Water-of-crystallization sentence examples

water-of-crystallization
  • At 150° C. it melts, and on the continued application of heat boils, giving off its water of crystallization.

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  • Moisture is evolved from substances containing water of crystallization or decomposed hydrates.

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  • When heated they liquefy; and if the heating be continued, the water of crystallization is driven off, the salt froths and^swells, and at last an amorphous powder remains.

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  • It fuses at 92° C. in its own water of crystallization.

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  • When heated it fuses in its own water of crystallization and becomes anhydrous at 110° C. It is used in pyrotechny for the manufacture of red-fire.

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  • It dissolves most organic compounds, resins, hydrocarbons, fatty acids and many metallic salts, sometimes forming, in the latter case, crystalline compounds in which the ethyl alcohol plays a role similar to that of water of crystallization.

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  • The salt melts in its water of crystallization at 75°, and the liquid thus obtained goes up to a density of 3.6.

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  • It crystallizes in prisms, which lose their water of crystallization at 160° C. The tellurates of the alkali metals are more or less soluble in water, those of the other metals being very sparingly or almost insoluble in water.

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  • At ordinary temperatures it crystallizes from aqueous solutions in large colourless monoclinic prisms, which effloresce in dry air, and at 35° C. melt in their water of crystallization.

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  • The salt crystallizes in large yellow plates, containing three molecules of water of crystallization.

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  • It loses four molecules of water of crystallization when heated to 100° C. and becomes anhydrous at about 300° C. The hexahydrate is dimorphous, a tetragonal form being obtained by crystallization of a solution of the heptahydrate between 20° and 30° C., and a monoclinic form between 50° and 70° C. Nickel sulphate combines with many metallic sulphates to form double salts, and also forms addition compounds with ammonia aniline and hydroxylamine.

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  • Rubidium carbonate, Rb2C03, formed by the addition of ammonium carbonate to rubidium hydroxide, is a crystalline mass which melts in its water of crystallization when heated.

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  • He also made many experiments with the tourmaline when cut into thin slices, and reduced to the finest powder, in which state each particle preserved its pyro-electricity; and he showed that scolezite and mesolite, even when deprived of their water of crystallization and reduced to powder, retain their property of becoming electrical by heat.

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  • A saturated solution of the hydroxide deposits on cooling a hydrated form Ba(OH) 2.8H 2 0, as colourless quadratic prisms, which on exposure to air lose seven molecules of water of crystallization.

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  • These crystals on heating to 130° C. lose the water of crystallization and leave a residue of the anhydrous peroxide.

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  • Crystals of ordinary borax swell up to a very great extent on heating, losing their water of crystallization and melting to a clear white glass.

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  • H2O (below 15° C.), which on being heated to a dark red heat loses its water of crystallization and leaves a white vitreous mass of the pentoxide.

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  • Arsenic acid, H3AsO4, is prepared as shown above, the compound 2H3AsO4.H2O on being heated to 100° C. parting with its water of crystallization and leaving a residue of the acid, which crystallizes in needles.

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  • In 1835 he published the results of an examination of the properties of water of crystallization as a constituent of salts.

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  • At 150° C. it melts, and on the continued application of heat boils, giving off its water of crystallization.

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  • Pure d-glucose, which may be obtained synthetically (see Sugar) or by adding crystallized cane sugar to a mixture of 80% alcohol and 115 volume of fuming hydrochloric acid so long as it dissolves on shaking, crystallizes from water or alcohol at ordinary temperatures in nodular masses, composed of minute six-sided plates, and containing one molecule of water of crystallization.

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  • It fuses at 92° C. in its own water of crystallization.

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  • When heated it fuses in its own water of crystallization and becomes anhydrous at 110° C. It is used in pyrotechny for the manufacture of red-fire.

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  • It loses its water of crystallization at loo C., and begins to sublime at about 150160° C., whilst on heating to a still higher temperature it partially decomposes into carbon dioxide and formic acid, or into carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water; the latter decomposition being also brought about by heating oxalic acid with concentrated sulphuric acid.

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  • The salt melts in its water of crystallization at 75°, and the liquid thus obtained goes up to a density of 3.6.

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  • It crystallizes in prisms, which lose their water of crystallization at 160° C. The tellurates of the alkali metals are more or less soluble in water, those of the other metals being very sparingly or almost insoluble in water.

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  • At ordinary temperatures it crystallizes from aqueous solutions in large colourless monoclinic prisms, which effloresce in dry air, and at 35° C. melt in their water of crystallization.

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  • It loses four molecules of water of crystallization when heated to 100° C. and becomes anhydrous at about 300° C. The hexahydrate is dimorphous, a tetragonal form being obtained by crystallization of a solution of the heptahydrate between 20° and 30° C., and a monoclinic form between 50° and 70° C. Nickel sulphate combines with many metallic sulphates to form double salts, and also forms addition compounds with ammonia aniline and hydroxylamine.

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  • These crystals on heating to 130° C. lose the water of crystallization and leave a residue of the anhydrous peroxide.

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  • H2O (below 15° C.), which on being heated to a dark red heat loses its water of crystallization and leaves a white vitreous mass of the pentoxide.

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  • Arsenic acid, H3AsO4, is prepared as shown above, the compound 2H3AsO4.H2O on being heated to 100° C. parting with its water of crystallization and leaving a residue of the acid, which crystallizes in needles.

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