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water-rat

water-rat

water-rat Sentence Examples

  • In the water-rat and agoutis it is.

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  • All rodents, with the sole exception of the dormice, have a caecum, often of great length and sacculated,, as in hares, the water-rat and porcupines; and the long colon in some, as the hamster and water-rat, is spirally twisted upon itself near the commencement.

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  • A third type, Prometheomys, from the Caucasus, is represented by a species of the size of a small water-rat, chestnut-brown in colour, with lighter feet, and the minute eyes covered with skin.

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  • Voles, as typified by the water-rat and the tailed fieldmouse, are stouter built and shorter-nosed rodentsthan the typical rats and mice, with smaller ears and eyes and shorter tails; all being good burrowers.

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  • The single species is from Tasmania, though it has been found fossil in New South Wales; it is somewhat similar in size and appearance to the English water-rat, but has longer and softer fur.

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  • Fleming, author of a work on British animals) for the water-rat and those species of field-mice which have cheek-teeth of the same general type.

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  • Although the British representatives of this group should undoubtedly retain their vernacular designations of water-rat and short-tailed field-mouse, the term "vole" is one of great convenience in zoology as a general one for all the members of the group. Systematically voles are classed in the mammalian order Rodentia, in which they constitute the typical section of the subfamily Microtinae in the Muridae, or mouse-group. As a group, voles are characterized by being more heavily built than rats and mice, and by their less brisk movements.

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  • The first of these is the common shoa 1 tailed field-mouse, or "field-vole," Microtus agrestis, which belongs to the typical section of the type genus, and M S is about the size of a 343 mouse, with a short stumpy body, and a Upper and Lower Molars of the Water-Rat tail about one-third the (or Water-Vole), Microtus amphibius.

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  • The second and larger species is the water-rat, or "watervole," which belongs to a second section of the genus, and is commonly known as Microtus (Arvicola) amphibius, although some writers employ the inappropriate specific name terrestris.

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  • The water-rat is perhaps the most often seen of all English mammals, owing to its diurnal habits.

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  • The range of the water-rat extends over Europe and North Asia from England to China, but the species is not found in Ireland, where no member of the group is native.

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  • Working for Muskie, Thompson wrote, " was something like being locked in a rolling box car with a vicious 200-pound water rat.

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  • Aquatic in habits, this animal is related to the English water-rat and therefore included in the sub-family Microtinae (see Vole).

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  • In the water-rat and agoutis it is.

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  • All rodents, with the sole exception of the dormice, have a caecum, often of great length and sacculated,, as in hares, the water-rat and porcupines; and the long colon in some, as the hamster and water-rat, is spirally twisted upon itself near the commencement.

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  • A third type, Prometheomys, from the Caucasus, is represented by a species of the size of a small water-rat, chestnut-brown in colour, with lighter feet, and the minute eyes covered with skin.

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  • Voles, as typified by the water-rat and the tailed fieldmouse, are stouter built and shorter-nosed rodentsthan the typical rats and mice, with smaller ears and eyes and shorter tails; all being good burrowers.

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  • In the circumpolar Evotomys (represented in England by the red-backed field-mouse) and the nearly allied North American Phenacomys, the molars develop roots in old age; but in Microtus (which includes the water-rat, and is circumpolar) they are rootless throughout life, the genus being' one of the largest in the mammalian class (see Vole).

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  • The single species is from Tasmania, though it has been found fossil in New South Wales; it is somewhat similar in size and appearance to the English water-rat, but has longer and softer fur.

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  • Fleming, author of a work on British animals) for the water-rat and those species of field-mice which have cheek-teeth of the same general type.

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  • Although the British representatives of this group should undoubtedly retain their vernacular designations of water-rat and short-tailed field-mouse, the term "vole" is one of great convenience in zoology as a general one for all the members of the group. Systematically voles are classed in the mammalian order Rodentia, in which they constitute the typical section of the subfamily Microtinae in the Muridae, or mouse-group. As a group, voles are characterized by being more heavily built than rats and mice, and by their less brisk movements.

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  • The first of these is the common shoa 1 tailed field-mouse, or "field-vole," Microtus agrestis, which belongs to the typical section of the type genus, and M S is about the size of a 343 mouse, with a short stumpy body, and a Upper and Lower Molars of the Water-Rat tail about one-third the (or Water-Vole), Microtus amphibius.

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  • The second and larger species is the water-rat, or "watervole," which belongs to a second section of the genus, and is commonly known as Microtus (Arvicola) amphibius, although some writers employ the inappropriate specific name terrestris.

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  • The water-rat is perhaps the most often seen of all English mammals, owing to its diurnal habits.

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  • The range of the water-rat extends over Europe and North Asia from England to China, but the species is not found in Ireland, where no member of the group is native.

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  • Working for Muskie, Thompson wrote, was something like being locked in a rolling box car with a vicious 200-pound water rat.

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  • I lost a good many of them, not knowing the cause until I happened to pull up some of the dead young trees, when I found the main roots were all barked round by the common water-rat, working below the line of the snow during a hard winter.

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