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weimar

weimar

weimar Sentence Examples

  • Beaulieu-Mareonnay, Karl von Dalberg and seine Zeit (Weimar, 1879).

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  • I'll drive all his Wurttemberg, Baden, and Weimar relations out of Germany....

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  • occur in the British Museum, the Bodleian Library, the Bibliotheque Nationale of France, and also in Rome, Weimar and Berlin.

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  • In fact, after the flight of the king and the subsequent suppression of the riots, a warrant was issued for his arrest; and he had barely time to escape to Weimar, where Liszt was at that moment engaged in preparing Tannhauser for performance, before the storm burst upon him with alarming violence.

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  • Two words I wrote to Liszt; his answer was the news that preparations were being made for the performance of the work, on the grandest scale that the limited means of Weimar would permit.

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  • Lohengrin was, in fact, produced at Weimar under Liszt's direction on the 28th of August 1850.

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  • To meet the impending blow the Prussians had been extended in a cordon along the great road leading from Mainz to Dresden, Blucher was at Erfurt, Riichel at Gotha, Hohenlohe at Weimar, Saxons in Dresden, with outposts along the frontier.

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  • An offensive move into Franconia was under discussion, and for this purpose the Prussian staff had commenced a lateral concentration about Weimar, Jena and Naumburg when the storm burst upon them.

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  • In the meanwhile, however, the Saxons had been moving from Naumburg through Gera on' Jena, Hohenlohe was near Weimar, and all the other divisions of the army had closed in a march eastwards, the idea of an offensive to the southward which Napoleon had himself attributed to them having already disappeared.

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  • Riichel, who with 15,000 men had been sent into the mountains as an advanced guard for the projected offensive, was recalled to Weimar, which he reached on the 13th.

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  • The main body were between Weimar and Apolda during the 12th, and the Saxons duly effected their junction with Hohenlohe in the vicinity of Vierzehnheiligen, whilst the latter had withdrawn his troops all but some outposts from Jena to the plateau about Capellendorf, some 4 m.

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  • Urgent messages were sent off to the Commissary von Goethe (the poet), at Weimar for permission to requisition food and firewood.

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  • She journeyed, in company with Constant, by Metz and Frankfort to Weimar, and arrived there in December.

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  • After holding minor educational posts, he obtained in 1791, through the influence of Herder, the appointment of rector of the gymnasium at Weimar, where he entered into a circle of literary men, including Wieland, Schiller, and Goethe.

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  • died in 1046 it was divided, and Meissen proper was given successively to William and Otto, counts of Weimar, and Egbert II., count of Brunswick.

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  • Finding himself out of sympathy with monastic life, he fled in 1783 to North Germany, and settled in Weimar, where he became Wieland's collaborateur on the German Mercury, and eventually his son-in-law.

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  • Tscheuschner, Handbuch der Glasfabrikation (Weimar, 1885); R.

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  • Behrend, Lex Salica (1873; 2nd ed., Weimar, 1897); J.

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  • Sohm, Der Prozess der Lex Salica (Weimar, 1867; French trans.

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  • Thevenin) and Die frcinkische Reichsund Gerichtsverfassung (Weimar, 1876); J.

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  • Abdy, Feudalism (1890); Paul Roth, Feudalitat and Unterthanverband (Weimar, 1863) .,; and Geschichte des Beneficialwesens (1850); M.

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  • Hartmann's Das arabische Strophengedicht, Weimar, 1897), and Ibn Quzman (12th century), a wandering singer, here first used the language of everyday life in the form of verse known as Zajal.

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  • from Halle, on the railway to Weimar and Erfurt.

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  • (Weimar, 1898), pp. 210-213.

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  • In 1776 he obtained through Goethe's influence the post of general superintendent and court preacher at Weimar, where he passed the rest of his life.

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  • There he enjoyed the society of Goethe, Wieland, Jean Paul (who came to Weimar in order to be near Herder), and others, the patronage of the court, with whom as a preacher he was very popular, and an opportunity of carrying out some of his ideas of school reform.

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  • This, added to ill-health, served to intensify a natural irritability of temperament, and the history of his later Weimar days is a rather dreary page in the chronicles of literary life.

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  • This seems to be sufficiently attested by the fact that he was greatly liked and esteemed, not only in the pulpit but in private intercourse, by cultivated women like the countess of Biickeburg, the duchess of Weimar and Frau von Stein, and, what perhaps is more, was exceedingly popular among the gymnasium pupils, in whose education he took so lively an interest.

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  • While much that Herder produced after settling in Weimar has little value, he wrote also some of his best works, among others his collection of popular poetry on which he had been engaged for many years, Stimmen der Volker in Liedern (1778-1779); his translation of the Spanish romances of the Cid (1805); his celebrated work on Hebrew poetry, Vom Geist der hebrdischen Poesie (1782-1783); and his opus magnum, the Ideen zur Philosophie der Geschichte der Menschheit (1784-1791).

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  • Thus his theoretic opposition to the Kantian aesthetics is but the reflection of his practical opposition to the form-idolatry of the Weimar poets.

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  • At Ludwigslust he fell in love with a young girl, and followed her to Weimar; but failing in his suit, he went next to Jena.

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  • In 1804 he accepted the post of librarian to Amelia, duchess-dowager of Weimar, which gave him the leisure he desired for the purpose of turning to account the literary and archaeological researches in which he had engaged at Rome.

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  • Fernow died at Weimar, December 4, 1808.

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  • After Luther's death (1546) and the battle of Miihlberg (1547) he had to yield to his rival, Julius von Pflug, and retire to the protection of the young duke of Weimar.

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  • Many letters and other short productions of his pen are extant in MS., especially five thick volumes of Amsdorfiana, in the Weimar library.

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  • A second rising was caused when, on the death of Ulrich II., count of Weimar and OrlamUnde, without issue in 1112, Henry seized these counties as vacant fiefs of the empire, while Lothair supported the claim of Siegfried, count of Ballenstadt, whose mother was a relative of Ulrich.

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  • In the first, which was fought on the 5th and 6th of September 1634, the hitherto invincible Swedish army, commanded by Duke Bernhard of Saxe Weimar and Marshal Horn, was defeated with great loss by a somewhat superior army of Imperialists and Spaniards under General Gallas, Horn and 3000 men being made prisoners and 6000 killed or mortally wounded.

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  • WEIMAR, a city of Germany, the capital of the grand-duchy of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach.

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  • Weimar owes its importance not to any industrial development, which the grand-dukes discourage within the limits of their Residenz, but to its intimate association with the classical period of German literature, which earned for it the title of the "poets' city" and "the German Athens."

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  • The golden age of Weimar, covered by the reign of Charles Augustus from 1775 to 1828, 'has left an indelible impress on the character of the town.

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  • In spite of its classical associations and of modern improvements, Weimar still retains much of its medieval character.

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  • It contains the tombs of the princes of the house of Saxe-Weimar, including those of the elector John Frederick the Magnanimous and his wife, and of Duke Bernhard of Weimar, a hero of the Thirty Years' War.

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  • The picture is regarded as the masterpiece of Lucas Cranach, who lived for a time at Weimar, in the Briick'sches Haus on the market-place.

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  • The most important building in Weimar is the palace, a huge structure forming three sides of a quadrangle, erected (1789-1803) under the superintendence of Goethe, on the site of one burned down in 1774.

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  • Wieland, who came to Weimar in 1772 as the duke's tutor, is also commemorated by a statue (1857), and his house is indicated by a tablet.

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  • Among the other prominent buildings in Weimar are the Griines Schloss (18th century), containing a library of 200,000 volumes and a valuable collection of portraits, busts and literary and other curiosities; the old ducal dower-house (Wittumspalais); the museum, built in1863-1868in the Renaissance style with some old masters and Preller's famous mural paintings illustrating the Odyssey.

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  • Weimar possesses also archaeological, ethnographical and natural science collections and the Liszt Museum (in the gardener's house in the park, for many years the musician's home).

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  • Various points in the environs of Weimar are also interesting from their associations.

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  • The history of Weimar, apart from its association with Charles Augustus and his court, is of little general interest.

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  • founded a separate Weimar line of counts.

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  • At the partition of Saxony in 1485 Weimar, with Thuringia, fell to the elder, Ernestine, branch of the Saxon house of Wettin, and has been the continuous residence of the senior branch of the dukes of this line since 1572.

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  • Under Charles Augustus Weimar became a centre of Liberalism as well as of art.

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  • The grand-duke's connexion with the courts of Russia and Holland - his mother was a Russian grand-duchess and his wife, Sophia Louisa (1824-1897), a princess of the Netherlands - tended to give the Weimar society a cosmopolitan character, and the grand-duke devoted himself largely to encouraging men of intellect, whether Germans or foreigners, who came to visit or to settle in the town.

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  • Under the patronage of Charles Alexander, also, Weimar became a famous musical centre, principally owing to the presence of Franz Liszt, who from 1848 to 1886 made Weimar his principal place of residence.

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  • Other notable conductors of the Weimar theatre orchestra were Eduard Lassen and Richard Strauss.

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  • See Scholl Weimar's Merkwil y digkeiten einst and jetzt (Weimar, 1857); Springer, Weimar's klassische Statten (Berlin, 1868); Ruland, Die Scheitze des Goethe National-Museums in Weimar (Weimar and Leipzig, 1887); Francke, Weimar and Umgebungen (3rd ed., Weimar, 1900); Kuhn, Weimar in Wort and Bild (4th ed., Jena, 1905).

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  • Mordtmann, Beitrage zur mindischen Epigraphik (Weimar, 1897); E.

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  • Weimar >>

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  • In 1547 the exelector John Frederick the Magnanimous was allowed to retain Weimar, Jena, Eisenach, Gotha, Henneberg and Saalfeld.

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  • The two survivors then founded separate jurisdictions at Weimar and Coburg, though arrangements were made to exchange territories every three years.

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  • In 1596 Saxe-Coburg gave off the branch Saxe-Eisenach; and in 1603 SaxeWeimar gave off Saxe-Altenburg, the elder Weimar line ending and the younger beginning with the latter date.

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  • By 1638 Weimar had absorbed both Coburg and Eisenach; Altenburg remained till 1672.

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  • In 1640 his three surviving sons ruled the duchies of Weimar, Eisenach and Gotha.

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  • His eldest son, Gustav, is the author of several well-known historical works, namely, Gustav Adolf (Leipzig, 1869-1870); Herzog Bernhard von Weimar (Leipzig, 1885); an admirable Historischer Handatlas (Leipzig, 1885), and several writings on various events of the Thirty Years' War.

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  • It appears to have been united with Meissen for some time, and this was certainly the case from 1046 to 1067, when both countries were ruled by William and Otto, counts of Weimar.

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  • the Grave (1323-1349) consolidated the power of his dynasty against rebellious vassals and the neighbouring counts of Weimar and Schwarzburg.

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  • - Richter, Die evangelischen Kirl henordnungen des sechzehnten Jahrhunderts (Weimar, 1846); Sehling, Die evangelischen Kirchenordnungen des 'Olen Jahrhinderts (Leipzig, 1902, &c.); Richter, Lehrbuch des katholischen and evangelischen Kirchenrechts (8th ed., Leipzig, 1886); Hundeshagen, Beitrage zur Kirchenverfassungsgeschichte and Kirchenpolitik inbesondere des Protestantismus, i.

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  • of Weimar.

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  • The treatise containing this important invention was made public by Baron von Zach under the title Ueber die leichteste and bequemste Methode die Bahn eines Cometen zu berechnen (Weimar, 1797).

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  • After meeting with some success in his efforts to take possession, he was driven from Saxony, and also from his mark by Henry, and compelled to take refuge in South Germany, and when peace was made in 1142 he renounced the Saxon dukedom and received the counties of Weimar and Orlamiinde.

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  • It was taken by Duke William of Weimar in 163 2; in 1761 its walls were dismantled, and, after being alternately Prussian and Hanoverian, it passed finally in 1866 with Hanover to Prussia.

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  • Miller, Rechtsgeschichte der Insel Helgoland (Weimar, 1904); W.

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  • He held for some years the office of court-preacher at Weimar, but owing to theological disputes was compelled to resign this office in 1561.

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  • At the close of the campaign of 1643 the French "Army of Weimar," having been defeated and driven into Alsace by the Bavarians, had there been reorganized under the command of Turenne, then a young general of thirty-two and newly promoted to the marshalate.

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  • Enghien brought with him a veteran army, called the "Army of France," Turenne remaining in command of the Army of Weimar.

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  • Enghien and Turenne had arranged that the Army of France was to move direct upon Freiburg by Wolfenweiter, while the Army of Weimar was to make its way by hillside tracks to Wittnau and thence to attack the rear of Mercy's lines while Enghien assaulted them in front.

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  • On the 4th of August the Army of France and the Army of Weimar met at Merzhausen, the rearmost troops of the Army of France came in, and the whole was arranged by the major-generals in the plain facing the Loretto ridge.

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  • With this object, the Army of Weimar was drawn off on the morning of the 9th of August and marched round by Betzenhausen and Lehen to Langen Denzling.

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  • Much of Constant's time was spent with her at Coppet; but he also made long sojourns at Weimar, where he mixed in the GoetheSchiller circle, and accumulated material for the great work on religion which he had begun, so far back as 1787, at Colom bier.

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  • (Weimar, 1898), pp. 395-397.

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  • (Weimar, 1898), p. 400.

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  • WILHELM MARTIN LEBERECHT DE WETTE (1780-1849), German theologian, was born on the 12th of January 1780, at Ulla, near Weimar, where his father was pastor.

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  • He was sent to the gymnasium at Weimar, then at the height of its literary glory.

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  • He retired for a time to Weimar, where he occupied his leisure in the preparation of his edition of Luther, and in writing the romance Theodor oder die Weihe des Zweiflers (Berlin, 1822), in which he describes the education of an evangelical pastor.

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  • at Karlsruhe, Weimar and Konigsberg.

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  • A typical German find is at Taubach, near Weimar, where almond-shaped stone wedges, small flint knives, and roughly-hacked pieces of porphyry and quartz are found, together with the remains of elephants.

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  • While the signatories of the peace of Prague were making ready to assist the emperor the only Germans on the other side were found in the army under Bernhard of SaxeBernhard Weimar.

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  • For the rest the sovereigns of Wflrttemberg and Saxony retained the title of king bestowed upon them by Napoleon, and this title was also given to the elector of Hanover; the dukes of Weimar, Mecklenburg and Oldenburg became grand dukes; and LUbeck, Bremen, Hamburg and Frankfort were declared free cities.

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  • Charles Augustus, the enlightened grand duke of Weimar, set the example, from the best of motives.

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  • cane and an uhlans stays, was magnified into a rebellion; drew down upon the grand duke of Weimar a collective protest of the powers; and set in motion the whole machinery of reaction.

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  • Litteratur (Weimar, 1898), vol.

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  • Other panel portraits of the period are three small ones of members of the Tucher family at Weimar and Cassel, and the striking, restlessly elaborated half-length of Oswald Krell at Munich.

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  • He had also the opportunity of reading the first act of the new tragedy before the duke of Weimar at Darmstadt in December 1784, and, as a sign of favour, the duke conferred upon him the title of "Rat."

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  • A new chapter in Schiller's life opened with his visit to Weimar in July 1787.

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  • Goethe was then in Italy, and the duke of Weimar was absent from Weimar; but the poet was kindly received by Herder and Wieland, by the duchess Amalie and other court notabilities.

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  • Towards the end of 1799 he took up his residence permanently in Weimar, not only to be near his friend, but also that he might have the advantage of visiting regularly the theatre of which Goethe was director.

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  • Schiller died at Weimar on the 9th of May 1805.

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  • He was ennobled in 1802, and in 1804 the duke of Weimar, unwilling to lose him, doubled his meagre salary of 400 talers.

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  • ERFURT, a city of Germany, in Prussian Saxony, on the Gera, and the railway Halle-Bebra, about midway between Gotha and Weimar, which are 14 m.

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  • Mainz Commission; the grand-duke of Weimar was compelled to deprive him of his professorship; and he was forbidden to lecture on philosophy.

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  • On his own representation at Weimar, he was in February 1805 made a professor extraordinarius, and in July 1806 drew his first and only stipend - Too thalers.

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  • But Goethe's professional duties had only a small share in the eventful years which lay between hips return from Strassburg and that visit to Weimar at the end of 1775, which turned the whole course of his career, and resulted in his permanent attachment to the Weimar court.

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  • Goethe's departure for Weimar in November made the final break less difficult.

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  • In December 1774 the young "hereditary prince" of Weimar, Charles Augustus, passing through Frankfort on his way to Paris, came into personal touch with Goethe, and invited the poet to visit Weimar when, in the following year, he took up the reins of government.

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  • During the first few months in Weimar the poet gave himself up to the pleasures of the moment as unreservedly as his patron; indeed, the Weimar court even looked upon him for a time as a tempter who led the young duke astray.

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  • Goethe was not long in Weimar before he was entrusted with responsible state duties, and events soon justified the duke's confidence.

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  • Goethe proved the soul of the Weimar government, and a minister of state of energy and foresight.

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  • As Friederike had fitted into the background of Goethe's Strassburg life, Lotte into that of Wetzlar, and Lili into the gaieties of Frankfort, so now Charlotte von Stein, the wife of a Weimar official, was the personification of the more aristocratic ideals of Weimar society.

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  • A religious epic, DieGeheimnisse, and a tragedy Elpenor, did not, it is true, advance much further than plans; but in 1777, under the influence of the theatrical experiments at the Weimar court, Goethe conceived and in great measure wrote a novel of the theatre, which was to have borne the title Wilhelm Meisters theatralische Sendung; and in 1779 himself took part in a representation before the court at Ettersburg, of his drama I phigenie auf Tauris.

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  • In Weimar he had felt that he was no longer in sympathy with the Sturm and Drang, but it was Italy which first taught him clearly what might take the place of that movement in Germanoetry.

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  • Disappointment in more senses than one awaited Goethe on his return to Weimar.

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  • The months of absence, however, the change he had undergone, and doubtless those lighter loves of which the Romische Elegien bear evidence, weakened the Weimar memories; if he left Weimar as Frau von Stein's lover he returned only as her friend; and she naturally resented the change.

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  • On the birth in 1789 of his son, Goethe had some thought of legalizing his relations with Christiane, but this intention was not realized until 1806, when the invasion of Weimar by the French made him fear for both life and property.

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  • A journey with the duke of Weimar to Breslau followed, and in 1792 he accompanied his master on that campaign against France which ended so ingloriously for the German arms at Valmy.

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  • Two:new interests, however, strengthened the ties between Goethe and Weimar, - ties which the Italian journey had threatened to sever: his appointment in 1791 as director of the ducal theatre, a post which he occupied for twenty-two years, and his absorption in scientific studies.

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  • Even less in touch with the living present were the various prologues and Festspiele, such as Paldophron and Neoterpe (1800), Was wir bringers (1802), which in these years he composed for the Weimar theatre.

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  • Goethe felt, even late in life, too intimately bound up with Weimar to discuss in detail his early life there, and he shrank from carrying his biography beyond the year 1775.

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  • Art, science, literature - little escaped his ken - and that not merely in Germany: English writers, Byron, Scott and Carlyle, Italians like Manzoni, French scientists and poets, could all depend on friendly words of appreciation and encouragement from Weimar.

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  • Meanwhile the years were thinning the ranks of Weimar society: Wieland, the last of Goethe's greater literary contemporaries, died in 1813, his wife in 1816, Charlotte von Stein in 1827 and Duke Charles Augustus in 1828.

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  • The second part of Faust forms a worthy close to the life of Germany's greatest man of letters, who died in Weimar on the 22nd of March 1832.

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  • As a poet, his fame has undergone many vicissitudes since his death, ranging from the indifference of the "Young German" school to the enthusiastic admiration of the closing decades of the 19th century - an enthusiasm to which we owe the Weimar Goethe-Gesellschaft (founded in 1885) and a vast literature dealing with the poet's life and work; but the fact of his being Germany's greatest poet and the master of her classical literature has never been seriously put in question.

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  • In 1887 the monumental Weimar edition, which is now approaching completion, began to appear; it is divided into four sections: I.

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  • of the Weimar edition.

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  • Collections of selected letters based on the Weimar edition have been published by E.

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  • Goethe's autobiography, Aus meinem Leben: Dichtung and Wahrheit, appeared in three parts between 1811 and 1814, a fourth part, bringing the history of his life as far as his departure for Weimar in 1775, in 1833 (English translation by J.

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  • Diezmann, Goethe and die lustige Zeit in Weimar (1857; 2nd ed., 1901); H.

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  • Pasquh, Goethes Theaterleitung in Weimar (2 vols., 1863); C. A.

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  • A Goethe-Gesellschaft was founded at Weimar in 1885, and numbers over 2800 members; its publications include the annual GoetheJahrbuch (since 1880), and a series of Goethe-Schriften.

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  • - Goethe's only son, August, born on the 25th of December 1789 at Weimar, married in 1817 Ottilie von Pogwisch (1796-1872), who had come as a child to Weimar with her mother (née Countess Henckel von Donnersmarck).

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  • Returning to Weimar in 1850, he was made a chamberlain by the grand-duke, and in 1852, his health being now somewhat restored, he entered the Prussian diplomatic service and went as attaché to Rome.

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  • In 1870 Ottilie von Goethe, who had resided mainly at Vienna, returned to Weimar and took up her residence with her two sons in the Goethehaus.

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  • Wolf Goethe (Weimar, 1889) is a sympathetic appreciation by Otto Mejer, formerly president of the Lutheran consistory in Hanover.

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  • 1-20; Carl Brockelmann, Geschichte der arabischen Litteratur (Weimar, 1898), vol.

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  • (Weimar, 1898), pp. 441-448.

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  • For list of other extant works see C. Brockelmann, Geschichte der arabischen Litteratur (Weimar, 1898), vol.

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  • From 1789 to 1811 the Weimar court theatrical company gave performances here of the plays of Schiller and Goethe, an attraction which greatly contributed to the well-being of the town.

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  • It is the largest of the Thuringian states, and consists of the three chief detached districts of Weimar, Eisenach and Neustadt, and twenty-four scattered exclaves, of which Allstedt, Oldisleben and Ilmenau belonging to Weimar, and Ostheim belonging to Eisenach, are the chief.

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  • m., of which 678 are in Weimar, 465 in Eisenach and 254 in Neustadt.

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  • The district of Weimar, which is at once the largest division and the geographical and historical kernel of the grand-duchy, is a roughly circular territory, situated on the plateau to the north-east of the Thuringian Forest.

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  • The Kickelhahn (2825 ft.) and the Hohe Tanne (2641 ft.) rise in Ilmenau; but the Grosser Kalm (1814 ft.) near Remda, in the extreme south, is the highest point in the main part of Weimar.

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  • The chief towns are Weimar, the capital, on the Ilm; Jena, with the common university of the Thuringian states, on the Saale; Apolda, the "Manchester of Weimar," to the east; and Ilmenau, lying among the hills on the edge of the Thuringian Forest to the S.W.

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  • Cattle-raising is carried on to a considerable extent, especially in Eisenach and Neustadt, while the sheep-farming centres in Weimar.

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  • Justice is administered by two high courts (Landesgerichte), at Weimar and Eisenach respectively; the district of Neustadt falling under the jurisdiction of the Landesgericht at Gera; while the supreme court of appeal for the four Saxon duchies, Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt and Reuss, together with portions of Prussia, is the Oberlandesgericht at Jena.

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  • In early times Weimar with the surrounding district belonged to the counts of Orlamiinde, and from the end of the 10th century until 1067 it was the seat of the counts of Weimar.

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  • See C. Kronfeld, Landeskunde des Grossherzogtums SachsenWeimar-Eisenach (Weimar, 1878-1879); and the official Staatshandbuch far das Grossherzogtum Sachsen (Weimar, 1904).

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  • His appeal to musicians was made in a threefold capacity, and we have, therefore, to deal with Liszt the unrivalled pianoforte virtuoso (1830 - r848); Liszt the conductor of the "music of the future " at Weimar, the teacher of Tausig, Billow and a host of lesser pianists, the eloquent writer on music and musicians, the champion of Berlioz and Wagner (1848-1861); and Liszt the prolific composer, who for some five-and-thirty years continued to put forth pianoforte pieces, songs, symphonic orchestral pieces, cantatas, masses, psalms and oratorios (1847-1882).

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  • From 1869 onwards Abbe Liszt divided his time between Rome and Weimar, where during the summer months he received pupils - gratis as formerly - and, from 1876 up to his death at Bayreuth on the 31st of July 1886, he also taught for several months every year at the Hungarian Conservatoire of Budapest.

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  • i., Weimar, 1899).

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  • After his death the young widow (still under forty), leaving Arthur at Hamburg, proceeded with her daughter Adele in the middle of 1806 to Weimar, where she arrived only a fortnight before the tribulation which followed the victory of Napoleon at Jena.

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  • Leaving the nation and its statesmen to fight out their freedom, he hurried away to Weimar, and thence to the quiet Thuringian town of Rudolstadt, where in the inn "Zum Ritter," out of sight of soldier and sound of drum, he wrote, helped by books from the Weimar library, his essay for the degree of doctor in philosophy.

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  • In November 1813 Schopenhauer returned to Weimar, and for a few months boarded with his mother.

    0
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  • During these few months at Weimar, however, he made some acquaintances destined to influence the subsequent course of his thought.

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  • of Weimar by the Weimar-Gera lines of railway.

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  • In 1662 it fell to Bernhard, youngest son of William duke of Weimar, and became the capital of a small separate duchy.

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  • Bernhard's line having become extinct in 1690, Jena was united with Eisenach, and in 1741 reverted with that duchy to Weimar.

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  • Like other Russian composers he owed much to the influence of Liszt at Weimar.

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  • from Weimar, on the main line of railway from Berlin via Halle, to Frankfort-onMain.

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  • A correspondence which he carried on with Goethe and Charles August, grand-duke of Saxe-Weimar, was collected and published at Weimar by Schade in 1856.

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  • He devoted his energies in quite early life to the study of Asiatic languages, and published in 1802 his Asiatisches Magazin (Weimar, 1802-1803).

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  • Klaproth's other works include: Reise in den Kaukasus and Georgien in den Jahren 1807 and 1808 (Halle, 1812-1814; French translation, Paris, 1823); Geographisch-historische Beschreibung des ostlichen Kaukasus (Weimar, 1814); Tableaux historiques de l'Asie (Paris, 1826); Memoires relatifs a l'Asie (Paris, 1824-1828); Tableau historique, geographique, ethnographique et politique de Caucase (Paris, 1827); and Vocabulaire et grammaire de la langue georgienne (Paris, 1827).

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  • 421-426, Weimar, 1898).

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  • He married in 1849, and during the next ten years lived first in Bingerbriick, afterwards in Neuwied, and then in Weimar, where together with Oskar Schade (1826-1906) he edited the Weimarische Jahrbuch (1854-1857).

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  • A highlyreputed series of life-sized chalk drawings of the same heads, of which the greater portion is at Weimar, consists of early copies, and is interesting though having no just claim to originality.

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  • Springer, Die klassischen Statten von Jena and Ilmenau (Berlin, 1869); Pasig, Goethe and Ilmenau (2nd ed., Weimar, 1902); and Fils, Bad Ilmenau and seine Umgebung(Hildburghausen, 1886).

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  • For his other works see Carl Brockelmann, Geschichte der arabischen Litteratur (Weimar, 1898), vol.

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  • After passing into the possession of the German kings and then of the rulers of Orlamiinde and of Weimar, it came into the hands of the counts of Schwarzburg in 1335.

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  • Julius Weisbach, Mechanics of Machinery and Engineering (London, 1848); Ernest Brauer, Die Konstruktion der Waage (Weimar, 1887); H.

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  • (Weimar, 1846); Hessencamp, Hessische Kirchenordnungen im Zeitalter der Reformation; Philip of Hesse's Correspondence with Bucer, ed.

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  • Antilia is marked in an anonymous map which is dated 1424 and preserved in the grand-ducal library at Weimar.

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  • Glassius succeeded Gerhard as editor of the Weimar Bibelwerk, and wrote the commentary on the poetical books of the Old Testament for that publication.

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  • From Bendemann's resignation it continued in the hands of a body of curators till 1873, when Hermann Wislicenus (1825-1899) of Weimar was chosen director.

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  • She was a patroness of art and literature, and attracted to Weimar many of the most eminent men in Germany.

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  • See C. Brockelmann's Geschichte der arabischen Litteratur (Weimar, 1898), vol.

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  • Weimar; by that of Rivoli he united against Spain the dukes of Modena, Parma and Mantua; he signed an open alliance with The the league of Heilbronn, the United Provinces and Frwch Sweden and after these alliances military operations Thirty began, Marshal de la Force occupying the duchy of Lor Years raine.

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  • pursued it year after year: in 1644 at Freiburg im Breisgau, despite the death of Guflbriant at Rottweil; in 1645 at Nordlingen, despite the defeat of Marienthal; and in 1646 in Bavaria, despite the rebellion of the Weimar cavalry; to see it finally triumph at Zusmarshausen in May 1648.

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  • (Weimar, Aug.

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  • They cut its grant by half, and slowly asphyxiated the Weimar institute to death through money withdrawal.

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  • Weimar Germany from 1924 to 1929 was undergoing a renaissance.

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  • The Depression sparked off problems, which the Weimar constitution and Treaty of Versailles prevented the government from using methods to effectively tackle.

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  • see C. Brockelmann's Geschichte der arabischen Litteratur (Weimar, 1898), vol.

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  • Statistik (1898); Christian Jensen, Vom Dilnenstrand der Nordsee and vom Wattenmeer (Schleswig, 1901), which contains a bibliography; Osterloh, Wangeroog and sein Seebad (Emden, 1884); Zwickert, Fiihrer durch das Nordseebad Wangeroog (Oldenburg, 1894); Nellner, Die Nordseeinsel Spickeroog (Emden, 1884); Tongers, Die Nordseeinsel Langeoog (2nd ed., Norden, 1892); Meier, Die Nordseeinsel Borkum (loth ed., Emden, 1894); Herquet, Die Insel Borkum, &c. (Emden, 1886); Scherz, Die Nordseeinsel .Tuist (2nd ed., Norden, 1893); von Bertouch, Vor 4 0 Jahren: Natur and Kultur auf der Insel Nordstrand (Weimar, 1891); W.

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    0
  • Boubee, "Camille Jordan a Weimar," in the Correspondant (1901), ccv.

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  • of Weimar and 77 S.W.

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  • occur in the British Museum, the Bodleian Library, the Bibliotheque Nationale of France, and also in Rome, Weimar and Berlin.

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  • In fact, after the flight of the king and the subsequent suppression of the riots, a warrant was issued for his arrest; and he had barely time to escape to Weimar, where Liszt was at that moment engaged in preparing Tannhauser for performance, before the storm burst upon him with alarming violence.

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  • Two words I wrote to Liszt; his answer was the news that preparations were being made for the performance of the work, on the grandest scale that the limited means of Weimar would permit.

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  • Lohengrin was, in fact, produced at Weimar under Liszt's direction on the 28th of August 1850.

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  • Kohl published facsimiles of the American section of the maps (Weimar, 1860).

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  • Among other geographical institutes in Germany which deserve mention are the Weimar Institut, founded in 17 9 1 by F.

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  • He came to England with his parents in 1799, but in1804-1805spent a winter with them at Weimar, where he met Goethe and Schiller, and received a bias to German literature which influenced his style and sentiments throughout his whole career.

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  • To meet the impending blow the Prussians had been extended in a cordon along the great road leading from Mainz to Dresden, Blucher was at Erfurt, Riichel at Gotha, Hohenlohe at Weimar, Saxons in Dresden, with outposts along the frontier.

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  • An offensive move into Franconia was under discussion, and for this purpose the Prussian staff had commenced a lateral concentration about Weimar, Jena and Naumburg when the storm burst upon them.

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  • In the meanwhile, however, the Saxons had been moving from Naumburg through Gera on' Jena, Hohenlohe was near Weimar, and all the other divisions of the army had closed in a march eastwards, the idea of an offensive to the southward which Napoleon had himself attributed to them having already disappeared.

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  • Riichel, who with 15,000 men had been sent into the mountains as an advanced guard for the projected offensive, was recalled to Weimar, which he reached on the 13th.

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  • The main body were between Weimar and Apolda during the 12th, and the Saxons duly effected their junction with Hohenlohe in the vicinity of Vierzehnheiligen, whilst the latter had withdrawn his troops all but some outposts from Jena to the plateau about Capellendorf, some 4 m.

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  • Urgent messages were sent off to the Commissary von Goethe (the poet), at Weimar for permission to requisition food and firewood.

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  • Eugene, with Lauriston's, Macdonald's and Regnier's corps, on the lower Saale, Ney in front of Weimar, holding the defile of Kdsen; the Guard at Erfurt, Marmont at Gotha, Bertrand at Saalfeld, and Oudinot at Coburg, and during the next few days the whole were set in motion towards Merseburg and Leipzig, in the now stereotyped Napoleonic order, a strong advanced guard of all arms leading, the remainder - about twothirds of the whole - following as " masse de manoeuvre," this time, owing to the cover afforded by the Elbe on the left, to the right rear of the advanced guard.

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  • She journeyed, in company with Constant, by Metz and Frankfort to Weimar, and arrived there in December.

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  • After holding minor educational posts, he obtained in 1791, through the influence of Herder, the appointment of rector of the gymnasium at Weimar, where he entered into a circle of literary men, including Wieland, Schiller, and Goethe.

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  • died in 1046 it was divided, and Meissen proper was given successively to William and Otto, counts of Weimar, and Egbert II., count of Brunswick.

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  • See C. Brockelmann, Geschichte der arabischen Litteratur (Weimar, 1898), vol.

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  • Beaulieu-Mareonnay, Karl von Dalberg and seine Zeit (Weimar, 1879).

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  • Finding himself out of sympathy with monastic life, he fled in 1783 to North Germany, and settled in Weimar, where he became Wieland's collaborateur on the German Mercury, and eventually his son-in-law.

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  • Tscheuschner, Handbuch der Glasfabrikation (Weimar, 1885); R.

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  • Behrend, Lex Salica (1873; 2nd ed., Weimar, 1897); J.

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  • Sohm, Der Prozess der Lex Salica (Weimar, 1867; French trans.

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  • Thevenin) and Die frcinkische Reichsund Gerichtsverfassung (Weimar, 1876); J.

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  • Abdy, Feudalism (1890); Paul Roth, Feudalitat and Unterthanverband (Weimar, 1863) .,; and Geschichte des Beneficialwesens (1850); M.

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  • Hartmann's Das arabische Strophengedicht, Weimar, 1897), and Ibn Quzman (12th century), a wandering singer, here first used the language of everyday life in the form of verse known as Zajal.

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  • from Halle, on the railway to Weimar and Erfurt.

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  • (Weimar, 1898), pp. 210-213.

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  • In 1776 he obtained through Goethe's influence the post of general superintendent and court preacher at Weimar, where he passed the rest of his life.

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  • There he enjoyed the society of Goethe, Wieland, Jean Paul (who came to Weimar in order to be near Herder), and others, the patronage of the court, with whom as a preacher he was very popular, and an opportunity of carrying out some of his ideas of school reform.

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  • This, added to ill-health, served to intensify a natural irritability of temperament, and the history of his later Weimar days is a rather dreary page in the chronicles of literary life.

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  • This seems to be sufficiently attested by the fact that he was greatly liked and esteemed, not only in the pulpit but in private intercourse, by cultivated women like the countess of Biickeburg, the duchess of Weimar and Frau von Stein, and, what perhaps is more, was exceedingly popular among the gymnasium pupils, in whose education he took so lively an interest.

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  • While much that Herder produced after settling in Weimar has little value, he wrote also some of his best works, among others his collection of popular poetry on which he had been engaged for many years, Stimmen der Volker in Liedern (1778-1779); his translation of the Spanish romances of the Cid (1805); his celebrated work on Hebrew poetry, Vom Geist der hebrdischen Poesie (1782-1783); and his opus magnum, the Ideen zur Philosophie der Geschichte der Menschheit (1784-1791).

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  • Thus his theoretic opposition to the Kantian aesthetics is but the reflection of his practical opposition to the form-idolatry of the Weimar poets.

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  • At Ludwigslust he fell in love with a young girl, and followed her to Weimar; but failing in his suit, he went next to Jena.

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  • In 1804 he accepted the post of librarian to Amelia, duchess-dowager of Weimar, which gave him the leisure he desired for the purpose of turning to account the literary and archaeological researches in which he had engaged at Rome.

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  • Fernow died at Weimar, December 4, 1808.

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  • After Luther's death (1546) and the battle of Miihlberg (1547) he had to yield to his rival, Julius von Pflug, and retire to the protection of the young duke of Weimar.

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  • Many letters and other short productions of his pen are extant in MS., especially five thick volumes of Amsdorfiana, in the Weimar library.

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  • A second rising was caused when, on the death of Ulrich II., count of Weimar and OrlamUnde, without issue in 1112, Henry seized these counties as vacant fiefs of the empire, while Lothair supported the claim of Siegfried, count of Ballenstadt, whose mother was a relative of Ulrich.

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  • In the first, which was fought on the 5th and 6th of September 1634, the hitherto invincible Swedish army, commanded by Duke Bernhard of Saxe Weimar and Marshal Horn, was defeated with great loss by a somewhat superior army of Imperialists and Spaniards under General Gallas, Horn and 3000 men being made prisoners and 6000 killed or mortally wounded.

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  • WEIMAR, a city of Germany, the capital of the grand-duchy of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach.

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  • Weimar owes its importance not to any industrial development, which the grand-dukes discourage within the limits of their Residenz, but to its intimate association with the classical period of German literature, which earned for it the title of the "poets' city" and "the German Athens."

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  • The golden age of Weimar, covered by the reign of Charles Augustus from 1775 to 1828, 'has left an indelible impress on the character of the town.

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  • In spite of its classical associations and of modern improvements, Weimar still retains much of its medieval character.

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  • It contains the tombs of the princes of the house of Saxe-Weimar, including those of the elector John Frederick the Magnanimous and his wife, and of Duke Bernhard of Weimar, a hero of the Thirty Years' War.

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  • The picture is regarded as the masterpiece of Lucas Cranach, who lived for a time at Weimar, in the Briick'sches Haus on the market-place.

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  • The most important building in Weimar is the palace, a huge structure forming three sides of a quadrangle, erected (1789-1803) under the superintendence of Goethe, on the site of one burned down in 1774.

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  • Wieland, who came to Weimar in 1772 as the duke's tutor, is also commemorated by a statue (1857), and his house is indicated by a tablet.

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  • Among the other prominent buildings in Weimar are the Griines Schloss (18th century), containing a library of 200,000 volumes and a valuable collection of portraits, busts and literary and other curiosities; the old ducal dower-house (Wittumspalais); the museum, built in1863-1868in the Renaissance style with some old masters and Preller's famous mural paintings illustrating the Odyssey.

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  • Weimar possesses also archaeological, ethnographical and natural science collections and the Liszt Museum (in the gardener's house in the park, for many years the musician's home).

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  • Various points in the environs of Weimar are also interesting from their associations.

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  • The history of Weimar, apart from its association with Charles Augustus and his court, is of little general interest.

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  • founded a separate Weimar line of counts.

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  • At the partition of Saxony in 1485 Weimar, with Thuringia, fell to the elder, Ernestine, branch of the Saxon house of Wettin, and has been the continuous residence of the senior branch of the dukes of this line since 1572.

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  • Under Charles Augustus Weimar became a centre of Liberalism as well as of art.

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  • The grand-duke's connexion with the courts of Russia and Holland - his mother was a Russian grand-duchess and his wife, Sophia Louisa (1824-1897), a princess of the Netherlands - tended to give the Weimar society a cosmopolitan character, and the grand-duke devoted himself largely to encouraging men of intellect, whether Germans or foreigners, who came to visit or to settle in the town.

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  • Under the patronage of Charles Alexander, also, Weimar became a famous musical centre, principally owing to the presence of Franz Liszt, who from 1848 to 1886 made Weimar his principal place of residence.

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  • Other notable conductors of the Weimar theatre orchestra were Eduard Lassen and Richard Strauss.

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  • See Scholl Weimar's Merkwil y digkeiten einst and jetzt (Weimar, 1857); Springer, Weimar's klassische Statten (Berlin, 1868); Ruland, Die Scheitze des Goethe National-Museums in Weimar (Weimar and Leipzig, 1887); Francke, Weimar and Umgebungen (3rd ed., Weimar, 1900); Kuhn, Weimar in Wort and Bild (4th ed., Jena, 1905).

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  • Mordtmann, Beitrage zur mindischen Epigraphik (Weimar, 1897); E.

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  • In 1547 the exelector John Frederick the Magnanimous was allowed to retain Weimar, Jena, Eisenach, Gotha, Henneberg and Saalfeld.

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  • The two survivors then founded separate jurisdictions at Weimar and Coburg, though arrangements were made to exchange territories every three years.

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  • In 1596 Saxe-Coburg gave off the branch Saxe-Eisenach; and in 1603 SaxeWeimar gave off Saxe-Altenburg, the elder Weimar line ending and the younger beginning with the latter date.

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  • By 1638 Weimar had absorbed both Coburg and Eisenach; Altenburg remained till 1672.

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  • In 1640 his three surviving sons ruled the duchies of Weimar, Eisenach and Gotha.

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  • His eldest son, Gustav, is the author of several well-known historical works, namely, Gustav Adolf (Leipzig, 1869-1870); Herzog Bernhard von Weimar (Leipzig, 1885); an admirable Historischer Handatlas (Leipzig, 1885), and several writings on various events of the Thirty Years' War.

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  • It appears to have been united with Meissen for some time, and this was certainly the case from 1046 to 1067, when both countries were ruled by William and Otto, counts of Weimar.

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  • the Grave (1323-1349) consolidated the power of his dynasty against rebellious vassals and the neighbouring counts of Weimar and Schwarzburg.

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  • - Richter, Die evangelischen Kirl henordnungen des sechzehnten Jahrhunderts (Weimar, 1846); Sehling, Die evangelischen Kirchenordnungen des 'Olen Jahrhinderts (Leipzig, 1902, &c.); Richter, Lehrbuch des katholischen and evangelischen Kirchenrechts (8th ed., Leipzig, 1886); Hundeshagen, Beitrage zur Kirchenverfassungsgeschichte and Kirchenpolitik inbesondere des Protestantismus, i.

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  • of Weimar.

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  • The treatise containing this important invention was made public by Baron von Zach under the title Ueber die leichteste and bequemste Methode die Bahn eines Cometen zu berechnen (Weimar, 1797).

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  • After meeting with some success in his efforts to take possession, he was driven from Saxony, and also from his mark by Henry, and compelled to take refuge in South Germany, and when peace was made in 1142 he renounced the Saxon dukedom and received the counties of Weimar and Orlamiinde.

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  • It was taken by Duke William of Weimar in 163 2; in 1761 its walls were dismantled, and, after being alternately Prussian and Hanoverian, it passed finally in 1866 with Hanover to Prussia.

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  • Miller, Rechtsgeschichte der Insel Helgoland (Weimar, 1904); W.

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  • He held for some years the office of court-preacher at Weimar, but owing to theological disputes was compelled to resign this office in 1561.

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  • At the close of the campaign of 1643 the French "Army of Weimar," having been defeated and driven into Alsace by the Bavarians, had there been reorganized under the command of Turenne, then a young general of thirty-two and newly promoted to the marshalate.

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  • Enghien brought with him a veteran army, called the "Army of France," Turenne remaining in command of the Army of Weimar.

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  • Enghien and Turenne had arranged that the Army of France was to move direct upon Freiburg by Wolfenweiter, while the Army of Weimar was to make its way by hillside tracks to Wittnau and thence to attack the rear of Mercy's lines while Enghien assaulted them in front.

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  • On the 4th of August the Army of France and the Army of Weimar met at Merzhausen, the rearmost troops of the Army of France came in, and the whole was arranged by the major-generals in the plain facing the Loretto ridge.

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  • With this object, the Army of Weimar was drawn off on the morning of the 9th of August and marched round by Betzenhausen and Lehen to Langen Denzling.

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  • Much of Constant's time was spent with her at Coppet; but he also made long sojourns at Weimar, where he mixed in the GoetheSchiller circle, and accumulated material for the great work on religion which he had begun, so far back as 1787, at Colom bier.

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  • (Weimar, 1898), pp. 395-397.

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  • (Weimar, 1898), p. 400.

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  • WILHELM MARTIN LEBERECHT DE WETTE (1780-1849), German theologian, was born on the 12th of January 1780, at Ulla, near Weimar, where his father was pastor.

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  • He was sent to the gymnasium at Weimar, then at the height of its literary glory.

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  • He retired for a time to Weimar, where he occupied his leisure in the preparation of his edition of Luther, and in writing the romance Theodor oder die Weihe des Zweiflers (Berlin, 1822), in which he describes the education of an evangelical pastor.

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  • at Karlsruhe, Weimar and Konigsberg.

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  • The fame of Weimar as a seat of musical education, though it possesses an excellent conservatoire, is based mainly on the tradition of the abb Liszt, who gathered about him here a number of distinguished pupils, some of whom have continued to make it their centre.

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  • A typical German find is at Taubach, near Weimar, where almond-shaped stone wedges, small flint knives, and roughly-hacked pieces of porphyry and quartz are found, together with the remains of elephants.

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  • While the signatories of the peace of Prague were making ready to assist the emperor the only Germans on the other side were found in the army under Bernhard of SaxeBernhard Weimar.

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  • For the rest the sovereigns of Wflrttemberg and Saxony retained the title of king bestowed upon them by Napoleon, and this title was also given to the elector of Hanover; the dukes of Weimar, Mecklenburg and Oldenburg became grand dukes; and LUbeck, Bremen, Hamburg and Frankfort were declared free cities.

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  • Charles Augustus, the enlightened grand duke of Weimar, set the example, from the best of motives.

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  • cane and an uhlans stays, was magnified into a rebellion; drew down upon the grand duke of Weimar a collective protest of the powers; and set in motion the whole machinery of reaction.

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  • Litteratur (Weimar, 1898), vol.

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  • Other panel portraits of the period are three small ones of members of the Tucher family at Weimar and Cassel, and the striking, restlessly elaborated half-length of Oswald Krell at Munich.

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  • He had also the opportunity of reading the first act of the new tragedy before the duke of Weimar at Darmstadt in December 1784, and, as a sign of favour, the duke conferred upon him the title of "Rat."

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  • A new chapter in Schiller's life opened with his visit to Weimar in July 1787.

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  • Goethe was then in Italy, and the duke of Weimar was absent from Weimar; but the poet was kindly received by Herder and Wieland, by the duchess Amalie and other court notabilities.

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  • Towards the end of 1799 he took up his residence permanently in Weimar, not only to be near his friend, but also that he might have the advantage of visiting regularly the theatre of which Goethe was director.

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  • Schiller died at Weimar on the 9th of May 1805.

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  • He was ennobled in 1802, and in 1804 the duke of Weimar, unwilling to lose him, doubled his meagre salary of 400 talers.

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  • ERFURT, a city of Germany, in Prussian Saxony, on the Gera, and the railway Halle-Bebra, about midway between Gotha and Weimar, which are 14 m.

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  • Mainz Commission; the grand-duke of Weimar was compelled to deprive him of his professorship; and he was forbidden to lecture on philosophy.

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  • On his own representation at Weimar, he was in February 1805 made a professor extraordinarius, and in July 1806 drew his first and only stipend - Too thalers.

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  • But Goethe's professional duties had only a small share in the eventful years which lay between hips return from Strassburg and that visit to Weimar at the end of 1775, which turned the whole course of his career, and resulted in his permanent attachment to the Weimar court.

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  • Goethe's departure for Weimar in November made the final break less difficult.

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  • In December 1774 the young "hereditary prince" of Weimar, Charles Augustus, passing through Frankfort on his way to Paris, came into personal touch with Goethe, and invited the poet to visit Weimar when, in the following year, he took up the reins of government.

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  • During the first few months in Weimar the poet gave himself up to the pleasures of the moment as unreservedly as his patron; indeed, the Weimar court even looked upon him for a time as a tempter who led the young duke astray.

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  • Goethe was not long in Weimar before he was entrusted with responsible state duties, and events soon justified the duke's confidence.

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  • Goethe proved the soul of the Weimar government, and a minister of state of energy and foresight.

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  • As Friederike had fitted into the background of Goethe's Strassburg life, Lotte into that of Wetzlar, and Lili into the gaieties of Frankfort, so now Charlotte von Stein, the wife of a Weimar official, was the personification of the more aristocratic ideals of Weimar society.

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  • Of other events of this period the most notable were two winter journeys, the first in 1777, to the Harz Mountains, the second, two years later, to Switzerland - journeys which gave Goethe scope for that introspection and reflection for which his Weimar life left him little time.

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  • A religious epic, DieGeheimnisse, and a tragedy Elpenor, did not, it is true, advance much further than plans; but in 1777, under the influence of the theatrical experiments at the Weimar court, Goethe conceived and in great measure wrote a novel of the theatre, which was to have borne the title Wilhelm Meisters theatralische Sendung; and in 1779 himself took part in a representation before the court at Ettersburg, of his drama I phigenie auf Tauris.

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  • In Weimar he had felt that he was no longer in sympathy with the Sturm and Drang, but it was Italy which first taught him clearly what might take the place of that movement in Germanoetry.

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  • Disappointment in more senses than one awaited Goethe on his return to Weimar.

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  • The months of absence, however, the change he had undergone, and doubtless those lighter loves of which the Romische Elegien bear evidence, weakened the Weimar memories; if he left Weimar as Frau von Stein's lover he returned only as her friend; and she naturally resented the change.

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  • On the birth in 1789 of his son, Goethe had some thought of legalizing his relations with Christiane, but this intention was not realized until 1806, when the invasion of Weimar by the French made him fear for both life and property.

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  • A journey with the duke of Weimar to Breslau followed, and in 1792 he accompanied his master on that campaign against France which ended so ingloriously for the German arms at Valmy.

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  • Two:new interests, however, strengthened the ties between Goethe and Weimar, - ties which the Italian journey had threatened to sever: his appointment in 1791 as director of the ducal theatre, a post which he occupied for twenty-two years, and his absorption in scientific studies.

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  • Even less in touch with the living present were the various prologues and Festspiele, such as Paldophron and Neoterpe (1800), Was wir bringers (1802), which in these years he composed for the Weimar theatre.

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  • Goethe felt, even late in life, too intimately bound up with Weimar to discuss in detail his early life there, and he shrank from carrying his biography beyond the year 1775.

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  • Art, science, literature - little escaped his ken - and that not merely in Germany: English writers, Byron, Scott and Carlyle, Italians like Manzoni, French scientists and poets, could all depend on friendly words of appreciation and encouragement from Weimar.

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  • Meanwhile the years were thinning the ranks of Weimar society: Wieland, the last of Goethe's greater literary contemporaries, died in 1813, his wife in 1816, Charlotte von Stein in 1827 and Duke Charles Augustus in 1828.

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  • The second part of Faust forms a worthy close to the life of Germany's greatest man of letters, who died in Weimar on the 22nd of March 1832.

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  • As a poet, his fame has undergone many vicissitudes since his death, ranging from the indifference of the "Young German" school to the enthusiastic admiration of the closing decades of the 19th century - an enthusiasm to which we owe the Weimar Goethe-Gesellschaft (founded in 1885) and a vast literature dealing with the poet's life and work; but the fact of his being Germany's greatest poet and the master of her classical literature has never been seriously put in question.

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  • In 1887 the monumental Weimar edition, which is now approaching completion, began to appear; it is divided into four sections: I.

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  • of the Weimar edition.

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  • Collections of selected letters based on the Weimar edition have been published by E.

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  • Goethe's autobiography, Aus meinem Leben: Dichtung and Wahrheit, appeared in three parts between 1811 and 1814, a fourth part, bringing the history of his life as far as his departure for Weimar in 1775, in 1833 (English translation by J.

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  • Diezmann, Goethe and die lustige Zeit in Weimar (1857; 2nd ed., 1901); H.

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  • Pasquh, Goethes Theaterleitung in Weimar (2 vols., 1863); C. A.

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  • A Goethe-Gesellschaft was founded at Weimar in 1885, and numbers over 2800 members; its publications include the annual GoetheJahrbuch (since 1880), and a series of Goethe-Schriften.

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  • - Goethe's only son, August, born on the 25th of December 1789 at Weimar, married in 1817 Ottilie von Pogwisch (1796-1872), who had come as a child to Weimar with her mother (née Countess Henckel von Donnersmarck).

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  • Returning to Weimar in 1850, he was made a chamberlain by the grand-duke, and in 1852, his health being now somewhat restored, he entered the Prussian diplomatic service and went as attaché to Rome.

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  • In 1870 Ottilie von Goethe, who had resided mainly at Vienna, returned to Weimar and took up her residence with her two sons in the Goethehaus.

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  • Wolf Goethe (Weimar, 1889) is a sympathetic appreciation by Otto Mejer, formerly president of the Lutheran consistory in Hanover.

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  • 1-20; Carl Brockelmann, Geschichte der arabischen Litteratur (Weimar, 1898), vol.

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  • (Weimar, 1898), pp. 441-448.

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  • For list of other extant works see C. Brockelmann, Geschichte der arabischen Litteratur (Weimar, 1898), vol.

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  • From 1789 to 1811 the Weimar court theatrical company gave performances here of the plays of Schiller and Goethe, an attraction which greatly contributed to the well-being of the town.

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  • It is the largest of the Thuringian states, and consists of the three chief detached districts of Weimar, Eisenach and Neustadt, and twenty-four scattered exclaves, of which Allstedt, Oldisleben and Ilmenau belonging to Weimar, and Ostheim belonging to Eisenach, are the chief.

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  • m., of which 678 are in Weimar, 465 in Eisenach and 254 in Neustadt.

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  • The district of Weimar, which is at once the largest division and the geographical and historical kernel of the grand-duchy, is a roughly circular territory, situated on the plateau to the north-east of the Thuringian Forest.

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  • The Kickelhahn (2825 ft.) and the Hohe Tanne (2641 ft.) rise in Ilmenau; but the Grosser Kalm (1814 ft.) near Remda, in the extreme south, is the highest point in the main part of Weimar.

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  • The chief towns are Weimar, the capital, on the Ilm; Jena, with the common university of the Thuringian states, on the Saale; Apolda, the "Manchester of Weimar," to the east; and Ilmenau, lying among the hills on the edge of the Thuringian Forest to the S.W.

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  • Cattle-raising is carried on to a considerable extent, especially in Eisenach and Neustadt, while the sheep-farming centres in Weimar.

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  • Justice is administered by two high courts (Landesgerichte), at Weimar and Eisenach respectively; the district of Neustadt falling under the jurisdiction of the Landesgericht at Gera; while the supreme court of appeal for the four Saxon duchies, Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt and Reuss, together with portions of Prussia, is the Oberlandesgericht at Jena.

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  • In early times Weimar with the surrounding district belonged to the counts of Orlamiinde, and from the end of the 10th century until 1067 it was the seat of the counts of Weimar.

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  • Although John Frederick the Magnanimous was deprived of the electorate in 1547 his sons retained Weimar; and one of them, John William (d.

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  • See C. Kronfeld, Landeskunde des Grossherzogtums SachsenWeimar-Eisenach (Weimar, 1878-1879); and the official Staatshandbuch far das Grossherzogtum Sachsen (Weimar, 1904).

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  • His appeal to musicians was made in a threefold capacity, and we have, therefore, to deal with Liszt the unrivalled pianoforte virtuoso (1830 - r848); Liszt the conductor of the "music of the future " at Weimar, the teacher of Tausig, Billow and a host of lesser pianists, the eloquent writer on music and musicians, the champion of Berlioz and Wagner (1848-1861); and Liszt the prolific composer, who for some five-and-thirty years continued to put forth pianoforte pieces, songs, symphonic orchestral pieces, cantatas, masses, psalms and oratorios (1847-1882).

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  • In 1848 he settled at Weimar with Princess Sayn-Wittgenstein (d.

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  • It was Liszt's habit to recommend novelties to the public by explanatory articles or essays, which were written in French (some for the Journal des debats and the Gazette musicale of Paris) and translated for the journals of Weimar and Leipzig - thus his two masterpieces of sympathetic criticism, the essays Lohengrin et Tannhduser a Weimar and Harold en Italie, found many readers and proved very effective.

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  • The compositions belonging to the period of his residence at Weimar comprise two pianoforte concertos, in E flat and in A, the " Todtentanz," the " Concerto pathetique " for two pianos, the solo sonata " An Robert Schumann," sundry " Etudes," fifteen " Rhapsodies Hongroises," twelve orchestral " Poemes symphoniques, " " Eine Faust Symphonie," and " Eine Symphonie zu Dante's ` Divina Commedia,' " the " 13th Psalm " for tenor solo, chorus and orchestra, the choruses to Herder's dramatic scenes " Prometheus," and the " Missa solennis " known as the " Graner Fest' Messe."

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  • From 1869 onwards Abbe Liszt divided his time between Rome and Weimar, where during the summer months he received pupils - gratis as formerly - and, from 1876 up to his death at Bayreuth on the 31st of July 1886, he also taught for several months every year at the Hungarian Conservatoire of Budapest.

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  • i., Weimar, 1899).

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  • After his death the young widow (still under forty), leaving Arthur at Hamburg, proceeded with her daughter Adele in the middle of 1806 to Weimar, where she arrived only a fortnight before the tribulation which followed the victory of Napoleon at Jena.

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  • At Weimar her talents, hitherto held in check, found an atmosphere to stimulate and foster them, her aesthetic and literary tastes formed themselves under the influence of Goethe and his circle, and her little salon gained a certain celebrity.

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  • Leaving the nation and its statesmen to fight out their freedom, he hurried away to Weimar, and thence to the quiet Thuringian town of Rudolstadt, where in the inn "Zum Ritter," out of sight of soldier and sound of drum, he wrote, helped by books from the Weimar library, his essay for the degree of doctor in philosophy.

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  • In November 1813 Schopenhauer returned to Weimar, and for a few months boarded with his mother.

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  • During these few months at Weimar, however, he made some acquaintances destined to influence the subsequent course of his thought.

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  • of Weimar by the Weimar-Gera lines of railway.

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  • In 1662 it fell to Bernhard, youngest son of William duke of Weimar, and became the capital of a small separate duchy.

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  • Bernhard's line having become extinct in 1690, Jena was united with Eisenach, and in 1741 reverted with that duchy to Weimar.

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  • Like other Russian composers he owed much to the influence of Liszt at Weimar.

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  • from Weimar, on the main line of railway from Berlin via Halle, to Frankfort-onMain.

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  • A correspondence which he carried on with Goethe and Charles August, grand-duke of Saxe-Weimar, was collected and published at Weimar by Schade in 1856.

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  • He devoted his energies in quite early life to the study of Asiatic languages, and published in 1802 his Asiatisches Magazin (Weimar, 1802-1803).

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  • Klaproth's other works include: Reise in den Kaukasus and Georgien in den Jahren 1807 and 1808 (Halle, 1812-1814; French translation, Paris, 1823); Geographisch-historische Beschreibung des ostlichen Kaukasus (Weimar, 1814); Tableaux historiques de l'Asie (Paris, 1826); Memoires relatifs a l'Asie (Paris, 1824-1828); Tableau historique, geographique, ethnographique et politique de Caucase (Paris, 1827); and Vocabulaire et grammaire de la langue georgienne (Paris, 1827).

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  • 421-426, Weimar, 1898).

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  • He married in 1849, and during the next ten years lived first in Bingerbriick, afterwards in Neuwied, and then in Weimar, where together with Oskar Schade (1826-1906) he edited the Weimarische Jahrbuch (1854-1857).

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  • A highlyreputed series of life-sized chalk drawings of the same heads, of which the greater portion is at Weimar, consists of early copies, and is interesting though having no just claim to originality.

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  • Springer, Die klassischen Statten von Jena and Ilmenau (Berlin, 1869); Pasig, Goethe and Ilmenau (2nd ed., Weimar, 1902); and Fils, Bad Ilmenau and seine Umgebung(Hildburghausen, 1886).

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  • For his other works see Carl Brockelmann, Geschichte der arabischen Litteratur (Weimar, 1898), vol.

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  • After passing into the possession of the German kings and then of the rulers of Orlamiinde and of Weimar, it came into the hands of the counts of Schwarzburg in 1335.

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  • Julius Weisbach, Mechanics of Machinery and Engineering (London, 1848); Ernest Brauer, Die Konstruktion der Waage (Weimar, 1887); H.

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  • He died at Weimar on the 3rd of March 1 554, having had three sons by his wife, Sibylla (d.

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  • (Weimar, 1846); Hessencamp, Hessische Kirchenordnungen im Zeitalter der Reformation; Philip of Hesse's Correspondence with Bucer, ed.

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  • Antilia is marked in an anonymous map which is dated 1424 and preserved in the grand-ducal library at Weimar.

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  • Glassius succeeded Gerhard as editor of the Weimar Bibelwerk, and wrote the commentary on the poetical books of the Old Testament for that publication.

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  • From Bendemann's resignation it continued in the hands of a body of curators till 1873, when Hermann Wislicenus (1825-1899) of Weimar was chosen director.

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  • She was a patroness of art and literature, and attracted to Weimar many of the most eminent men in Germany.

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  • Weimar; by that of Rivoli he united against Spain the dukes of Modena, Parma and Mantua; he signed an open alliance with The the league of Heilbronn, the United Provinces and Frwch Sweden and after these alliances military operations Thirty began, Marshal de la Force occupying the duchy of Lor Years raine.

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  • pursued it year after year: in 1644 at Freiburg im Breisgau, despite the death of Guflbriant at Rottweil; in 1645 at Nordlingen, despite the defeat of Marienthal; and in 1646 in Bavaria, despite the rebellion of the Weimar cavalry; to see it finally triumph at Zusmarshausen in May 1648.

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  • (Weimar, Aug.

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  • Weimar Germany from 1924 to 1929 was undergoing a renaissance.

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  • This was the famous Weimar period with its gay subculture.

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  • The Depression sparked off problems, which the Weimar constitution and Treaty of Versailles prevented the government from using methods to effectively tackle.

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  • Having attracted the attention of Franz Liszt, Sherwood spent his last three years in Weimar under the tutelage of the legendary master.

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  • Boubee, "Camille Jordan a Weimar," in the Correspondant (1901), ccv.

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  • of Weimar and 77 S.W.

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  • Kohl published facsimiles of the American section of the maps (Weimar, 1860).

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  • Among other geographical institutes in Germany which deserve mention are the Weimar Institut, founded in 17 9 1 by F.

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