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washington

washington

washington Sentence Examples

  • A considerable part of this land was surveyed by George Washington between 1748 and 1751.

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  • In 1841-1843 he was in Europe on behalf of the Tyler administration, and he is said to have been instrumental in causing the appointment of Lord Ashburton to negotiate in Washington concerning the boundary dispute between Maine and Canada.

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  • America, Washington, Smithsonian Inst., 1883); L.

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  • Morse showed, by experiments made in 1842 on a canal at Washington, that it was possible to interrupt the metallic electric circuit in two places and yet retain power of electric Morse.

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  • Morse showed, by experiments made in 1842 on a canal at Washington, that it was possible to interrupt the metallic electric circuit in two places and yet retain power of electric Morse.

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  • He was a great thinker and a great doer, and with Washington he helped to make our country free.

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  • (The use of such practices continued into the scientific age: While Jenner was inoculating people with his new smallpox vaccine, doctors were draining half a gallon of blood from George Washington for his sore throat, a procedure that hastened his death.

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  • I drove over to Greenbriar Road 'cause I figured I'd take a peek before I informed the Washington crowd of suits I had access to the place.

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  • Marcy in 1833-1839, was a member of the New York Assembly in 1842, in 1844 and in 1845, being speaker in 1845; mayor of Utica in 1843, and in 1852 was elected governor of the state over Washington Hunt (1811-1867), the Whig candidate, who had defeated him in 1850.

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  • Among the places I visited were West Point, Tarrytown, the home of Washington Irving, where I walked through "Sleepy Hollow."

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  • Since then it has met in Philadelphia, Belfast, London, Toronto, Glasgow, Washington and Liverpool.

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  • Next to Washington he was the greatest American.

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  • Loyal to American interests and devoted to General Washington, he was one of the most useful of the state executives during the War of Independence.

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  • Three Oecumenical Conferences have been held - two at City Road, London, in and 1901, and one at Washington in 1891.

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  • Proceedings of Seventh General Council of the Alliance of Reformed Churches holding the Presbyterian System (Washington, 1899).

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  • On the roll of the general council held at Washington in 1899 there were sixty-four churches.

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  • The boys from Washington are going all out.

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  • In 1825 he bought and afterwards edited in Washington, D.C., The United States Telegraph, which soon became the principal organ of the Jackson men in opposition to the Adams administration.

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  • I was culpable in contributing openly to the memory of Miss Washington and I was listed in some press accounts as the well-known grandfather of Eric when he was kidnapped last fall.

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  • First their location; gleaned from that accommodating Miss Washington and her memory of the area code.

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  • Of course I did not know what it was all about, but I enjoyed the pleasant odours that filled the house and the tidbits that were given to Martha Washington and me to keep us quiet.

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  • A brother in Maine and a sister in Washington DC.

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  • He successfully hunted down Brenda Washington, no easy chore.

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  • The incidents of this undertaking are the theme of Washington Irving's Astoria.

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  • Washington, and to the efficient board of trustees, which has included such men as Robert C. Ogden and Seth Low.

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  • The largest granite quarries are near Barre, Washington county, a city which owes its importance to the quarries.

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  • The Barre granites, like those of Woodbury and Calais (also in Washington county) and part of those of South Ryegate, Kirby and Newark (Caledonia county), are of the biotite type; they are grey, except the stone from Newark, which is pinkish.

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  • In Washington county there are quarries near Northfield.

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  • He graduated, at West Point in 1853, served for two years in the artillery, was assistant professor of natural and experimental philosophy at West Point in 1855-1860, and while on leave (1860-1861) was professor of physics at Washington university, St Louis.

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  • wide, except Washington Street, which has a width of 120 ft.

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  • Martha Washington understood my signs, and I seldom had any difficulty in making her do just as I wished.

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  • The chief events of the year 1893 were my trip to Washington during the inauguration of President Cleveland, and visits to Niagara and the World's Fair.

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  • TO MRS. KATE ADAMS KELLER South Boston, April 13, 1893. ...Teacher, Mrs. Pratt and I very unexpectedly decided to take a journey with dear Dr. Bell Mr. Westervelt, a gentleman whom father met in Washington, has a school for the deaf in Rochester.

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  • Check into the murder of a woman named Brenda Washington in Omaha, Nebraska.

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  • This killer of Miss Washington is your most dire threat to date.

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  • Bush, History of Education in Vermont (Washington, 1900).

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  • She was back in Washington.

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  • Brockville is just over the border from Maryland and Washington.

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  • I whined to my daddy director back in Washington.

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  • Is Brenda Washington's murder being investigated as tied to the death of Rupert Youngblood in California and the deputy sheriff in Alabama?

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  • I reluctantly agreed and told him we were devastated that we prompted these deaths; the deputy sheriff, Youngblood, Brenda Washington.

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  • Our guy didn't quit with Brenda Washington.

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  • But Bryce wasn't the one who killed Brenda Washington!

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  • The legislature, composed of the members from the western counties who had been elected on the 23rd of May and some of the holdover senators who had been elected in 1859, met at Wheeling on the 1st of July, filled the remainder of the state offices, organized a state government and elected two United States senators who were recognized at Washington.

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  • The site of the city was a part of the Castle Hill estate of Thomas Walker (1715-1794), an intimate friend of George Washington.

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  • from Washington.

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  • quarry from which other red marbles are taken; and at Roxbury, Washington county, a fine serpentine, called "green marble," or verde antique, is quarried.

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  • In this body he served in 1789-1796, supported Hamilton's financial measures, Washington's neutrality proclamation and the Jay Treaty, and became one of the recognized leaders of the Federalist party.

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  • He was a prominent member of the Republican party, and in 1861 was a delegate to the Peace Conference in Washington.

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  • de Arnaud, The New Era in Russia (Washington, 1890); E.

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  • Dewsnup (ed.), Railway Organization and Working (Chicago, 1906); Interstate Commerce Commission; Rate Regulation Hearings before the U.S. Senate Committee (Washington, 5 vols., 1905); and on current matters, The Official Railway Guide (monthly, New York, the Railroad Age Gazette (weekly, New York) and the Commercial and Financial Chronicle (weekly, New York).

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  • 1249 2691 1181 2483 See the Quarterly and Annual Reports, issued by the Board of Trade, London, and the Annual Statistical Reports and Quarterly Accident Bulletins, published by the Interstate Commerce Commission, Washington.

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  • It was not till more than half a century later that an American, Sylvester Marsh, employed the rack system for the purpose of enabling trains to surmount steep slopes on the Mount Washington railway, where the maximum gradient was nearly 1 in 22.

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  • He was chairman of the committee on territories, and took an active part in urging the admission as states of North Dakota, South Dakota, Washington, Idaho and Montana, which finally came into the Union during his presidency.

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  • Among the measures and events distinguishing his term as president were the following: The meeting of the Pan-American Congress at Washington; the passage of the McKinley Tariff Bill and of the Sherman Silver Bill of 1890; the suppressing of the Louisiana Lottery; the enlargement of the navy; further advance in civil service reform; the convocation by the United States of an international monetary conference; the establishment of commercial reciprocity with many countries of America and Europe; the peaceful settlement of a controversy with Chile; the negotiation of a Hawaiian Annexation Treaty, which, however, before its ratification, his successor withdrew from the Senate; the settlement of difficulties with Germany concerning the Samoan Islands, and the adjustment by arbitration with Great Britain of the Bering Sea fur-seal question.

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  • In 1902 the king of Sweden, as arbitrator under a convention signed at Washington in 1899, decided that Great Britain and the United States were liable for injuries due to action taken by their representatives during the military operations of 1899.

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  • Washington Irving, who had already made preparations to occupy the same field, generously withdrew in his favour.

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  • of Washington).

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  • (of Washington) and the western portion was called Nevada.

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  • Early in 1864, when it became evident that two more Republican votes might be needed in the United States Senate for reconstruction purposes, party leaders at Washington urged the people of Nevada to adopt a constitution and enter the Union as a patriotic duty, and on the 21st of March 1864 Congress passed an act to enable the people of the Territory to form a state government.

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  • of Washington), and in 1866 still farther extended it to the 37th and fixed the southern boundary as it exists at present.

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  • 4 (June 1895); idem., The Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of North-western Nevada (Washington, 1885), U.S. Geological Survey Monograph, No.

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  • He was a member of the International Prime Meridian and Time Conference in 1884, and of the Board of Fortifications in 1885-1886; was superintendent of the Naval Academy from 1886 to 1890; and was promoted to captain and served as delegate at the International Maritime Conference at Washington in 1889.

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  • The Federalist Party, which may be regarded as definitely organized practically from 1791, was led, leaving Washington aside, by Alexander Hamilton and John Adams. A nationalization of the new central government to the full extent warranted by a broad construction of the powers granted to it by the constitution, and a correspondingly strict construction of the powers reserved to the states and the citizens, were the basic principles of Hamilton's policy.

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  • As governor he gave Washington able support and sent out the expedition under George Rogers Clark into the Illinois country.

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  • From 1 794 until his death he declined in succession the following offices: United States senator (1794), secretary of state in Washington's cabinet (1795), chief justice of the United States Supreme Court (1795), governor of Virginia (1796), to which office he had been elected by the Assembly, and envoy to France (1799).

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  • Miller, he was appointed manager of the Rensselaer & Saratoga railway, which he bought up when it was in a very bad condition, and skilfully reorganized; in the same way he bought and reorganized the Rutland & Washington railway, from which he ultimately realized a large profit.

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  • Cotton is grown in every county of the state, but the large yields are in the Delta (Bolivar, Coaohma, Washington, Yazoo and Leflore counties), the greatest cotton-producing region of the world, and in Monroe, Lowndes and Noxubee counties on the Alabama border.

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  • The seats of government have been Natchez (1798-1802), Washington (1802-1817), Natchez (1817-1821), Columbia (1821-1822), Jackson (1822 seq.).

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  • 633-828 (Washington, 1900); "Report of the Mississippi Historical Commission" in the Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society, v.

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  • North Carolinians fought under Washington at Brandywine and Monmouth and played a still more important part in the Southern campaigns of 1778-1781.

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  • Kunz; Report of the Secretary of Agriculture in Relation to the Forests, Rivers and Mountains of the Southern Appalachian Region (Washington, 1902); Climatology of North Carolina (Raleigh, 1892); and H.

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  • Bassett, Constitutional Beginnings of North Carolina (Baltimore, 1894); The Regulators of North Carolina (Washington, 1894); and Slavery in the State of North Carolina (Baltimore, 1899), are all trustworthy.

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  • He graduated at Jefferson College (now Washington and Jefferson College) in 1850 and was admitted to the bar in 1854.

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  • The semi-centennial of this debate was celebrated in 1908, when the Illini Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, caused a suitably inscribed boulder weighing 23 tons to be set up in Washington Park as a memorial.

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  • Never, since the death of Washington, had there been in the United States such a universal expression of public sorrow and bereavement.

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  • of Washington, D.C., and about 125 m.

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  • In its rotunda is Jean Antoine Houdon's full-length marble statue of Washington, provided for by the Virginia General Assembly in 1784, and erected in 1796; its base bears a fine inscription written by James Madison.

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  • Richmond has many fine monuments and statues of historic interest and artistic merit, the most noteworthy of the former being the Washington Monument, in Capitol Square.

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  • In 1850 the commission accepted the model submitted by Thomas Crawford (1814-1857), an American sculptor, the corner-stone of the monument was laid in that year, and the equestrian statue of Washington, with sub-statues of Patrick Henry and Thomas Jefferson, was unveiled on the 22nd of February 1858.

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  • Its nearness to Washington, the material and manufacturing resources concentrated in it, and the moral importance attached to its possession by both sides, caused it to be regarded as the centre of gravity of the military operations in the east to which the greatest leaders and the finest armies were devoted from 1861 to 1865.

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  • Fox, Napoleon Bonaparte and the Siege of Toulon (Washington, 1902); H.

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  • The superintendent of the local Sunday school sent him to an academy at Washington, Wilkes county, for one year and in the following year (1828) he was sent by the Georgia Educational Society to Franklin College (university of Georgia), where he graduated in 1832.

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  • In June 1775, with a view to promoting the union of the colonies, he seconded the nomination of Washington as commander-in-chief of the army.

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  • Partly for this reason, while Washington had the vote of every elector in the first presidential election of 1789, Adams received only thirty-four out of sixtynine.

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  • In 1796, on the refusal of Washington to accept another election, Adams was chosen president, defeating Thomas Jefferson; though Alexander Hamilton and other Federalists had asked that an equal vote should be cast for Adams and Thomas Pinckney, the other Federalist in the contest, partly in order that Jefferson, who was elected vice-president, might be excluded altogether, and partly, it seems, in the hope that Pinckney should in fact receive more votes than Adams, and thus, in accordance with the system then obtaining, be elected president, though he was intended for the second place on the Federalist ticket.

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  • 3 (Washington, 1893), a very important work; D.

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  • 50 (Washington, 1901 sqq.).

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  • Portsmouth was the birthplace of Governor Benning Wentworth (1696-1770) and his nephew Governor John Wentworth (1737-1820); of Governor John Langdon (1739-1819); of Tobias Lear (1762-1816), the private secretary of General Washington from 1785 until Washington's death, consul-general at Santo Domingo in 1802-1804, and negotiator of a treaty with Tripoli in 1805; of Benjamin Penhallow Shillaber (1814-1890), humorist, who is best known by his Life and Sayings of Mrs Partington (1854); of James T.

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  • Wilgus, "Evolution of Township Government in Ohio," in the Annual Report of the American Historical Association for 18 94, pp. 403-412 (Washington, 1895); D.

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  • East of the Rocky Mountains (Washington, 1891), and his Report on the Mound Explorations of the Bureau of Ethnology in the 12th Report (1894) of that Bureau, supplementing his earlier bulletins, Problem of the Ohio Mounds and the Circular, Square and Octagonal Earthworks of Ohio (1889); and W.

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  • In 1861 he was a delegate from Maryland to the peace convention at Washington; in1861-1862he was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates.

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  • He died at Washington, D.C., on the 13th of October 1890.

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  • Atlantic Avenue, along the harbour front, was created, and Washington Street, the chief business artery, was largely remade after 1866.

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  • Washington Street, still narrow, is perhaps the most crowded and congested thoroughfare in America.

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  • Another tunnel has been added to the system, under Washington Street.

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  • Morton; an emancipation group of Thomas Ball with a portrait statue of Lincoln; a fine equestrian statue, by the same sculptor, of Washington, one of the best works in the country (1869); an army and navy monument in the Common by Martin Millmore, in memory of the Civil War; another (1888) recording the death of those who fell in the Boston Massacre of 1770; statues of Admiral D.

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  • Finally came war, with Lexington and Bunker Hill, and beleaguerinent by the colonial army; until on the 17th of March 1776 the British were compelled by Washington to evacuate the city.

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  • Washington Gladden >>

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  • The invitations were accepted, and the conference assembled at Washington on Nov.

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  • France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Rumania, Turkey-in-Europe, Styria, Slavonia, Hungary, Transylvania, Galicia, Lower Austria, Wurttemberg, Brandenberg, West Prussia, Crimea, Kuban, Terek, Kutais, Tiflis, Elizabetpol, Siberia, Transcaspia, Mesopotamia, Persia, Assam, Burma, Anam, Japan, Philippine Islands, Borneo, Sumatra, Java, Algeria, Egypt, British Columbia, Alaska, Washington, California, Colorado, Texas, Louisiana, Barbados, Trinidad, Venezuela, Peru, South Australia, Victoria, New Zealand.

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  • Holland, France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Hungary, Silesia, Moravia, Westphalia, Brunswick, Hanover, Schleswig-Holstein, (German) Silesia, Poland, Kutais, Uralsk, Turkestan, Armenia, Syria, Arabia, Persia, Tunis, Egypt, West Africa, British Columbia, Alberta, Assiniboia, Athabasca, Manitoba, New Jersey, South Dakota, Washington, Montana, Oklahoma, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, California, New Mexico, Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mexico, Hayti, Trinidad, Colombia, Argentina [?], New Zealand.

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  • He died at Washington, D.C., on the 18th of December 1865.

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  • 108 B (Washington, 1906); Bulletin No.

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  • 6, 59th Congress, 1st session (Washington, 1906).

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  • He resisted the navy, the mainspring of Washington's foreign policy; he opposed commercial treaties and diplomatic intercourse in a similar fashion.

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  • See Charles McCarthy, The Antimasonic Party: A Study of Political Anti-Masonry in the United States, 1827-1840, in the Report of the American Historical Association for 1902 (Washington, 1903); the Autobiography of Thurlow Weed (2 vols., Boston, 1884); A.

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  • The American army under Washington encamped near Dobbs Ferry on the 4th of July 1781, and started thence for Yorktown in the following month.

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  • In the Van Brugh Livingston house on the 6th of May 1783, Washington and Governor George Clinton met General Sir Guy Carleton, afterwards Lord Dorchester, to negotiate for the evacuation by the British troops of the posts they still held in the United States.

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  • See also Annual Reports of the Governor of Porto Rico (Washington, 1901 sqq.); H.

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  • (ibid., 1902); Report on the Census of Porto Rico (Washington, 1900); W.

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  • He died in Washington, D.C., March 2 1921.

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  • (Washington, 1908).

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  • The medical school, a department of Washington University, includes laboratory, anatomical, clinical and other buildings.

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  • Among the best residence streets are Peachtree and West Peachtree streets to the north, and the older streets to the south of the business centre of the city - Washington Street, Whitehall, Pryor and Capitol Avenues.

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  • Mason was a near neighbour and a lifelong friend of George Washington, though in later years they disagreed in politics.

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  • In 1769 he drew up for Washington a series of non-importation resolutions, which were adopted by the Virginia legislature.

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  • In 1886 he was made under secretary for foreign affairs; in 1892 he joined the cabinet as chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster; in 1894 he was president of the Board of Trade, and acted as chairman of the royal commission on secondary education; and in Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman's cabinet (1905) he was made chief secretary for Ireland; but in February 1907 he was appointed British ambassador at Washington, and took leave of party politics, his last political act being a speech outlining what was then the government scheme for university reform in Dublin - a scheme which was promptly discarded by his successor Mr Birrell.

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  • Adams, The Influence of Grenville on Pitt's Foreign Policy (Washington, 1904).

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  • When McClellan entered upon his Peninsular Campaign in 1862 the important duty of defending Washington from the army of "Stonewall" Jackson fell to the corps commanded by Banks.

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  • He was later placed in command of the garrison at Washington, and in November sailed from New York with a strong force to replace General B.

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  • The city has a park and a boulevard system; the principal parks are Washington, Lincoln, Reservoir and Mildred.

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  • Washington in his will provided for the emancipation of his own his first wishes to see some plan adopted by which slavery in his country might be abolished by law," and again he wrote that to this subject his own suffrage should never be wanting.

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  • On the Colonial Slave Trade and Slavery: Washington Irving, Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus (1828), several times reprinted; Arthur Helps, Life of Las Casas (1868); Bryan Edwards, History, Civil and Commercial, of the British West Indies (1793; 5th ed.

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  • The romance of his love affair with Sarah Curran - who afterwards married Robert Henry Sturgeon, an officer distinguished in the Peninsular War - has cast a glamour over the memory of Robert Emmet; and it inspired Thomas Moore's well-known songs, "She is far from the land where her young hero sleeps," and "Oh, breathe not his name"; it is also the subject of Washington Irving's "The Broken Heart."

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  • In 1811 Morse, whose tastes during his early years led him more strongly towards art than towards science, became the pupil of Washington Allston, and accompanied his master to England, where he remained four years.

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  • In 1843 Congress passed the long-delayed appropriation, steps were at once taken to construct a telegraph from Baltimore to Washington, and on the 24th of May 1844 it was used for the first time.

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  • chap. i., and Wharton's Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States (6 vols., Washington, 1889).

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  • Perley Poore's Constitutions (2 vols., Washington, 1877); a special account of the government of the territorial period may be found in D.

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  • Taft, Secretary of War, and Robert Bacon, Acting Secretary of State) were sent from Washington to act as peace mediators.

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  • See United States Department of War, Report on the Census of Cuba 1899 (Washington, 18 99); U.S. Bureau of the Census, Cuba: Population, History and Resources, 1907 (1909).

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  • Brooke (2 vols., 1899; Havana and Washington, 1900), L.

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  • Wood (33 vols., 1900-1902; Washington, 1901-1902).

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  • 1892) and Washington and Lee (LL.B.

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  • 63 of the Bureau of Soils, U.S. Department of Agriculture (Washington, 1910).

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  • Davis, Polaris (Hall's) North Polar Expedition (Washington, 1876).

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  • and they saw to the north-east Cape Washington, in about 83° 38' N.

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  • (Washington, 1885); Three Years of Arctic Service (2 vols.

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  • BRENHAM, a city and the county-seat of Washington county, Texas, U.S.A., situated in the S.E.

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  • Minnesota ranked third among the states of the Union in 1900 in the production of lumber, but in 1905 was fifth, the supply having diminished and the industry having been developed in the states of Washington and Louisiana.

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  • Poinsett at Washington, the Indian titles to all lands east of the Mississippi were practically extinguished.

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  • Andrews, Minnesota and Dacotah (Washington, 1857); and C. E.

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  • Ritter, "Harrimania maculosa, a new Genus and Species of Enteropneusta from Alaska," Papers from the Harriman Alaska Exhibition (ii.), Proc. Washington Ac. (ii.

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  • As a member of the latter body he became chairman in January 1778 of the committee appointed to visit Washington at Valley Forge, and confer with him concerning the reorganization of the army.

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  • This committee spent about three months in camp, and assisted Washington in preparing the plan of reorganization which Congress in the main adopted.

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  • In 1877 he was one of the counsel for the United States before the commission which in accordance with the treaty of Washington met at Halifax, N.S., to arbitrate the fisheries question between the United States and Great Britain.

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  • Among his charges was John Parke Custis, the step-son of George Washington, with whom he began a long and intimate friendship. Returning to England, he was ordained by the bishop of London in March 1762, and at once sailed again for America, where he remained until 1775 as rector of various Virginia and Maryland parishes, including Hanover, King George's county, Virginia, and St Anne's at Annapolis, Maryland.

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  • He was an accomplished writer and scholar, contributed largely to William Hutchinson's History of the County of Cumberland (2 vols., 1794 seq.), and published A View of the Causes and Consequences of the American Revolution (1797), dedicated to George Washington, and consisting of thirteen discourses delivered in America between 1763 and 1775.

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  • At the close of his embassy he told the Canadians that probably three-fourths of the business of the British embassy at Washington was Canadian, and of the 11 or 12 treaties he had signed nine had been treaties relating to the affairs of Canada.

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  • Bangor is served directly by the Maine Central railway, several important branches radiating from the city, and by the Eastern Steamship line; the Maine Central connects near the city with the Bangor & Aroostook railway (whose general offices are here) and with the Washington County railway.

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  • CHARLEROI, a borough of Washington county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., on the Monongahela river, near the S.W.

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  • See The Trial of Samuel Chase (2 vols.,Washington, 1805), reported by Samuel H.

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  • Here are the Vulcan iron-works and shipbuilding yards, where the liners "Deutschland" (1900), the "Kaiserin Augusta Victoria" (1906), and the "George Washington" (1908), the largest vessel (722 ft.

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  • Patenotre was sent to Washington, where he was raised to the rank of ambassador in 1893.

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  • Soc. Washington, vol.

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  • the Aldabra Group of the Seychelles Islands (Seychelles, 1907); Dr Abbott in Proceedings, United States National Museum (Washington, 1894); A.

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  • The credit of the realization is due, in the first place, to the tsar of Russia, who initiated the Hague Conference of 1899, and, in the second place to Lord Pauncefote (then Sir Julian Pauncefote, British ambassador at Washington), who urged before a committee of the conference the importance of organizing a permanent international court, the service of which should be called into requisition at will, and who also submitted an outline of the mode in which such a court might be formed.

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  • The question of liability was then referred to commissioners appointed by each state, and, on their failing to agree, to Sir Edward Thornton, British minister at Washington, who by his award, in 1875, found there was due from Mexico to Upper California, or rather to the bishops there as administrators of the fund, an arrear of interest amounting to nearly $100,000, which was directed to be paid in gold.

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  • By three several protocols signed Germ n at Washington in February 1903, it was agreed that Italy certain claims by Great Britain, Germany and Italy, on Versus behalf of their respective subjects against the Venezuelan government should be referred to three mixed commissions, and that for the purpose of securing the payment of these claims 30% of the customs revenues at the ports of La Guayra and Puerto Caballo should be remitted in monthly instalments to the representative of the Bank of England at Caracas.

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  • Moore, History of the International Arbitrations to which the United States has been a Party (Washington, 1898).

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  • Hutchinson, Report on Trade in Brazil (Washington, 1906); F.

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  • In 1790 he was elected to the United States senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of William Grayson, and although in this body he vigorously opposed Washington's administration, Washington on the 27th of May 1 794 nominated him as minister to France.

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  • Washington seems never to have forgiven Monroe for this, though Monroe's opinion of Washington and Jay underwent a change in his later years.

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  • On the 27th of September 1814, after the disaster of Bladensburg and the capture of Washington by the British, he was appointed secretary of war to succeed General John Armstrong, and discharged the duties of this office, in addition to those of the state department, until March 1815.

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  • In 1820 he was re-elected, receiving all the electoral votes but one, which William Plumer (1759-1850) of New Hampshire cast for John Quincy Adams, in order, it is said, that no one might share with Washington the honour of a unanimous election.

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  • Schouler points out that like Washington and Lincoln he was " conspicuous.

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  • Researches (Washington, 1866); Ney Elias, in Journal R.G.S.

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  • control of the water power and for the construction of the great dam across the Merrimac. The Bay State woollen mills, which in 1858 became the Washington mills, and the Atlantic cotton mills were both chartered in 1846.

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  • The Pacific mills (1853) introduced from England in 1854 Lister combs for worsted manufacture; and the Washington mills soon afterward began to make worsted dress goods.

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  • Worsted cloths for men's wear seem to have been made first about 1870 at nearly the same time in the Washington mills here, in the Hockanum mills of Rockville, Connecticut, and in Wanskuck mills, Providence, Rhode Island.

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  • In July Mr. Mihajlovic, the Serbian minister at Washington, was summarily dismissed.

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  • After completing his preliminary education in the little school at Lexington, Virginia, which later developed into Washington and Lee University, he came under the influence of the religious movement known as the "great revival" (1789-1790) and devoted himself to the study of theology.

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  • 10, Washington, 1903).

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  • An official work (Veloz Goiticoa, Venezuela, Washington, 1904)1904) gives the number of coffee trees in Venezuela as 250,000,000 belonging to 33,000 estates; the output was 42,806 tons in 1907.

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  • For the moment nothing more was heard of this boundary question by the public, but General Crespo instructed the Venezuelan minister in Washington to ask for the assistance of the United States in the event of any demand being made by the British Government for an indemnity.

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  • The Guiana boundary question began now to assume an acute stage, the Venezuelan minister in Washington having persuaded President Cleveland to take up the cause of Venezuela in vindication of the principles of the Monroe doctrine.

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  • In 1898 General Crespo was succeeded as president by Senor Andrade, who had represented Venezuela in Washington during the most acute stage of the frontier question.

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  • The Washington government had indeed no cause to be well disposed to Castro, for he treated the interests of Americans in Venezuela with the same highhanded contempt for honesty and justice as those of Europeans.

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  • of American Republics] (Washington, 1904); F, Vizcarrondo Rojas, Resena Geografica de Venezuela (Caracas, 1895); R.

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  • Other sections of the party were strongly represented by Mr John Morley as secretary for India, Mr Bryce (afterwards ambassador at Washington) as chief secretary for Ireland, Sir R.

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  • 108 D., Sailing Directions for Lake Ontario, Hydrographic Office, U.S. Navy (Washington, D.C., 1902); St Lawrence Pilot (7th ed.), Hydrographic Office, Admiralty (London, 1906).

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  • Giddings (Chicago, 1892), by his son-inlaw, George Washington Julian (1817-1899), a Free-soil leader and a representative in Congress in 1849-1851, a Republican representative in Congress in 1861-1871, a Liberal Republican in the campaign of 1872, and afterwards a Democrat.

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  • - The following works are the most important: Denny, Monographia Anoplurorum Britanniae (London, 18 43); Giebel, Insecta Epizoa (which contains the working-up of Nitzsch's posthumous materials; Leipzig, 1874); van Beneden, Animal Parasites (London, 1876); Piaget, Les Pediculines (Leiden, 1880); Megnin, Les Parasites et les maladies parasitaires (Paris, 1880); Neumann, Parasites and Parasitic Diseases of Domesticated Animals (1892); Osborn, Pediculi and Mallophaga affecting Man and the Lower Animals (Washington, 1891; U.S. Dept.

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  • The city has 95 acres of boulevards and avenues under park supervision and several fine parks (17, with 307 acres in 1907), notably Washington (containing Calverley's bronze statue of Robert Burns, and Rhind's "Moses at' the Rock of Horeb"), Beaver and Dudley, in which is the old Dudley Observatory - the present Observatory building is in Lake Avenue, south-west of Washington Park, where is also the Albany Hospital.

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  • WHITEHALL, a village of Washington (disambiguation)|Washington county, New York, U.S.A., in a township of the same name on the Poultney river and the Champlain Canal, at the head of Lake Champlain, and 78 m.

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  • Bird C. Willis of Virginia and a grand-niece of George Washington.'

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  • The table has been adapted from the Monthly Summary of Commerce and Finance of the United States, January 1907, prepared in the Bureau of Statistics, Treasury Department, Washington Government Printing Office, 1902.

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  • Hoffman in the Fourteenth Report (Washington, 1896) of the Bureau of American Ethnology and A.

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  • Pierce, The Freedmen's Bureau (Iowa City, 1904); Report of the Joint Committee on Reconstruction (Washington, 1866); W.

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  • Thence he was sent to Washington and the Vatican.

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  • In Coolidge's Tavern (still standing) Washington was entertained on his New England tour in 1789; and in a house recently moved from Mt Auburn Street to Marshall Street the Committee of Safety met in 1775.

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  • He died at Washington on the 8th of February 1877.

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  • He served in the state House of Representatives in 1827,1829-30,1832 and 1834-35, was state comptroller in 1835 and 1842-43, was postmaster at Hartford in 1835-42, and was chief of the bureau of provisions and clothing in the Navy Department at Washington in 1846-1849.

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  • Infirmities multiplied upon him, until his death at Washington on the 22nd of October 1900.

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  • National Museum at Washington.

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  • See Handbook of American Indians (Washington, 1907).

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  • In the senate he was looked upon as President Washington's personal spokesman and as the leader of the Administration party.

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  • It was Ellsworth who suggested to Washington the sending of John Jay to England to negotiate a new treaty with Great Britain, and he probably did more than any other man to induce the senate, despite widespread and violent opposition, to ratify that treaty when negotiated.

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  • By President Washington's appointment he became chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States in March 1796, and in 1799 President John Adams sent him, with William Vans Murray (1762-1803) and William R.

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  • Shaler, Geology of Nantucket (Washington, 1889), being U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, No.

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  • In this year he took such an active part in raising funds to defend John Brown, then on trial in Virginia, that he aroused the suspicions of a senatorial committee investigating Brown's raid, and was summoned to Washington to tell what he knew of the affair.

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  • On the next day the Sixth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry started south for the defence of Washington, and was the first fully armed and equipped volunteer regiment to reach the capital.

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  • Within six days after the call, nearly four thousand Massachusetts volunteers had departed for Washington.

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  • But Halleck soon went to Washington as general-in-chief, and Grant took command of his old army and of Rosecrans' Army of the Mississippi.

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  • " I purpose to fight it out on this line, if it takes all summer, was his message from the battlefield of Spottsylvania to the chief of staff at Washington.

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  • The scandals, indeed, were rife in Washington, and affected persons in close relations with the president.

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  • The most important event in foreign policy was the treaty with Great Britain of the 8th of May 1871, commonly known as the Treaty of Washington, whereby several controversies between the United States and Great Britain, including the bitter questions as to damage inflicted upon the United States by the "Alabama" and other Confederate cruisers built and equipped in England, were referred to arbitration.

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  • In 1869 the government of Santo Domingo (or the Dominican Republic) expressed a wish for annexation by the United States, and such a step was favoured Washington, comprising wholesale frauds on the public revenue, awakened lively disgust.

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  • At the beginning of the War of Independence he raised a regiment and as colonel did good service in the Battle of Bunker Hill, in the Canadian expedition, and in Washington's New Jersey campaign in the winter of 1776-77.

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  • The first banks organized in the state were the Providence Bank in 1791, the Bank of Rhode Island at Newport in 1795, and the Washington Bank at Westerly in 1800.

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  • Foerste, Geology of the Narragansett Basin (Washington, 1899); and T.

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  • 1750) and the two brothers of George Washington, Lawrence (who succeeded to the management upon the death of Lee) and Augustine; and of Englishmen, including John Hanbury, a wealthy London merchant.

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  • WASHINGTON (or WASHINGTON Court House), a city and the county-seat of Fayette county, Ohio, U.S.A., on Paint Creek, 35'35 m.

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  • Washington, or Washington Court House as it is often called to distinguish it from the village of Washington in Guernsey county, Ohio, was laid out in 1810 and was chartered as a city in 1888.

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  • Washington, Pennsylvania >>

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  • McPherson, Political History of the Rebellion (Washington, 1876); and W.

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  • His brother, Charles Washington Baird (1828-1887), a graduate of New York University (1848) and of the Union Theological Seminary (1852), and the minister in turn of a Dutch Reformed church at Brooklyn, New York, and of a Presbyterian church at Rye, New York, also was deeply interested in the history of the Huguenots, and published a scholarly work entitled The History of the Huguenot Emigration to America (2 vols., 1885), left unfinished at his death.

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  • He died at Washington, D.C., on the 21st of March 1891, leaving no children.

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  • Institution at Washington.

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  • below Washington.

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  • BARRE, a city of Washington county, Vermont, U.S.A., in the north central part of the state, about 6 m.

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  • He died at Washington on the 27th of December 1883.

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  • BRISTOL, a city of Sullivan county, Tennessee, and Washington county, Virginia, U.S.A., 130 m.

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  • In 1861 he was a delegate to the peace congress at Washington, and in 1866 was appointed by the governor of New Jersey, as a Republican, to fill a vacancy in the United States senate.

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  • On the 14th of May 1861 he was appointed colonel of the 13th U.S. Infantry, a new regiment, and was soon assigned to command a brigade in General McDowell's army in front of Washington.

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  • An equestrian statue, by Saint Gaudens, was unveiled at New York in 1903, and another at Washington in the same year.

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  • Blaine graduated at Washington College in Washington, Pennsylvania, in 1847, and subsequently taught successively in the Military Institute, Georgetown, Kentucky, and in the Institution for the Blind at Philadelphia.

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  • Afterwards he went to Washington as secretary to Congressman Paul Sorg, of Ohio.

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  • VANCOUVER, a city and the county-seat of Clarke county, Washington, U.S.A., on the Columbia river about loo m.

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  • It is served by the Northern Pacific, the Great Northern, the Oregon & Washington, and the Spokane, Portland & Seattle railways, and by steamship lines, being accessible to sea-going vessels; a ferry connects with the Portland Electric railway.

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  • Vancouver Barracks, east of the city, is an important U.S. military post (established in 1849) and the headquarters of the Military Department of the Columbia (including Washington, Oregon, Idaho, except the part in Yellowstone Park, and Alaska); the military reservation includes some 640 acres.

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  • Hunter (Washington, 1903) for his private life, and D.

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  • Gates recommended him for a brigadier-general's commission for services which another actually performed, and succeeded in gaining it, but their friendship was broken by the collapse of the Conway Cabal against Washington in which both were implicated and about which Wilkinson had indiscreetly blabbed.

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  • John the Divine, in New York, and another head of Lincoln in the rotunda of the Capitol at Washington.

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  • Other works include the Sheridan monument in Washington; " Mares of Diomedes " and " Ruskin " in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; statue of Lincoln, Newark, N.J.; statue of Henry Ward Beecher, Brooklyn; the Wyatt Memorial, Raleigh, N.C.; " The Flyer " at the university of Virginia; gargoyles for a Princeton dormitory; " Wonderment of Motherhood " and " Conception."

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  • He died at Washington, D.C., on the 24th of January 1907.

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  • Its railway mileage in January 1907 was J33.6 m.; the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington (Pennsylvania system), the Baltimore & Philadelphia (Baltimore & Ohio system), and the Wilmington & Northern (Philadelphia & Reading system) cross the northern part of the state, while the Delaware railway (leased by the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington) runs the length of the state below Wilmington, and another line, the Maryland, Delaware & Virginia (controlled by the Baltimore, Chesapeake & Atlantic railway, which is related to the Pennsylvania system), connects Lewes, Del., with Love Point, Md., on the Chesapeake Bay.

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  • Powell, History of Education in Delaware (Washington, 1893), and a sketch in the Annual Report for 1902 of the United States Commissioner of Education.

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  • of the Report of the Superintendent of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey for 1893 (Washington, 1905) there is " A Historical Account of the Boundary Line between the States of Pennsylvania and Delaware, by W.

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  • After the assassination of Lincoln, Hancock was placed in charge of Washington, and it was under his command that Booth's accomplices were tried and executed.

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  • His policy, however, of discountenancing military trials and conciliating the conquered did not meet with approval at Washington, and he was at his own request transferred.

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  • He took part in the first battle of Bull Run in 1861, and soon afterwards became chief of artillery in the Washington defences.

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  • He held various commands until 1883, when he retired to become governor of the Soldiers' Home, Washington, D.C. He died on the 11th of February 1889.

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  • Maury, however, recognized that in great depths on the " Washington " and by the Austrians on the " Pola " the surest guarantee of bottom having been reached was to bring in 1890-1893, the latter carrying the investigations to the Red up a sample of the deposit.

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  • A definite terminology for the larger forms of sub-oceanic relief was put forward by the International Geographical Congress at Berlin in 1899 and adopted by that at Washington in 1004.

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  • Sigsbee, Deep-sea Sounding and Dredging (Washington, 1880); O.

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  • Important current and temperature charts of the ocean and occasional memoirs are published for the Admiralty by the Meteorological Office in London, by the U.S. Hydrographic Office in Washington, the Deutsche Seewarte in Hamburg, and also at intervals by the French, Russian, Dutch and Scandinavian admiralties.

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  • The result was the disputed election of 1876, when two sets of returns were sent to Washington from the states of Florida, Louisiana, South Carolina and Oregon.

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  • WILLIAM MEADE (1789-1862), American Protestant Episcopal bishop, the son of Richard Kidder Meade (1746-1805), one of General Washington's aides during the War of Independence, was born on the 11th of November 1789, near Millwood, in that part of Frederick county which is now Clarke county, Virginia.

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  • Natural gas was discovered in Washington (disambiguation)|Washington county in 1879, but was not commercially used in that vicinity until 1888.

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