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weighed

weighed Sentence Examples

  • The thoughts of where we would go from here weighed heavily on everyone's mind.

  • Wynn's warning weighed heavier on her thoughts.

  • The responsibility of Death weighed heavily on his shoulders.

  • In the meantime, killing dealers he used to consider colleagues or allies weighed heavily on his emotions at a time when he needed to think clearly.

  • He knew more weighed on her wish than a simple kiss.

  • The words made him smile but weighed on her.

  • He didn't realize until now just how heavy her family's decision had weighed on her.

  • Stas, in his syntheses of silver iodide, weighed the silver and the iodine separately, and after converting them into the compound he weighed this also.

  • It is evident that if our experiments are solely directed to the verification of this law, they should, if possible; be carried out in a hermetically closed vessel, the vessel and its contents being weighed before and after the chemical change.

  • Berzelius took 8 grams of copper, converted it into the coloured chloride, and sealed up the whole of this in solution, together with a weighed strip of copper.

  • For the quantitative determination of cobalt, it is either weighed as the oxide, C0304, obtained by ignition of the precipitated monoxide, or it is reduced in a current of hydrogen and weighed as metal.

  • "Cat" or "cat-head," in nautical usage, is the projecting beam on the bows of a ship used to clear the anchor from the sides of the vessel when weighed.

  • In the season of 1899-1900 the wool exports weighed 420,000,000 lb, and averaged more than 5 lb per sheep. The extra weight of fleece was owing to the large importation of better breeds.

  • Such a motive weighed much with Hobbes and with the French materialists of the 18th century, such as La Mettrie and d'Holbach.

  • The responsibilities and anxieties of government unassisted by parliament, and the continued struggle against the force of anarchy, weighed upon him and exhausted his physical powers.

  • It can also be determined as sulphide, by precipitation with sulphuretted hydrogen, the precipitated sulphide being dried at Ioo° C. and weighed.

  • This is a suggestion which deserves to be well weighed.

  • As used by George Stephenson on the Stockton & Darlington and Whitstable & Canterbury lines they weighed 28 lb per yard.

  • long and weighed 35 lb to the yard, and they were fastened by iron wedges to chairs weighing 15 or 17 lb each.

  • long and weighed 36 lb to the yard, manufactured in England, since there were then no mills in America able to roll them.

  • high; they weighed 3 or 4 tons, and were divided into three compartments holding six persons each, or eighteen in all.

  • Only a few words are preserved, but the details, when carefully weighed, are extremely significant.

  • long; and at Westminster in 1558 it weighed no less than 3 cwt.

  • The numbers of cattle (both fat and store) weighed at scheduled places in 1893 and 1905 2 were respectively 7.59 and 18% of those entering those markets.

  • The numbers for Scotland are greater throughout than those for England, 72% of the fat cattle entering the scheduled markets in Scotland in 1905 2 having been weighed, while in England the proportion was only 20 7 0.

  • As illustrating heavy weights, there were in the 1893 show, out of 310 entries of cattle, four beasts which weighed over a ton.

  • But apart from these public aims there were private motives which weighed with Bonaparte.

  • Such were the discouraging conditions which weighed him down at the time of the interview with the tsar at Erfurt (September 27th - October 12th, 1808).

  • In 1840 the finest cloth that could be made of the above dimensions weighed about 1600 grains, and was worth Do.

  • The cotton from each is collected and kept separately, and at the end of the season carefully examined and weighed, and a final selection is then made which reduces the number to perhaps five; the cotton from each of these plants is gained separately and the seed preserved for sowing.

  • in the second half of the 13th century, partly (so far as relates to the Cid) from the above, partly from contemporary Arabic histories, and partly from tradition; the Cronica del Cid, first published in 1512, by Juan de Velorado, abbot of the monastery of San Pedro at Cardena, which is a compilation from the last, interlarded with new fictions due to the piety of the compiler; lastly, various Arabic manuscripts, some of contemporary date, which are examined and their claims weighed in the second volume of Professor Dozy's Recherches sur l'histoire politique et litteraire de l'Espagne pendant le moyen dge (Leiden, 1849).

  • The total alkali is determined by incinerating a weighed sample in a platinum dish, dissolving the residue in water, filtering and titrating the filtrate with standard acid.

  • (a) Gravimetric. - This method is made up of four operations: (I) a weighed quantity of the substance is dissolved in a suitable solvent; (2) a particular reagent is added which precipitates the substance it is desired to estimate; (3) the precipitate is filtered, washed and dried; (4) the filter paper containing the precipitate is weighed either as a tared filter, or incinerated and ignited either in air or in any other gas, and then weighed.

  • If the substance to be weighed changes in composition on strong heating, it is necessary to employ a tared filter, i.e.

  • In the case of a tared filter it is weighed repeatedly until the weight suffers no change; then knowing the weight of the filter paper, the weight of the precipitate is obtained by subtraction.

  • If the precipitate may be ignited, it is transferred to a clean, weighed and recently ignited crucible, and the filter paper is burned separately on the lid, the ash transferred to the crucible, and the whole ignited.

  • After ignition, it is allowed to cool in a desiccator and then weighed.

  • The space a must allow for the inclusion of a copper spiral if the substance contains nitrogen, and a silver spiral if halogens be present, for otherwise nitrogen oxides and the halogens may be condensed in the absorption apparatus; b contains copper oxide; c is a space for the insertion of a porcelain or platinum boat containing a weighed quantity of the substance; d is a copper spiral.

  • After having previously roasted the tube and copper oxide, and reduced the copper spiral a, the weighed calcium chloride tube and potash bulbs are put in position, the boat containing the substance is inserted (in the case of a difficultly combustible substance it is desirable to mix it with cupric oxide or lead chromate), the copper spiral (d) replaced, and the air and oxygen supply connected up. The apparatus is then tested for leaks.

  • Having replaced the oxygen in the absorption vessels by air, they are disconnected and weighed, after having cooled down to the temperature of the room.

  • Difficultly volatile liquids may be weighed directly into the boat; volatile liquids are weighed in thin hermetically sealed bulbs, the necks of which are broken just before they are placed in the combustion tube.

  • As the mineral only yields from 2 to 3% of the pigment, it is not surprising to learn that the pigment used to be weighed up with gold.

  • The heaviest nodule weighed over 20 tons.

  • The bowl is weighed before and after the passage of the current, and the increase gives the mass of silver deposited.

  • The so-called free government subject to the empire lasted for twenty-seven years; and the desired protection of Spain weighed more and more heavily until it became a tyranny.

  • The facts are judicially stated and weighed in Bishop J.

  • Another heat test, that of Will, consists in heating a weighed quantity of the guncotton in a stream of carbon dioxide to 130° C., passing the evolved gases over some red-hot copper, and finally collecting them over a solution of potassium hydroxide which retains the carbon dioxide and allows the nitrogen, arising from the guncotton decomposition, to be measured.

  • The commander-in-chief weighed the pros and cons and he decided against a combination of war on such lines.

  • It is used to determine the density of a body experimentally; for if W is the weight of a body weighed in a balance in air (strictly in vacuo), and if W' is the weight required to balance when the body is suspended in water, then the upward thrust of the liquid (I) (2) "F r an Minim ' 'i n or weight of liquid displaced is W-W, so that the specific gravity (S.G.), defined as the ratio of the weight of a body to the weight of an equal volume of water, is W/(W-W').

  • He weighed out a lump of gold and of silver of the same weight as the crown; and, immersing the three in succession in water, he found they spilt over measures of water in the ratio:: A or 33: 24: 44; thence it follows that the gold: silver alloy of the crown was as I I: 9 by weight.

  • They are weighed and then dumped into a washing machine, consisting of a large horizontal cage, submerged in water, in which revolves a horizontal shaft carrying arms. The arms are set in a spiral form, so that in revolving they not only stir the roots, causing them to rub against each other, but also force them forward from the receiving end,of the cage to the other end.

  • It may also be precipitated as zinc ammonium phosphate, NH4ZnP04, which is weighed on a filter tared at 100°.

  • Adoption, for example, as a practice for improving the happiness of families and the welfare of society, is capable of being weighed, and can in truth only be weighed, by utilitarian considerations, and has been commended 1 For Comte's place in the history of ethical theory see Ethics.

  • His government, too, weighed heavily upon the people, and the king was less popular than is sometimes imagined.

  • While serving his time he had the misfortune accidentally to shoot a young man who came to visit him; and although through the intercession of his master he escaped prosecution, the untoward event weighed heavily on his mind, and led him at the close of his apprenticeship to quit his native place.

  • In quantitative estimations it is generally weighed as oxide, after precipitation as sulphide or carbonate, or in the metallic form, reduced as above.

  • As they were dependent on the protection of the landlords, the Mahommedans were docile tenants, and their competition weighed heavily on the Christians.

  • It is allowed to cool and then weighed.

  • After cooling it is weighed.

  • The flask is removed from the ice, allowed to attain the temperature of the room, and then weighed.

  • In historical order we may briefly enumerate the following: - in 1811, Gay-Lussac volatilized a weighed quantity of liquid, which must be readily volatile, by letting it rise up a short tube containing mercury and standing inverted in a vessel holding the same metal.

  • A small quantity of the substance is weighed into a tube, of the form shown in fig.

  • The vessel is completely filled with mercury, the capillary sealed, and the vessel weighed.

  • Mercury is expelled, and when this expulsion ceases, the vessel is removed, allowed to cool, and weighed.

  • The principle may be thus stated: the solid is weighed in air, and then in water.

  • In practice the solid or plummet is suspended from the balance arm by a fibre - silk, platinum, &c. - and carefully weighed.

  • pressure, W i the weight in water, atmospheric conditions remaining very nearly the same; p is the density of the water in which the body is weighed, a is (I +at°) in which a is the coefficient of cubical expansion of the body, and S is the density of the air at t°, p mm.

  • The determination of salinity was formerly carried out by evaporating a weighed quantity of sea-water to dryness and weighing the residue.

  • This responsibility, however, weighed but lightly on her; while her son was overwhelmed with remorse, she calmly enjoyed her short-lived triumph.

  • in thickness, weighed 14.3 tons, and another at Anzin, intended to lift a gross load of 15 tons from 750 metres, is 221 in.

  • The tub when brought to the surface, after passing over a weigh-bridge where it is weighed and tallied by a weigher specially appointed for the purpose by the men and the owner jointly, is run into a " tippler," a cage turning about a horizontal axis which discharges the load in the first half of the rotation and brings the tub back to the original position in the second.

  • The idea that some extraneous substance is essential to the process is of ancient date; Clement of Alexandria (c. 3rd century A.D.) held that some "air" was necessary, and the same view was accepted during the middle ages, when it had been also found that the products of combustion weighed more than the original combustible, a fact which pointed to the conclusion that some substance had combined with the combustible during the process.

  • The crucible is then removed from the rubber support, weighed and replaced; the liquid is filtered through in the ordinary way; and the crucible with its contents is again removed, dried, ignited and weighed.

  • A direct proof of its material nature was given by Galileo, who weighed a copper ball containing compressed air.

  • At present all gold bullion brought to the Mint is weighed and portions are cut off for assay.

  • Silver coins are not weighed but are selected for withdrawal when they present a worn appearance.

  • Among the incidental operations are (a) the valuation of the bullion by weighing and assaying it; (b) " rating" the bullion, or calculating the amount of copper to be added to make up the standard alloy; (c) recovering the values from ground-up crucibles, ashes and floor sweepings (the Mint " sweep "); (d) assaying the melted bars; (e) " pyxing " the finished coin or selecting specimens to be weighed and assayed; (f) " telling " or counting the coin.

  • Gold and silver coins are examined and tested by ringing, and each coin is then weighed separately by being passed over delicate automatic balances.

  • The movement of the slide now pushes another coin forward, and the weighed coin is displaced by it and falls down the shoot, through one of the slots.

  • In most foreign mints the blanks are weighed by the automatic balances before being struck, and those which are too heavy are reduced by filing or planing.

  • At intervals these coins are weighed and assayed by a jury of skilled persons and the results reported to the Crown.

  • The main span weighed 1629 tons, the side spans 154 and 166 tons (Buck, Proc. Inst.

  • The bridge superstructure weighed 2150 tons, so that 38 cub.

  • gauge weighed at most 35 to 45 tons, and their length between buffers was such that the average load did not exceed 1 ton per foot run.

  • This inquiry yielded (in 1867) the result 783, and this Joule himself was inclined to regard as more accurate than his old determination by the frictional method; the latter, however, was repeated with every precaution, and again indicated 772.55 foot-pounds as the quantity of work that must be expended at sea-level in the latitude of Greenwich in order to raise the temperature of one pound of water, weighed in vacuo, from 60 to 61° F.

  • Before being placed in the cells the zinc plates were weighed.

  • Calcium is generally estimated by precipitation as oxalate which, after drying, is heated and weighed as carbonate or oxide, according to the degree and duration of the heating.

  • Further, he urges that all historical study is valueless which does not take in a knowledge of original authorities, and he teaches both by example and precept what authorities should be thus described, and how they are to be weighed and used.

  • in., which contain each 252.724 grains of water in a vacuum at 62°, or 252.458 grains of water weighed with brass weights in air of 62° with the barometer at 30 in.

  • In the measurement of the cubic inch it has been found that 2 the specific mass of the cubic inch of distilled water freed from air, and weighed in air against brass weights (= 8.13), at the temperature of 62° F., and under an atmospheric pressure equal to 30 in.

  • = 30 in., weighed in air against brass weights.

  • The equivalent of the litre in gallons may also be derived as follows: Let P(1 - p/d) = P1(1 - p/d1), where P is the weight of the water contained in the gallon when weighed in London -- g at London = g at Paris (45°) x 1.000577.

  • The miserable condition of his country, and his own very precarious situation, weighed heavily upon his sensitive soul, and he suffered severely both in mind and body.

  • The existence ~of gold in that region had been long known to the aboriginal inhabitants, but no attention was paid to this by the whites, until about the beginning of the soth renf,irv, when n,ipvpts were found, one of which weighed 28 lb.

  • The debt of the Dominion in 1873 and in 1905 was: - While the debt had thus increased faster than the population, it weighed less heavily on the people, not only on account of the great increase in commercial prosperity, but of the much lower rate of interest paid, and of the increasing revenue derived from assets.

  • The instrument weighed 4000 grains, and the addition of a grain caused it to sink through an inch.

  • In the centesimal hydrometer of Francceur the volume of the stem between successive divisions of the scale is always, oath of the whole volume immersed when the instrument floats in water at 4° C. In order to graduate the stem the instrument is first weighed, then immersed in distilled water at 4° C., and the line of flotation 7.1 F marked zero.

  • In the form of a chromate, it may be determined by precipitation, in acetic acid solution, with lead acetate; the lead chromate precipitate collected on a tared filter paper, well washed, dried at loo° C. and weighed; or the chromate may be reduced by means of sulphur dioxide to the condition of a chromic salt, the excess of sulphur dioxide expelled by boiling, and the estimation carried out as above.

  • The silk is for four hours exposed to a dry heat of 230° F., and immediately thereafter weighed.

  • Having weighed the probable pains and pleasures of approaching old age, he decided that life had nothing left for which he greatly cared, and drowned himself.

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