduct have come to light; water was got from wells lined with wooden tubs, and must have been scanty in dry summers.

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  • The Heath is continued eastward in Parliament Hill (borough of St Pancras), acquired for the public in 1890; and westward outside the county boundary in Golders Hill, owned by Sir Spenser Wells, Bart., until 1898.

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  • Chalybeate springs were discovered at Hampstead in the 17th century, and early in the 18th rivalled those of Tunbridge Wells and Epsom.

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  • By the close of 1861 wells had been drilled from which 2000 to 3000 barrels flowed in a day without pumping, and the state's yearly output continued to increase until 1891, when it amounted to 31,424,206 barrels.

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  • Since then, however, wells have been going dry, and when,.

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  • In drilling for some of the first oil wells gas escaped, and in a few instances this was used as a fuel for generating steam in the boilers of the drilling-engines.

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  • In some instances, too, wells which were drilled for oil produced only gas.

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  • Here he became king and taught the inhabitants of the country to dig wells.

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  • The water-supply is from wells sunk through the sandy soil to the rock; of these there are more than twenty - an unusual number for a Syrian town.

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  • The municipality owns the waterworks, the water being obtained from artesian wells.

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  • There are brine baths supplied from wells near Middlesbrough, a pier, gardens and promenades.

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  • Three miles south is a fine stone circle, and to the south-east are the wells of Struell, famous as miraculous healers among the peasantry until modern times.

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  • Water is obtained from wells and springs in sufficient quantity to supply an extensive system of irrigation.

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  • The water supply, from wells some 150 ft.

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  • Wells, Culture of the Chrysanthemum; Rev. S.

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  • Some years afterwards he was made prebendary of Wells Cathedral.

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  • The Jumna and the Ganges enclose within their angle a fertile tract well irrigated with tanks and wells.

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  • It contains bathing-stairs, tanks and wells, and a great number of handsome temples, of which the finest is that of Govind Deva, a cruciform vaulted building of red sandstone, dating from 1590.

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  • The water which has found its way through the granitic sand flows over the surface of the mica schist and settles in the hollows, and by sinking wells to the solid rock a supply of water can generally be obtained.

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  • It is estimated that (apart from those in a few areas where the sand stratum is thin and water is reached at the depth of a few feet) there are about 900 of these wells.

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  • As there is no highland area draining into Kordofan, the underground reservoirs are dependent on the local rainfall, and a large number of the wells are dry during many months.

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  • Much has been done in parts of Australia by means of artesian wells.

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  • The most probable meaning of the name is "seven wells," despite the non-Semitic construction involved in this interpretation.

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  • Seven ancient wells still exist here, though two are stopped up. Eusebius and Jerome mention the place in the 4th century as a large village and the seat of a Roman garrison.

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  • The flank defences of the main wall are insufficient; indeed there is no pretence at scientific structure about any part of the defences; but the site of the city is well chosen for defence, and the water supply (drawn by canals from the Arghandab or derived from wells) is good.

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  • In the neighbourhood are petroleum wells and a diamond mine.

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  • ARTESIAN WELLS, the name properly applied to watersprings rising above the surface of the ground by natural hydrostatic pressure, on boring a small hole down through a series of strata to a water-carrying bed enclosed between two impervious layers; the name is, however, sometimes loosely applied to any deep well, even when the water is obtained by pumping.

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  • The municipality owns and operates its water-works, water being obtained from artesian wells.

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  • These means are such as the digging of wells, planting medicinal herbs, and trees for shade, sending out of missionaries, appointment of special officers to supervise charities, and so on.

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  • A very familiar means in India of raising water from wells in places where the spring level is as much sometimes as 100 ft.

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  • In a few localities, notably in South Dakota, the Yakima valley of Washington, San Joaquin, and San Bernardino valleys of California, San Luis valley of Colorado, and Utah valley of Utah, water from artesian wells was also used for the irrigation of from 1 to 160 acres.

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  • The great east window at Wells and the window at the west end of the nave at Chartres are fine examples.

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  • The municipality owns and operates the water-works, the water-supply being obtained from artesian wells.

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  • Artesian Wells >>

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  • Stewart, were despatched to occupy Jakdul wells, 96 m.

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  • The Desert Column, 1800 men, with 2880 camels in poor condition and 153 horses, found the enemy in possession of Abu Klea wells on the 16th, and was desperately attacked on the 17th.

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  • The wells being occupied and a zeriba formed, the column started on the evening of the 18th.

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  • Lloyd, the Suakin commandant, advanced to the Taroi Wells, 19 m.

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  • He occupied Abu Klea wells and Metemma; recalled the amir Ibrahim Khalil, with 4000 men, from the Ghezira; brought to Omdurman thc army of the west under Mahmudsome 10,000 men; entrusted the line of the AtbaraEd Darner, Adarama, Asubri and El Fasherto Osman Digna; constructed defences in the Shabluka gorge; and personally superintended the organization and drill of the forces gathered at Orndurman, and the collection of vast stores of food and supplies of camels for offensive expeditions.

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  • The mineral occurs generally in lenticular deposits, which may reach a thickness of more than loo ft.; but it is mined only to a limited extent, most of the salt being obtained from brine springs and wells which derive their saline character from deposits of salts.

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  • After the sinking of oil wells in 1901, Beaumont became one of the principal oil-producing places in the United States; its oil refineries are connected by pipe lines with the surrounding oil fields, and two 6-in.

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  • The other urban districts are Brynmawr, Builth Wells and Hay, with populations of 6833, of 1805 and of 1680 respectively in 1901.

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  • Crickhowell and Talgarth are market towns, while Llanwrtyd Wells is a rapidly developing health resort.

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  • The city owns and operates its electric-lighting plant and its water-supply system, the water, of exceptional purity, being obtained from artesian wells 4 m.

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  • The city owns and operates the water-works and electric-lighting plant; the water-supply is derived from artesian wells.

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  • It is situated at the confluence of the Luckow with the Dniester and its principal resources are the recovery of salt from the neighbouring brine wells, soapmaking and the trade in timber.

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  • C. Wells definitely propounded the theory of natural selection, but applied it only to certain human characters.

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  • 1279), chancellor of England and archbishop of York, was a son of Hugh Giffard of Boyton, Wiltshire, and after serving as canon and archdeacon of Wells, was chosen bishop of Bath and Wells in May 1264.

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  • These are the most abundant at the foot of a chain of hills where the oil wells of Daliki, Bebehan, Ramuz and Shushtar, Dizful, Pusht-i-Kuh, and Qasr-i-Shirin are situated.

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  • Wells Williams, The Middle Kingdom (London, 1883); Pere Havret, La Stele de Si-ngan Fou (Shanghai, 1895-1902); F.

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  • RICHARD FOX (c. 1448-1528), successively bishop of Exeter, Bath and Wells, Durham, and Winchester, lord privy seal, and founder of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, was born about 1448 at Ropesley near Grantham, Lincolnshire.

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  • The ecclesiastical preferment was merely intended to provide a salary not at Henry's expense; for Fox never saw either Exeter or the diocese of Bath and Wells to which he was translated in 1492.

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  • Meanwhile in 1494 Fox had been translated to Durham, not merely because it was a richer see than Bath and Wells but because of its political importance as a palatine earldom and its position with regard to the Borders and relations with Scotland.

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  • Roads to Bardsey - with the monks' wells, found at intervals of 7 to 9 m.

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  • There are, however, numerous wells, water being obtained freely from the porous sandstone which underlies a great part of the Libyan desert.

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  • Some very ancient wells are 400 ft.

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  • After successively holding the livings of Pluckley and Brickley in Kent, he was installed in 1881 as dean of Wells.

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  • Wells were to be dug and trees planted along the roads; a system of medical aid was established throughout his kingdom and the conquered provinces, as far as Ceylon, for both man and beast.

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  • Each of these roads was laid out with avenues of trees, with wells of water, and with frequent sardis or rest-houses.

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  • Petroleum is an important product, and there are wells at a number of places along the coast, from Tumbes to Sechura, the most productive being those of Talara and Zorritos.

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  • WESTON-SUPER-MARE, a seaside resort in the Wells parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, on the Bristol Channel, 1372 m.

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  • Struck by the difficulties of every kind which had to be encountered by poor pilgrims to Mecca from Bagdad and its neighbourhood, he ordered Yaqtin, his freedman, to renew the milestones, to repair the old reservoirs, and to dig wells and construct cisterns at every station of the road where they were missing.

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  • The great boundary rivers flow through low-lying valleys fertilized by their overflow or percolation, while a high bank leads up to the central upland, which, though naturally dry and unproductive except where irrigated by wells, has been transformed by various canal systems. This favoured region may be regarded as the granary of upper India.

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  • The water supply is from artesian wells.

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  • Wells and H.

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  • The water-supply system is owned and operated by the borough; the water is derived from streams flowing southward in the sparsely settled area east of the borough, and also from driven wells in the same region; it is pumped by ten engines at Ridgewood to a reservoir having a capacity of about 300,000,000 gallons, while a part of it is re-pumped to a high service reservoir near the north entrance to Prospect Park for the service of the most elevated part of the borough.

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  • In the south artesian wells, and in the Great Valley the rivers of the Sierra slope, are the main source of water-supply.

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  • The municipal water supply is obtained from artesian wells.

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  • According to primitive thought, rivers, lakes, springs and wells are commonly inhabited by spirits which readily assume human or animal form.

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  • Lucian, De dea Syria, § 12 seq.) are connected with the beliefs associating wells or springs with serpents and other occupants.

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  • The Popo Agie and Lander fields produce the largest quantities of oil, the wells being partly gushers from which a heavy fuel oil is obtained.

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  • There is a great variety in the grades of oils produced in the state, ranging from the heavy asphaltic oils of the Popo Agie and Lander fields to the high-grade lubricants and superior light products obtained from the wells in the Douglas, Salt Creek and Uinta county fields.

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  • The average daily production is very high, owing to a large number of the wells flowing under the natural pressure of the gas.

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  • The municipality owns the water-works, the water-supply being obtained from artesian wells.

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  • Ships passing through the Suez Canal are subject to similar inspection; sick persons are landed at Moses Wells, and suspected ones detained.

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  • The plain is fertile where cultivated, fairly supplied with deep wells, and in many places covered with good pasture.

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  • CHEDDAR, a small town in the Wells parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, 22 m.

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  • It was granted by John in 1204 to Hugh, archdeacon of Wells, who sold it to the bishop of Bath and Wells in 1229, whose successors were overlords until 1 553, when the bishop granted it to the king.

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  • Pierpont (provisional), Republican Henry Horatio Wells, „ „ Gilbert Carlton Walker, „ James Lawson Kemper, Conservative..

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  • In 1713 he produced a reformed liturgy, and soon afterwards founded a society for promoting primitive Christianity, lecturing in support of his theories at London, Bath and Tunbridge Wells.

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  • They burrow in the sands of every shore; they throng the weeds between tide-marks; they ascend all streams; they are found in deep wells, in caverns, in lakes; in Arctic waters they swarm in numbers beyond computation; they find lodgings on crabs, on turtles, on weed-grown buoys; they descend into depths of the ocean down to hundreds or thousands of fathoms; they are found in mountain streams as far above sea-level as some of their congeners live below it.

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  • Among the secondary hygienic advantages are the numerous mineral wells.

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  • There have been very few flowing wells.

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  • Memphis is the see of a Protestant Episcopal bishopric. The city is supplied with water from more than eighty artesian wells, having an average depth of about 400 ft.

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  • Subsequently the streets were cleansed and repaved, an improved sewer system was put in operation, and the water supply was obtained from artesian wells.

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  • committed to custody for a libel on his superior, James Montagu (1568?-1618), bishop of Bath and Wells.

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  • His Manual of Chemistry, first published in 1819, enjoyed wide popularity, and among other works he brought out a Dictionary of Science, Literature and Art in 1842, on a new edition of which he was engaged when he died at Tunbridge Wells on the 11th of February 1866.

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  • Leonard Wells Volk >>

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  • This is the beginning of the species-god, and implies a step of thought comparable to the production in language of general terms. These protecting spirits were free beings, having form and shape, but not individualized; while above them rose the higher deities like the forest-god Tapio and his maiden Hillervo, protectress of herds, or Ahto the water-god who gradually took the place of Vesi, the actual element originally conceived as itself divine, and ruled over the spirits of lakes and rivers, wells and springs.

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  • The largest furnaces are those of the Boston & Montana Company at Great Falls, Montana, which have put through soo tons of charge daily, pouring their melted slag and matte into large wells of io ft.

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  • The municipality owns its waterworks, the water being obtained from eleven artesian wells, and being chemically similar to that of Waukesha Springs.

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  • Wells's Anticipations (1901), A Modern Utopia (1905) and New Worlds for Old (1908).

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  • Having been made prebendary of Exeter, of Wells and of York, he was consecrated bishop of Hereford in 1370, was translated to the see of London in 1375, and became archbishop of Canterbury in 1381, succeeding Simon of Sudbury in both these latter positions.

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  • The old clock, presented to the abbey by Adam de Sodbury (1322-1335), and noteworthy as an early example of a clock striking the hours automatically with a count-wheel, was once in Wells cathedral, but is now preserved in the Victoria and Albert Museum.

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  • He was removed to Wells, where he was "arraigned and next day put to execution for robbing of Glastonbury church."

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  • Bishop Kennion of Bath and Wells entered into an agreement to raise a sum of £31,000, the cost of the purchase; this was completed, and the site and buildings were formally transferred at a dedicatory service in 1909 to the Diocesan Trustees of Bath and Wells, who are to hold and manage the property according to a deed of trust.

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  • This deed provided for the appointment of an advisory council, consisting of the archbishop of Canterbury, the bishop of Bath and Wells and four other bishops, each with power to nominate one clerical and one lay member.

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  • In watching the troops of patients who go to the wells we notice that most of them do more early rising, take more regular exercise, and drink more water in the course of a month at the well than they would do in the rest of the year at home.

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  • Where it is impossible for the patient to visit Carlsbad, half a teaspoonful or a teaspoonful of salt may be taken in a large tumbler of hot water on rising every morning; but when taken at home the treatment is not so effective as at Carlsbad, because at the wells sipping water is associated with early rising, considerable exercise and a very carefully regulated diet.

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  • Daguerre for the invention of photography, the grant for the publication of the works of P. Fermat and Laplace, the acquisition of the museum of Cluny, the development of railways and electric telegraphs, the improvement of the navigation of the Seine, and the boring of the artesian wells at Grenelle.

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  • But it leaves a connected line of desert route between Nushki and Seistan, which is open in all ordinary seasons, to the south, and this route has been largely developed, posts or serais having been established at intervals and wells having been dug.

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  • The Cambarus and Amblyopsis have wide distribution, being found in many other caves, and also in deep wells, in Kentucky and Indiana.

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  • The Moors introduced many improvements, especially in the system of irrigation; the characteristic Portuguese wells with their perpetual chains or buckets are of Moorish invention, and retain their Moorish name of noras.

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  • When Wykeham was provost of Wells, Wynford was retained as architect on the ist of February1364-1365at a fee of 40s.

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  • a day when in Wells (Wells, Lib.

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  • On the 31st of October he was made a canon of York, and on the 15th of December provost of the fourteen prebends of Combe in Wells cathedral, while at some date unknown he obtained also prebends in Bridgenorth collegiate church and St Patrick's, Dublin, and the rectory of Menheniot in Cornwall.

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  • Water was at that time in remote parts of the city drawn from artesian wells.

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  • Artesian wells are used in places, as in the stock country of the Baboquivari valley.

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  • Artesian wells are much used in the south-east.

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  • Hot water (175° F.) from artesian wells near the city is utilized for the natatorium and to heat many residences and public buildings.

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  • HERBERT GEORGE WELLS (1866-), English novelist was born at Bromley, Kent, on the 21st of September 1866, the son of Joseph Wells, a professional cricketer.

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  • Sir Thomas Spencer Wells >>

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  • is discharged from numerous springs; and at Boise, water with a temperature of 165° is obtained from wells.

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  • Salt wells are numerous in the middle and south-east sections of the lower peninsula; the first successful one was drilled in Saginaw county in 1859 and 1860.

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  • A small quantity of petroleum is obtained from thirteen wells in St Clair county in the east part of the lower peninsula; and the mineral waters at Mount Clemens, Benton Harbor and Alma are of considerable commercial value for medicinal purposes.

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  • Later in the month proceedings were instituted against him by the bishop of Bath and Wells under the Clergy Discipline Act.

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  • A deity who sent the fertilizing rains would come to be regarded as a god of vegetation, who descended into the earth and whose power worked in the life that wells forth from the earth in plant and tree.

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  • The city's water supply is obtained from artesian wells.

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  • The " Waterstones," or Lower Keuper Sandstones, - forming gentle elevations above the softer marls, and usually charged with an abundant supply of water, which can be reached by wells, - form the site of many towns, such as Birmingham, Warwick and Lichfield, and of very numerous villages.

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  • Towns are found only round the edge bordering the Weald Clay, such as Tonbridge, Tunbridge Wells and Horsham; and along the line where it is cut off by the sea, e.g.

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  • struct and maintain waterworks, dig wells, take on lease or hire any waterworks, purchase waterworks or water, or right to take or convey water either within or without their district, and any rights, powers and privileges of any water company, and contract with any person for the supply of water.

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  • All public sources of water-supply such as streams, pumps, wells, reservoirs, conduits, aqueducts and works used for the gratuitous supply of water to the inhabitants of the district are vested in the council, who may cause all such works to be maintained and plentifully supplied with pure and wholesome water for the gratuitous use of the inhabitants, but not for sale by them.

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  • William George Crosby Anson Peaslee Morrill Samuel Wells .

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  • Boardman, Climate, &c., of Maine (Washington, 1884); Walton Wells, The Water Power of Maine (Augusta, 1869);.

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  • The city's water-supply is drawn from artesian wells.

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  • It is so called from one of several wells or springs in this district, near which miracle plays were performed by the parish clerks of London.

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  • Wells, Journal of Hellenic Studies (1905), p. 1 93 ff., who assigns the Argive expedition to the outset of the reign, whereas nearly all historians have dated it in or about 495 B.C.

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  • Under French administration the town has been rebuilt, placed (1905) in railway communication with the coast, and given an ample water supply by the sinking of artesian wells.

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  • The presence of petroleum, indicated by many ancient workings in the shape of shallow hand- (dug wells, can be traced continuously at the foot of the Transylvanian Alps, from Turnu Severin into Bukovina.

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  • Rumans claim for their product a higher percentage of pure oil than is found in the American, Galician and Caucasian wells; and, although American competition nearly destroyed this industry between 1873 and 1895, improved methods and legislation favouring the introduction of foreign capital enabled it to recover.

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  • The total value of natural gas from wells in Missouri in 1908 was $22,592.

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  • A few small oil wells are open near the Kansas line.

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  • In the vicinity of the city there are salt wells, and Saginaw county is the most productive coalfield in the state - in 1907 its output was 1,047, 9 2 7 tons, more than half the total for the state.

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  • 40) that Mecca lies in a sterile valley, and the old geographers observe that the whole Haram or sacred territory round the city is almost without cultivation or date palms, while fruit trees, springs, wells, gardens and green valleys are found immediately beyond.

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  • Considerable suburbs now lie outside the quarter named after this gate; in the middle ages a pleasant country road led for some miles through partly cultivated land with good wells, as far as the boundary of the sacred territory and gathering place of the pilgrims at Tanim, near the mosque of Ayesha.

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  • Fortunately good water is tolerably plentiful; for, though the wells are mostly undrinkable, and even the famous Zamzam water only available for medicinal or religious purposes, the underground conduit from beyond Arafa, completed by Sultan Selim II.

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  • They are either connected with genuine memories of the Prophet and his times, or have spurious legends to conceal the fact that they were originally holy stones, wells, or the like, of heathen sanctity.

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  • Sacred wells are familiar features of Semitic sanctuaries, and Islam, retaining the well, made a quasi-biblical story for it, and endowed its tepid waters with miraculous curative virtues.

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  • But even the rural populations have generally found surface springs insufficiently constant for their use and have adopted the obvious remedy of sinking wells.

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  • Deep wells owe their comparative immunity from pollution to the circumstances that the larger quantity of water yielded renders it worth while to pump that water and convey it by pipes from comparatively unpolluted areas; and that any impurities in the water must have passed through a considerable depth, and by far the larger part of them through a great length of filtering material, and must have taken so long a time to reach the well that their organic character has disappeared.

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  • The principal water-bearing formations, utilized in Great Britain by means of deep wells, are the Chalk and the New Red Sandstone.

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  • As the formation approaches the condition of pure sand, the water-bearing property of any given mass increases, but the difficulty of drawing water from it without admixture Wells is of sand also increases.

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  • Hence it arises that, in sand formations, only shallow wells or small boreholes are commonly found.

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  • When the water has been drawn down by pumping to a lower level its passage through the sandstone or chalk in the neighbourhood of the borehole is further resisted by the smaller length of borehole below the water; and there are many instances in which repeated lowering and increased pumping, both from wells and boreholes, have had the result of reducing the water available, after a few years, nearly to the original quantity.

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  • Here water is maintained above the sea-level by the annual rainfall, and may be drawn off by wells or borings.

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  • Where the strata are not uniformly porous, they may resist the passage of water from the direction of the sea or they may assist it; and round the whole coast of England, in the Magnesian limestone to the northeast, in the Chalk and Greensand to the east and south, and in the New Red Sandstone to the west, the number of wells which have been abandoned as sources of potable supply, owing to the percolation of sea water, is very great.

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  • Perhaps the first important cases occurred in the earlier part of the 19th century on the Lancashire shore of the Mersey estuary, where, one after another, deep wells in the New Red Sandstone had to be abandoned for most purposes.

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  • Elkington showed that by cutting a deep drain through the clay, aided when necessary by wells or auger holes, the subjacent bed of sand or gravel in which a body of water is pent up by the clay, as in a vessel, might be tapped and the water conveyed harmlessly in the covered drain to the nearest ditch or stream.

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  • There are natural gas wells in the vicinity.

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  • In the city are the Wells Memorial Hospital, St Peter's General Hospital, a Carnegie library, a Federal building and a Soldiers' Monument.

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  • It is on the main railway from Czernovitz, in Bukovina, to Galatz; and on two branch lines, one of which enters Transylvania through the Ghimesh Pass, while both give access to the salt mines, petroleum wells and forests of the Carpathians.

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  • The soil is very fertile, but since the dam over the Karun at Ahvaz was swept away and the numerous canals which diverted the waters of the river for irrigation became useless, a great part of the province is uncultivated, and most of the crops and produce depend for water on rainfall and wells.

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  • He died at Leigh, near Tunbridge Wells, on the 9th of August 1883.

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  • On the 1st of January 1909 there were 3223 wells in operation, some of which were 1200 ft.

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  • deep. It has been found that " dead " gas wells, if drilled somewhat deeper, generally become active oil wells.

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  • The development of the petroleum field, which extends over Adams, Wells, Jay, Blackford and Grant counties, was rapid up to 1904.

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  • Again, the most convenient site for oil wells is the crest of an anticline or "dome," where an impervious stratum imprisons the gas and oil in a subjacent saturated layer under pressure.

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  • below the surface; some wells have been drilled 1500 ft.

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  • deep. The value of the natural gas produced in the state was $15,873 in 1889, $2,261,836 in 1905 and $7,691,587 in 1908, when there were 1917 producing wells, and Kansas ranked fourth of the states of the United States in the value of the natural gas product, being surpassed by Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio.

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  • that some of the most splendid of the English cathedrals, Salisbury (1220-1258) and Wells (1230-1239), were built.

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  • Charles Jeremiah Wells >>

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  • He was educated at Wells, and then in succession at University College and Christ Church, Oxford.

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  • LLANDRINDOD, or Llandrindod Wells, a market town,.

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  • The city owns and operates the electriclighting plant; the water-works system is privately owned, and the water supply is obtained from deep wells at San Leandro.

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  • As there are no canals in the district, irrigation is obtained solely from wells, tanks and rivers.

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  • The petroleum wells of Ferghana and the beds of graphite about Zairamnor are neglected.

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  • For example, where the high plateau of the Libyan desert descends into a longitudinal valley between Syrtis and the Nile delta there are a few spots where the water comes to the surface or is found in shallow wells.

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  • In 1349 two thousand Jews were burned at Strassburg on a charge of causing a pestilence by poisoning the wells.

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  • part of Indian Territory near the Oklahoma border as early as 1890, but there was little development until 1903, when several wells were drilled in the vicinity of Bartlesville.

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  • Then wells were drilled to the W.

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  • on the Osage Reservation, and to the S., until in 1906 about 110 wells were drilled into the famous Glen Pool near Sapulpa.

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  • One of these wells has a flow of about moo barrels a day, and the total product from the Oklahoma oil-field (which includes wells in The agricultural statistics for 1909 are taken from the Year-Book of the United States Department of Agriculture.

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  • Natural gas abounds in the same region, and several strong wells were developed in 1906, and immediately afterwards gas began to be used largely for industrial purposes for which in 1908 the price was from 1 z to 15 cents per moo ft.

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  • On the other hand there are abundant traces of animistic worship, which have survived in wells, often associated with a sacred tree (Ir.

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  • The latter is one of the chief examples of the period, to which must be added the cathedral of Salisbury (except the tower); the Galilee at Ely; nave and transept of Wells (1225-1240); nave of Lincoln; west front of Peterborough; and the minster at Beverley.

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  • The small fertile valleys between the plateaus are watered by streams during the greater portion of the year, while wells of particularly good and pure water are numerous.

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  • That Marna was lineally descended from Dagon is probable in every way, and it is therefore interesting to note that he gave oracles, that he had a circular temple, where he was sometimes worshipped by human sacrifices, that there were wells in the sacred circuit, and that there was also a place of adoration to him situated, as was usual, outside the town.

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  • Where no running water is available for irrigation, water is often obtained from wells by means of waterwheels (nones) of simple construction.

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  • In recent years many artesian wells have been sunk for irrigation.

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  • The ancient caravan routes Korosko-Abu Hamed and BerberSuakin have been superseded by the railways, but elsewhere wells and rest-houses are maintained along the main routes between the towns and the Nile.

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  • At the same time river communications were improved and the numbers of wells on caravan roads increased.

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  • Ornamental articles of inlaid wood, called Tonbridge ware, chiefly sold at Tunbridge Wells, are largely manufactured.

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  • Atmospheric pressure is probably the principal cause of their action; they are therefore termed " weather wells " in some localities.

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  • Saline wells at Lincoln (2463, 1050 and 570 ft.

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  • Novorossiysk is connected by a branch railway to Tikhoryetskaya (169 m.) with the main Caucasian line, which crosses the Volga near Tsaritsyn, and has become an important centre for the export of corn, and since the petroleum wells of Groznyi in northern Caucasia were tapped it has become an entrepot for the export of petroleum.

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  • He held several prebends, was dean of St Asaph and then dean of Wells, and became bishop of Norwich in 1413.

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  • Other indications of volcanic agency are the oil springs occurring on the coast, and even in the bed of the sea near Cape Skinari on the north side, and especially the famous pitch or bituminous wells already mentioned by Herodotus (Hist., bk.

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  • A little water is obtained from wells, and some from an aqueduct 7 m.

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  • He owns a large Spanish land grant – oil wells and such.

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  • The final descent into Builth wells was superb, with plenty of jumps to get some airtime on.

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  • appraisal drilling is back up to 1998 levels, with 16 wells spudded.

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  • Tube wells drilled into the ground to provide drinking water safe from cholera were later found to contain naturally occurring arsenic.

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  • artisans ' dwellings called Wells Buildings.

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  • Nathan Wells from Crossgates is to take part in the 9th national learning disability athletics championships in Manchester later this year.

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  • They know how to change their ideas - but how do you change a deeply felt aversion or hatred that wells up from inside?

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  • The Americans were unprepared for the very high pressures encountered in wells at relatively shallow depths and suffered some blowouts as a result.

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  • As a practicing Catholic, Blakely then slightly boggles DS Winters by praying over Wells.

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  • M (formerly Prescriptive) Sun; mercatum, recorded 7 Sept 1201, held by burgesses of Wells.

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  • cess pools which filtered into nearby wells.

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  • Another 20,000 are being drip fed mutagenic and carcinogenic chemicals from their tube wells, whilst Dow refuses to clean up.

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  • Wells Horne - ' The ancient city gets its name from the water that springs up in large volume in more than one place.

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  • commuteust live within commuting distance of Tunbridge Wells.

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  • The policy the SSTA has arranged with Tunbridge Wells Equitable Friendly Society has a normal deferment of one year.

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  • In a region practically devoid of rivers, these wells were worshiped by the Mayans.

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  • dissolve WELLS recoils from the photo in horror, dissolving into tears, hand over his mouth.) MARTIN WELLS: Vicky.

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  • These wells have, with few exceptions, sunk into total disuse.

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  • dote will be missed by many people, but I will let Marney Wells his doting mom tell his story... .

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  • enrolled at the university you should visit the Students Union at Wells Street to collect the application form.

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  • One of the earliest uses of biological weapons occurred in the 6th century BC when the Assyrians poisoned enemy wells with rye ergot.

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  • Special emphasis is given to spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells.

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  • expanded to include Tunbridge Wells with the support of BMW.

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  • exposes what is left at the bottom of the wells to fresh erosion.

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  • The Fleur de Lis in Mill Street is to have a face-lift which could cost owners Charles Wells brewery up to £ 400,000.

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  • Conversely Cairn Energy topped the fallers after disappointing news on several of its appraisal wells.

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  • He was a respected solicitor in Wells, but he broke out at intervals to drive the town fire engine!

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  • Within the wells of Celtic folklore, the mystery of Loch Ness has baffled scientists for decades.

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  • formants of the pure vowels of British English Written by J. C. Wells contains information, diagrams and tables.

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  • The stage was Indian Wells Country Club, where the two singers played in the same foursome Wednesday.

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  • French white wine and Exceeding good and then returned to y e wells 38 miles.

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  • Stories In Red, Sadler's Wells, London Published: 09 March 2006 You can have too many frills.

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  • Through sheer frustration Wells began taking his ideas elsewhere.

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  • This keeps my stock levels down little and often says retail guru Danny Wells!

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  • Susannah Wells, who was also vindicated, was less fortunate as she had already been branded by the public hangman.

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  • Wonderfully sited for visiting historic Wells, Bath, Bristol and Glastonbury, with pretty villages and ancient landmarks close by.

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