We-l sentence example

we-l
  • Besides, Howie knows the consequences of discovery as well as we do.
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  • We were getting along so well.
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  • Otherwise, it's just as well we never see each other again.
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  • While Martha is my kindred spirit, Quinn and I always got along fairly well the few times we're all gotten together.
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  • We trudged through the next few weeks marginally well though the schedule was exhausting to all and, in spite of our efforts, our other lives were suffering.
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  • We recorded the tips as well.
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  • All in all, we were getting along admirably well considering how much time we spent in each other's company.
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  • His mother wasn't doing well and from what we could gather from his vague conversations, she wasn't expected to recover.
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  • Hospitals clean up real well and we weren't exactly Johnnie-on-the-spot getting there.
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  • We paid for the swimming pool so we might as well use it.
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  • I updated him on all we'd learned, with the only good news that baby Claire was alive and apparently well.
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  • We'll get along well.
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  • I just decided it was a fait accompli and we might as well address the situation as best we can.
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  • We thought you were doing well.
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  • We know how well that screening worked out, now don't we?
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  • "When he's well enough, we'll move him," he told the anxious woman in brown.
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  • "We're not going to get involved in another mess again, are we?" he asked, knowing full well the answer.
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  • "Well, we can't very well go searching her room for it," Cynthia answered.
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  • We did some digging in old records at the museum as well.
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  • Well we can't, so you might as well relax.
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  • We've got it all under control, so just relax and get well.
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  • We see how well that worked.
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  • We'll take the supplies and come back for our team member when he's well.
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  • We had to rely on our wits as well as our bodies to get into and out of some really rough places.
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  • We have our own kinds of generators, ones that don't work nearly as well.
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  • "I'll stay with you until we can see well enough to cut you free," she said.
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  • His room was on the far side—away from the bed, so we couldn't hear as well as the other.
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  • Yeah, well maybe we can do a little bargaining.
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  • We might as well leave her in peace.
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  • We're closest, I guess — and she's my friend — as well as yours.
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  • We've lost one child already and I don't think I could stand losing Jonathan as well.
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  • We watch them as well.
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  • We'll see them coming before they arrive, but the forest hides the armies south and north of the city too well.
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  • When we use pesticides, we kill them as well as the harmful insects - and even the bees.
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  • This is –" "Great, well we'll be about half an hour early.
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  • That's why we're pressuring her as well.
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  • She said life was about choices, the ones we make as well as the ones we don't.
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  • It also becomes clear that only where such mental life really appears need we assign an independent existence, but that the purposes of everyday life as well as those of science are equally served if we deprive the material things outside of us of an independence, and assign to them merely a connected existence through the universal substance by the action of which alone they can appear to us.
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  • We have then to think of a full universe of matter (and matter = extension) divided and figured with endless variety, and set (and kept) in motion by God; and any sort of division, figure and motion will serve the purposes of our supposition as well as another.
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  • If we now endeavour to give a general estimate of Pericles' character and achievements, it will be well to consider the many departments of his activity one by one.
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  • It is well known that the Romans borrowed their methods of hepatoscopy from the Etruscans, and, apart from the direct evidence for this in Latin writings, we have, in the case of the bronze model of a liver found near Piacenza in 1877, and of Etruscan origin, the unmistakable proof that among the Etruscans the examination of the liver was the basis of animal divination.
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  • God has brought us hither to consider the work we may do in the world as well as at home."
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  • But, when we look at the many passages in which the violas double the basses, we shall do well to consider whether there is room in the harmonic scheme for the violas to do anything else, and whether the effect would not be thin without them.
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  • The law and custom which preceded the Code we shall call " early," that of the New Babylonian empire (as well as the Persian, Greek, &c.) " late.
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  • We lectic" may explain this to ourselves as an extraordinarily space as well as in time; nothing does anything for itself.
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  • When we consider, however, the great variability in those surroundings and the consequent changes a plant must encounter, it appears obvious that interaction ~nd adjustment between the plant and its environment must be constant and well balanced.
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  • It must not be overlooked that the living cells of the plant react upon the parasite as well as to all external agencies, and the nature of disease becomes intelligible only if we bear in mind that it consists in such altered metabolismdeflected physiologyas is here implied.
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  • Under the head of malformations we place cases of atrophy of parts or general dwarfing, due to starvation, the attacks of Fungi or minute insects, the presence of unsuitable food-materials and so on, as well as cases of transformation of stamens into petals, carpels into leaves, and so forth.
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  • 38); the story of Thais is a pure fiction, and we may well believe that he repented the damage he had done (Arrian vi.
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  • We distinguish between a Siberian, Mongolian, Mediterranean and European province, none of which can be well defined.
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  • Passing over the Messabatae, who inhabited a valley which may perhaps be the modern MahSabadan, as well as the level district of Yamutbal or Yatbur which separated Elam from Babylonia, and the smaller districts of Characene, Cabandene, Corbiana and Gabiene mentioned by classical authors, we come to the fourth principal tribe of Susiana, the Cissii (Aesch.
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  • extremes we find various transitional forms: an active larva, as described above, but with four-segmented, single-clawed legs, as among the rove-beetles and their allies; the body well armoured, but slender and worm-like, with very short legs as in wireworms and mealworms (figs.
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  • So we prove him, and see how well he has drunk.
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  • Palestinian states on the other, and that they could scarcely have escaped the all-pervading Babylonian influences of 2000-1400 B.C. It is now becoming clearer every day, especially since the discovery of the laws of Khammurabi, that, if we are to think sanely about Hebrew history before as well as after the exile, we can only think of Israel as part of the great complex of Semitic and especially Canaanite humanity that lived its life in western Asia between 2060 and 600 B.C.; and that while the Hebrew race maintained by the aid of prophetism its own individual and exalted place, it was not less susceptible then, than it has been since, to the moulding influences of great adjacent civilizations and ideas.
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  • We also know that from earliest times Israel believed in the evil as well as good spirits.
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  • Tooley Street, leading east from Southwark by London Bridge railway station, is well known in connexion with the story of three tailors of Tooley Street, who addressed a petition to parliament opening with the comprehensive expression "We, the people of England."
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  • At this time they were speaking Oscan as well as Greek, and two of three Oscan inscriptions in Greek alphabet still testify to the language spoken in the town in the 3rd century B.C. We know, however, that the Bruttians, though at this date speaking the same language (Oscan) as the Samnite tribe of the Lucani, were not actually akin to them.
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  • Though Mill appears here purely as the disciple of Ricardo, striving after more precise statement, and reaching forward to further consequences, we can well understand in reading these essays how about the time when he first sketched them he began to be conscious of power as an original and independent thinker.
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  • But every genuine attempt to overcome its difficulties brings us into closer touch with the period we are examining; and though we may not be able to throw our conclusions into the form of large generalizations, we shall get to know something of the operation of the forces which determined the economic future of England; understand more clearly than our forefathers did, for we have more information than they could command, and a fuller appreciation of the issues, the broad features of English development, and be in a position to judge fairly well of the measures they adopted in their time.
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  • We may conclude, therefore, that they were preceded, in Cambrian times or earlier, by Arthropods possessing well developed appendages on all the trunk-segments.
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  • We have already seen that among the princes who joined the First Crusade there were some who were rather politiques than devots, and who aimed at the acquisition of temporal profit as well as of spiritual merit.
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  • He knew Greek and Arabic; and he was well acquainted with the affairs of Constantinople, to which he went at least twice on political business, and with the history of the Mahommedan powers, on which he had written a work (now lost) at the command of Amalric. It was Amalric also who set him to write the history of the Crusades which we still possess (in twenty-two books, with a fragment of a twentythird) - the Historia rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum.
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  • But Strabo, Pliny and Ptolemy, as well as the y better Moslem geographers, drew the eastern only under the Graeco-Roman administration that we find a definite district known as Syria, and that was at first restricted to the Orontes basin.
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  • But from his time onwards there has been a continuous stream of admiralty reports, and we begin to find important cases decided on the instance as well as on the prize side.
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  • But we are not to suppose that even he, latitudinarian and innovator as he was, could have conceived the possibility of abolishing an institution so deeply rooted in the social conditions, as well as in the ideas, of his time.
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  • In the political writings of Reshid and `Akif Pashas we have the first clear note of change; but the man to whom more than to any other the new departure owes its success is Shinasi Effendi, who employed it (1859) for poetry as well as for prose.
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  • They counselled retreat, but having heard them all he replied, in substance: " If we leave here at all we may as well retire to Strassburg, for unless the enemy is held by the threat Sf further operations he will be free to strike at our communications and has a shorter distance to go.
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  • In these, as well as in his most dramatic success of Marengo in 1800, we can discern no trace of strategical innovation.
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  • In addition to these Clement often speaks of his intention to write on certain subjects, but it may well be doubted whether in most cases, if not all, he intended to devote separate treatises to 1 Zahn thinks we have part of them in the Adumbrationes Clem.
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  • It may, however, well be that both peach and almond are derived from some pre-existing and now extinct form whose descendants have spread over the whole geographic area mentioned; but this is a mere speculation, though indirect evidence in its support might be obtained from the nectarine, of which no mention is made in ancient literature, and which, as we have seen, originates from the peach and reproduces itself by seed, thus offering the characteristics of a species in the act of developing itself.
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  • Hence, if we assume that, in the Daniell's cell, the temperature coefficients are negligible at the individual contacts as well as in the cell as a whole, the sign of the potential-difference ought to be the same at the surface of the zinc as it is at the surface of the copper.
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  • In regard to the ancients' knowledge of lead compounds, we may state that the substance described by Dioscorides as, uoXv,3Saiva was undoubtedly litharge, that Pliny uses the word minium in its present sense of red lead, ana that white lead was well known to Geber in the 8th century.
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  • Among the German we may mention Wolf and his followers, as well as Mendelssohn, J.
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  • The connexion is not so intimate in Scorpio, but is nevertheless a very close one, closer than we find in any other Arthropods in which the arterial system is well developed, e.g.
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  • Leaving that question for consideration in connexion with the systematic statement of the characters of the various groups of Arachnida which follows on p. 475, it is well now to consider the following question, viz., seeing that Limulus and Scorpio are such highly developed and specialized forms, and that they seem to constitute as it were the first and second steps in the series of recognized Arachnida - what do we know, or what are we led to suppose with regard to the more primitive Arachnida from which the Eurypterines and Limulus and Scorpio have sprung ?
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  • The charge of heathenism we find in Suidas is probable enough; that is to say, Tribonian may well have been a crypto-pagan, like many other eminent courtiers and litterateurs of the time (including Procopius himself), a person who, while professing Christianity, was at least indifferent to its dogmas and rites, cherishing a sentimental recollection of the older and more glorious days of the empire.
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  • The interruption of maritime intercourse, the stagnation of industry and trade, the rise in the price of the necessaries of life, the impossibility of adequately providing for the families of those - call them reservists, " landwehr," or what you will - who are torn away from their daily toil to serve in the tented field, - these are considerations that may well make us pause before we abandon a peaceful solution and appeal to brute force.
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  • In the writings of the alchemists we find the words misy, sory, chalcanthum applied to alum as well as to iron sulphate; and the name atramentum sutorium, which ought to belong, one would suppose, exclusively to green vitriol, applied indifferently to both.
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  • We cannot, for instance, say that the fraction C _2 I is arithmetically equal to x+I when x= I, as well as for other values of x; but we can say that the limit of the ratio of x 2 - I to x - I when x becomes indefinitely nearly equal to I is the same as the limit of x+ On the other hand, if f(y) has a definite and finite value for y = x, it must not be supposed that this is necessarily the same as the limit which f (y) approaches when y approaches the value x, though this is the case with the functions with which we are usually concerned.
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  • It abolished the conception of life s an entity above and beyond the common properties of matter, and led to the conviction that the marvellous and exceptional qualities of that which we call " living " matter are nothing more nor less than an exceptionally complicated development of those chemical and physical properties which we recognize in a gradually ascending scale of evolution in the carbon compounds, containing nitrogen as well as oxygen, sulphur and hydrogen as constituent atoms of their enormous molecules.
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  • If, on the other hand, the point be well immersed in the geometrical shadow, the earlier zones are altogether missing, and, instead of a series of terms beginning with finite numerical magnitude and gradually diminishing to zero, we have now to deal with one of which the terms diminish to zero at both ends.
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  • The second collection of " Davidic " psalms, as well as the Korahite and Asaphic psalms, have been subjected to an Elohistic redaction, for which we must find a reason if the history of the Psalter is to be written.
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  • Since this last collection includes a psalm (cx.) which can scarcely refer to any one earlier than Simon the Maccabee, and cannot well be later than his time, we are justified in assigning the compilation of this collection to about the year 140 B.C. But by this time a great change had taken place in the aims and aspirations of the Jews.
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  • 5 It was not from Greek only that translations were made into Syriac. Of translations from Pahlavi we have such examples as the version of pseudo-Callisthenes' History of Alexander, made in the 7th century from a Pahlavi version of the Greek original - that of Kalilah and Dimnah executed in the 6th century by the periodeutes Bodh - and that of Sindbad, which dates from the 8th century; and in the late period of Syriac literature, books were translated from Arabic into Syriac as well as vice versa.
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  • Neither of these passages would fit the prose romance, as we know it, but both might well suit the lost French source of the Lanzelet; where we are in a position to compare the German versions of French romances with their originals we find, as a rule, that the translators have followed their source faithfully.
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  • Harvey, as is well known, spoke slightingly of the great chancellor, and it is not till the rapid development of physical science in England and Holland in the latter part of the century, that we find Baconian principles explicitly recognized.
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  • We see now that the practice of the experimental method endows with a new vision both the experimenter himself and, through his influence, those who are associated with him in medical science, even if these be not themselves actually engaged in experiment; a new discipline is imposed upon old faculties, as is seen as well in other sciences as in those on which medicine more directly depends.
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  • Mathematically we have thus in all cases to compute present value on the basis of a deferred as well as a limited annuity.
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  • Now it is again generally admitted that in these sections we have the genuine account of one who was a member of Paul's company, who may well have been Luke.
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  • Here we hear of a " king of Kengi," as well as of a certain Me-silim, king Ur-nines of Kis, who had dealings with Lugal-suggur, high- dynasty.
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  • Their power extended to the Mediterranean, and we possess a large number of contemporaneous monuments in the shape of contracts and similar business documents, as well as chronological tables, which belong to their reigns.
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  • we possess, as well as those now lost which served as the basis of the old editions, do not go back beyond the time of Charlemagne (end of 8th century and 9th century).
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  • The first forty-two years of his life are obscure; we learn from incidental remarks of his that he was a Sunnite, probably according to the IIanifite rite, well versed in all the branches of natural science, in medicine, mathematics, astronomy and astrology, in.
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  • We have no clue to the ethnic character and relations of the Pisidians, except that we learn from Strabo that they were distinct from the neighbouring Solymi, who were probably a Semitic race, but we find mention at an early period in these mountain districts of various other tribes, as the Cabali, Milyans, &c., of all which, as well as the neighbouring Isaurians and Lycaonians, the origin is wholly unknown, and the absence of monuments of their languages must remain so.
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  • Next, as all investigation proceeds from that which is known best to that which is unknown or less well known, and as, in social states, it is the collective phenomenon that is more easy of access to the observer than its parts, therefore we must consider and pursue all the elements of a given social state together and in common.
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  • Her language is graceful and natural, her sentiments are refined and sober; and, as Mr Aston well says, her story flows on easily from one scene of real life to another, giving us a varied and minutely detailed picture of life and society in KiOto, such as we possess for no other country at the same period.
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  • And if he is the sea-god, we must remember that there is a heavenly as well as an earthly ocean; hence the clouds are sometimes called Tangaloa's ships.
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  • If we add to pictures of this class a few Scriptural subjects, a few Oriental dreams, one or two of tender sentiment like "Wedded" (one of the most popular of his pictures, and well known by not only an engraving, but a statuette modelled by an Italian sculptor), a number of studies of very various types of female beauty, "Teresina," "Biondina," "Bianca," "Moretta," &c., and an occasional portrait, we shall nearly exhaust the two classes into which Lord Leighton's work (as a painter) can be divided.
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  • It is necessary in the first place to make quite certain that the right deity is being addressed: hence it is well to invoke all the spirits who might be concerned, and even to add a general formula to cover omissions: here we have the ritual significance of the indigitamenta.
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  • As we know from the New Testament, the custom of reading in the synagogues both from the Law 4 and from the Prophets 5 was well established in the 1 st century A.D.: its introduction, therefore, will date from a much earlier period.
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  • we find Targums to the Song of Moses and to the Decalogue, in which this process has been fully carried out, the text of Onkelos being given as well as the variants of the Fragmentary Targum.
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  • The Jews were as well able as their neighbours to fashion golden calves, snakes and the minor idols called teraphim, when their legislator, in the words we have just cited, forbade the ancillary use of all plastic and pictorial art for religious purposes.
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  • Indeed, approximate accuracy is not attained until we are within sixteen hundred years of our own era; but the sequence of events of a period preceding this by two thousand years is well established, and the recent discoveries of Professor Petrie carry back the record to a period which cannot well be less than five thousand, perhaps not less than six thousand years B.C. Both from Egypt and Mesopotamia, then, the records of the archaeologist have brought us evidence of the existence of a highly developed civilization for a period exceeding by hundreds, perhaps by thousands, of years the term which had hitherto been considered the full period of man's existence.
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  • Even in so important a matter as the great conflict between Persia and Greece it has been suggested more than once that we should be able to gain a much truer view were Persian as well as Greek accounts accessible.
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  • For, since the commencement of the era is placed at an intermediate period of history, we are compelled to resort to a double manner of reckoning, backward as well as forward.
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  • we are comparatively well informed from Greek sources; for the earlier part of his reign from Ctesias and Xenophon (Anabasis), for the later times from Dinon of Ephesus, the historian of the Persians (from whom the account of Justin is derived), from Ephorus (whose account is quoted by Diodorus) and others.
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  • We hear 3 of " Brownists " in London about 1585, while the London petitioners of 1592 refer to their fellows in " other gaols throughout the land "; and the True Confession of 1596 specifies Norwich, Gloucester, Bury St Edmunds, as well as " many other places of the land."
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  • But we hear no good news of that kind, and gather small comfort from the mere fact that Congregational churches are holding their own as well as any of their neighbours."
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  • l5 Nevertheless we may well suppose that the popular religion of ancient Israel had much to say of superhuman beings other than Yahweh, but that the inspired writers have mostly suppressed references to them as unedifying.
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  • We cannot well claim more than these three kinds of reality for the first and the last signs, the miracle at Cana and the resurrection of Lazarus.
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  • Since the forces called into play by an extension or compression of the material are proportional to the cross-section, it follows that if we consider any case and then another case in which, with the same longitudinal disturbance, the cross-section is doubled, the force in the second case is doubled as well as the mass to be moved.
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  • At this point we might well make more than a passing reference to St Paul (Rom.
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  • Yet they do not really add much to what is there already, and they have the drawbacks of pseudonymity; they lack concrete and personal qualities; they are general expressions of tendencies which we cannot well locate or measure, save by means of the Apostolic Fathers themselves or of their earliest Catholic successors.
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  • But before we proceed to this it may be well to note one or two things that come out by comparison of the systems already before us.
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  • The actual terms of the constitution are introduced by a preamble, which runs: " We, the Czechoslovak nation, desiring to consolidate the perfect unity of our people, to establish the reign of justice in the Republic, to assure the peaceful development of our native Czechoslovak land, to contribute to the common welfare of all citizens of this State and to secure the blessings of freedom to coming generations, have in our National Assembly this 29th day of February 1920 adopted the following Constitution for the Czechoslovak Republic: and in so doing we declare that it will be our endeavour to see that this Constitution together with all the laws of our land be carried out in the spirit of our history as well as in the spirit of those modern principles embodied in the idea of Self-determination, for we desire to take our place in the Family of Nations as a member at once cultured, peace-loving, democratic and progressive."
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  • (v.) We are confirmed in this opinion by the fact that the epistles of St Paul furnish many indications that Christians in general, including those who had not been much in contact with the original Twelve, were well acquainted with the leading features in the character of Christ and in the Christian ideal, although there is little corresponding evidence for their knowledge of details in the life of Christ.
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  • Practically we may say that the estimate of the Four to which Tatian and Irenaeus testify must have been well established by the middle of the century, though sporadic instances may be found of the use of other Gospels that did not become canonical.
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  • In these we are presented, in a condensed form, with an account of the people, the language and the civil and ecclesiastical history, as well as the agricultural and commercial state of Scotland during the first thirteen centuries of our era.
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  • With the latter, which is best designated as the "system of natural liberty," we ought to associate the memory of the physiocrats as well as that of Smith, without, however, maintaining their services to have been equal to his.
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  • Despite their rare occurrence, the males of over one hundred and twenty species have now been recognized, and we may well believe that all species will be found to present males.
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  • 3) mention is made of one Clement whose office it is to communicate with other churches, and this function agrees well with what we find in the letter to the church at Corinth by which Clement is best known.
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  • Perhaps we may illustrate his position by saying that the elements undergo a change analogous to what takes place in iron, when by being brought into an electric field it becomes magnetic. The substance of the elements remain as well as their accidents, but like baptismal water they gain by consecration a hidden virtue benefiting soul and body.
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  • The Fihrist reckons seven principal works of Mani, six being in the Syriac and one in the Persian language; regarding some of these we also have information in Epiphanius, Augustine, Titus of Bostra, and Photius, as well as in the formula of abjuration (Cotelerius, PP. Apost.
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  • On comparing it with the Semitic religions of nature we perceive that it was free from their sensuous cultus, substituting instead a spiritual worship as well as a strict morality.
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  • To the latter we are indebted for the substance of the following description, as well as for the 1 plan, reduced from his elucidated transcript of the original preserved in the archives of the convent.
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  • pp. 1-22.) But the extraordinary thing is that, without exactly agreeing among themselves, the catalogues give titles which do not agree well with the Aristotelian works as we have them.
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  • As then we find this identification of pleasure with activity in the Metaphysics and in the De Anima, as well as in the Nicomachean Ethics, the Eudemian Ethics and the Magna Moralia, the only logical conclusion, from which there is no escape, is that, so far as the treatment of pleasure goes, any Aristotelian treatise which defines it as activity is genuine.
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  • As we cannot without a tittle of evidence accept such a consequence, we conclude that Aristotle formulated the distinction between argumentative and adventitious, artificial and inartificial evidences, both in the Rhetoric to Alexander and in the Rhetoric; and that the former as well as the latter is a genuine work of Aristotle, the founder of the logic of rhetoric.
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  • In fact, as to the Categories as well as the De Interpretatione, we are at a complete loss.
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  • We must refer to Kayser and Runge's Handbuch for further details, as well as for information on other spectra such as those of silver, thallium, indium and manganese, in which series lines have been found.
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  • The fact that the gases with which we are most familiar are not rendered luminous by being heated in a tube to a temperature well above a white heat has often been a stumbling block and raised the not unreasonable doubt whether approximately homogeneous oscillations could ever be obtained by a mere thermal process.
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  • The detection of the presence of chlorine or bromine or iodine in a compound is at present undecided, and it may be well that we may have to look for its effects in a different part of the spectrum.
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  • The details of this antagonism, as well as nearly all our knowledge of this valuable drug, we owe to Sir Thomas Fraser, who introduced it into therapeutics.
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  • As a rule their initial consecration goes back beyond memory and tradition; we can rarely seize it in the making, as in the case of a Roman puteal, or spot struck by lightning, which was walled round like a well (puteus) against profanation, being thenceforth a shrine of Semo Sancus, the god of lightning.
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  • This second position is a new form of metaphysical idealism, containing the supposition, which lies at the foundation of later German philosophy, that since understanding shapes the objects out of sensations, and since nature, as we know it, consists of such objects, " understanding, though it does not make, shapes nature," as well as our knowledge.
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  • In order to prove this novel conclusion he started afresh from the Cartesian " I think " in the Kantian form of the synthetic unity of apperception acting by a priori categories; but instead of allowing, with all previous metaphysicians, that the Ego passively receives sensations from something different, and not contenting himself with Kant's view that the Ego, by synthetically combining the matter of sensations with a priori forms, partially constructs objects, and therefore Nature as we know it, he boldly asserted that the Ego, in its synthetic unity, entirely constructs things; that its act of spontaneity is not mere synthesis of passive sensations, but construction of sensations into an object within itself; and that therefore understanding makes as well as shapes Nature.
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  • 1908) as well as in his psychological work on the Analysis of Sensations (Beitrage zur Analyse der Empfindungen, 1886), we find two main causes, both psychological and epistemological; namely, his views on sense and on inference.
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  • We possess some of the results collected by this mission in an excellent short treatise on Tibet by P. Orazio himself, as well as in the Alphabetum Tibetanum of the Augustine monk A.
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  • If the salt crystallizes with a certain amount of water as well as with none, we get a second point of equilibrium between four phases.
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  • It is probably to this period and these circumstances that we must look for at all events the rudimentary beginnings of the military as well as the religious orders of chivalry.
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  • The p p p p eschatology of the Old Testament is thus closely connected with, but not limited by, Messianic hope, as there are eschatological teachings that are not Messianic. As the Old Testament revelation is concerned primarily with the elect nation, and only secondarily (in the later writings) with the individual persons composing it, we follow the order of importance as well as of time in dealing first with the people.
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  • The attitude of theologians generally regarding individual destiny is well expressed by Dr James Orr, "The conclusion I arrive at is that we have not the elements of a complete solution, and we ought not to attempt it.
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  • 4 " Their zeal and success," to quote the words of Kurtz, " are witnessed to by the fact that at the beginning of the 8th century, throughout all the district of the Rhine, as well as Hesse, Thuringia, Bavaria and Alemannia, we find a network of flourishing churches bearing the impress of Celtic institutions."
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  • It is well known that this name (rocos) was given on account of practical ability; and in accordance with this we find that Thales had been occupied with civil affairs, and indeed several instances of his political sagacity have been handed down.
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  • It is well known that as we rise from the sealevel into the upper regions of the atmosphere the temperature decreases.
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  • In Switzerland there are Italian-speaking regions, as well as some spots (in the Grisons) where the old Romance dialect of Romansch or Ladin survives; while in Austria, besides German, Italian and Ladin, we havea Slavonic-speaking population in the South-Eastern Alps.
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  • Garden Tools, &c. - Most of these are so well known that we shall not discuss them here.
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  • For the first time in the earth's history we find Foraminifera taking a prominent part in the marine faunas; the genus Fusulina was abundant in what is now Russia, China, Japan, North America; Valvulina had a wide range, as also had Endothyra and Archaediscus; Saccammina is a form well known in Britain and Belgium, and many others have been described; some Carboniferous genera are still extant.
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  • The latter fact, as well as the extraordinary fastidiousness, so to speak, of parasites in their choice of hosts or of organs for attack, point to reactions on the part of the host-plant, as well as capacities on that of the parasite, which may be partly explained in the light of what we 'now know regarding enzymes and chemotropism.
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  • The road to Ostia may have existed from the first: but after the Latin corn munities on the lower Anio had fallen under the dominion of Rome, we may well believe that the first portion of the Via Salaria, leading to Antemnae, Fidenae (the fall of which is placed by tradition in 428 B.C.) and Crustumerium, came into existence.
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  • My friends never had occasion to vindicate any one circumstance of my character and conduct; not but that the zealots, we may well suppose, would have been glad to invent and propagate any story to my disadvantage, but they could never find any which they thought would wear the face of probability.
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  • The phenomenon absolutely corresponds to that of fusion and solidification, only that it generally takes place less quickly; consequently we may have prismatic sulphur at ordinary temperature for some time, as well as rhombic sulphur at loo°.
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  • For the restoration of the Greek text we have, besides many Greek MSS., uncial and cursive, the old Latin, the Syro-Hexaplar, the Armenian, Sahidic and Ethiopic versions, as well as a considerable number of quotations in the Greek and Latin Fathers.
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  • In the latter we possess a more historical account of the anointing of Jehu, and Robertson Smith observes: "When the history in I Kings represents Elijah as personally commissioned to inaugurate [the revolution] by anointing Jehu and Hazael as well as Elisha, we see that the author's design is to gather up the whole contest between Yahweh and Baal in an ideal picture of Elijah and his work" (Ency.
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  • Inscriptions have naturally been found in considerable numbers, and we are indebted to them for much information concerning the municipal arrangements of the town, as well as the construction of various edifices and other public works.
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  • On the 27th of February 1860 in Cooper Union, New York City, he made a speech (much the same as that delivered in Elwood, Kansas, on the 1st of December) which made him known favourably to the leaders of the Republican party in the East and which was a careful historical study criticising the statement of Douglas in one of his speeches in Ohio that "our fathers when they framed the government under which we live understood this question [slavery] just as well and even better than we do now," and Douglas's contention that "the fathers" made the country (and intended that it should remain) part slave.
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  • The island, like the rest of Theodoric's dominions, was certainly well looked after by the great king and his minister; yet we hear darkly of disaffection to, Gothic rule (Cass.
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  • We find that if the series of excitations of the muscle be prolonged beyond the short stage of initial improvement, the contractions, after being well maintained for a time, later decline in force and speed, and ultimately dwindle even to vanishing point.
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  • With sufficient time and labour the work might no doubt have been done; but what we possess of Justinian's own legislation, and still more what we know of the general condition of literary and legal capacity in his time, makes it certain that it would not have been well done, and that the result would have been not more valuable to the Romans of that age, and much less valuable to the modern world, than are the results, preserved in the Digest and the Codex, of what he and Tribonian actually did.
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  • The only argument of weight in favour of this view is that it makes the amount of writing on the two tables less unequal, while we know that the second table as well as the first was written on both sides (Ex.
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  • We have the evidence of this in his own written words, as well as in a sketch which he drew to indicate the seat of his suffering to some physician with whom he was in correspondence, and again in the record of his physical aspect which is preserved by a portrait engraved on wood just after his death, from a drawing made no doubt not long before: in this portrait we see his shoulders already bent, the features somewhat gaunt, the old pride of the abundant locks shorn away.
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  • When two thinkers of such eminence (probably the two greatest ethical thinkers of antiquity) have arrived independently at this strange"--conclusion, have agreed in ascribing to cravings, felt in this life, so great, and to us so inconceivable, a power over the future life, we may well hesitate before we condemn the idea as intrinsically absurd, and we may take note of the important fact that, given similar conditions, similar stages in the development of religious belief, men's thoughts, even in spite of the most unquestioned individual originality, tend though they may never produce exactly the same results, to work in similar ways.
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  • We cannot to-day determine the exact homes or provenance of these freebooters, who were a terror alike to the Frankish empire, to England and to Ireland and west Scotland, who only came into view when their ships anchored in some Christian harbour, and who were called now Normanni, now Dacii, now Danes, now Lochlannoch; which last, the Irish name for them, though etymologically " men of the lakes or bays," might as well be translated " Norsemen," seeing that Lochlann was the Irish for Norway.
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  • Unfortunately at this point our best authority ceases; and we cannot well explain the changes which brought about the Christianization of the Normans and their settlement in Normandy as vassals, though recalcitrant ones, of the West Frankish kings.
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  • In Ireland, besides the important and successful Turgesius, we read of a Saxulf who early met his death, as well as of Ivar (Ingvar), famous also in England and called the son of Ragnar Lodbrog, and of Oisla, Ivar's comrade; finally (the vikings in Ireland being mostly of Norse descent) of the wellknown Olaf the White, who became king of all the Scandinavian settlements in Ireland.
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  • The conquest of Cephalonia and Zante followed, and we find five counts of the family of Tocco holding Cephalonia, and probably Zante as well as Santa Maura, as tributary to the republic. But the footing thus gained by the Venetians was not maintained, and through the closing part of the 13th and most of the 14th century the islands were a prey by turns to corsairs and to Greek and Neapolitan claimants.
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  • We have no idea who the disciple may have been who thus seized upon the sadder elements of the teaching of Jesus; but we may well think of him as one of those who were living in Palestine in the dark and threatening years of internecine strife, when the Roman eagles were gathering round their prey, and the first thunder was muttering of the storm which was to leave Jerusalem a heap of stones.
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  • Time after time His life is threatened before the feast is ended, and when the last passover has come we can well understand, what was not made sufficiently clear in the brief Marcan narrative, why Jerusalem proved so fatally hostile to His Messianic claim.
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  • The term alkali is employed in a technical sense for the carbonate and hydrate (of sodium), but since in the Leblanc process the manufacture of sodium sulphate necessarily precedes that of the carbonate, we include this as well as the manufacture of hydrochloric acid which is inseparable from it.
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  • We then descend to the second terrace, in the centre of which the substructure of the great second temple was revealed, together with so much of the walls, as well as the several architectural members forming the superstructure, that it has been possible for E.
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  • Near the Christian era the chief of one of these, which was called Kushan, subdued the rest, and extended his conquests over the countries south of the Hindu Kush, including Sind as well as Afghanistan, thus establishing a great dominion, of which we hear from Greek writers as Indo-Scythia.
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  • It is not a little curious that the obvious improvement of trans ferring the declination axis as well as the declination-clamp to the telescope end of the declination axis was so long delayed; we can explain the delay only by the desire to retain the declination circle as a part of the counterpoise.
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  • The propositions maintained in the argument are - "(1) That something has existed from eternity; (2) that there has existed from eternity some one immutable and independent being; (3) that that immutable and independent being, which has existed from eternity, without any external cause of its existence, must be self-existent, that is, necessarily existing; (4) what the substance or essence of that being is, which is self-existent or necessarily existing, we have no idea, neither is it at all possible for us to comprehend it; (5) that though the substance or essence of the self-existent being is itself absolutely incomprehensible to us, yet many of the essential attributes of his nature are strictly demonstrable as well as his existence, and, in the first place, that he must be of necessity eternal; (6) that the self-existent being must of necessity be infinite and omnipresent; (7) must be but one; (8) must be an intelligent being; (9) must be not a necessary agent, but a being endued with liberty and choice; (to) must of necessity have infinite power; (I I) must be infinitely wise, and (12) must of necessity be a being of infinite goodness, justice, and truth, and all other moral perfections, such as become the supreme governor and judge of the world."
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  • The question of logic is how we infer in fact, as well as perfectly; and we cannot understand inference unless we consider inferences of probability of all kinds.
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  • - The emphasis now laid on judgment, the recovery from Hume's confusion of beliefs with ideas and the association of ideas, and the distinction of the mental act of judging from its verbal expression in a proposition, are all healthy signs in recent logic. The most fundamental question, before proceeding to the investigation of inference, is not what we say but what we think in making the judgments which, whether we express them in propositions or not, are both the premises and the conclusion of inference; and, as this question has been diligently studied of late, but has been variously answered, it will be well to give a list of the more important theories of judgment as follows: a.
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  • But in the judgment the point is not what we state, but what we think; and so long as the existence of A is added in thought, the judgment in question must contain the thought that A exists as well as that A is B, and therefore is a judgment that something is determined both as existing and in a particular manner.
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  • The aim of logic in general is to find the laws of all inference, which, so far as it obeys those laws, is always consistent, but is true or false according to its data as well as its consistency; and the aim of the special logic of knowledge is to find the laws of direct and indirect inferences from sense, because as sense produces sensory judgments which are always true of the sensible things actually perceived, inference from sense produces inferential judgments which, so far as they are consequent on sensory judgments, are always true of things similar to sensible things, by the very consistency of inference, or, as we say, by parity of reasoning.
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  • It is an advance on this when Heraclitus 2 opposes to the eyes and ears which are bad witnesses " for such as understand not their language " a common something which we would do well to follow; or again when in the incommensurability of the diagonal and side of a square the Pythagoreans stumbled upon what was clearly neither thing nor image of sense, but yet was endowed with meaning, and henceforth were increasingly at home with symbol and formula.
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  • Thirdly we have the limiting cases of this in the inductive syllogism 5ui 7riu'mw, 7 a syllogism in the third figure concluding universally, and yet valid because the copula expresses equivalence, and in analogy 8 in which, it has been well said, instances are weighed and not counted.
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  • The practical aim of science is as well achieved if we set forth possible causes as in showing the actual cause.
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  • of snow on its slopes, from a distance and height well calculated to permit the eye to take in its true proportions, we agreed that no single mountain we know presented such a magnificent and impressive appearance as the Armenian Giant."
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  • The highest pressures recorded for cane-sugar are nearly three times as great as those given by van't Hoff's formula for the gas-pressure, but agree very well with the vapour-pressure theory, as modified by Callendar, provided that we substitute for V in Arrhenius's formula the actual specific volume of the solvent in the solution, and if we also assume that each molecule of sugar in solution combines with 5 molecules of water, as required by the observations on the depression of the freezing-point and the rise of the boiling-point.
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  • In the Phoenician alphabet Zain was the seventh letter, occupying the same position and having the same form approximately (i) as the early Greek Z, while in pronunciation it was a voiced s-sound; Samech () followed the 'symbol for n of and was the ordinary s-sound, though, as we have seen, e it is in different Greek states at the earliest period as well as E; after the symbol for p came Zade (v), which was a strong palatal s, though in name it corresponds to the Greek Nra; while lastly Shin (W) follows the symbol for r, and was an sh-sound.
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  • We have seen that at Babylon itself the Aramaic language and character were well known.
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  • On the latter, it may well be questioned whether the presence or absence of "we" be not due to psychological causes, rather than to the writer's mere presence or absence.'
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  • Considering that the divergence of two alphabets (like the difference of two dialects) requires both time and familiar use, we may gather from these facts that writing was well known in Greece early in the 7th century B.e.2 The rise of prose composition in the 6th century B.C. has been thought to mark the time when memory was practically superseded by writing as a means of preserving literature - the earlier use of letters being confined to short documents, such as lists of names, treaties, laws, &c. This conclusion, however, is by no means necessary.
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  • When we are satisfied that each of the great Homeric poems is either wholly or mainly the work of a single poet, a question remains which has been matter of controversy in ancient as well as modern times - Are they the work of the same poet?
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  • those ineradicable forces of the natural man assumed, if we may trust the depositions of ecclesiastics well acquainted with his life, a form of brutal atheistic cynicism.
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  • From this we may infer that they spoke a language cognate with the Scythic. The greater part of the barbarian names occurring in the inscriptions of Olbia, Tanais and Panticapaeum are supposed to be Sarmatian, and as they have been well explained from the Iranian language now spoken by the Ossetes of the Caucasus, these are supposed to be the representatives of the Sarmatae and can be shown to have a direct connexion with the Alani, one of their tribes.
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  • Helmholtz says: " If we accept the hypothesis that elementary substances are composed of atoms, we cannot well avoid concluding that electricity also is divided into elementary portions which behave like atoms of electricity."
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  • " Then and only then may we hope well of the sciences, when in a just scale of ascent and by successive steps, not interrupted or broken, we rise from particulars to lesser axioms; and then to middle axioms, one above the other; and last of all to the most general."
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  • By all means let universal characterization be attempted - we are about to attempt one here, though well aware of the difficulty in the present state of our knowledge - but they must at least model themselves on the composite photograph rather than the impressionist sketch.
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  • The observations of Spruce are of themselves almost conclusive as to the possibility of Europeans becoming acclimatized in the tropics; and if it is objected that this evidence applies only to the dark-haired southern races, we are fortunately able to point to facts, almost equally well authenticated and conclusive, in the case of one of the typical Germanic races.
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  • On his death in 1066 a civil war broke out in which the leaders were two obscure princes named Eric. Probably the division of feeling between Vestergotland and Upland in the matter of religion was the real cause of this war, but nothing is known of the details, though we hear that both kings as well as the chief men of the land fell in it.
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  • In watching the troops of patients who go to the wells we notice that most of them do more early rising, take more regular exercise, and drink more water in the course of a month at the well than they would do in the rest of the year at home.
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  • It seems clear that he had a peculiar gift for evoking the enthusiasm of rude tribes, and we can well understand how the famous white fawn, a present from one of the natives, which was his constant companion and was supposed to communicate to him the advice of the goddess Diana, promoted his popularity.
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  • Zeno, we have reason to believe, adopted the Cynic Logos for his guidance to truth as well as to morality.
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  • If the sinuosity is slight we have the Vibrio form; if pronounced, and the spiral winding well marked, the forms are known as Spirillum, Spirochaete, &c. These and similar terms have been applied partly to individual cells, but more often to filaments consisting of several cells; and much confusion has arisen form the difficulty of defining the terms themselves.
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  • Similarly we are unable to divide Schizomycetes sharply into parasites and saprophytes, since it is well proved that a number of species - facultative parasites - can become one or the other according to circumstances.
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  • The life of a reformer did not in itself make him thoroughly happy; he chafed more and more under its fatigues, and he always felt that his natural place would have been among senators or ambassadors; but he belonged essentially to the heroic type, and it may well have been of him that Emerson was thinking when he wrote those fine words: "What forests of laurel we bring and the tears of mankind to him who stands firm against the opinion of his contemporaries."
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  • The course of development here outlined, in which the nauplius gradually passes into the adult form by the successive addition of somites and appendages in regular order, agrees so well with the process observed in the development of the typical Annelida that we must regard it as being the most primitive method.
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  • We may also refer many of his most important treatises in prose, as well as a large portion of his Latin correspondence, to the leisure he enjoyed in this retreat.
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  • It should be noted before we pass to Rome that with the expansion of Hellenism the subject of historians expanded as well.
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  • We are little troubled, of course, with heresies, and are not shocked by the outbreaks of theological zeal; but where thought as well as action does not reach beyond the limits of earth and time, we do not find man in his best estate.
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  • We possess no other document written in it, and on this account modern Parsee scholars, as well as the older Pahlavi books, speak of the language and writing indifferently as Avesta.
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  • As the original home of the language can only be very doubtfully conjectured, we shall do well to follow the usage sanctioned by old custom and apply the word to both.
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  • But, even granting that a certain obscurity still hangs undispelled over the problem of the old Avesta, with its twenty-one nasks, we may well believe the Parsees themselves, when they affirm that their sacred literature has passed through successive stages of decay, the last of which is represented by the present Avesta.
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  • A few species, as we have seen, are monoecious or dioecious, while many are polygamous (having unisexual as well as bisexual flowers as in many members of the tribes Andropogoneae, fig.
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  • i.), but we can well believe that the concrete fact which the prophetic call illuminated was an impending blow to the state (i.
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  • Of drawings there are very many, including few only for the "Last Supper," many for the Sforza monument, as well as the multitude of sketches, scientific and other, which we find intermingled among the vast body of his miscellaneous MSS., notes and records.
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  • We see him full of tenderness to animals, a virtue not common in Italy in spite of the example of St Francis; open-handed in giving, not eager in getting- "poor," he says, "is the man of many wants"; not prone to resentment - "the best shield against injustice is to double the cloak of long-suffering"; zealous in labour above all men - "as a day well spent gives joyful sleep, so does a life well spent give joyful death."
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  • Lasne, an engraver of Caen), represent him as a man of serious, almost of stern countenance, and this agrees well enough with such descriptions as we have of his appearance, and with the idea of him which we should form from his writings and conduct.
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  • We want to have Old England as well taught as New England."
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  • The periods of such discharges are so short, their positions so isolated and the areas affected so small, that we have little or no exact knowledge concerning them, though their disastrous results are well known.
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  • Hence, throughout the world we find the shallow well still very common in rural districts.
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  • We have hitherto supposed the pumps for drawing the water to have been placed in the well at such a level as to be accessible, while the suction pipe only is below water.
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  • His mathematical studies seem to have been undertaken and carried to their full development without any assistance whatever, and the result is that his writings belong to no particular " school," unless indeed we consider them to form, as they are well entitled to do, a school by themselves.
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  • The discoveries, papers and treatises we have mentioned might well have formed the whole work of a long and laborious life.
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  • But the Tell and Winkelried stories stand in a very different position when looked at in the dry light of history, for, while in the former case imaginary and impossible men (bearing now and then a real historical name) do imaginary and impossible deeds at a very uncertain period, in the latter we have some solid ground to rest on, and Winkelried's act might very well have been performed, though, as yet, the amount of genuine and early evidence in support of it is very far from being sufficient.
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  • As a general class, the sulphates are soluble in water, and exhibit well crystallized forms. Of the most insoluble we may notice the salts of the metals of the alkaline earths, barium, strontium and calcium, barium sulphate being practically insoluble, and calcium sulphate sparingly but quite appreciably soluble.
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  • Finally, in the course of so many centuries, the number of ecclesiastical laws has increased to such an extent, and these laws have accumulated in such immense collections, that in a certain sense we can well say: We are crushed beneath the laws, obruimur leg'ibus.
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  • On the other hand, we can quite well express the result of dividing 4rd.
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  • But only slight modifications are required to produce the Tornaria larva of the Enteropneusta and other larvae, including the special type that is inferred from the Dipleurula larval stages of recent forms to have characterized the ancestor of the Echinoderms. We cannot enter here into all the details of comparison between these larval forms; amid much that is hypothetical a few homologies are widely accepted, and the preceding account will show the kind of relation that the Echinoderms bear to other animals, including what are now usually regarded as the ancestors of the Chordata (to which back-boned animals belong), as well as the nature of the evidence that their study has been, or may be, made to yield.
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  • The Egyptian inscriptions show that Cambyses officially adopted the titles and the costume of the Pharaohs, although we may very well believe that he did not conceal his contempt for the customs and the religion of the Egyptians.
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  • we have also Malverne and the Monk of Evesham; for the early Lancastrians, Capgrave, Elmham, Otterbourne, Adam of Usk; and for Henry VI., Amundesham, Whethamstede, William of Worcester and John Hardyng, as well as a number of anonymous briefer chronicles, edited, though not in the Rolls series, by J.
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  • We are disposed to agree with the Brazilian historian Constancio that Maranon is derived from the Spanish word marana, a tangle, a snarl, which well represents the bewildering difficulties which the earlier explorers met in navigating not only the entrance to the Amazon, but the whole island-bordered, river-cut and indented coast of the now Brazilian province of Maranhao.
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  • We may further consider the inflections and double tangents, as well in general as in regard to cubic and quartic curves.
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  • - We have in much that precedes disregarded, or at least been indifferent to, reality; it is only thus that the conception of a curve of the m-th order, as one which is met by every right line in in points, is arrived at; and the curve itself, and the line which cuts it, although both are tacitly assumed to be real, may perfectly well be imaginary.
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  • We have thus a means of geometrical representation for the portions, as well imaginary as real, of any real or imaginary curve.
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  • The execution was as excellent as the conception, and if we reflect that it was begun in the midst of that momentous war which raised England to her climax of territorial greatness in East and West, we may easily realize how the task of describing these portentous and far-reaching events would be likely to strengthen Burke's habits of wide and laborious observation, as well as to give him firmness and confidence in the exercise of his own judgment.
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  • In this speech, moreover, and in the only less powerful one of the preceding year upon American taxation, as well as in the Letter to the Sheriffs of Bristol in 1777, we see the all-important truth conspicuously illustrated that half of his eloquence always comes of the thoroughness with which he gets up his case.
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  • But these excuses were mere trifles, and well deserve to be forgiven, when we think that though the offender was in form acquitted, yet Burke succeeded in these fourteen years of laborious effort in laying the foundations once for all of a moral, just, philanthropic and responsible public opinion in England with reference to India, and in doing so performed perhaps the most magnificent service that any statesman has ever had it in his power to render to humanity.
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  • We may take it as well established that St Paul (2 Cor.
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  • 2 We may A well believe that he represents scholastic divinity at its best.
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  • If we are warranted in regarding the Second Person of the Godhead as in very deed " Himself vouchsafing to be made, " that great Becoming cannot well be suspended upon a contingency which might or might not arise; and theologians in general regard the sin of man as such a contingent event.
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  • We have no similar calculation of loss for Great Britain, where wheat is not so much grown, but it is well known that there is a continual, serious depreciation of value in the crops due to parasitic fungi.
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  • We observe that men are classified according to their functions; all kinds of man, and indeed all organs of man, have their special functions, and are judged as functionaries and organs according as they perform their functions well or ill.
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  • May we not then infer that man, as man, has his proper function, and that the well-being or " doing well " that all seek really lies in fulfilling well the proper function of man, - that is, in living well that life of the rational soul which we recognize as man's distinctive attribute ?
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  • Similarly, in the view taken by the Stoics of the duties of social decorum, and in their attitude to the popular religion, we find a fluctuating compromise between the disposition to repudiate what is conventional, and the disposition to revere what is 1 The Stoics seem to have varied in their view of " good repute," eu50 ia; at first, when the school was more under the influence of Cynicism, they professed an outward as well as an inward indifference to it; ultimately they conceded the point to common sense, and included it among rrponyp. va.
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  • Before, however, we take a brief survey of the progress of systematic ethics from Ambrose to Thomas Aquinas, it may be well to examine the chief features of the new moral consciousness that had spread through Graeco-Roman civilization, and was awaiting philosophic synthesis.
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  • The profound horror with which the Christian's conception of a suffering as well as an avenging divinity tended to make him regard all condemnable acts was tinged with a sentiment which we may perhaps describe as a ceremonial aversion moralized - the aversion, that is, to foulness or impurity.
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  • Only in a secondary sense is approval due to certain " abilities and dispositions immediately connected with virtuous affections," as candour, veracity, fortitude, sense of honour; while in a lower grade still are placed sciences and arts, along with even bodily skills and gifts; indeed, the approbation we give to these is not strictly moral, but is referred to the " sense of decency or dignity," which (as well as the sense of honour) is to be distinguished from 1 In a remarkable passage near the close of his eleventh sermon Butler seems even to allow that conscience would have to give way to self-love, if it were possible (which it is not) that the two should come into ultimate and irreconcilable conflict.
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  • Imagining, as we may well do, that the radius of this sphere is infinite - then every direction, whatever the origin, may be represented by a point on its surface.
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  • The changes which the aspect of the heaven undergoes, as we travel North and South, are so well known that they need not be described in detail here; but a general statement of them will give a luminous idea of the geometrical co-ordinates we have described.
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  • Speaking in a general way, we may say that computations pertaining to the orbital revolutions of double stars, as well as the bodies of our solar system, are to a greater or less extent of the classes we have described.
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  • If 1 be the mean longitude of the planet whose motion we are considering, and 1' that of the attracting planet affecting it, the periodic inequalities of the elements as well as of the co-ordinates of the attracted planet, may be represented by an infinite series of terms like the following: a sin (l' - l)+b sin (2l' - l)+c sin (l'- 2l)+&c.
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  • We hear also of one Master Peter, who inscribed and illuminated maps for the infante; the mathematician Pedro Nunes declares that the prince's mariners were well taught and provided with instruments and rules of astronomy and geometry "which all map-makers should know"; Cadamosto tells us that the Portuguese caravels in his day were the best sailing ships afloat; while, from several matters recorded by Henry's biographers, it is clear that he devoted great attention to the study of earlier charts and of any available information he could gain upon the trade-routes of north-west Africa.
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  • Though we cannot with Beza regard Calvin at this time as a centre of Protestant activity, he may well have preached at Lignieres as a reformatory Catholic of the school of Erasmus.
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  • When we are told of the freedom of Aragon, it is well to remember that it was enjoyed only by the small minority who were personally free and also privileged: by the citizens of the towns which had charterscalled in Aragon the Universidadesthe nobles, the gentry and the Church.
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  • In regard to the mares generally, we have a record of the royal mares already alluded to, and likewise of three Turk mares brought over from the siege of Vienna in 1684, as well as of other importations; but it is unquestionable that there was a very large number of native mares in England, improved probably from time to time by racing, however much they may have been crossed at various periods with foreign horses, and that from this original stock were to some extent derived the size and stride which characterized the English race-horse, while his powers of endurance and elegant shape were no doubt inherited from the Eastern horses, most of which were of a low stature, 14 hands or thereabouts.
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  • We append the pedigree of Blair Athol, winner of the Derby and St Leger in 1864, who, when subsequently sold by auction, fetched the then unprecedented sum of 12,000 guineas, as it contains, not only Stockwell (the emperor of stallions, as he has been termed), but Blink Bonny and Eleanor - in which latter animal are combined the blood of Eclipse, Herod, Matchem and Snap, - the mares that won the Derby in 1801 and 1857 respectively, as well as those queens of the stud, Eleanor's greatgranddaughter Pocahontas and Blink Bonny's dam Queen Mary.
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  • We also note the same generous inclusion of the household slaves and of the resident alien as well as the fatherless and widow that characterizes the autumnal festival of "Booths."
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  • Here we must bear in mind that Hebrew numeration always includes the day which is the terminus a quo as well as that which is term.
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  • We are so accustomed to regard Hunyadi as the incarnation of Christian chivalry that we are apt to forget that he was a great captain and a great statesman as well as a great hero.
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  • (2) Self-interest, founded on the love of pleasure and the fear of pain, is the sole spring of judgment, action, affection; self-sacrifice is prompted by the fact that the sensation of pleasure outweighs the accompanying pain; it is thus the result of deliberate calculation; we have no liberty of choice between good and evil; there is no such thing as absolute right - ideas of justice and injustice change according to customs. (3) All intellects are equal; their apparent inequalities do not depend on a more or less perfect organization, but have their cause in the unequal desire for instruction, and this desire springs from passions, of which all men commonly well organized are susceptible to the same degree; and we can, therefore, all love glory with the same enthusiasm and we owe all to education.
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  • Among the lower classes of plants we have scarcely any knowledge of Palaeozoic Bryophyta; Fungi were probably abundant, but their remains give us little information; while, even among the Algae, which are better represented, well characterized specimens are scanty.
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  • Many specimens with structure preserved are known from the Lower Carboniferous, and among them Pteridosperms (Heterangium, Calamopitys, Cladoxylon, Protopitys) are well represented, if we may judge by the anatomical characters.
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  • 6), recorded from several European localities, as well as from North America, Japan, China, Australia, India and Persia, affords an instance of a common type of bipinnate frond similar to Todites Williamsoni, which has been included in the Polypodiaceae; but such meagre evidence of the soral characters as we possess also points to a comparison with the recent fern Todea barbara.
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  • In fact, not a single Dicotyledon is common to these two closely allied divisions of the Cretaceous series; a circumstance not easy to explain, when we see how well the oaks and figs are represented in each.
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  • As a result of his researches on the anomodont reptiles and the Stegocephalia (4), as the extinct order that includes the well known labyrinthodonts is now called, we have had the proposal by H.
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  • As a group, we were well satisfied with our two day results but we knew we'd just begun exploring this bizarre happening.
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  • I plan well what I will say when we are together, but dread of so burdening this dear and gentle man with the troubled future before us causes me to only hold him close and retain my silence.
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  • We had two teams operational able to conduct a mission requiring well over a dozen teams and no supplies.
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  • His room was on the far side—away from the bed, so we couldn't hear as well as the other.
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  • Parkside was no safer than the worst of the worst—we might as well be living in Philadelphia, or, God forbid, The Big Apple!
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  • We're closest, I guess — and she's my friend — as well as yours.
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  • This is –" "Great, well we'll be about half an hour early.
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  • We're able to simultaneously show the benefits of the product as well as to improve perception of the brand.
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  • When we suffer from bodily pain there is bound to be mental affliction as well.
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  • Victims and complainants we treat very well but (and particularly with ETs) we never had any aftercare.
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  • We are looking for dynamic, well qualified applicants with healthcare experience and working knowledge of the NHS.
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  • And the fact that it was very comfortable, and that we were looked after extremely well by these two spinster aunts.
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  • Puna Ibises and Andean Gulls are often present in large numbers and with luck we'll see Andean avocet as well.
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  • We've grown basil from seed and its strident taste goes well with a tomato salad.
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  • We carry a wide variety of baby crib bedding and crib sets available from well known manufacturers that you are familiar with.
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  • Jo was not feeling at all well and as we climbed up the pass he became progressively worse and his eyes became very bloodshot.
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  • As a team we had a feeling both Hungary and Belgium were feeding bloodworm at the start as well as joker.
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  • If we meet I may be so bold as to ask for advice in person if all is not going well.
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  • We may well hear more about this case, but if Debenhams do eventually lose it will at least make the bookkeeping easier.
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  • The Church knew as well as we do that in our era the alternative to Fascism is revolutionary Communism, and not bourgeois democracy.
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  • All went well until we hit the problem of how to retract the bowsprit.
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  • Common language speaks the truth as to this: we say, a person is well bred.
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  • We deal with National organizations as well as regional and independent brokerages and general and commercial legal practices.
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  • Ah little brook you'll miss us right well we know.
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  • At 11am and 1pm we crack the bubbly for midnight back in NZ and Oz, then party on well into the afternoon.
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  • We saw many more bullfinches as well as at least three Grenada Flycatchers and another Bare-eyed Thrush.
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  • All junior cadets are well up to proficiency standard and we can expect good results in the coming examination early next term.
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  • We recommend that you keep accurate corporate records to protect your corporate veil, and make sure you have adequate capitalization as well.
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  • We are looking for an experienced cashier to work at a very well established, large retail outlet.
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  • At Sister Ray we offer quality limited edition signed as well as limited edition signed, and limited edition cd.
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  • So well fed and watered we headed off to spot some more cetaceans with Susie's warnings ringing in our ears.
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  • At psychic reading we offer psychic tarot readings online or by post as well as a number of other card systems and pure clairvoyance.
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  • We had to brave the cold to see this but it was well worth it.
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  • MAC: Yeah, well the first night we toured in '84, we played Verona [Italy] in this huge Coliseum.
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  • We provide our business partners with personal support as well as product data sheets, product photographs and sales collateral.
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  • We cannot so well lay forth our hearts with such largeness and comfort in our own concernments before others.
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  • Around the shore we found Tawny Pipit and Rufous-tailed Lark as well as a quite confiding Southern Gray Shrike.
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  • We become contemptuous of other believers who we decide are not " walking the talk " as well as we think we are.
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  • We offer an excellent continental breakfast in the well equiped and well presented dining/kitchen room.
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  • It would have done so financially as well until local councellors convinced social services that we had bankrupted ourselves doing their job for them.
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  • Here we found meadow and bloody cranesbill, creeping jenny and rock stonecrop, as well as hoary plantain in flower.
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  • We encourage composting and alternatives to herbicides and pesticides and are looking for habitat creation as well as variety of plants present.
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  • The roadside flowers were attractive and we saw our first Cretan cyclamen as well as Giant and Yellow Bee orchids.
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  • We have definite May Ball performances lined up, and are looking to play other gigs around Cambridge as well.
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  • As well as creative love, we see destructive, grasping selfishness.
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  • We offer a unique experience visually as well as musically with special costumes to suit the era such as 70's disco.
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  • I mean really, if you're not going to use ANY common sense we might as well dunk you in the straight away!
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  • But we did see a young elk as well as reindeer and roe deer.
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  • Without the society's constant encouragement we might well have given up.
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  • We have long experience of SOCRATES exchange students from other member countries of the European Union, as well as ISEP exchange students from other member countries of the European Union, as well as ISEP exchange students.
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  • gee what a life, but funnily enough we all felt fit and looked well.
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  • South through Tanzania, our route takes us through Mikumi National Park where we may well see giraffe or elephant grazing along the roadside.
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  • Now we can understand well the gist of the parable.
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  • The materials we use are very glitzy, responds very well to lighting and hence compliments erotic photography.
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  • We may well be absolutely gob smacked once the figures for SRB funding in Northwood are released.
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  • We have a grand piano, recital and practice facilities, as well as the use of the Theater.
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  • We went to view the phalanx in action as well as seeing the 20mm gun in action.
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  • On April 23rd we had a hailstorm with what may well be the biggest hailstones I have ever seen.
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  • I'm ticking along quite well now apart from the occasional hiccup which we all have from time to time.
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  • We inspected Colins observation hive which was doing well with a clearly marked queen.
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  • We have also had the children treated constitutionally by a classical homeopath to enhance their well being.
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  • horrifyess to say we were horrified to see our favorite cafe was closed, ah well the pub opposite was open.
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  • huntsman the HoC go for a complete ban we could well see huntsmen from England traveling across the border.
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  • Puna ibises and Andean Gulls are often present in large numbers and with luck we'll see Andean Avocet as well.
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  • It all probably sounds quite idyllic, well it is, that's why we live here.
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  • As well as the birds we saw green iguanas, black-tailed iguanas, Jesus Christ lizards, American crocodiles and howler monkeys.
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  • We'll change income tax to help the less well off and we'll ask the very wealthy to contribute more.
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  • infomercial products come from the U.S. but then again we export our talents as well.
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  • As a result of these processes we may well see areas of land inundated by the sea.
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  • We were all of us well inured to the way they were apt to quarrel.
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  • We have developed a subgraph isomorphism algorithm for ordered graphs, which performs well on the TOPS descriptions of protein structure.
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  • Our flight was delayed and we reached Porto Sani well past midnight, rather jaded.
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  • jolly well rope a bit off next time, to make sure we get a match at all.
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  • kit muster for the troop which we all passed - well done troop!
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  • lascivious grace, in whom all ill well shows, Kill me with spites, yet we must not be foes.
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  • We are well aware of the multi-page tomes, written in dense legalese, which many people associate with the writing of wills.
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  • We have had a lot of success in breeding other lemur species and hope that the Red-fronted lemurs will also breed well at Colchester.
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  • We have had a lot of success in breeding other lemur species and hope that the Red-fronted lemur species and hope that the Red-fronted lemurs will also breed well at Colchester.
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  • We mourn the loss not only of a good soldier, but of a good comrade as well.
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  • At Boomerang Group we offer quality search engine ranking lye as well as search engine ranking lye, and search engine ranking dudley.
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  • We also performed madrigals in the gardens of Mottisfont Abbey last year, as well as singing Evensong at Romsey Abbey.
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  • We are also well situated, if you wish to visit the Welsh mainland.
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  • The foreign character of the weights here is then well maintained by the larger number we have now got.
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  • We would suggest serving mead lightly chilled and whilst mead keeps well it should be kept cool and closed to reduce oxidation.
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  • We also provide specialist medical advice and clinical support to hospitals, as well as educating and training transfusion medicine specialists.
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  • We provide commercial units to let west midlands to let as well as commercial units to let to rent west midlands and commercial property.
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  • At the plow we offer quality rooms east midlands hotel accomodation as well as east midlands hotel accomodation, and east midlands hotel.
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  • We descended to the first mirador and shortly below it took a track left which headed toward a well wooded stream.
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  • All well tired we retired and awaited the morrow.
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  • We recommend warm salty mouthwashes 3 - 4 times a day, as well as normal tooth brushing.
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  • Wednesday Wednesday saw the first kit muster for the troop which we all passed - well done troop!
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  • For this we are using molecular modeling to investigate docking of the novel compounds, as well as conventional mutagenesis and expression techniques.
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  • And yet, surrounded by the false mystique of technical devices, we readily yield up all possibility of doing it well.
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  • nascent engaged Buddhist movement may well be just the amalgam we now need.
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  • We offer natal, compatibility and transit reports, as well as birth and aspect charts.
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  • I honestly believe if Dirty Frank had n't nobbled him at New Year we would be well clear of Everton now.
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  • More controversial, and not likely to be fully acceptable, was the hope that maybe we could standardize nomenclature as well.
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  • We work mostly with nucleic acids here, incorporating modified nucleosides into linear as well as small circular DNA/RNA chains.
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  • All the bowlers were unlucky and we were hampered in the field due to a wet outfield and an injury as well.
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  • So we are treating more new outpatients as well as cutting waiting lists.
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  • We do not track what individual users read, but instead how well each page or content area performs overall.
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  • In fact I'd rather we'd had the white panties, but I don't think it would have carried quite as well.
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  • For pudding we had poached pear in white wine and cinnamon and a banana parfait - both classic well prepared and attractively presented.
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  • passed the ball around well, moved around well and really competed when we had to.
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  • Such ' sense ' technologies may well become more pervasive in the future, helping to augment the world in which we live.
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  • We welcome well behaved pets, free of charge.
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  • We then pillage what really should be private, in order to finance the common weal.
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  • All the resorts we feature have well equipped and staffed polyclinics and hospitals.
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  • We're in the process of adding some vector primitives to address the needs of CAD users, as well.
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  • Now, of course we have disposable pull-ups that do get wet well that's a success for real diaper campaigners.
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  • puna ibises and Andean Gulls are often present in large numbers and with luck we'll see Andean Avocet as well.
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  • We had a pumpkin carving competition and grand raffle, as well as hot dogs and toffee apples to eat.
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  • Using self-cultivation we ultimately reap the harvest of a well refined character.
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  • We review the Jesus Myth web sites as well as those who have taken the trouble to provide a rebuttal.
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  • We do not have a relatives room but do have recliners to use as well.
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  • reflected on the fact that we're very well served in the Diocese by our Local Radio Stations.
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  • As well as traditional graves we have a garden of remembrance memorial garden where ashes may be buried under standard roses.
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  • In finding this, we advised the client to install a new fan with a symmetrical, well balanced rotor.
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  • In the final quarter we batted well with Victoria, Emily and Jenna scoring rounders.
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  • run-down of the above menu 's Match Photos yes, we do play matches as well!
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  • And here in the book of Revelation we are told right there in verse 4 that tribulation saints will reign as well.
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  • This name fits well with Caledonian as a Scots word and we already have an ermine saltire on our University crest.
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  • The deeply sad opening to the second movement was so well sculpted we would have liked to hear more.
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  • If we see the selenites we will hide from them as well as we can.
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  • All went well until we saw a sentry on the road.
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  • We stopped at a well and met two Belgians, Axel and Anne, and their old sheepdog.
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  • We provide Nevis ready-made companies and off-the shelf companies as well as a " Name of your choice " service.
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  • They treated us very well with what they had, because as I have said coming off a sunken ship we had nothing.
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  • We started the second half well and after 10 minutes Craig Trimble hit a snap shot which flew into the top corner.
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  • We must create that siege mentality once more, which served United so well during the club's dominance in the 90's.
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  • I will play them so we can have a singalong, provided that we sing new songs as well.
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  • Kryten: Well either we're under attack sir, or we're having a disco.
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  • All well and good you might think but how can we work with that overpowering paint smell?
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  • We arrived into Montreal during a heavy snowstorm which persisted for well over a day.
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  • We have got a good stand-in captain, he has done well.
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  • On we went to the third climb I had this well sussed in advance.
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  • She added: " It is so rare we find something that is so tactile as well.
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  • We've bought some really terrific players over the years who have done really well for us.
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  • We had them in a right tizzy, which makes me think it is well worth a return visit.
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  • In mammals we make use of RNAi techniques as well as in vitro transcription analysis.
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  • We work closely with the National union of Students and the lecturers ' unions as well as other bodies relevant to postgraduate education.
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  • It's a mundane, but vital thing, because if we leave the room untidy, we might well lose our venue.
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  • As we would put it in our contemporary vernacular, you might as well talk to the wall.
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  • We greet the Canadian working class and people with whom for thirty years and more we have shared weal and woe.
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  • We'll also be on the lookout for fin, sperm, humpback and sei whales as well as several other seal species.
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  • But as late as the 9th and 10th centuries the alba is still an everyday as well as a liturgical garment, and we find bishops and synods forbidding priests to sing mass in the alba worn by them in ordinary life (see Braun, p. 62).
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  • Roughness of construction cannot be regarded as a proof of antiquity, inasmuch as in some cases we find the additions less well built than the original nuraghe; and it is often clear from the careful work at points where it was necessary that the lack of finer construction was often simply economy of labour.
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  • "But yet as it is best, if we wish to understand the nature of plants or of men, to consider how they may by degrees proceed from seeds, rather than how they were created by God in the beginning of the world, so, if we can excogitate some extremely simple and comprehensible principles, out of which, as if they were seeds, we can prove that stars, and earth and all this visible scene could have originated, although we know full well that they never did originate in such a way, we shall in that way expound their nature far better than if we merely described them as they exist at present."
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  • The author died 1672, and left the book unfinished; but the language of the title occurs in the first sentence; so it is undoubtedly Wilkins's, as well as sanctioned by his editor and connexion through marriage, Tillotson, afterwards the archbishop. We meet with " Natural Religion " again in Samuel Clarke's works, and notably in Bishop Joseph Butler's Analogy (1736).
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  • Accordingly, even in a hurried survey of the history of theism, we must try to question the systems we are reviewing upon their attitude towards human freedom and immortality, as well as upon their doctrine of God.
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  • Later travellers repeat the stories, too well founded, of the ferocious hostility of the people; of whom we may instance Cesare Federici (1569), whose narrative is given in Ramusio, vol.
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  • Polycycly was derived independently from monocycly in solenostelic and in dictyostelic forms. In the formation of the stem of any fern characterized in the adult condition by one of the more advanced types of vascular structure all stages of increase in complexity from the haplostele of the first-formed stem to the particular condition characteristic of the adult stem are gradually passed through by a series of changes exactly parallel with those which we are led to suppose, from the evidence obtained by a comparison of the adult forms, must have taken place in the evolution of the race, There is no more striking case in the plantkingdom of the parallel between ontogeny (development of the individual) and phylogeny (development of the race) so well known in many groups of animals.
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  • In the lowly as well as the higher green plants we have evidence of special~ ization of the external protoplasts for the same purpose, which takes various shapes and shows different degrees of completeness, culminating in the elaborate barks which clothe our forest trees.
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  • Instances of what we may term tolerated parasitism, where the host plant seems to accommodate itself very well to the presence of the Fungus, paying the tax it extorts and nevertheless not succumbing but managing to provide itself with sufficient material to go on with, are not rare; and these seem to lead to those cases where the mutual accommodation between host and guest has been carried so far that each derives some benefit from the associationsymbiosis (see FUNGI).
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  • In primitive cults the distinction between sacred and unclean is far from complete or well defined (see Taboo); consequently we find two types of cathartic sacrifice - (i.) one to cleanse of impurity and make fit for common use, (ii.) the other to rid of sanctity and in like manner render suitable for human use or intercourse.
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  • We also know that between 2000 and 1400 E.C. the Babylonian language as well as Babylonian civilization and ideas spread over Palestine (as the Tell el Amarna tables clearly testify).
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  • Equally well we may derive it from methane by replacing a hydrogen atom by the monovalent group CH 2 CH 31 named ethyl; hence propane may be considered as " ethylmethane."
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  • After even the finest things in Tannhauser, the Vorspiel to Lohengrin comes as a revelation, with its quiet solemnity and breadth of design, its ethereal purity of tone-colour, and its complete emancipation from earlier operatic forms. The suspense and climax in the first act is so intense, and the whole drama is so well designed, that we must have a very vivid idea of the later Wagner before we can see how far the quality of musical thought still falls short of his ideals.
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  • Besides the celebrated school of the Palace, where Alcuin had among his hearers the members of the imperial family and the dignitaries of the empire as well as talented youths of humbler origin, we hear of the episcopal schools of Lyons, Orleans and St Denis, the cloister schools of St Martin of Tours, of Fulda, Corbie, Fontenelle and many others, besides the older monasteries of St Gall and Reichenau.
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  • Schefer, Paris), a theoretical description of his religious and philosophical principles; and we can very well dismiss the rest as being probably just as apocryphal as Nasir's famous autobiography (found in several Persian tadhkiras or biographies of poets), a mere forgery of the most extravagant description, which is mainly responsible for the confusion in names and dates in older accounts of our author.
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  • 1 The Assyrian records, as well as the Egyptian, distinguish many peoples in both areas from the Kheta-Khatti; and the most we can infer from these records is that there was an occasional league formed under the Hittites, not any imperial subjection or even a continuous federation.
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  • The language in this and the following section is highly figurative; but as Porter has well remarked: "Figurative language is the only language in which we can express our hope of heaven, and no figures can have greater power to suggest this hope than those taken from the literal longings of exiled Israel for the recovery of its land and city."
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  • We now appreciate too thoroughly the intricacy of the medieval Church; its vast range of activity, secular as well as religious; the inextricable interweaving of the civil and ecclesiastical governments; the slow and painful process of their divorce as the old ideas of the proper functions of the two institutions have changed in both Protestant and Catholic lands: we perceive all too clearly the limitations of the reformers, their distrust of reason and criticism - in short, we know too much about medieval institutions and the process of their disintegration longer to see in the Reformation an abrupt break in the general history of Europe.
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  • and his companions undertook to defend the following propositions: (1) That the Holy Christian Church, of which Christ is the only Head, is born of the Word of God, abides therein, and does not listen to the voice of a stranger; (2) that this Church imposes no laws on the conscience of people without the sanction of the Word of God, and that the laws of the Church are binding only in so far as they agree with the Word; (3) that Christ alone is our righteousness and our salvation, and that to trust to any other merit or satisfaction is to deny Him; (4) that it cannot be proved from the Holy Scripture that the body and blood of Christ are corporeally present in the bread and in the wine of the Lord's Supper; (5) that the mass, in which Christ is offered to God the Father for the sins of the living and of the dead, is contrary to Scripture and a gross affront to the sacrifice and death of the Saviour; (6) that we should not pray to dead mediators and intercessors, but to Jesus Christ alone; (7) that there is no trace of purgatory in Scripture; (8) that to set up pictures and to adore them is also contrary to Scripture, and that images and pictures ought to be destroyed where there is danger of giving them adoration; (9) that marriage is lawful to all, to the clergy as well as to the laity; (I o) that shameful living is more disgraceful among the clergy than among the laity.
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  • As Longomontanus is mentioned in Anthony Wood's anecdote, and as Wittich as well as Longomontanus were assistants of Tycho, we may infer that Wittich's prosthaphaeresis is the method referred to by Wood.
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  • As an example of mispunctuation we may take Shelley's Triumph of Life, 188 sqq., "` If thou can'st, forbear To join the dance, which I had well forborne ' Said the grim Feature of my thought ` Aware I I will unfold,'" &c., for "said the grim Feature (of my thought aware) ` I will unfold.'" Grammatical Assimilations.
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  • There we must figure to ourselves the philosopher, constantly referring to his autograph rolls; entering references and cross-references; correcting, rewriting, collecting and arranging them according to their subjects; showing as well as reading them to his pupils; with little thought of publication, but with his whole soul concentrated on being and truth.
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  • With Tamias (sometimes split into Tamias and Eutamias) we reach the North American striped groundsquirrels, or chipmunks, well characterized by the large internal cheek-pouches, with one outlying species in Northern Asia and Europe (see GROUND-Squirrel).
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  • We can only conjecture that the lost book i., as well as book ii., was concerned with arithmetic, book iii.
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  • If we consider how Philo, while remaining a devout Jew in religion, yet managed to assimilate the whole Stoic philosophy, we can well believe that the Essenes might have been influenced, as Zeller maintained that they were, by Neo-Pythagoreanism.
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  • The phenomenon absolutely corresponds to that of fusion and solidification, only that it generally takes place less quickly; consequently we may have prismatic sulphur at ordinary temperature for some time, as well as rhombic sulphur at loo°.
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  • We in ye no chronological points by which to fix the date when Zend 01 ased to be a living language; no part of the Avesta can well be re~ tt later than the 5th or 4th century B.C. Before Alexanders ~r Ire it is said to have been already written out on dressed cowhides d preserved in the state archives at Persepolis.
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  • To Henrique Lopes de Men - donga, scholar, critic and poet, we owe some strong historical plays as well as the piece written with Lobato, which made a big hit.
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  • On the whole, then (though degeneracy, as well as progress, is a force in human evolution), we are not tempted to believe in so strange a combination of forgetfulness with long memory, nor so excessive a degeneration from common sense into a belief in the personality of phenomena, as are required no less by Spencer's system than by that of Max Muller.
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  • to about 3000 B.C. In Babylonia as well as in Assyria as a direct offshoot of Babylonian culture (or as we might also term it "Euphratean" culture), astrology takes its place in the official cult as one of the two chief means at the disposal of the priests (who were called bare or "inspectors") for ascertaining the will and intention of the gods, the other being through the inspection of the liver of the sacrificial animal (see Omen).
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  • We've been in the dark quite a while, and you may as well explain what has happened.
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  • "He was well and happy when we left Italy," they answered.
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  • We are already well on our way.
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  • The arrival of these texts—as well as Byzantium's own architecture, science, and art—triggered a sensory and intellectual explosion, which became the cultural movement we now call the Renaissance.
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  • And he used his decades of dominance on the national scene, as well as his fantastic oratorical ability, to advance that belief and essentially invent the Democratic Party we know today.
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  • At the same time, the percent of income we individually have to spend on feeding ourselves plummeted as well.
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  • This dairyman also makes some of the milk into cheese and we use a lot of that as well.
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  • They may not bump into them very often in what we call "everyday life" but do know them well enough to friend them.
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  • In a word, while such friends are near us we feel that all is well.
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  • I read her lips almost exclusively, (she does not know the manual alphabet) and we get on quite well.
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  • But, in spite of all their wild efforts, neither side was scored, and we all laughed and said, "Oh, well now the pot can't call the kettle black!"...
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  • Miss Keller does not as a rule read very fast, but she reads deliberately, not so much because she feels the words less quickly than we see then, as because it is one of her habits of mind to do things thoroughly and well.
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  • If, then, we would indeed restore mankind by truly Indian, botanic, magnetic, or natural means, let us first be as simple and well as Nature ourselves, dispel the clouds which hang over our own brows, and take up a little life into our pores.
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  • We might as well omit to study Nature because she is old.
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  • Next to us is not the workman whom we have hired, with whom we love so well to talk, but the workman whose work we are.
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  • Once in a while we sat together on the pond, he at one end of the boat, and I at the other; but not many words passed between us, for he had grown deaf in his later years, but he occasionally hummed a psalm, which harmonized well enough with my philosophy.
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  • Having each some shingles of thought well dried, we sat and whittled them, trying our knives, and admiring the clear yellowish grain of the pumpkin pine.
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  • No face which we can give to a matter will stead us so well at last as the truth.
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  • "We may as well go back," said the son in French.
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  • I shall have my own orchestra, but shouldn't we get the gypsy singers as well?
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  • We'll manage very well without a doctor.
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  • It's well that the charitable Prussian ladies send us two pounds of coffee and some lint each month or we should be lost! he laughed.
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  • If our army is well organized and strong and has withdrawn to Drissa without suffering any defeats, we owe this entirely to Barclay.
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  • We had a well-to-do homestead, plenty of land, we peasants lived well and our house was one to thank God for.
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  • Now, of course we have disposable pull-ups that do get wet well that 's a success for real diaper campaigners.
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  • Morgan also offers some solid strategies to get and maintain rapport and she explains the " We Space " concept quite well.
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  • I also reflected on the fact that we 're very well served in the Diocese by our Local Radio Stations.
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  • We accept well behaved dogs by prior arrangement in designated " doggy friendly " bedrooms and the residents lounge.
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  • Quick run-down of the above menu 's Match Photos yes, we do play matches as well !
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  • And here in the book of Revelation we are told right there in verse 4 that Tribulation saints will reign as well.
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  • This name fits well with Caledonian as a Scots word and we already have an ermine Saltire on our University crest.
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  • If we see the Selenites we will hide from them as well as we can.
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  • We might as well have been Albanian sheet metal workers for all we knew about making a record.
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  • We provide contacts for welfare, research and careers as well as helping to keep shipmates in touch with one another.
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  • We must create that siege mentality once more, which served United so well during the club 's dominance in the 90's.
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  • We have an increasing problem with the significations of the houses as well.
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  • Kryten: Well either we 're under attack sir, or we 're having a disco.
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  • To tackle this we would propose an increase in the number of Procurators Fiscal as well as weekend and evening sittings of courts.
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  • JL: Err, well we 're best known for our strong stance on immigration.
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  • Over the years we have achieved a total return on stockholders ' funds well in excess of the annual cost of this new borrowing.
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  • She added: It is so rare we find something that is so tactile as well.
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  • We have run a number of special training taster sessions at the Resource Center in King Square House which have been well attended.
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  • We 've bought some really terrific players over the years who have done really well for us.
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  • Suddenly, we received well aimed fire from a thicket of trees.
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  • We have well matured financial and securities market and time-tested judicial systems.
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  • As we stood outside the hotel a Bat Falcon flew past and we saw all three toucan species very well.
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  • As well as the normal set of kit for racing and training we were given tracksuit jackets and trousers to wear to races.
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  • We work closely with the National Union of Students and the lecturers ' unions as well as other bodies relevant to postgraduate education.
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  • It 's a mundane, but vital thing, because if we leave the room untidy, we might well lose our venue.
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  • However, we think the problem may be that each well is not being sealed separately which is impeding proper vapor diffusion.
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  • We present a new, wavelet based analysis method using Ulysses polar magnetic field data, which is particularly well suited to this work.
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  • We've compiled a list of tips on choosing a pre-school as well as hints for how to make those first few days of school easier for your baby and you.
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  • We took her to a vet that flushed out her nasal passage, as well as did a scoping to look for nasal polyps but none were found.
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  • With that single bulb replacement we would save enough energy to light two to three million homes for one year, as well as saving about $600,000.00 in energy costs.
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  • It is imperative that we strive to consume less, as well as more wisely.
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  • With the current rate of burning down trees in the rain forests as well as other instances of deforestation worldwide, we're seeing an overall increase in airborne carbon dioxide.
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  • Every step counts, however small, and therefore there are plenty of ways that we as individuals as well as large corporations can reduce our impact on the environment.
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  • This means that as well as reducing waste, we are also saving on the energy and materials required to make these items.
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  • OA: Whenever we can, we try and use eco-friendly materials as well as to implement recycling throughout our company.
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