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weeds

weeds Sentence Examples

  • Are the weeds getting a little high along the drive?

  • If it isn't the skunks and opossum killing the chickens, it's the weeds taking over the garden.

  • The chickens liked their new run, which was purposely left full of weeds.

  • From the window a flower box was visible, overgrown with weeds.

  • You boys are growing like weeds.

  • The lawn, if it could be called that, was overgrown with weeds and sadly in need of mowing.

  • She parked the car and worked her way through calf-high weeds until she reached the porch.

  • Behind her lay a path of crushed grass and beyond that, tall weeds and grass.

  • Stay away from the weeds and rocks and you won't have to worry about them.

  • Sure, you can eat those weeds, but what do they taste like?

  • At its close the green must be carefully examined, weeds uprooted, worn patches re-turfed, and the whole laid under a winter blanket of silver-sand.

  • Plants as agents of damage and disease may be divided into those larger forms which as weeds, epiphytes and so forth, do injury by dominating and shading more delicate species, or by gradually exhausting the soil, &c., and true parasites which actually live on and in the tissues of the plants.

  • they may be mere weeds like groundsels or ragworts, or climbers masquerading like ivy, or succulent and almost leafless, or they may be shrubs and even trees.

  • The seventh year's fallow prevented the exhaustion of the soil, which was further enriched by the burning of the weeds and spontaneous growth of the Sabbatical year.

  • Scare off the birds, harrow up the weeds, cut down all that shades the crop. Ploughs, waggons, threshing-sledges, harrows, baskets, hurdles, winnowing-fans are the farmer's implements.

  • The threshing-floor must be smooth and rammed hard to leave no crevices for weeds and small animals to get through.

  • " In the latter end of May and the begynnynge of June, is tyme to wede the come "; and then we have an accurate description of the different weeds, and the instruments and mode of weeding.

  • It is therefore necessary not only to pulverize the soil by repeated ploughings before it be seeded, but, as it becomes gradually more and more compressed afterwards, recourse must be had to tillage while the plants are growing; and this is hoeing, which also destroys the weeds that would deprive the plants of their nourishment.

  • A more rational system of cropping now began to take the place of the thriftless and barbarous practice of sowing successive crops of corn until the land was utterly exhausted, and then leaving it foul with weeds to recover its power by an indefinite period of rest.

  • The opportunities which rotation cropping affords for the cleaning of the land from weeds is another distinct element of advantage.

  • Under this system the clover is ploughed up in the autumn, the nitrogen stored up in its roots being left in the soil for the nourishment of the cereal crop. The following summer the wheat crop is harvested, and an opportunity is afforded for extirpating weeds which in the three previous years have received little check.

  • The fresh-water spider (Argyroneta) lives amongst the weeds of lakes and ponds and, like Desis, is quite at home beneath the water either swimming from spot to spot or crawling amongst the stems of aquatic plants.

  • As a permanent home the spider makes beneath the surface a thimble-shaped web, with inverted mouth, anchoring it to the weeds.

  • All grass and weeds must be kept down, and the crust must be broken after every rain, but these seem to be the only principles upon which all agree.

  • The most effective tool against the weeds is a broad sharp " sweep," as it is called, which takes everything it meets, while going shallower than most ploughs.

  • Harrows and cultivators are used where there are few weeds, and the mulching process is the one desired.

  • The experience of planters in general is in favour of the complete removal of weeds from a rubber plantation.

  • Many of the plants are annuals; among these are some of the commonest weeds of cultivation, shepherd's purse (Capsella Bursa-pastoris), charlock (Brassica Sinapis), and such common FIG.

  • One of the commonest tropical weeds, Evolvulus alsinoides, has slender, long-trailing stems with small leaves and flowers.

  • South of the lake is a wide plain, traversed by the Semliki river, which enters the Nyanza through a swamp of tall weeds, chiefly ambach and papyrus.

  • Weeds, therefore, which need sour conditions for development are checked by liming and the better grasses and clovers are encouraged.

  • As some of these sulphur compounds have a poisonous effect on plants, gas-lime cannot be applied to land directly without great risk or rendering it incapable of growing crops of any sort - even weeds - for some time.

  • It tends to destroy insects and weeds, and gets rid of acidity of the soil.

  • To destroy the seeds, &c., of weeds, and the larvae of insect pests, a fire is often lighted, kept from the ground itself by intervening wood logs, or the seed-bed is thoroughly steamed.

  • After this treatment the upper 2 or 3 in, of soil are well pulverized, and fertilizers added, usually, to prevent reintroduction of seeds of weeds, in the form of guano or chemical manures.

  • During this period, until the plants begin to ripen, the tilth is maintained and weeds checked first by horse cultivators or horsehoes, and, as the plants increase in size, by hand labour.

  • The cercaria swims freely for a time and either encysts directly on grass or weeds or it enters a second host which may be another mollusc, an insect, crustacean or fish, and then encysts.

  • This singular phenomenon is supposed to owe its appearance to an accumulation of gas, formed by the decay of vegetable matter, detaching and raising to the surface the matted weeds which cover the floor of the lake at this point.

  • Its nest is generally placed among weeds above the bottom of the water.

  • In these districts and others the number has become much reduced, owing doubtless in part to the fatal practice of catching the birds just before or during the breeding-season; but perhaps the strongest cause of their growing scarcity is the constant breaking-up of waste lands, and the extirpation of weeds (particularly of the order Compositae) essential to the improved system of agriculture; for in many parts of Scotland, East Lothian for instance, where goldfinches were once as plentiful as sparrows, they are now only rare stragglers, and yet there they have not been thinned by netting.

  • The presence of a dense population has driven out some, and brought in others, including some noxious weeds.

  • The first year the crop would be free from weeds, the second year only those grew whose seeds were wafted or carried by birds, the third year the crop required hoeing, which was done with sticks, and then the space was abandoned for new ground.

  • The upper layer of the soil must therefore be free from weeds, finely pulverized and stocked with a readily-available supply of nutriment.

  • Among imported pests the rabbit and sparrow, and a numerous company of European and American thistles and other weeds, have to be systematically contended with.

  • For the processes of the paper manufacturer esparto is used in the dry state, and without cutting; roots and flowers and stray weeds are first removed, and the material is then boiled with caustic soda, washed, and bleached with chlorine solution.

  • Others - the majority - live among weeds, the tubicolous ones mostly upon them.

  • For the successful raising of the finer sorts of willows good, well-drained, loamy upland soil is desirable, which before planting should be deeply trenched and cleared of weeds.

  • The ground should be kept free of weeds by frequent hoeing and, if not subject to periodical alluvial floods, manured yearly.

  • It flourishes best in small tanks and ponds, in which the water is constantly changing and does not freeze; in such localities, and with a full supply of food, which consists of weeds, crumbs of bread, bran, worms, small crustaceans and insects, it attains to a length of from 6 to 12 in., breeding readily, sometimes at different times of the same year.

  • Deep-sea weeds as a rule contain more iodine than those which are found in the shallow waters.

  • Its stones were carted away, and the churchyard, overgrown with weeds, became the dumpingground for rubbish.

  • Encouragement to seedgrowing is given by the holding of seed fairs, and bulletins are issued on weeds, the methods of treating seed-wheat against smut and on other subjects.

  • The Seed Control Act of 1905 brings under strict regulations the trade in agricultural seeds, prohibiting the sale for seeding of cereals, grasses, clovers or forage plants unless free from weeds specified, and imposing severe penalties for infringements.

  • Thus Ivan Poroshkov, Peter's contemporary, the father of Russian political economy, writes as follows: "If any land be over-much encumbered with weeds, corn cannot be sown thereon unless the weeds first be burned with fire.

  • apart, the ground being made as level and firm as possible, and the plants should be regularly thinned, hoed and kept free from weeds.

  • Endless masses of tall weeds, belonging to a few species, cover the face of the country - large Cruciferae, Cynareae and Umbelliferae - also large quantities of liquorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra and echinata) and Lagonychium, and the white ears of the Imperata.

  • In autumn the withered weeds are torn up by the wind and driven immense distances.

  • In this operation all stones larger than a man's fist must be taken out, and all roots of trees and of perennial weeds carefully cleared away.

  • Gravel walks must be kept free from weeds, either by hand weeding, or by the use of one of the many weed killers now on the market.

  • When weeds are thrown to the pigs, this fermentation becomes specially desirable to kill their seeds.

  • For the destruction of weeds on gravel walks or in paved yards a strong dose of salt, applied either dry or in a very strong solution, is found very effective, especially a hot solution, but after a time much of it becomes washed down, and the residue acts as a manure; its continued application is undesirable, as gravel so treated becomes pasty.

  • Whatever the seeds, the ground should be made tolerably firm both beneath and above them; this may be done by treading in the case of most kitchen garden crops, which are also better sown in drills, this admitting the more readily of the ground being kept clear from weeds by hoeing.

  • The ground must also be thoroughly cleared of the roots of all coarse, perennial weeds, and be worked to a fine tilth ready for turfing or sow ing.

  • The more expeditious method is of course to lay down turf, which should be free from weeds, and is cut usually in strips of i ft.

  • Flower-beds should be kept well hoed and raked, to prevent the growth of weeds next month.

  • This is usually a busy month, as many crops have to be gathered, and, if hoeing is not promptly seen to, weeds are certain to give great trouble.

  • - Celery that is to be stored for winter use should be put away before the end of the month in all sections north of Virginia; south of that it may be left in most places where grown throughout the winter if well covered up. The stalks of the asparagus bed should be cut off, and burned if there are berries on them, as the seeds scattered in the soil sometimes produce troublesome weeds.

  • During the years in which the soil is allowed to lie fallow, the grass and weeds which spring up serve as pasture for cattle, but the poverty of the pasture is such that at least two hectares are required for the maintenance of every animal.

  • The wild flora of the alluvial valley was probably always restricted and eventually was reduced almost to the weeds of cultivation, when every acre of soil, at one period of the year dnder water, and at another roasted under the burning heat of a semi-tropical sun, was carefully tilled.

  • They burrow in the sands of every shore; they throng the weeds between tide-marks; they ascend all streams; they are found in deep wells, in caverns, in lakes; in Arctic waters they swarm in numbers beyond computation; they find lodgings on crabs, on turtles, on weed-grown buoys; they descend into depths of the ocean down to hundreds or thousands of fathoms; they are found in mountain streams as far above sea-level as some of their congeners live below it.

  • Linseed is subject to extensive and detrimental adulterations, resulting not only from careless harvesting and cleaning, whereby seeds of the flax dodder, and other weeds and grasses are mixed with it, but also from the direct admixture of cheaper and inferior oil-seeds, such as wild rape, mustard, sesame, poppy, &c., the latter adulterations being known in trade under the generic name of " buffum."

  • Lands newly broken up from pasture suit it well, as these are generally freer from weeds than those that have been long under tillage.

  • This is a tedious and expensive process, and hence the importance of sowing the crop on land as free as possible from weeds of all kinds.

  • Agassiz (in his work on Lake Superior) tells us that the roadside weeds of the north-eastern United States, to the number of 130 species, are all European, the native weeds having disappeared westwards; while in New Zealand there are, according to T.

  • In a state of nature, every recurring severe winter or otherwise unfavourable season weeds out those individuals of tender constitution or imperfect structure which may have got on very well during favourable years, and it is thus that the adaptation of the species to the climate in which it has to exist is kept up. Under domestication the same thing occurs by what C. Darwin has termed "unconscious selection."

  • The ground should be ploughed about four times and all weeds removed.

  • Euphorbias attain great size and orchillas are characteristic of the forest weeds.

  • 12); C. tribuloides (bur-grass) and other species are troublesome weeds in North and South America, as the involucre clings to the wool of sheep and is removed with great difficulty.

  • Cynodon Dactylon, Eleusine indica, Imperata arundinacea, Sporobolus indicus, &c., and such weeds of cultivation as species of Setaria, Echinochloa.

  • in height, the land is harrowed for the purpose of thinning the crop and to clear it of weeds.

  • " Cereals, chiefly maize, with green crops and fields of gourds, alternate with fallow land overgrown by coarse grasses, weeds and stunted shrubs.

  • Those who reap this harvest destroy all the weeds of sorrow."

  • In the case of arable land the crops are poor and moisture-loving weeds flourish.

  • In some species young examples have been met with in which the nema ends above in a small membranous disk, which has been interpreted as an organ of attachment to the underside of floating bodies, probably sea weeds, from which the young polypary hung suspended.

  • A few years ago the wheat received from the north-west was very clean indeed, but since the new land has all been cultivated the fields are growing more weedy, with the result that the wheat brought in is becoming mixed with oats and seeds of weeds, requiring more careful separating and inspection.

  • " The site now occupied by wide quays extending several miles in length was then entirely covered with water when the sea rose a few inches above ordinary level, and that even in a perfect calm; the banks of the river near the mouth were only indicated by clusters of wretched hovels built on piles and by narrow patches of sand skirted by tall weeds, the only vegetable product of the vast swamps beyond.

  • Of the total 200 species 150 (130 indigenous) are valuable for forage, 34 (20 indigenous) are classed economically as weeds, 10 are non-indigenous cereals and 6 are ornamental.

  • Weeds are very numerous (about 125); and some, notably the sand-bur (Solanum rostratum) cockle-bur, and tumble-weeds among indigenous, and the Russian thistle (Salsola tragus) and purslane among non-indigenous species, are agricultural pests.

  • Are the weeds getting a little high along the drive?

  • Gathering the weeds took precious time, but the energy the horse would sustain from it might save their lives in the near future.

  • Think of the possibilities if we could reduce pollination of weeds and intrusive vegetation.

  • Later, thinking back, he realized it was on that one-hour bike trip the first few seeds of comprehension began to sprout something besides weeds in the garden of his mind.

  • If it isn't the skunks and opossum killing the chickens, it's the weeds taking over the garden.

  • The chickens liked their new run, which was purposely left full of weeds.

  • From the window a flower box was visible, overgrown with weeds.

  • You boys are growing like weeds.

  • The lawn, if it could be called that, was overgrown with weeds and sadly in need of mowing.

  • She parked the car and worked her way through calf-high weeds until she reached the porch.

  • Behind her lay a path of crushed grass and beyond that, tall weeds and grass.

  • Stay away from the weeds and rocks and you won't have to worry about them.

  • Sure, you can eat those weeds, but what do they taste like?

  • Weeds are the bane of fields, lust is the bane of mankind.

  • bare patches of ground leave room for weeds to take root.

  • Hoe for digging weeds This hoe was made by a blacksmith.

  • broad-leaved weeds produced three times more seeds in the conventional crops.

  • chickpea seed a head start with uniform germination and stronger plants that can outgrow weeds and resist pests.

  • choked with floating weeds or algae.

  • cleating the asparagus bed of weeds too, but was happy to pass that over the Chris, as SB getting ravenous.

  • To control weeds, grow clover in the winter in areas where you have no plant cover.

  • comfrey plants Try to hoe every day to keep the weeds away.

  • Remove all weeds and rubble and level off using a compactor and spirit level, to ensure a firm, even surface.

  • Mulching with bark, rotted compost or the like will do a good job in keeping weeds at bay.

  • conspecific neighbors on the size of Brassica napus and Veronica persica weeds.

  • contact dermatitis from weeds; patch testing with their oleoresins.

  • All the greens were rebuilt with Tifdwarf Bermuda grass and the fairways resurfaced with Bermuda grass removing all the existing crab grass and weeds.

  • crop rotation experiments have mainly been limited by nitrogen supply and by competition from weeds.

  • cross-pollinate with related species, creating uncontrollable weeds.

  • The crop should be kept free of weeds by surface cultivations using a tractor-mounted cultivator between the rows and hand hoeing around the plants.

  • powered rotary cultivators - these machines use cutting, uprooting and burial to kill the weeds.

  • Weeds is what tortoises need, and if you can find some dandelions in your garden this will be a good start.

  • dermatitis from weeds; patch testing with their oleoresins.

  • discouragens that the earth is constantly being enriched with organic matter, turned, thereby discouraging weeds, and aerated.

  • June is a month of seemingly exponential growth both for the weeds and your plants.

  • The only thing the derelict linoleum factory is good for is weeds.

  • fallow, heavy land is plowed in April to give the weeds time to start into growth.

  • fester smell far worse than weeds. ' WHAT?

  • flightless wings while running back into the weeds.

  • As every organic gardener knows, or if you're just starting out you'll soon find out, the main problem is weeds!

  • germinatehree applications, at least five days apart, may be made to give extended control of later germinating weeds.

  • herbicide resistant ' genes from GM plants are already crossing over into weeds.

  • hoe off the emerging weeds Sow immediately into the prepared, weed free bed.

  • Around a month later will use the inter-row hoe to get the better rooted weeds e.g. vol.

  • injurious weeds to grow on land.

  • leaved weeds should be eliminated in three to four weeks.

  • linoleum factory is good for is weeds.

  • A peat or bark mulch in the Spring will assist in keeping weeds at bay.

  • Someone had been hoeing up the weeds by the path, possibly the related woody nightshade which may have been its host.

  • notifiable weeds ' like the poisonous ragwort.

  • noxious weeds along some of the main roads in the county.

  • overgrown with weeds.

  • overrun with weeds?

  • paddyse were once vibrant, green rice paddies; the tsunami reduced them to lifeless hinterlands where not even weeds will grow.

  • paddyse were once vibrant, green rice paddies; the tsunami reduced them to lifeless hinterlands where not even weeds will grow.

  • Also bare patches of ground leave room for weeds to take root.

  • Exeter Ship Canal Two alien weeds, parrots feather and floating marsh pennywort, have invaded Exeter Ship Canal.

  • perennial grass weeds.

  • The maize crop was in its second year, weeds were being stopped, and the Inga was recycling nutrients, including phosphorus.

  • Annual weeds like chickweed, and shepherds ' purse will have already started to flower and set seed.

  • putrescent matter, uprooted weeds, and the remains of fish and mollusks.

  • Under the 1959 Weeds Act, it is an offense to allow ragwort to grow on any land, whether farmland or grass verges.

  • I started cleating the asparagus bed of weeds too, but was happy to pass that over the Chris, as SB getting ravenous.

  • replenished when weeds start to grow through.

  • In the nursery, where there are lots of lovely little annual rudbeckias, there are a number of little weeds starting to sprout.

  • The result is that we tend to have fewer weeds in crops following a rye green manure.

  • The next hurdle to overcome is the weeds seeds.

  • smother the weeds on your plot with layers of old carpet?

  • Pernicious weeds - these include morning glory, sheep sorrel, ivy and several types of grasses.

  • soybean growers have used cover crops successfully in conjunction with herbicides to reduce cultivation and control weeds.

  • Within 50 years it became not only the commonest speedwell but also one of the commonest annual weeds.

  • The Minister has powers under the Weeds Act 1959 to require an occupier of land to prevent the spread of creeping thistle.

  • suppressing weeds.

  • Key weeds: sow thistle is prevalent early in the season.

  • Under the Weeds Act 1959, the Minister has the powers to require an occupier of land to prevent the spread of spear thistle.

  • trampled down the weeds and it all looks really good.

  • troublesome weeds.

  • Ground Cover Plants - Plants that carpet the ground with dense growth suppressing weeds.

  • Compost improves the texture of your soil, helps the soil to retain moisture and smothers weeds around plants.

  • We will clear a small pond of litter and any overgrowing weeds.

  • The type of weed control depends on whether annual or perennial weeds are present.

  • By using a selective hormonal treatment you can safely kill the broad-leaved weeds whilst leaving the grass.

  • Please do not trespass as habitat is under severe threat and it is easy to hike in noxious weeds and to disturb nesting birds.

  • We found a good selection of arable weeds in the balancing pond.

  • Control of invasive weeds of grassland in environmentally sensitive areas Disease resistance markers in forage grasses.

  • weeds seeds.

  • For small weeds use a spot lawn weedkiller or remove physically with a Daisy Grubber.

  • Weeds and weedkiller We spray weedkiller on pavements made of bricks and concrete slabs, and on the sides of tarmac pavements.

  • The edible weeds that plagued them have been harvested and sold or gotten woody.

  • Around his head hung a wreath of stinking weeds.

  • At its close the green must be carefully examined, weeds uprooted, worn patches re-turfed, and the whole laid under a winter blanket of silver-sand.

  • Plants as agents of damage and disease may be divided into those larger forms which as weeds, epiphytes and so forth, do injury by dominating and shading more delicate species, or by gradually exhausting the soil, &c., and true parasites which actually live on and in the tissues of the plants.

  • they may be mere weeds like groundsels or ragworts, or climbers masquerading like ivy, or succulent and almost leafless, or they may be shrubs and even trees.

  • A few of the mouths of the smaller canals are kept open so as to receive a limited supply of water at the rise of the river in May, which then distributes itself over the lower lying lands in the interior, almost without labour on the part of the cultivators, giving birth in such localities to the most abundant crops, but by far the larger portion of the region between the rivers is at present an arid howling wilderness es dotted with tels or ruin-heaps, strewn in the most part with broken pottery, the evidence of former habitation, and bearing nothing but the camel-thorn, the wild caper, the colocynth-apple, wormwood and other weeds of the desert.

  • The seventh year's fallow prevented the exhaustion of the soil, which was further enriched by the burning of the weeds and spontaneous growth of the Sabbatical year.

  • Scare off the birds, harrow up the weeds, cut down all that shades the crop. Ploughs, waggons, threshing-sledges, harrows, baskets, hurdles, winnowing-fans are the farmer's implements.

  • The threshing-floor must be smooth and rammed hard to leave no crevices for weeds and small animals to get through.

  • " In the latter end of May and the begynnynge of June, is tyme to wede the come "; and then we have an accurate description of the different weeds, and the instruments and mode of weeding.

  • It is therefore necessary not only to pulverize the soil by repeated ploughings before it be seeded, but, as it becomes gradually more and more compressed afterwards, recourse must be had to tillage while the plants are growing; and this is hoeing, which also destroys the weeds that would deprive the plants of their nourishment.

  • A more rational system of cropping now began to take the place of the thriftless and barbarous practice of sowing successive crops of corn until the land was utterly exhausted, and then leaving it foul with weeds to recover its power by an indefinite period of rest.

  • The opportunities which rotation cropping affords for the cleaning of the land from weeds is another distinct element of advantage.

  • Under this system the clover is ploughed up in the autumn, the nitrogen stored up in its roots being left in the soil for the nourishment of the cereal crop. The following summer the wheat crop is harvested, and an opportunity is afforded for extirpating weeds which in the three previous years have received little check.

  • The fresh-water spider (Argyroneta) lives amongst the weeds of lakes and ponds and, like Desis, is quite at home beneath the water either swimming from spot to spot or crawling amongst the stems of aquatic plants.

  • As a permanent home the spider makes beneath the surface a thimble-shaped web, with inverted mouth, anchoring it to the weeds.

  • All grass and weeds must be kept down, and the crust must be broken after every rain, but these seem to be the only principles upon which all agree.

  • The most effective tool against the weeds is a broad sharp " sweep," as it is called, which takes everything it meets, while going shallower than most ploughs.

  • Harrows and cultivators are used where there are few weeds, and the mulching process is the one desired.

  • The experience of planters in general is in favour of the complete removal of weeds from a rubber plantation.

  • For this reason proposals have been made to plant in the place of weeds low-growing leguminous plants, the growth of which will not only prevent impoverishment and loss of soil during the rains and conserve moisture in the heat, but will also have the effect of enriching the soil in nitrogenous constituents through the power leguminous plants possess of absorbing nitrogen from the air through nodules on their roots.

  • Many of the plants are annuals; among these are some of the commonest weeds of cultivation, shepherd's purse (Capsella Bursa-pastoris), charlock (Brassica Sinapis), and such common FIG.

  • One of the commonest tropical weeds, Evolvulus alsinoides, has slender, long-trailing stems with small leaves and flowers.

  • South of the lake is a wide plain, traversed by the Semliki river, which enters the Nyanza through a swamp of tall weeds, chiefly ambach and papyrus.

  • Weeds, therefore, which need sour conditions for development are checked by liming and the better grasses and clovers are encouraged.

  • As some of these sulphur compounds have a poisonous effect on plants, gas-lime cannot be applied to land directly without great risk or rendering it incapable of growing crops of any sort - even weeds - for some time.

  • It tends to destroy insects and weeds, and gets rid of acidity of the soil.

  • To destroy the seeds, &c., of weeds, and the larvae of insect pests, a fire is often lighted, kept from the ground itself by intervening wood logs, or the seed-bed is thoroughly steamed.

  • After this treatment the upper 2 or 3 in, of soil are well pulverized, and fertilizers added, usually, to prevent reintroduction of seeds of weeds, in the form of guano or chemical manures.

  • During this period, until the plants begin to ripen, the tilth is maintained and weeds checked first by horse cultivators or horsehoes, and, as the plants increase in size, by hand labour.

  • The cercaria swims freely for a time and either encysts directly on grass or weeds or it enters a second host which may be another mollusc, an insect, crustacean or fish, and then encysts.

  • In these cynic weeds and with Epicurean good humour did he dictate his politics, and in this school did the heir of the empire attend his lessons and imbibe them."

  • This singular phenomenon is supposed to owe its appearance to an accumulation of gas, formed by the decay of vegetable matter, detaching and raising to the surface the matted weeds which cover the floor of the lake at this point.

  • Its nest is generally placed among weeds above the bottom of the water.

  • In these districts and others the number has become much reduced, owing doubtless in part to the fatal practice of catching the birds just before or during the breeding-season; but perhaps the strongest cause of their growing scarcity is the constant breaking-up of waste lands, and the extirpation of weeds (particularly of the order Compositae) essential to the improved system of agriculture; for in many parts of Scotland, East Lothian for instance, where goldfinches were once as plentiful as sparrows, they are now only rare stragglers, and yet there they have not been thinned by netting.

  • The presence of a dense population has driven out some, and brought in others, including some noxious weeds.

  • The first year the crop would be free from weeds, the second year only those grew whose seeds were wafted or carried by birds, the third year the crop required hoeing, which was done with sticks, and then the space was abandoned for new ground.

  • Morthoe, Luton Hoo, the Hoe at Plymouth, &c.; this is the same as Northern English "heugh" and is connected with "hang"), an agricultural and gardening implement used for extirpating weeds, for stirring the surface-soil in order to break the capillary channels and so prevent the evaporation of moisture, for singling out turnips and other root-crops and similar purposes.

  • The upper layer of the soil must therefore be free from weeds, finely pulverized and stocked with a readily-available supply of nutriment.

  • Among imported pests the rabbit and sparrow, and a numerous company of European and American thistles and other weeds, have to be systematically contended with.

  • For the processes of the paper manufacturer esparto is used in the dry state, and without cutting; roots and flowers and stray weeds are first removed, and the material is then boiled with caustic soda, washed, and bleached with chlorine solution.

  • Others - the majority - live among weeds, the tubicolous ones mostly upon them.

  • For the successful raising of the finer sorts of willows good, well-drained, loamy upland soil is desirable, which before planting should be deeply trenched and cleared of weeds.

  • The ground should be kept free of weeds by frequent hoeing and, if not subject to periodical alluvial floods, manured yearly.

  • It flourishes best in small tanks and ponds, in which the water is constantly changing and does not freeze; in such localities, and with a full supply of food, which consists of weeds, crumbs of bread, bran, worms, small crustaceans and insects, it attains to a length of from 6 to 12 in., breeding readily, sometimes at different times of the same year.

  • Deep-sea weeds as a rule contain more iodine than those which are found in the shallow waters.

  • Its stones were carted away, and the churchyard, overgrown with weeds, became the dumpingground for rubbish.

  • Encouragement to seedgrowing is given by the holding of seed fairs, and bulletins are issued on weeds, the methods of treating seed-wheat against smut and on other subjects.

  • The Seed Control Act of 1905 brings under strict regulations the trade in agricultural seeds, prohibiting the sale for seeding of cereals, grasses, clovers or forage plants unless free from weeds specified, and imposing severe penalties for infringements.

  • Thus Ivan Poroshkov, Peter's contemporary, the father of Russian political economy, writes as follows: "If any land be over-much encumbered with weeds, corn cannot be sown thereon unless the weeds first be burned with fire.

  • apart, the ground being made as level and firm as possible, and the plants should be regularly thinned, hoed and kept free from weeds.

  • Endless masses of tall weeds, belonging to a few species, cover the face of the country - large Cruciferae, Cynareae and Umbelliferae - also large quantities of liquorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra and echinata) and Lagonychium, and the white ears of the Imperata.

  • In autumn the withered weeds are torn up by the wind and driven immense distances.

  • In this operation all stones larger than a man's fist must be taken out, and all roots of trees and of perennial weeds carefully cleared away.

  • Gravel walks must be kept free from weeds, either by hand weeding, or by the use of one of the many weed killers now on the market.

  • When weeds are thrown to the pigs, this fermentation becomes specially desirable to kill their seeds.

  • For the destruction of weeds on gravel walks or in paved yards a strong dose of salt, applied either dry or in a very strong solution, is found very effective, especially a hot solution, but after a time much of it becomes washed down, and the residue acts as a manure; its continued application is undesirable, as gravel so treated becomes pasty.

  • Whatever the seeds, the ground should be made tolerably firm both beneath and above them; this may be done by treading in the case of most kitchen garden crops, which are also better sown in drills, this admitting the more readily of the ground being kept clear from weeds by hoeing.

  • The ground must also be thoroughly cleared of the roots of all coarse, perennial weeds, and be worked to a fine tilth ready for turfing or sow ing.

  • The more expeditious method is of course to lay down turf, which should be free from weeds, and is cut usually in strips of i ft.

  • Flower-beds should be kept well hoed and raked, to prevent the growth of weeds next month.

  • This is usually a busy month, as many crops have to be gathered, and, if hoeing is not promptly seen to, weeds are certain to give great trouble.

  • - Celery that is to be stored for winter use should be put away before the end of the month in all sections north of Virginia; south of that it may be left in most places where grown throughout the winter if well covered up. The stalks of the asparagus bed should be cut off, and burned if there are berries on them, as the seeds scattered in the soil sometimes produce troublesome weeds.

  • above freezing, the severity of frosts in winter is thus obviated, and the growth, especially of the roots of grasses, is encouraged; (2) nourishment or plant food is actually brought on to the soil, by which it is absorbed and retained, both for the immediate and for the future use of the vegetation, which also itself obtains some nutrient material directly; (3) solution and redistribution of the plant food already present in the soil occur mainly through the solvent action of the carbonic acid gas present in a dissolved state in the irrigation-water; (4) oxidation of any excess of organic matter in the soil, with consequent production of useful carbonic acid and nitrogen compounds, takes place through the dissolved oxygen in the water sent on and through the soil where the drainage is good; and (5) improvement of the grasses, and especially of the miscellaneous herbage, of the meadow is promoted through the encouragement of some at least of the better species and the extinction or reduction of mosses and of the innutritious weeds.

  • During the years in which the soil is allowed to lie fallow, the grass and weeds which spring up serve as pasture for cattle, but the poverty of the pasture is such that at least two hectares are required for the maintenance of every animal.

  • The wild flora of the alluvial valley was probably always restricted and eventually was reduced almost to the weeds of cultivation, when every acre of soil, at one period of the year dnder water, and at another roasted under the burning heat of a semi-tropical sun, was carefully tilled.

  • They burrow in the sands of every shore; they throng the weeds between tide-marks; they ascend all streams; they are found in deep wells, in caverns, in lakes; in Arctic waters they swarm in numbers beyond computation; they find lodgings on crabs, on turtles, on weed-grown buoys; they descend into depths of the ocean down to hundreds or thousands of fathoms; they are found in mountain streams as far above sea-level as some of their congeners live below it.

  • Linseed is subject to extensive and detrimental adulterations, resulting not only from careless harvesting and cleaning, whereby seeds of the flax dodder, and other weeds and grasses are mixed with it, but also from the direct admixture of cheaper and inferior oil-seeds, such as wild rape, mustard, sesame, poppy, &c., the latter adulterations being known in trade under the generic name of " buffum."

  • Lands newly broken up from pasture suit it well, as these are generally freer from weeds than those that have been long under tillage.

  • This is a tedious and expensive process, and hence the importance of sowing the crop on land as free as possible from weeds of all kinds.

  • Agassiz (in his work on Lake Superior) tells us that the roadside weeds of the north-eastern United States, to the number of 130 species, are all European, the native weeds having disappeared westwards; while in New Zealand there are, according to T.

  • In a state of nature, every recurring severe winter or otherwise unfavourable season weeds out those individuals of tender constitution or imperfect structure which may have got on very well during favourable years, and it is thus that the adaptation of the species to the climate in which it has to exist is kept up. Under domestication the same thing occurs by what C. Darwin has termed "unconscious selection."

  • The ground should be ploughed about four times and all weeds removed.

  • Euphorbias attain great size and orchillas are characteristic of the forest weeds.

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