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waterways

waterways Sentence Examples

  • in height; low hills are found in the north-western province of Chau-Doc. Cochin-China is remarkable for the abundance of its waterways.

  • The waterways of Cochin-China communicate by means of natural or artificial channels (arroyos), facilitating transport and aiding in the uniform distribution of the inundation to which the country owes its fertility.

  • Favoured by its proximity to two great waterways and by its two ports, Nisaea on the Saronic and Pegae on the Corinthian Gulf, Megara took a prominent part in the commercial expansion of Greece from the 8th century onwards, and for two hundred years enjoyed prosperity out of proportion to the slight resources of its narrow territory.

  • Sueca has a thriving trade in grain and fruit from the Jucar valley, which is irrigated by waterways created by the Moors.

  • The region of the Red River and Assiniboine valleys was opened up by the fur traders, who came by the waterways from Lake Superior, and afterwards by the water communication with Hudson Bay.

  • Waterways.1The waterways of France, 7543 m.

  • The canal and river system attains its greatest utility in the north, northeast and north-centre of the country; traffic is thickest along the Seine below Paris; along the rivers and small canals of the rich departments of Nord and Pas-de-Calais and along the Oise and the canal of St Quentin whereby they communicate with Paris; along the canal from the Marne to the Rhine and the succession of waterways which unite it with the Oise; along the Canal de lEst (departments of Meuse and Ardennes); and along the waterways uniting Paris with the Sane at Chalon (Seine, Canal du Loing, Canal de Briare, Lateral canal of the Loire and Canal du Centre) and along the Sane between Chalon and Lyons.

  • The "Marble Arch" cave near Florencecourt, with its emerging river, is a characteristic example of the subterranean waterways in the limestone.

  • Russian craft play, however, a much more important part on the internal waterways, the traffic on which increases rapidly, e.g.

  • There are no navigable waterways, and the railway mileage is small.

  • From Bristol downward the river is one of the most important commercial waterways in England, as giving access to that great port.

  • One of the first great public improvements made within the state was the connexion of these waterways by two canals - the Ohio & Erie Canal from Cleveland to Portsmouth, and the Miami & Erie Canal from Toledo to Cincinnati.

  • Kerosene is transported in bulk by various means; specially constructed steel tank barges are used on the waterways of the United States, tank-cars on the railroads, and tank-wagons on the roads.

  • 1 Report of Deep Waterways Commission (1896).

  • The improvement of waterways in the interior of the empire was not neglected, the Babylonian canal system was repaired, the obstructions in the Tigris removed.

  • It is served by the railways of the Western and the Orleans Companies and by those of the state, but it has no navigable waterways.

  • The problem of inland waterways has always been a most important one in northern, eastern and southern Louisiana, where there are systems of improved bayous, lakes and canals which, with the levees, make this region something like Holland, on a greater scale.

  • of these waterways of decided commercial importance.

  • At this point also the two rivers are connected by a canal, the northernmost of a series of canals which formerly united the two great waterways, and at the same time irrigated the intervening plain.

  • They are constructed not only as navigable waterways, but also to relieve the rivers from periodical overflow, and to drain the marshy districts.

  • In 1907 the length of the navigable waterways of Hungary was 3200 m., of which 2450 m.

  • The Rhine has been one of the chief waterways of Europe from the earliest times; and, as its channel is not exposed to the danger of silting up like those of the Elbe and the Oder, it has always been comparatively easy to keep it open.

  • He was shortly assigned to a territorial command on the Mississippi, and first won distinction by his energy in seizing, on his own responsibility, the important point of Paducah, Kentucky, situated at the confluence of the two great waterways of the Tennessee and the Ohio (6th Sept.

  • The nation does not seem to have appreciated the deficiencies of the syndicates service, supplemented as it was by a network of waterways which greatly increased the facilities for transport.

  • The harbour is connected by canals with the river Aa and the navigable waterways of the department.

  • The waterways which traverse and surround it and the character of its numerous gabled medieval houses give it the appearance of an old Dutch, rather than of a German, town.

  • of navigable waterways.

  • The inland waterways include the 25 ft.

  • Other important waterways which have been authorized by the United States government and on which work was proceeding in 1910 are canals from the Rio Grande river to the Mississippi river at Donaldsonville, Louisiana; and "a navigable channel depth of 5 ft.

  • Congressional appropriations for the survey, improvement and maintenance of waterways began in 1852; amounted to $15,055,688 between 1891 and 1896 inclusive, and $1,613,829 between 1897 and 1907; the total appropriated being $23,249,419.

  • The Spaniards, with monstrous fatuity, refused to make use of the superb waterways provided by the Parana and Paraguay, and endeavoured to stifle all trade.

  • A system of waterways (the Geeste and Hadelner canals, meeting one another at Bederkesa) connects the estuary of the Weser with that of the Elbe; a canal between the Hunte and the Leda gives connexion with the Ems. On the upper Weser (above Bremen) the navigation, which is interrupted by occasional rapids, is assisted by locks and weirs.

  • Washington's many waterways, both fresh and salt, and especially those which indent or are near the coast, make the fisheries resources of great value.

  • - Bridges (old forms, brig, brygge, brudge; Dutch, brug; German, Briicke; a common Teutonic word) are structures carrying roadways, waterways or railways across streams, valleys or other roads or railways, leaving a passage way below.

  • Long bridges of several spans are often termed " viaducts," and bridges carrying canals are termed " aqueducts," though this term is sometimes used for waterways which have no bridge structure.

  • After the Tauern railway had been built for the Alpine countries - without, it is true, any particular pecuniary help from the Polish part of the empire, which was known to be only passively interested - the Poles demanded a complete carrying into effect and extension of the waterways law, with a larger State subsidy.

  • It was over these demands in connexion with the waterways, which the Minister of Finance declared to be impossible of fulfilment to the extent required by the Poles, that Bienerth's mainstay failed to support him; and on Dec. 12 he sent in his resignation, which was, however, followed by a renewed Bienerth Ministry, composed of Germans, Poles and officials.

  • His programme was to be an honourable mediator in the German-Bohemian quarrel, to extend the railway system, and to satisfy the wishes of the Poles in the waterways question by an expenditure of 73.4 million kronen on canal construction in Galicia, to which Galicia was to contribute only 9.4 million kronen, the State finding the other 64, and by an expenditure of 125 millions on river improvements, 99 of which would be contributed by the State.

  • A great economic and social programme 'was announced, including the extension of waterways, the exploitation of electricity, an improved system of communication, industrial insurance, and a department for public health.

  • As a wholly inland nation, Czechoslovakia has to rely in the matter of transport upon its railways and its waterways, notably the Elbe, which connects the republic with Hamburg and the North Sea, and the Danube, which unites it with the east of Europe and the Balkans.

  • Many weeks passed without any success to the Union arms. Vicksburg and its long line of fortifications stood on high bluffs, all else was swampy lowland and intricate waterways.

  • In the north, the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the intricately branching waterways of Puget Sound between the Cascade and the Olympic ranges occupy trough-like depressions which were filled by extensive glaciers in Pleistocene times; and thus mark the beginning of the great stretch of forded coast which extends northward to Alaska.

  • rhe waterways here afford excellent harbours.

  • More than $250,000,000 has been spent by the national government for the improvement of waterways, yet no general system exists, and a large part of this enormous sum has been wasted on unimportant or impossible projects, especially in recent decades, since the river navigation has been a declining interest.

  • Of recent years there has been a great revival of interest in the improvement of inland waterways upon systematic plans, which promises better than an earlier period of internal improvements in the first half of the 19th century, the results of which were more or less disastrous for the state and local governments that undertook them, and only less so for the national government.

  • Coal, iron ore, building materials, lumber, livestock, cotton, fruits, vegetables, tobacco and grain are the great items in the domestic commerce of the country, upon its railways, inland waterways, and in the coasting trade.

  • Of this total 42.6% was moved on the Great Lakes, and 36~8% on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts and waterways.

  • All of these rivers are waterways of some importance in their lower course, and are navigated by powerful stern-wheel boats supplying the posts and mining camps of the interior with their requirements.

  • Most of the mining development is in southern British Columbia, where a network of railways and waterways gives easy access; but as means of communication improve to the north a similar development may be looked for there.

  • Despite the increase in railway facilities, the waterways remain important factors in the transportation of the country.

  • The canal system of Canada, linking together the great natural waterways, is also of much present and prospective importance in cheapening the transportation of agricultural produce.

  • The neutralization of territory belonging to states which are not otherwise neutralized includes the neutralization of waterways such as the Suez and Panama canals.

  • Of waterways, international rivers have been the chief subject of neutralization.

  • On the other hand neutralization has made progress in respect of waterways, 1 Under the treaty of the 29th of March 1864, the courts of Great Britain, France and Russia in their character of guaranteeing powers of Greece declared with the assent of the courts of Austria and Prussia that the islands of Corfu and Paxo as well as their dependencies should, after their union to the Hellenic'kingdom, enjoy the advantages of perpetual neutrality, and the king of the Hellenes undertook on his part to maintain such neutrality- (Art.

  • In 1817, at the instance of John Quincy Adams, the United States and Great Britain entered into a compact whereby the Great Lakes, and the waterways from them to the ocean by the St Lawrence river, which divide the United States from the Dominion of Canada, were practically excluded from any possible hostilities.

  • He next investigated the sources of the Sutlej, made hydrographic investigations of the Manasarowar lakes, with the neighbouring underground waterways, and proceeded thence to Gartok.

  • The water-tube type, with multiple waterways, consists of a number of separate tubes j oined together in various ways.

  • As waterways all the rivers labour under the drawbacks of rapids, mud-banks at their mouths, banks overgrown with forest, sparse population, and currents liable to serious variations due to irregularity of supply from the mountains and sudden rainfalls.

  • The rivers, like those already characterized, and for the same reason, are not available as waterways.

  • From Gorinchem the New Merwede (constructed in the second half of the 19th century) extends between dykes through the marshes of the Biesbosch to the Hollandsch Diep. These great rivers render very important service as waterways.

  • Again, a totally different character belongs to the canals in North Brabant, and the east and north-east of Holland where, in the absence of great rivers, they form the only waterways which render possible the drainage of the fens and the export of peat; and unite the lesser streams with each other.

  • Doughty (London, 1887); On Dutch Waterways, by G.

  • That portion of Flanders which skirts the south bank of the Scheldt thus passed into the possession of the States, and with it the complete control of all the waterways to the sea.

  • The numerous affluents of these rivers, such as the Lys, Dyle, Dender, Ourthe, Ambleve, Vesdre, Lesse and Semois, provide a system of waterways almost unique in Europe.

  • The total of navigable waterways is given as 1360 m.

  • Germany is thus a country abounding in natural waterways, the total length of them being estimated at 7000 m.

  • Waierways.In Germany the waterways are almost solely in the possession of the state.

  • To adopt a figure, it is probable that the sources from which the two streams of life - animal and vegetable - spring may not be separable by a well-defined watershed at all, but consist of a great level upland, in which the waterways anastomose.

  • Probably in no country in the world are there gathered together within comparatively narrow limits so many clean-cut waterways, measuring thousands of feet in depth, affording such a stupendous system of narrow roadways through the hills.

  • The work of construction was under the control of the Inland Waterways and Docks Section of the Royal Engineers, and involved the reclamation of a large tract of swampy foreshore, the widening and deepening of the waterway, the construction of a wharf and jetty nearly a mile in length equipped with powerful cranes and of docks for the building and repair of certain kinds of craft, the erection of acres of hutments and store-sheds, and the laying of some 50 m.

  • the Tyne, here the boundary between Northumberland and Durham, is one of the most important commercial waterways in England.

  • In all, about sixty kinds of timber of marketable quality are furnished in more or less profusion, but the difficulty of extraction, even in the regions situated in close proximity to the large waterways, renders it improbable that the timber trade of Borneo will attain to any very great dimensions until other and easier sources of supply have become exhausted.

  • Here are all the large towns, and hither European settlers were attracted from the first by the temperate climate, rich soil, and natural waterways.

  • The scenery of both the lake and the skrgdrd is similar, the numerous islands low, rocky, and generally wooded, the waterways between them narrow and quiet.

  • The water system of the province comprises a few small rivers (now largely canalized) in the high lands in the east, and the vast network of canals, waterways and lakes of the whole north and west.

  • By the Nile waterways there is easy transport from the southern and western equatorial provinces and from Sennar and other eastern districts.

  • by deepening the navigable channel through it and clearing out various waterways (the Eskilstuna river, Hjelmar canal, &c.) in 1878-1887.

  • The extensive system of natural waterways, especially in central Sweden, has been utilized to the full in the development of internal navigation, just as the calm waters within the skargard afford opportunity for safe and economical coastwise, traffic. The earliest construction of canals dates from the 15th century, the patriot Engelbrekt and King Gustavus Vasa both foreseeing its importance.

  • The total length of the canalized water-system of Sweden is a little over 700 m., though wholly artificial waterways amount only to 115 m.

  • The province is traversed by the main railway lines, which all converge at Utrecht, and is also amply provided with navigable waterways.

  • The lagoon of Aveiro, the estuary of the Sado and the broad inland lake formed by the Tagus above Lisbon, recall the waterways of Holland.

  • The Minho (Spanish Mino) is the most northerly river of Portugal, and in size and importance is only inferior to the three great waterways already mentioned.

  • The most important internal waterways are the lower Tagus and the Douro between Oporto and the Paiz do Vinho.

  • The waterways of Brittany are for the most part of little value owing to their torrent-like character.

  • of Kiel (see Germany: Waterways).

  • The situation of Berlin, midway between the Elbe and the Oder, with which rivers it is connected by a web of waterways, at the crossing of the main roads from Silesia and Poland to the North Sea ports and from Saxony, Bohemia and Thuringia to the Baltic, made it in medieval days a place of considerable commercial importance.

  • long), utilizing the Mukhovets-Bug rivers, forms a link in the waterways that connect the Dnieper with the Vistula.

  • The commerce and shipping of Schleswig-Holstein, stimulated by its position between two seas, as well as by its excellent harbours and waterways, are much more prominent than its manufactures.

  • Both the Dniester and the Pruth are important waterways commercially, the former being navigable up to Mogilev and the latter to Leovo (46° 30' N.

  • Although the waterways are much neglected, compared with those of France or of Germany, they might still be very useful if they were enlarged and improved and if free competition with railways could be secured.

  • Various proposals have been made for the establishment of a single control over all inland waterways.

  • The lower or estuarine courses of some of the English rivers as the Thames, Tyne, Humber, Mersey and Bristol Avon, are among the most important waterways in the world, as giving access for seaborne traffic to great ports.

  • There is some traffic on the navigable drainage cuts and rivers of the Fens, but beyond these, in a broad consideration of the waterways of England from the point of view of their commercial importance, it is unnecessary to go.

  • As regards navigation, only such taxes or duties were to be levied as had "the character of an equivalent for services rendered to navigation itself"; and it was further provided that (Article 16) "The roads, railways or lateral canals which may be constructed with the special object of obviating the innavigability or correcting the imperfection of the river route on certain sections of the course of the Congo, its affluents, and other waterways, placed under a similar system as laid down in Article 15, shall be considered, in their quality of means of communication, as dependencies of this river and as equally open to the traffic of all nations.

  • He was called away on duty as chief military engineer (ingegnere camerale) with the special charge of inspecting and maintaining all the canals and waterways of the duchy.

  • Rivers and other waterways still carry a large part of the traffic of Bengal, especially in the delta.

  • Beyond Galatz, the river again turns eastward, branching out, near Tulcea, into three great waterways, which wind through a low-lying alluvial delta to the sea.

  • During the early period, the settlement of the northern and central portions of the state was greatly retarded by the lack of highways or navigable waterways.

  • m., which is intersected by waterways and great chains of lakes and bears a population of 800 to the sq.

  • To him the human race is indebted, in large measure, for the maritime exploration, within one century (1420-1522), of more than half the globe, and especially of the great waterways from Europe to Asia both by east and by west.

  • The navigable waterways include the Mississippi river (which forms the western boundary of the state); the Tennessee river, navigable throughout its length, from Knoxville; and the Cumberland river, navigable throughout its length in the state.

  • At a personal level, therefore, I have the utmost sympathy for staff employed by British Waterways facing a reorganization.

  • All the six native British amphibians have declining populations but most still occur on our waterways.

  • autonomous in matters concerning their regions, with separate Management Boards controlling LT and Inland Waterways.

  • British Waterways have asked boaters proposing to travel through the area to alter their plans.

  • boatmanntire holdings - including objects painted by boatmen, costumes worn by boating families. waterways souvenirs, along with photographic and archive material.

  • cox box NT signal flag communications equipment Equipment designed for communication in an inland waterways context.

  • A good way to explore the waterways is on a self-drive cruiser.

  • More... BW tackles unlicensed boats British Waterways has been taking a firm stand with license dodgers.

  • eleventh of a regular series of articles on waterways on the internet.

  • British Waterways ' began work to stabilize the embankment on 2nd March.

  • fifteenth of a regular series of articles on waterways on the internet.

  • Players have just choice of waterways mark twain must wine flagons and.

  • An electronic fob in place of the old British Waterways key will operate the new stations.

  • fourteenth of a regular series of articles on waterways on the internet.

  • R J Evans He was appointed as the first salaried General Secretary of the Inland Waterways Association in 1952.

  • British Waterways has constructed an otter holt from logs to encourage otters to return to the canal for breeding.

  • icebreaker hull, we navigate high latitude waterways closed to conventional shipping.

  • Its streamlined design allows you to delve deeper into many of the hitherto inaccessible labyrinthine waterways.

  • inland waterways network is vital to the sustainable future of the Basingstoke Canal.

  • Sadly one almost expects waterways to have assorted junk in them and Salmon's Brook is no exception.

  • Here we will explore the rich labyrinth of waterways which will afford us excellent wildlife viewing.

  • CL transport BT canal passenger boat longboat The familiar name for the narrow boat on the River Severn and associated waterways to the Midlands.

  • VENICE Among the waterways of Venice restored palaces and stately mansions are your atmospheric homes to explore its myriad alleys and canals.

  • meander the lanes on a heritage bus, or the waterways at the helm of a canal boat.

  • miles of derelict inland waterways are now the subject of restoration plans.

  • nook of ground where canals and waterways do not make news.

  • pleasure boater and activist for the Inland Waterways Association.

  • pollute the waterways.

  • Much of the land is fragmented, polluted and divided by waterways, overhead pylons, roads and railways.

  • Justly reproved, I commend any business which encourages the appreciation of Britain's waterways deserves support, not carping.

  • Top of page Bright Ideas Kansas City residents will build 10,000 rain gardens to reduce runoff that is polluting waterways.

  • sampan ride around the waterways, or explore some of the many nearby islands.

  • seventeenth of a regular series of articles on waterways on the internet.

  • simplifyarges for freight carried on the Agency's waterways should be radically simplified.

  • sixteenth of a regular series of articles on waterways on the internet.

  • thirteenth of a regular series of articles on waterways on the internet.

  • twelfth of a regular series of articles on waterways on the internet.

  • The morning or time at all Russia's waterways of.

  • Only wash fuel over the side in an emergency; it is an offense to pollute the waterways.

  • These notes are intended to encourage everyone to help each other enjoy cruising the waterways.

  • These included some legally abandoned waterways such as the Cromford Canal, Grantham Canal and Llangollen Canal.

  • Currently another 500 miles of derelict inland waterways are now the subject of restoration plans.

  • All best wishes for health, happiness, and many lovely walks in many beautiful parks along many tidal and non-tidal waterways.

  • It is also the first return to the Agency's East Anglian waterways since it was held at Peterborough on the Nene in 1993.

  • Barges and narrow boats may be hired for trips along the tranquil waterways amidst largely unspoiled countryside.

  • waterways Danube rhine.

  • waterways enthusiasts which has really made this possible.

  • Daily access from the national inland waterways network is vital to the sustainable future of the Basingstoke Canal.

  • These are the old wharves which were separated by wide waterways.

  • in height; low hills are found in the north-western province of Chau-Doc. Cochin-China is remarkable for the abundance of its waterways.

  • The waterways of Cochin-China communicate by means of natural or artificial channels (arroyos), facilitating transport and aiding in the uniform distribution of the inundation to which the country owes its fertility.

  • Favoured by its proximity to two great waterways and by its two ports, Nisaea on the Saronic and Pegae on the Corinthian Gulf, Megara took a prominent part in the commercial expansion of Greece from the 8th century onwards, and for two hundred years enjoyed prosperity out of proportion to the slight resources of its narrow territory.

  • Sueca has a thriving trade in grain and fruit from the Jucar valley, which is irrigated by waterways created by the Moors.

  • The exploration of the waterways round about the empire was Alexander's immediate concern, the discovery of the presumed connexion of the Caspian with the Northern Ocean, the opening of a maritime route from Babylon to Egypt round Arabia.

  • The region of the Red River and Assiniboine valleys was opened up by the fur traders, who came by the waterways from Lake Superior, and afterwards by the water communication with Hudson Bay.

  • 15; it will be seen that each of the upper sections has a number of cross waterways which form a series of gratings over the fire-box and intercept most of the heat generated, effecting great economy of fuel.

  • Waterways.1The waterways of France, 7543 m.

  • The canal and river system attains its greatest utility in the north, northeast and north-centre of the country; traffic is thickest along the Seine below Paris; along the rivers and small canals of the rich departments of Nord and Pas-de-Calais and along the Oise and the canal of St Quentin whereby they communicate with Paris; along the canal from the Marne to the Rhine and the succession of waterways which unite it with the Oise; along the Canal de lEst (departments of Meuse and Ardennes); and along the waterways uniting Paris with the Sane at Chalon (Seine, Canal du Loing, Canal de Briare, Lateral canal of the Loire and Canal du Centre) and along the Sane between Chalon and Lyons.

  • The "Marble Arch" cave near Florencecourt, with its emerging river, is a characteristic example of the subterranean waterways in the limestone.

  • Russian craft play, however, a much more important part on the internal waterways, the traffic on which increases rapidly, e.g.

  • There are no navigable waterways, and the railway mileage is small.

  • From Bristol downward the river is one of the most important commercial waterways in England, as giving access to that great port.

  • An important investigation undertaken by the Bacterioscopical Laboratory, with regard to the pollution of the Venetian canals by the city sewage, led to the discovery that the water of the lagoons possesses auto-purifying power, not only in the large canals but even in the smallest ramifications of the waterways.

  • One of the first great public improvements made within the state was the connexion of these waterways by two canals - the Ohio & Erie Canal from Cleveland to Portsmouth, and the Miami & Erie Canal from Toledo to Cincinnati.

  • Kerosene is transported in bulk by various means; specially constructed steel tank barges are used on the waterways of the United States, tank-cars on the railroads, and tank-wagons on the roads.

  • 1 Report of Deep Waterways Commission (1896).

  • The improvement of waterways in the interior of the empire was not neglected, the Babylonian canal system was repaired, the obstructions in the Tigris removed.

  • It is served by the railways of the Western and the Orleans Companies and by those of the state, but it has no navigable waterways.

  • The problem of inland waterways has always been a most important one in northern, eastern and southern Louisiana, where there are systems of improved bayous, lakes and canals which, with the levees, make this region something like Holland, on a greater scale.

  • of these waterways of decided commercial importance.

  • At this point also the two rivers are connected by a canal, the northernmost of a series of canals which formerly united the two great waterways, and at the same time irrigated the intervening plain.

  • They are constructed not only as navigable waterways, but also to relieve the rivers from periodical overflow, and to drain the marshy districts.

  • In 1907 the length of the navigable waterways of Hungary was 3200 m., of which 2450 m.

  • In 1901 the Austrian government laid before the Reichsrat a canal bill, with proposals for works estimated to take twenty years to complete, and including the construction of a canal between the Oder, starting at Prerau, and the upper Elbe at Pardubitz, and for the canalization of the Elbe from Pardubitz to Melnik (see Austria: Waterways).

  • The Rhine has been one of the chief waterways of Europe from the earliest times; and, as its channel is not exposed to the danger of silting up like those of the Elbe and the Oder, it has always been comparatively easy to keep it open.

  • He was shortly assigned to a territorial command on the Mississippi, and first won distinction by his energy in seizing, on his own responsibility, the important point of Paducah, Kentucky, situated at the confluence of the two great waterways of the Tennessee and the Ohio (6th Sept.

  • The nation does not seem to have appreciated the deficiencies of the syndicates service, supplemented as it was by a network of waterways which greatly increased the facilities for transport.

  • The harbour is connected by canals with the river Aa and the navigable waterways of the department.

  • The waterways which traverse and surround it and the character of its numerous gabled medieval houses give it the appearance of an old Dutch, rather than of a German, town.

  • of navigable waterways.

  • The inland waterways include the 25 ft.

  • Other important waterways which have been authorized by the United States government and on which work was proceeding in 1910 are canals from the Rio Grande river to the Mississippi river at Donaldsonville, Louisiana; and "a navigable channel depth of 5 ft.

  • Congressional appropriations for the survey, improvement and maintenance of waterways began in 1852; amounted to $15,055,688 between 1891 and 1896 inclusive, and $1,613,829 between 1897 and 1907; the total appropriated being $23,249,419.

  • The Spaniards, with monstrous fatuity, refused to make use of the superb waterways provided by the Parana and Paraguay, and endeavoured to stifle all trade.

  • A system of waterways (the Geeste and Hadelner canals, meeting one another at Bederkesa) connects the estuary of the Weser with that of the Elbe; a canal between the Hunte and the Leda gives connexion with the Ems. On the upper Weser (above Bremen) the navigation, which is interrupted by occasional rapids, is assisted by locks and weirs.

  • Washington's many waterways, both fresh and salt, and especially those which indent or are near the coast, make the fisheries resources of great value.

  • - Bridges (old forms, brig, brygge, brudge; Dutch, brug; German, Briicke; a common Teutonic word) are structures carrying roadways, waterways or railways across streams, valleys or other roads or railways, leaving a passage way below.

  • Long bridges of several spans are often termed " viaducts," and bridges carrying canals are termed " aqueducts," though this term is sometimes used for waterways which have no bridge structure.

  • After the Tauern railway had been built for the Alpine countries - without, it is true, any particular pecuniary help from the Polish part of the empire, which was known to be only passively interested - the Poles demanded a complete carrying into effect and extension of the waterways law, with a larger State subsidy.

  • It was over these demands in connexion with the waterways, which the Minister of Finance declared to be impossible of fulfilment to the extent required by the Poles, that Bienerth's mainstay failed to support him; and on Dec. 12 he sent in his resignation, which was, however, followed by a renewed Bienerth Ministry, composed of Germans, Poles and officials.

  • His programme was to be an honourable mediator in the German-Bohemian quarrel, to extend the railway system, and to satisfy the wishes of the Poles in the waterways question by an expenditure of 73.4 million kronen on canal construction in Galicia, to which Galicia was to contribute only 9.4 million kronen, the State finding the other 64, and by an expenditure of 125 millions on river improvements, 99 of which would be contributed by the State.

  • A great economic and social programme 'was announced, including the extension of waterways, the exploitation of electricity, an improved system of communication, industrial insurance, and a department for public health.

  • As a wholly inland nation, Czechoslovakia has to rely in the matter of transport upon its railways and its waterways, notably the Elbe, which connects the republic with Hamburg and the North Sea, and the Danube, which unites it with the east of Europe and the Balkans.

  • Many weeks passed without any success to the Union arms. Vicksburg and its long line of fortifications stood on high bluffs, all else was swampy lowland and intricate waterways.

  • In the north, the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the intricately branching waterways of Puget Sound between the Cascade and the Olympic ranges occupy trough-like depressions which were filled by extensive glaciers in Pleistocene times; and thus mark the beginning of the great stretch of forded coast which extends northward to Alaska.

  • rhe waterways here afford excellent harbours.

  • More than $250,000,000 has been spent by the national government for the improvement of waterways, yet no general system exists, and a large part of this enormous sum has been wasted on unimportant or impossible projects, especially in recent decades, since the river navigation has been a declining interest.

  • Of recent years there has been a great revival of interest in the improvement of inland waterways upon systematic plans, which promises better than an earlier period of internal improvements in the first half of the 19th century, the results of which were more or less disastrous for the state and local governments that undertook them, and only less so for the national government.

  • Coal, iron ore, building materials, lumber, livestock, cotton, fruits, vegetables, tobacco and grain are the great items in the domestic commerce of the country, upon its railways, inland waterways, and in the coasting trade.

  • Of this total 42.6% was moved on the Great Lakes, and 36~8% on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts and waterways.

  • All of these rivers are waterways of some importance in their lower course, and are navigated by powerful stern-wheel boats supplying the posts and mining camps of the interior with their requirements.

  • Most of the mining development is in southern British Columbia, where a network of railways and waterways gives easy access; but as means of communication improve to the north a similar development may be looked for there.

  • Despite the increase in railway facilities, the waterways remain important factors in the transportation of the country.

  • The canal system of Canada, linking together the great natural waterways, is also of much present and prospective importance in cheapening the transportation of agricultural produce.

  • The neutralization of territory belonging to states which are not otherwise neutralized includes the neutralization of waterways such as the Suez and Panama canals.

  • Of waterways, international rivers have been the chief subject of neutralization.

  • On the other hand neutralization has made progress in respect of waterways, 1 Under the treaty of the 29th of March 1864, the courts of Great Britain, France and Russia in their character of guaranteeing powers of Greece declared with the assent of the courts of Austria and Prussia that the islands of Corfu and Paxo as well as their dependencies should, after their union to the Hellenic'kingdom, enjoy the advantages of perpetual neutrality, and the king of the Hellenes undertook on his part to maintain such neutrality- (Art.

  • In 1817, at the instance of John Quincy Adams, the United States and Great Britain entered into a compact whereby the Great Lakes, and the waterways from them to the ocean by the St Lawrence river, which divide the United States from the Dominion of Canada, were practically excluded from any possible hostilities.

  • He next investigated the sources of the Sutlej, made hydrographic investigations of the Manasarowar lakes, with the neighbouring underground waterways, and proceeded thence to Gartok.

  • The water-tube type, with multiple waterways, consists of a number of separate tubes j oined together in various ways.

  • As waterways all the rivers labour under the drawbacks of rapids, mud-banks at their mouths, banks overgrown with forest, sparse population, and currents liable to serious variations due to irregularity of supply from the mountains and sudden rainfalls.

  • The rivers, like those already characterized, and for the same reason, are not available as waterways.

  • From Gorinchem the New Merwede (constructed in the second half of the 19th century) extends between dykes through the marshes of the Biesbosch to the Hollandsch Diep. These great rivers render very important service as waterways.

  • Again, a totally different character belongs to the canals in North Brabant, and the east and north-east of Holland where, in the absence of great rivers, they form the only waterways which render possible the drainage of the fens and the export of peat; and unite the lesser streams with each other.

  • Doughty (London, 1887); On Dutch Waterways, by G.

  • That portion of Flanders which skirts the south bank of the Scheldt thus passed into the possession of the States, and with it the complete control of all the waterways to the sea.

  • The numerous affluents of these rivers, such as the Lys, Dyle, Dender, Ourthe, Ambleve, Vesdre, Lesse and Semois, provide a system of waterways almost unique in Europe.

  • The total of navigable waterways is given as 1360 m.

  • Germany is thus a country abounding in natural waterways, the total length of them being estimated at 7000 m.

  • Waierways.In Germany the waterways are almost solely in the possession of the state.

  • The most westerly of these streams, the Ogun, enters the Lagos lagoon, which is connected by navigable waterways with the Niger (see Lagos).

  • To adopt a figure, it is probable that the sources from which the two streams of life - animal and vegetable - spring may not be separable by a well-defined watershed at all, but consist of a great level upland, in which the waterways anastomose.

  • Probably in no country in the world are there gathered together within comparatively narrow limits so many clean-cut waterways, measuring thousands of feet in depth, affording such a stupendous system of narrow roadways through the hills.

  • The work of construction was under the control of the Inland Waterways and Docks Section of the Royal Engineers, and involved the reclamation of a large tract of swampy foreshore, the widening and deepening of the waterway, the construction of a wharf and jetty nearly a mile in length equipped with powerful cranes and of docks for the building and repair of certain kinds of craft, the erection of acres of hutments and store-sheds, and the laying of some 50 m.

  • the Tyne, here the boundary between Northumberland and Durham, is one of the most important commercial waterways in England.

  • In all, about sixty kinds of timber of marketable quality are furnished in more or less profusion, but the difficulty of extraction, even in the regions situated in close proximity to the large waterways, renders it improbable that the timber trade of Borneo will attain to any very great dimensions until other and easier sources of supply have become exhausted.

  • Here are all the large towns, and hither European settlers were attracted from the first by the temperate climate, rich soil, and natural waterways.

  • The scenery of both the lake and the skrgdrd is similar, the numerous islands low, rocky, and generally wooded, the waterways between them narrow and quiet.

  • The water system of the province comprises a few small rivers (now largely canalized) in the high lands in the east, and the vast network of canals, waterways and lakes of the whole north and west.

  • By the Nile waterways there is easy transport from the southern and western equatorial provinces and from Sennar and other eastern districts.

  • by deepening the navigable channel through it and clearing out various waterways (the Eskilstuna river, Hjelmar canal, &c.) in 1878-1887.

  • The extensive system of natural waterways, especially in central Sweden, has been utilized to the full in the development of internal navigation, just as the calm waters within the skargard afford opportunity for safe and economical coastwise, traffic. The earliest construction of canals dates from the 15th century, the patriot Engelbrekt and King Gustavus Vasa both foreseeing its importance.

  • The total length of the canalized water-system of Sweden is a little over 700 m., though wholly artificial waterways amount only to 115 m.

  • The province is traversed by the main railway lines, which all converge at Utrecht, and is also amply provided with navigable waterways.

  • The lagoon of Aveiro, the estuary of the Sado and the broad inland lake formed by the Tagus above Lisbon, recall the waterways of Holland.

  • The Minho (Spanish Mino) is the most northerly river of Portugal, and in size and importance is only inferior to the three great waterways already mentioned.

  • The most important internal waterways are the lower Tagus and the Douro between Oporto and the Paiz do Vinho.

  • The waterways of Brittany are for the most part of little value owing to their torrent-like character.

  • of Kiel (see Germany: Waterways).

  • The situation of Berlin, midway between the Elbe and the Oder, with which rivers it is connected by a web of waterways, at the crossing of the main roads from Silesia and Poland to the North Sea ports and from Saxony, Bohemia and Thuringia to the Baltic, made it in medieval days a place of considerable commercial importance.

  • long), utilizing the Mukhovets-Bug rivers, forms a link in the waterways that connect the Dnieper with the Vistula.

  • The commerce and shipping of Schleswig-Holstein, stimulated by its position between two seas, as well as by its excellent harbours and waterways, are much more prominent than its manufactures.

  • Both the Dniester and the Pruth are important waterways commercially, the former being navigable up to Mogilev and the latter to Leovo (46° 30' N.

  • Although the waterways are much neglected, compared with those of France or of Germany, they might still be very useful if they were enlarged and improved and if free competition with railways could be secured.

  • Various proposals have been made for the establishment of a single control over all inland waterways.

  • The lower or estuarine courses of some of the English rivers as the Thames, Tyne, Humber, Mersey and Bristol Avon, are among the most important waterways in the world, as giving access for seaborne traffic to great ports.

  • There is some traffic on the navigable drainage cuts and rivers of the Fens, but beyond these, in a broad consideration of the waterways of England from the point of view of their commercial importance, it is unnecessary to go.

  • As regards navigation, only such taxes or duties were to be levied as had "the character of an equivalent for services rendered to navigation itself"; and it was further provided that (Article 16) "The roads, railways or lateral canals which may be constructed with the special object of obviating the innavigability or correcting the imperfection of the river route on certain sections of the course of the Congo, its affluents, and other waterways, placed under a similar system as laid down in Article 15, shall be considered, in their quality of means of communication, as dependencies of this river and as equally open to the traffic of all nations.

  • He was called away on duty as chief military engineer (ingegnere camerale) with the special charge of inspecting and maintaining all the canals and waterways of the duchy.

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